Federal Building


Springfield Journal Register, date of paper which originally published the following is unknown.



REMEMBER OLD FEDERAL BUILDING IN HORSE AND BUGGY DAYS?
This structure on the southeast corner of 6th and Monroe Streets, on the site of the present Federal Building, was Springfield's first Post Office and Government Building and was considered very pretentious for its period. Erected in 1867 in Grant's administration at a cost of about $320,000 including furnishings, it was about 120 feet in length by 75 feet in width, with the outer walls of limestone from the quarry near Nauvoo, Ill. Note the imposing Mansard elevation the center of the roof, with an eagle surmounting it. The upper floors were occupied by the Federal courts (court room was on top floor) and various Federal offices. This picture dates back to the Nineties - the horse and buggy days and the era of bicycles, telegrap poles, etc. In the following decade, an addition was built and various other improvements made. This structure was razed in 1929 and the present Federal Building and Post Office, costing nearly $700,000, was occupied in October, 1930.

THE OLD FEDERAL BUILDING JUST BEFORE RAZIN IN 1928--
This will round out your collection of pictures of the old Post Office and Federal Building on the southeast corner of 6th and Monroe Streets. Springfield's first government-owned structure of the kind, it was dedicated about the year 1870. Cost of the building was $320,000, furnishings included. Originally it was about 120 feet in length by 75 in width, the south portion having been added after the turn of the century. Postmasters in this period were J. L. Crane, D. L. Phillips, Paul Selby, H. W. Clendenin, J. C. Conkling, Reddick M. Ridgely, Charles A. Keyes, William Barret Ridgely, Lewis H. Miner, Loren E. Wheeler, James W. Patton and William H. Conkling. The present Post Office and Federal Building, costing approximately $700,000, was occupied in October of 1930.

(Note - the Post Office moved out of the Federal Building during the late 1990's leaving the Federal Courts as the primary occupant.


Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



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