HISTORY OF MACOUPIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS DESCRIPTIVE OF ITS SCENERY,
AND

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS.

Published by Brink, McDonough & Co., Philadelphia 1879



Page 106

THOMAS M. METCALF was born in Hopkins county, Kentucky, the 10th of November, 1828. William Metcalf, Jr., his father, was also a native of the same state. The Metcalf's are an old family, and were originally from Virginia, and settled in Kentucky at an early period. William Metcalf, Jr., emigrated to Illinois and settled in Macoupin county, on section six, in what is now known as Western Mound township, in April, 1835. He there remained engaged in cultivating the soil until 1858, when he removed to Girard in this county. In 1874 he removed to section one South Otter township, where he at present resides. He married Miss Huldah A. Davis, who is also a native of Kentucky. There were ten children born to them, six of whom are at present living, and all residents of the county except the wife of W. B. Michaels, who lives in Beardstown, Illinois. The subject of our sketch remained at home working upon the farm in the summer and attending the common schools in the winter, until his nineteenth year, when he taught school one session, after which he entered upon the study of medicine, intending to adopt that as his profession, but after one year's trial he abandoned it and entered a dry-goods store in Waverly, Morgan county, Illinois, as a clerk. He continued clerking for three years, at the end of which time he purchased a stock of dry-goods in Greenfield, Greene county, Illinois, and continued in that business until 1855, when he removed to Girard, Macoupin County, where soon after his arrival he was elected justice of the peace. To this office he added that of a general collecting agent, and continued so engaged for eleven years, when he went into the lumber business, and also operated a planing-mill in connection therewith. A short time afterwards a fire broke out and consumed the mill and a large portion of the stock, entailing upon him considerable loss. He afterwards obtained an interest in a grocery and hardware store, in which he continued until 1869, when he received the nomination for the office of county clerk on the Republican ticket, and in the ensuing election was elected by a handsome majority. He served his term of office, discharging the duties in a manner that gave satisfaction to his numerous friends. On the 29th of January, 1850, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma L. Thayer, who is a native of Massachusetts. Her parents came to Illinois in 1839, and settled in Chatham, Sangamon County. Both he and his estimable lady are members of the Baptist Church. He cast his first vote for Gen. Winfield Scott in 1852, and after the abandonment of the old-line Whig organization, he joined the republican party, and has been a staunch and consistent member ever since. In 1856 he was nominated by the republican party for the office of sheriff against Mr. McClure. The county was then overwhelmingly democratic, and Mr. Metcalf was defeated by only eighty-four votes. Mr. Metcalf has practically retired from active business pursuits, and is enjoying the fruits of a well spent life.


Index to Biographies

All material contained on these pages are furnished for the free use of those engaged researching their family origins. Any commercial use, without the consent of the host/author of these pages is prohibited. .