PAST AND PRESENT
OF
MENARD COUNTY, ILLINOIS - 1905

Chicago: The S.J. Clarke Publishing Company


Transcribed by: Kristin Vaughn

Page 242

JERMAN TICE, deceased, was a life-long resident of Menard county and as an agriculturist was prominently identified with its growth and development. He was born near Athens on the 27th of November, 1831, and was a son of Jacob and Jane Tice, who were natives of Maryland and Virginia, respectively. His paternal grandparents came to this country from Germany. Jerman Tice was reared in much the usual manner of farmer boys in a frontier settlement and his education was acquired in the early schools of this county. During his boyhood and youth he assisted his father in the labors of the home farm and at times worked by the day or month for neighboring farmers. Throughout life he followed agricultural pursuits and in April, 1869, purchased a farm near Greenview, where he continued to make his home until called to his final rest on the 23d of October, 1895. In connection with general farming he also engaged in the raising and feeding of stock.

Mr. Tice was married November 30, 1856, to Miss Mary Jenison, who was born near Petersburg, Menard county, September 18. 1834, and was descended from Scotch ancestors, who on crossing the Atlantic settled in New England. Her parents were Rev. John and Martha (McNabb) Jenison. Her father was born in Massachusetts and at the age of nine years accompanied his parents on their removal to New York. From that state he came to Illinois at an early day, locating in Menard county, where he followed farming and also engaged in preaching, being a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. For some time he served as justice of the peace and died January 30, 1852, honored and respected by all who knew him. In his family were eight children. Mr. Tice was one of a family of eleven children, and to him and his wife was born a son, their only child, Homer J., who is represented elsewhere in this volume.

Politically Mr. Tice was identified with the Republican party, but never cared for the honors or emoluments of public office, preferring the quiet of private life. At one time he affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and was a man highly respected and esteemed by all with whom he came in contact either in business or social life.


1905 Bio. Index

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