BOWMAN, Peter G.
Portrait & Biographical Record Winnebago & Boone Cos., IL. Chicago: Biographical Pub. Co., 1892, pp 1046-1049

Peter G. BOWMAN, a shipping clerk and one of the stockholders of the Forest City Knitting Company, was born in Sweden 06 Jan 1838, and is a son of Andrew PETERSON, who with his family crossed the Atlantic to America, sailing from Gottenburg on 19 Apr and landing in NY on 30 May 1852.  They came at once to St. Charles [Kane County], IL, and there the father died at 45 years of age, only a few months after his arrival.  His wife afterwards married a Mr. BOWMAN, a Swedish gentleman, who died while in the service during the War of the Rebellion.  She then married Robert WELTON, who is now deceased, and at this writing makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. LONG, of Rockford [Winnebago County, IL].  Although now 80 years of age, she is very well preserved.

On coming to the U. S., our subject settled in Kane County, IL, where he resided for some time.  He first came to Rockford in 1865, but subsequently removed to Chicago [Cook County], where he engaged in the grocery business until 1885.  He then returned to Rockford and for some time was connected with Mr. MUNTHE in the real estate business, and yet owns an interest in an addition.  He is now shipping clerk for the Forest City Knitting [p 1049] Company, with which he has been connected since its organization, and is also one of the stockholders.

While residing in Chicago Mr. BOWMAN was united in marriage with Miss Sophia FLOREN, who was born and reared in the same province in Sweden as her husband.  When a young lady she crossed the Atlantic to America and made her home in Chicago until after marriage.   She has been a true wife and helpmate to Mr. BOWMAN, and by her efforts has aided him materially.  They have two children, a son and daughter:  Robert G., an enterprising young man, employed in the works of the Nelson Knitting Company; and Anna, who is still at home.  The family have a pleasant home, which is the old Sylvester SCOTT property on the east bank of the Rock River.  The household is the abode of hospitality and the members of the family rank high in the social circles in which they move.  Mr. BOWMAN may well be called a self-made man, for whatever success he has achieved in life is due entirely to his own efforts.  By his industry and enterprise he has worked his way upward and has acquired a good property.

Submitted by Cathy Kubly.