HISTORY OF MACOUPIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS DESCRIPTIVE OF ITS SCENERY,
AND

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS.

Published by Brink, McDonough & Co., Philadelphia 1879



Page 228:

EDWARD B. CLARK was born in Logan county, Kentucky, Oct. 25, 1824. Howard Clark, his father, was a native of Warren county. The family were originally from Virginia. His great-grandfather was born in England. There were two brothers who came over to America, one of whom married, and from him have sprung the present Clark family. They settled in Virginia prior to the revolutionary war, and subsequently removed to Kentucky. There were five boys born to them, and one girl, who, however, died at an early age. Mr. Clark removed to Illinois in 1831, and settled in Edwardsville, Madison county, and in 1835 removed to Macoupin county, two and a half miles west of Brighton, now known as part of Jersey county, where he remained for twenty-five years, when he removed to the village of Brighton, where he remained until his death in 1866. The mother died in 1858. The subject of our sketch went to school in the winter season and worked upon the farm in the summer months. He received a good education. He remained at home until he was twenty-one years of age, after which he worked on a farm, for which he received $12 per month. In 1848 he purchased land and built a small cabin on it, and commenced cultivating the soil.

In the spring of 1851 he was united in marriage to Miss Nancy Parker, who is a native of Kentucky. Her parents removed to Illinois while she was yet in her infancy. Nine children have been born to them, eight of whom are living. Charles M., the second son, died August 27, 1878, in his twenty-fifth years. Two daughters are married. One resides in the village of Piasa and the other is a resident of Eldorado, Kansas. Isaac W. Clark, a younger brother of the present sketch, enlisted in the 27th regiment Illinois volunteers, and was wounded at Atlanta, and it is supposed was taken prisoner on the field of battle and taken to Andersonville, where he died from the effect of the wounds soon after. Both Mr. Clark and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. He is republican, but takes not active part in politics except to vote his sentiments. He has been successful in life, and is one of the prominent and substantial farmers of Macoupin county. He is much respected for his worth as a man and citizen.




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