Henry W. Jones. Peoria Co. Portrait and Biographical Album 1890 Page 198

In traveling through Peoria County, a stranger would note with satisfaction the signs of prosperity and good taste, which mark many of its rural abodes. One of the most attractive to be seen in Kickapoo Township is that of the above named gentleman, an old settler, whose estate has taken on the character of those who have so long occupied it. The entire two hundred acres are carefully and intelligently managed, neatness and order being every where apparent and indicating that the owner makes of farming both an art and a science. The building which have been erected are well designed, commodious and conveniently disposed, and are kept in first class order.

In Culpeper County, Va., in 1782, Henry Jones was born. Some two years later, near the Juniata River in Pennsylvania, Sarah Zian opened her eyes to the light of day. This coupe, upon growing to maturity, married and settled in Gallia county, Ohio, whence they removed to Jackson county about 1824. In 1831, they came to Peoria county, IL settling in Limestone Township, on what was known as Jones Prairie or Jones' Spring. There Mr. Jones breathed his last about 1852, his surviving several years. Their family comprised two sons and six daughters.

The sixth child in this family was born in Gallia county, Ohio, Feb. 7, 1819, and christened Henry W. this lad came to Peoria county with his parents when in his thirteenth year and grew to manhood on his father's farm in Limestone Township. He remained under the parental roof until his marriage, which occurred in the fall of 1842, when he set up his own home in the same township. About a year and a half later he removed to section 34, Kickapoo Township, where he has continued to reside, making farming his chief business and securing a merited reward for his industry and good judgment.

The wife of Henry W. Jones was known in her maidenhood as Miss Rebecca Miller, and was born in Shelby County, Ky., Dec. 28, 1821. She is the seventh in a family comprising six sons and two daughters born to Reuben and Nancy (Sturgeon) Miller. They were natives of the Blue Grass State in which they were married and spent their wedded life. Mr. Miller died in Shelby County about 1826 and in 1834, his widow with her family came to Peoria County, IL. She settled in Kickapoo Township, dying there in 1872. There the marriage rites of her daughter Rebecca and our subject were celebrated Oct. 30, 1842.

To Mr. and Mrs. Jones twelve children have been born of whom we note the following; Clarissa C. is the wife of Francis Peppard; Lovina is the wife of Charles Daly; Amanda E. married Thomas Necomb; Charles P., who married Miss Caroline Daly, died in Limestone Township, March 17, 1888; Lucinda is the wife of Robert Awl; James H. Married Miss Alice Brown and lives in Kickapoo Township; Malinda J., is the wife of Alfred Kershaw, of Elmwood township; John F. died when about eleven years old; George N. died when two years old; Anna died in infancy; Adeline C. is the wife of William Edwards, of Rosefield Township; Euphemia is the wife of Richard Lonsdale, Jr., of Kickapoo Township

Probably no citizen of Kickapoo Township has borne a more active part in local affairs than the subject of this sketch. He is deeply interested in the welfare of this section of the country and ever ready to bear a part in movements which will promote it. His fellow-citizens recognize this fact, and also his intelligence and good judgment, and have therefore called for his services as School Director, School Trustee, Highway commissioner, Justice of the Peace and Assessor. He is liberal in his religious views, honorable and upright in his dealings, kindly in social and domestic relations, and deserving of that which he receives-the thorough respect and good will of his associates. His wife is a fitting companion for a man of his calibre, bearing well her part in the duties of life and winning many friends thereby.

The paternal grandfather of our subject was James Jones, a Welshman, who married Sarah Howdeshell, who was of German and English extraction. They were among the early settlers of the Buckeye State, in which they were gathered to their fathers.

Submitted by Londie Benson.