History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.277.

HENRY HOLADAY, farmer, P.O. West York, was born in the same house in which he is now residing, December 4 1827, to Robert and Margaret (Willard) Holaday. His father was born in North Carolina in 1779; emigrated to Orange Co., Ind., in 1816, and to Crawford County, Ill., in 1818. Here he remained engaged in farming until he died in 1837. He was of Scotch descent. His mother was born in South Carolina in 1775, and died in Crawford County 1843. They were the parents of four children, of whom Henry was the youngest child.  He has always made his present residence his home, but has been to New Orleans several trips on a flat-boat with grain, and in 1850 went to California and followed mining for three years and six months. He is now engaged in tilling the soil of the home farm and is the owner of 197 acres of good land. In 1855, he married Miss Abigail Prevo, who died March 4, 1835 [sic] [should be 1875], leaving five children as the result of their union, of whom four are now living, viz.: William, Elizabeth, Usher and Abigail. In 1881, on the 13th June, he married Miss Nancy Willet, a native of Tennessee. Mrs. Holaday is a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Holaday is a man of good principle and bears a name and reputation which is beyond reproach. He is a Democrat.

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.291.

SIMPSON RAINS, farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, born in Crawford County, Ill., September 6, 1829. His father, Ambrose B. Rains, was born, raised and educated in Wayne County, N. C.  He emigrated to Illinois in a very early day, locating in Union County, and subsequently to Crawford County in 1827. He settled on the farm now owned by our subject. He died February 22, 1860, aged sixty years.  His grandfather was a soldier of the Revolutionary war.  The mother of our subject was Charlotte Cox, a native of near Goldsboro, N.C.  She was brought to Illinois by her parents in an early day, who settled in Union County. She died June 1, 1850, aged forty-five years one month and fourteen days. Of the eleven children born to them, four are now living, viz., Simpson, Nancy (John) Kaufman, Lafayette and Henry. Simpson Rains was raised on the farm, and educated from subscription schools, common in his day.   When he was twenty-four years of age, he left his home and embarked on his career in life as a farmer.  He then bought sixty acres of land, and though he was compelled to go in debt for it and pay ten percent interest on the principal, he managed to struggle through and prosper, and in a few years to make an addition of forty acres to his farm, which was located in Section 16, Hutsonville Township. In 1864, he sold his farm and removed to the old homestead farm, buying 302 acres of the other heirs. He continued to add to this until his farm contained 432 acres. He has deeded forty acres of this to his oldest son.  In 1853, he married Miss Nancy Jane Lindley, a native of Crawford County, born June 22, 1834. She is a daughter of Owen and Hannah Lindley, natives of Indiana.  Mr. and Mrs. Rains have the following children: Edward, Morton, Clarissa, Mary, Emma, George, Louisa, Nancy and Fanny, twins, and Ellen. He and wife are religiously connected with the Universalist Church. Politically, he is a Republican. He has served the people as School Director for about twenty years.

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketchs p.239.

"JOHN HILL, merchant, Robinson. Among the old and prominent citizens of Crawford County is John Hill, whose name heads this sketch, He is a native of the Hoosier State, and was born in Sullivan County November 10, 1816, but removed with his parents to this county in 1818, where his home has ever since been. His career has been tilling the soil until recently, and before he divided up his land among his children, he was one of the largest, if not the largest, land owners in Crawford County -- being the owner of some 2,500 acres, among which was the original 160 acres entered and settled on by his father in 1818. To this he added until it compromised 620 acres, and on this he lived until his removal to Robinson, a few years ago. He was one of the most successful farmers in the county, and accumulated a handsome property by his perserving energy and industry. Upon his removal to Robinson he engaged in the grocery business, and in this, as in farming, his usual success has attended him. He erected a handsome brick storehouse on the east side of the public square, and has a large and complete stock of goods. He does a large and profitable business, his annual sales amounting to $20,000 to $30,000. Mr. Hill was married February 28, 1838, in this county, to Miss Morris, by whom he has four children, viz. -- Charles M., Henry M., Diana Boofter and Mary McLean. His wife died in 1863, and he was married a second time, in 1875, to Mrs. Sterrett. Politically, Mr. Hill is a Democrat of the Jackson type."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketchs p.239.

"CHARLES M. HILL, farmer and merchant, Robinson, is a son of John Hill, and was born in this county, December 5, 1839; he has always made his home in this county. In addition to the common schools of the neighborhood, he attended school for some time at Marshall, Clark County. He was married, January 25, 1861, to Miss Mary Wolfe, a daughter of Henry Wolfe, Esq. He engaged in farming in Hutsonville Township, on a farm of 200 acres. They have four children living and one dead; their names are as follows: Sarah L., Catherine V., John C., Mary C., Henry E. Politically, Mr. Hill is a Democrat."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketchs p.239.

"ALVA G. HILL, farmer, P.O. Robinson, was born August 17, 1845, and is a native of this county; his early life was spent on a farm in Licking Township. He attended the common schools of the neighborhood and the colleges at Westfield and at Merom, Ind.  He taught four winter terms and farmed during the summers. He was married, August 26, 1873, to Miss E. E. Watkins, a daughter of Jesse Watkins, Esq., of this county. He owns considerable land. Has resided with his father-in-law, Mr. Watkins since 1874. He has three children -- Henry K., Ray W., and Joseph A.  Mr. Hill is a Republican."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketchs Hutsonville Township p.261.

"WILLIAM F. ATHEY, stock-raiser and farmer, P. O. Annapolis, is one of the largest and most successful of the stockraisers and farmers of Crawford County. He was born in Licking County, Ohio, July 17, 1833. His father, Robert Athey, was born in Fauquier county, Va., April 23, 1801. Here he was raised, educated and married. In 1830, in the fall of 1850, he removed to Crawford county, Ill.  He has followed the occupation of a farmer, but is now living a retired life upon his farm of 260 acres, in Hutsonville Township. His father was Elijah Athey, a native of Virginia, and of Scotch descent. He died in Ohio, in 1835 or 1836, aged eighty-four years.   The mother of our subject, Eliza Smith, was born in Virginia, and died in 1835, age thiry years. She was the mother of three children, of whom William was the second child. His early life was spent at home, receiving such an education as could be obtained from the common schools, and assisting to till the soil of his father's farm.  At twenty-one years of age, he left his home and embarked on his career in life as a hired hand upon a farm for John Hill, and remained in his employ for about four years. In 1859, he bought eighty acres of land where he now resides, and began farming on his own account; here he has since remained, and by his honesty, industry and economy, succeeded in accumulating a good property. He is now the owner of 960 acres of prarie land in one body. Mr. Athey raises a large quanity of stock and deals largely in stock, making it a specialty. In 1859, he married Miss Adeline Newlin, a native of Crawford County.  Politically, he is a Democrat."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.263-264.

"LEROY E. CHAMBERS, stock-dealer, P.O. Hutsonville, is a native of Orange County, Ind., born September 13, 1848, a son of Charles F. and Mary S. (Elrod) Chambers, both natives of Orange County. The father was born May 3, 1823, a son of Samuel and Eleanor (Lindley) Chambers, he, born October 20, 1783, in North Carolina, and she, August 18, 1784. The grandparents of our subject were blessed with nine children, Charles F. being the youngest of the family, and his brother, William G., is the only living representative of the old family. He was born March 27, 1816. The father of our subject was a harness-maker by trade, but also engaged in farming. He was also a great inventor, and many untimely hours which he spent in this direction, perceptably hastened his death, which occurred May 12, 1876. The mother of our subject was born February 24, 1828, and died in June, 1851. She was the mother of two children, our subject being the only one who lived to maturity. The father was married a second time, to Mary Lindley, born May 16, 1830, and died June 26, 1876. She was the mother of nine children. Our subject's great-grandfather, Jonathan Lindley, was the founder of Paoli, Ind., and his great grandfather, Samuel Chambers, laid out Chambersburg, of the same State, and was once Judge of Orange County. Our subject received but a meager education, mostly in his native county.  He was married, March 10, 1870, to Lucetta Newlin, born September 13, 1848, in this county, a daughter of Cyrus and Eliza Ann (Hill) Newlin. Mr. and Mrs. Chambers are the parents of six children -- Oscar E., born July 23, 1871; Estella B., November 1, 1873; Everett A., March 9, 1875; Elmer A., September 4, 1877; Alice C., November 12, 1879, and Arthur C., December 6, 1881. Our subject has a farm of 416 acres, and he engages in general farming and stock dealing. He is a Republican in politics."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.267-8.

REV. JOHN L. COX, farmer and preacher, P.O. Hutsonville, was born in Crawford County, on his present farm, December 10, 1840. His father was a farmer, born in Wayne County, N.C., September 25, 1804. He came to Union County, Ill., with his parents in 1823, and in 1825 to Crawford County, and three years later married Miss Debora Lindley, a native of North Carolina, born April 5, 1811. He died January 22, 1868, and she died November 24, 1878. They had ten children, eight of whom lived to be grown, John L. being the sixth child. His early life was spent on the home farm, and was educated from the common schools.  At twenty-five years of age, he left his home, married, and engaged in farming on his own account. His wife died the same year, and the following summer he returned to the home farm, where he has since remained.  In January, 1867, he began preaching in the Missionary Baptist Church, near his present residence, and for the last twelve years he has been the regular pastor of that church. He is now dividing his time between the above church and the Mount Zion and Liberty Churches. He was five years pastor of the Rich Woods Baptist Church, southeast of Palestine. Mr. Cox is a man of energy, and in connection with his clerical duties, is actively engaged in farming. He is the owner of a good farm of 145 acres. His first marriage occurred January 25, 1866, to Miss Augusta Rains, who died November 21, 1866. His present marriage occurred November 25, 1875, to Miss Lucinda Mickey, a native of Crawford County, born February 8, 1856. This union has been blessed with the following children: Earnest, Eunice and Almie.

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.268.

"SIMPSON COX, farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, was born near his present residence in Crawford County, August 19, 1847. He is the youngest son of Byrant Cox, whose biography appears in this work. His early life was spent at home assisting in toiling the soil of his father's farm and receiving  such an educating as the common schools afforded. When he became of age he was given by his father 106 acres of home farm, and he has since remained here engaged actively in farming and stock-raising. He is now the owner of 460 acres of good land. In Crawford County, February 11, 1879, he married Miss Olive Newlin, a native of the county, born February 7, 1847 to Cyrus and Eliza Ann (Hill) Newlin. Mr. and Mrs. Cox are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Cox is now holding the office of Supervisor."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.272.

"CAPT. GEORGE B. EVERINGHAM, farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, was born near Trimble Station, Crawford County, Ill., March 2, 1843.  His father, John Everingham, was born near Cincinnati, Ohio, and there raised and educated. In 1830, he emigrated to Crawford County, Ill., and located at Palestine, where he engaged at his trade, that of a harness-maker, which had been learned in Ohio. He afterward divided his time between farming and working his trade. He died June 20, 1873. He was the son of Enoch Everingham, a native of Sussex County, N.J., a millwright by trade.   The mother of our subject, Sarah (Newlin) Everingham, was born in Crawford County, Ill., and died April 15, 1878. She was the mother of fourteen children, of whom nine are now living, George B., being the oldest child. He was raised on a farm, and was compelled to work out for his board, while receiving a limited common school education. At nineteen years of age, he enlisted in the late rebellion, serving Company F, of the Sixty-second Illinois Volunteers Infantry. He was in the following engagements: Jackson, Tenn.; Cross Roads, Tenn.; and Little Rock, Ark. He entered the service December 1, 1861, as a private, and was mustered out March 6, 1866, Captain of his company. After the close of the war, he returned home and worked with his father at the harness-maker's trade for about three months, and then engaged in the livery business, at Palestine, in partnership with John E. Miller. After one year in this business, he engaged in farming with his brothers, William and Allen C., renting a farm on the prairie. In 1868, he bought 30 acres of the home farm and remained upon the same until January, 1871, when he traded this land for 112 acres where he now resides. Mr. Everingham's life has been marked with many ups and downs, but being a man of good health, he has worked many days from sunrise till sunset, and by his energy, honesty and economy he has managed to meet his many discouragements and drawbacks, and at present stands among the more substantial men of Crawford County. He is now the owner of one of the best improved farms of the county, containing 260 acres of good land. In February, 1868, he married Miss Anna M., daughter of William Musgrave. They have the following children: Nora, Ellen, Ida, Arthur C., and Esther. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church; he is Deacon of same. Politically, he is a Republican."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.275.

SAMUEL S. GREEN, farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, is a native of Crawford County, Ill., born August 14, 1834.   His father, Joseph Green, was born in North Carolina, in 1802, emigrated to Union County, Ill., in 1822, and a few years later to Crawford County, where he remained actively engaged in farming to the time of his death, which occurred in 1855. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk war. His wife, and mother of our subject, was Queen E. (Lindley) Green. She was born in North Carolina in 1811, and died in Crawford County in July, 1856. She was the mother of twelve children, of whom Samuel was the fourth child. He was raised on a farm and educated from the common schools; at twenty-one years of age, he left his home and embarked on his career in life as a farmer. His first farm contained forty acres, located near his present residence. After ten years spent on this farm, he returned to the old homestead farm, where he has since remained. He is now the owner of 230 acres of land. He married Miss Alice R. Boyd, September 13, 1854. She is a native of Crawford County. They have the following children: Elzora E. (Morton) Guyer, Joseph W., James, Henry E., Harry E., Charles O., Ulysses G., Anna L. and Thomas E.   Mr. and Mrs. Green are members of the Friends Church. Politically, he is a firm Republican.

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.276-277.

"DOCTOR HILL, farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, whose portrait appears in this work, is one of the worthy pioneers of Crawford County. He settled in what is now Hutsonville Township, with his family, in the year 1818, after having resided for a period of nearly two years in what is now Sullivan County, Ind.  He was born June 28, 1796 in Randolph County, N.C., a son of John and Rachel (Sargent) Hill.  The father was a farmer, born and raised in the same place our subject was, and died in 1849, aged about eighty-two years.  The mother was also a native of North Carolina, and died in this county, at the advanced age of ninety-three years. The parents were blessed with nine children. The educational facilities of our subject's younger days granted him but a meager education in the old subscription of schools.  His early life was spent farming pursuits, and as necessity required he also engaged at shoe-making and blacksmithing, and at the advanced age of eighty-six years, he made plows, upon which implement he claims to be the original inventor of many substantial improvements.  He was first married in his native county, in 1815, to Nancy Boyd, born March 9, 1797, in Guilford County N.C., a daughter of James Boyd. She died in 1825, leaving a family of five children--- Sargent, Elizabeth, Rachel, Mary and Nancy. The second marriage of our subject occurred November 13, 1828, in this county. He wedded Cynthia Smith, born July 2, 1795, on the South Branch of the Potomac, Virginia, a daughter of Jacob B. and Hannah (Hand) Smith, he a native of Germany, and she of Virginia. Mrs. Hill died in January, 1872. When he first came to this county, our subject purchased 160 acres of land of the Government, but being unable to pay for the same, retained only one-fourth of it, an act of Congress compelling him to relinquish the balance. His present farm consists of about 402 acres, which is given to general farming.  Our subject has served this county as a Commissioner, under the old system of county organization. In politics he adheres to the Democratic principles of Thomas Jefferson, and he has distinct recollections of the adminstration of that devoted espouser of the cause of Colonial liberty."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.277-278.

"ANDREW J. HOLMES, farmer, P.O. Eaton, was born in Licking County,Ohio, August 30, 1841, to Reuben A. and Lucy (Fristo) Holmes. His father was born in Virginia in 1798, where he was raised, educated and married. Soon after he married, he removed to Ohio, and there he remained until 1848, when he immigrated to Illinois, and settled in Crawford County. Here he remained engaged in farming until he died in December 1853. During his younger days, he worked at the carpenter's trade. He was Associate Judge of Crawford County, a very prominent and enterprising citizen and owner of about two thousand acres of land. His wife, and mother of our subject, was born in Shenandoah County, Va., July 11, 1812, and died in Crawford County, Ill., in November, 1878. She was the mother of nine children, of whom seven are now living, Andrew being the fourth child and youngest son. He was brought to Crawford County by his parents when he was seven years of age. He received the benefit of the common schools of the county, and arriving at his majority embarked on his career in life as a farmer upon the old homestead farm, where he now owns 320 acres of land. April 2, 1865, in Crawford County, he married Miss Melissa, a daughter of Andrew and Nancy (Hill) Newlin. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes have four children -- Orlin G., Evaline V., Augusta F., and an infant unnamed. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. He is a member of the Granger's Lodge, No.825, of Eaton, and a Democrat in politics."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.280-281.

SAMUEL LINDLEY. Farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, was born in Crawford County, Ill., May 28, 1832, to William and Mary (Prevo) Lindley. His father was a farmer, born in North Carolina, July, 16, 1795, and removed to Peoria, Ind., with his parents, when he was sixteen years of age. In 1827, he removed to Crawford County, Ill., and there he remained to the time of his death, which occurred March 26, 1853. He was a member of the Quaker Church. His mother was born in North Carolina July 4, 1799, and is now living. She was brought to Clark County, Ill., by her parents, in the year 1817. She was married February 20, 1828, and is the mother of seven children, of whom Samuel was the third child born. He was raised on a farm and educated in common schools. After the death of his father, he, with his brother Thomas, managed the home farm.  At thirty years of age he married, and began farming on his own account upon a farm of 160 acres left him by his father. In March 1865, he exchanged his farm for one containing 140 acres, where he is now residing. He is now the owner of 285 acres of good land. In Robinson, October 2, 1861, he married Miss Harriet Hollenbeck, a native of Clark County, Ill., and daughter of John and Isabelle (Houts) Holenbeck [sic]. Mr. and Mrs. Lindley have six children, viz.: Emma, Charles E., (Ollie and John W., twins), Viola and Samuel E.  Mr. Lindley and wife are members of the Baptist church. He is an active member of the order of Knights of Honor; is a Democrat in politics, and served the county as supervisor for two terms.

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.281.

CYRUS A. LINDLEY, farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, is a native of Crawford County, Ill., where he was born December 8, 1847. His father John H. Lindley, was born February 11, 1816, Orange County, Ind., from whence he came when quite young, with his father, to Crawford County. Here he passed his youth, assisting in the work of a farm in a new country, picking up such education as the country schools afforded, and the work of a farm of farm allowed. In 1840, he commenced life on his own account, marrying, and going on to a farm of his own. He followed farming to the day of his death, November 19, 1878, and with such success as to die possessed of 360 acres of land. Mr. Lindley was a public-spirited man, a liberal contributor to the support of churches, schools and for charitable objects. He was also an active member of the Universalist Church, and a charter member of the Masonic Lodge. Mary Jane (Lacy) Lindley, wife of the above and mother of the subject of this sketch, was born in Clark County, Ill., August 6, 1832 [sic]. She is now residing on the homestead. Her parents, Eben and Abigail (Prevo) Lacy, were natives of North Carolina, and emigrated to Clark County about 1822. Her father died about 1829 [sic], but her mother, born October 4, 1800, is still living in Clark County.  Mrs. Lindley was the oldest of four children born to her parents. Cyrus Lindley was the third in a family of thirteen children, nine of whom are still living. His youth was spent upon the farm, gaining the rudiments of an education at the common schools during the less busy seasons. In his twenty-eighth year, he left home and engaged in farming on his own account, locating two miles north of his present residence. In 1877, he removed to his present farm containing 100 acres. March 30, 1875, he married Miss Amanda Bishop, a native of Crawford County. She is the daughter of Ezekiel and Rebecca (Musgrave) Bishop, both natives of North Carolina. Her father was born in 1816, came to Crawford County about 1833, and is now residing in Robinson. Her mother was born in 1815, and died in January, 1880. To Cyrus and Amanda (Bishop) Lindley have been born three children - Leslie, Irma and Olla. Mrs. Lindley is a member of the Universalist Church. Mr. Lindley is an active member of the Masonic Lodge, No. 313, Located at York, and a prominent Republican in politics.

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.284.

"SARGENT NEWLIN, farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, was born in Crawford County, Ill., February 5, 1823. His father John Newlin, was born in North Carolina, where he was raised on a farm, educated, and married. In 1815, he with his family and the Hill family emigrated to Indiana and settled in Sullivan County, and in 1818, came to Crawford County. He entered 200 acres of land in section 28, of Hutsonville Township, and afterwards bought 120 acres. He was among the first settlers to Crawford County. He died. His wife Jane (Hill) Newlin, born in North Carolina, and died in Crawford County.  She was the mother of eight children, of whom the following are now living: Malinda, William H., Dinah, Sargent, Rachael and Charles.  Sargent Newlin was raised on a farm and educated from the subscription schools. At the age of twenty-one years of age, he married, and embarked on his career in life as a farmer. He was given eighty acres of unimproved land by his father, and has since added to it until now his farm contains 317 acres.  December 22, 1842, he married Jane Lackey, a native of Bourbon County, Ky., born in 1826. She has borne him the following children: Anna M., John T. and Rose E. Politically, Mr. Newlin is a Democrat, and has served the township as Supervisor."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.284-285.

"CYRUS NEWLIN, farmer, P.O. Hutsonville, was born one half mile from his present residence, in Crawford County, Ill., June 3, 1825, to James and Elizabeth (Simons) Newlin. His father was born in Orange County, N.C., December 4, 1781, where he was raised, educated and married. In 1818, he emigrated to Crawford County, Ill., entered 480 acres of land, where Cyrus now resides. His occupation was that of a farmer, and he continued the same until he died in 1852. He was the son of John Newlin, a native of North Carolina.   The mother of our subject was born in Orange County, N.C., and died in Crawford County, Ill., in 1850. They were the parents of ten children of whom eight lived to be grown -- all boys, Cyrus being the youngest. He was raised on the farm, and educated from the subscription schools of his native county. At twenty-one years of age he married, and remained with his parents until four years later, in 1850, when he went to California and engaged in mining and merchandising for one year. In 1851, he returned to Crawford County, bought 160 acres of land, and began farming where he now resides. In 1862, he went to Chicago, and visited the Northern part of Illinois.   In 1872, he went to Colorado, where he remained for about two months, visiting Denver City, Central City, in the mountains, Colorado Springs and Pueblo. Mr. Newlin has made this trip and many others for the improvement of his health. Since 1850, Mr. Newlin has been extensively engaged in raising and trading in stock, finding market for the same at home.  In his farming and business transactions, he has met with success, and is now the owner of 400 acres of land. In March 1846, he married Miss Eliza Ann Hill, a native of Crawford County, born September 12, 1825. She is the daughter of John A. and Sarah (Barbee) Hill. He was a native of Orange County, N.C., born in 1818, and engaged in farming to the time of his death which occurred in 1834.  She was born in Shelby County, Ky., in 1801, and died at Palestine, in Crawford County, in 1855. She was brought to the county by her parents in 1819, who settled near Palestine. Mr. and Mrs. Newlin have been blessed with three children, of whom two are now living: Olive, wife of Simpson Cox, and Lucetta, wife of Leroy Chambers."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.285.

"ANDREW NEWLIN, farmer and stock dealer, P.O. Hutsonville, was born in Crawford County, Ill., June 25, 1829, the youngest son of William and Rachel (Hill) Newlin. The father was a native of North Carolina, and was a son of Thomas Newlin of Irish descent.  The mother of our subject was also a native of North Carolina, and died in August 1833, her husband following her five years later. The parents were blessed with six children -- four sons and two daughters. The advantages of a good education were not accorded our subject, a limited attendance in the old subscription schools of the county having to suffice in this direction. His early life was given to farming pursuits, and he has since turned his attention to no other business. He was married, April 8, 1852, in this county, to Mary Holmes, born August 23, 1830, in Licking County, Ohio, a daughter of Reuben A. and Barbara (Hockman) Holmes, natives of Shenandoah County, Va. The father died in this county in December 1853, aged fifty-six years in the previous August. The mother died in Ohio, in April 1832. They were the parents of six children. The father was married a second time, the union being blessed with nine children. Mr. and Mrs. Newlin are the parents of ten children -- Albert, born February 14, 1853; Amanda, May 22, 1855; Laura, February 7, 1857; Allen, October 31, 1858; Adaline, April 9, 1860; Stephen D., May 4, 1862; Lawrence, June 28, 1864; Ira, June 29, 1868; an infant, died March 20, 1871, and Clinton, born September 27, 1872. Our subject's present farm property consists of 2,396 acres of land, all of which lies in Hutsonville Township, with the exception of sixty acres, which is in Clark County. He started in life with but $150, which his father left to him, and the manner whereby was gained the vast difference between these figures and the ones which represent his present fortune, is worthy of the studious emulation of all. The affairs of his place have been conducted under the immediate supervision of a master mind, and his present ownings are the direct result of his own tact, industry and preseverance. He has served his township as Supervisor for a period of three years, and has also filled many other minor offices. In politics, he adheres to the principles of Democracy."

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.225.

FRANCIS M. ADAMS, son of Thomas Adams, was born October 20, 1860, in this county. He was raised on a farm; his faculties for education were the common schools of the county; he was married in this county January, 1880, to Sarah A. Kirk, daughter of Jacob Kirk, has had one child – William Jacob. He owns 109 acres. Politically, is Democratic.

 

History Of Crawford And Clark Counties, Illinois 1883, Edited by William Henry Perrin,  (O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, Lakeside Building, Chicago 1883), Biographical Sketches p.260.

LEWIS ADAMS, hotel, Hutsonville, is a native of Preble County, Ohio, born April 13, 1832. His father, Samuel Adams, is a native of New Jersey; he was brought to Preble County, Ohio, by his parents, when he was eighteen years of age. In 1868, he removed to Cass County, Ind., where he is now living a retired life upon his farm.  His mother, Emily (Cook) Adams, was a native of New Jersey, and died in Cass County, Ind., in 1872. She was the mother of nine children, of whom Lewis, our subject, was the second child. He was raised on a farm and educated from the common schools of this county. At twenty-one years of age he engaged in the huckster business. In 1857, he engaged in the butter and egg business at Cincinnati. In 1858, he returned to Preble County, and engaged in the mercantile business in partnership with Frank McWhinney, at Eldorado; here he remained for about eight years. In 1864, he sold his interest in the store and removed to Galveston, Ind., where he engaged in the same business for himself. In 1870, he engaged in the saw mill business in partnership with David Thomas. In 1873, he exchanged his interest in the mill for a farm, and remained upon the same about one year. In 1874, he again embarked in the mercantile business, at Galveston, until 1876, when the crisis of that year swept away all of his property. In 1877, he again engaged in farming, and the following year removed to Crawford County, where he engaged in the same business until 1879, when he bought his present business at Hutsonville, “The Adams Hotel.” In his last vocation, Mr. Adams has met with success; his house is the best hotel of the county, and the geniality and courtesy of the landlord keep the house filled.  In 1854, he married Miss Hannah Shuman, who has borne him eight children, of whom five are now living – Sarah, Emma, Anna, Frank and Harvey. Mr. Adams is a member of I.O.O.F., and a Republican in politics.

Thanks to Minga (Buckle) Stivers for submission of biographies.