HISTORY OF MACOUPIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS DESCRIPTIVE OF ITS SCENERY,
AND

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS.

Published by Brink, McDonough & Co., Philadelphia 1879




Page 210

JAMES H. YOWELL

Among the old settlers in Macouin county, Mr. Yowell is justly accorded a place in this work. He was born in Morgan county, Illinois, November 7th, 1829. His parents, John and Sophia Yowell, moved to this state from Shelby county, Kentucky. His ancestry on the paternal side were of German origin, and on the maternal side Scotch-Irish. John Yowell was a native of Kentucky, and his father, Jame H. Yowell, was a native of Virginia. John Yowell settled in Macoupin county, ten miles northeast of Carlinville, in November, 1829, were he engaged in farming and carried on a blackmsith shop, until his death in 1874. He raised a family of six children, James H., being the eldest. John Yowell was a soldier in the Black Hawk war; was commissioend lieutenant of his company. After his return he was elected captain of the company, and held that postition as long as the company was an organization.

In 1864, he was elected County Asssociate Justice, and filled that office four years. Mr. Yowell was highly esteemed by those who had the pleasure of his acquaintance, and by them his loss was sincerely mourned and regretted. James H., assisted on hs father's farm during his minority, and as he was the oldest much of the hard labor devolved upon him. He attended the county schools during the winter months, where he received a fair education.

August 25th 1853, he was united in marriae to Miss Edith Ann Husband: she was native of this county. There were six chidlren born to this union; one died in infancy; their names are as follows: John Edwin, now married to Miss Fannie McMahon and living on the old Yowell homestead; George S.; James A. Lincoln; and William S., now living at home. April 17th 1866, Mrs. Yowell died and left Mr. Yowell five small children to care for. He kept the family together and on May 16, 1867, he married Miss Mary C. Brown, a native of Jersey county, Illinois, and daughter of Capt. Joseph W. Brown, now of Fort Smith, Arkansas. They have been blessed with three children: Charles E., Edith May, and Ada Maud.

Mr. Yowell's life occupation has been that of a farmer; he started in life little aided and what property he has was gained by perserverance, good managment and hard work. In politics he was formerly a whig, but on the formation of the republican party, he identified himself with that party, and is still a strong worker for its success. He is honest and honorable in all his dealings with his fellow men, and the word of Jame H. Yowell in the community where he is best known, is never doubted. He is of a lively and jovial nature, unassuming in his manners, genial in isposition; he dispenses a liberal hospitality with the ease and grace of the olden time. His religious sentiment is embraced in the grand old precept, "Do unto others as you would them do unto you.: He never joined any religious sect, yet he has always transacted his business honorably, and entertains no fears of the eternal hereafter.
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