Search billions of records on Ancestry.com

W3cC Validation




Wish you were here!
(Postcards from Lovington:
Churches )

../Images/Moultrie.gif




(Click on the front or back of a card to see a full-size image.)

Title Front Back Transcription/Comments
Catholic Church, 1938 Postmark:
Lovington Ill, Jun 8 1938 (Time is unreadable)


Addressed to:
Miss Bonita McLaughlin
Wash. Co. Hosp.
Hagerstown, Md


Message:
Dear Bonnie & Betty,

Well, is the good old hospital still running smoothly? Am having a nice time running around. Write me a letter. Must Close - Bye - Love - Mary


Contributed by Thomas Young.
Catholic Church, 1950s Postally unused.

C. L. Bence, Mattoon, Illinois

Based on the vehicle in the background, as well as the noticeably improved state of the building, this photo probably dates from the 1950's.
Christian Church, 1907 Postmark:
Hammond Ill, Nov 2 1907 12 PM


Addressed to:
Miss Maurine Lowery
Hammond
Illinois
Piatt Co.


Message:
Dear Maurine:

Aunt Minnie is sick and she did not come up this week, but she will come up next week. I am in Hammond today. I wish you could in town this evening I will be at Nelle Evans.

Your friend,
Vera Collett

Vera Collett, b. c. 1893, was the daughter of Theodore and Florence H. McCravey Collett of Iowa. By 1900, Vera was living in Lovington with her grandmother, Delilah Jane McCravey (1828-1915) and aunt Minnie Lou (1861-1948), where she lived for decades.

Nelle (or Nellie) Evans (born about 1889) was the wife of Earl Evans, and lived in Hammond village in 1910.Because she was about four years older than Vera, it is likely that they knew each other as children, though I've been unable to document this.
Christian Church, 1910 Postmark:
Lovington Aug 20 1910 5 PM


Addressed to:
Mrs. H. D. Willard
723 N. 13th St.
E. St. Louis,
Illinois


Message:
Am having such a good visit out the Howell farm. Found Hattie looking much better than I expected to.

Wish you might spend a few weeks in a place like this. It would make you fat I'm sure. The best country ham and butter milk and plenty of it. Love to all.
Stella B.


The Willards were probably Harry C. and Bess Eleanor Morris Willard, who married 12 Jul 1900 in Wayne County.

There are a number of Howells who may have been the family referenced here, but none had a Hattie or Harriet in the family; consequently, they cannot be narrowed down, and both Hattie and Stella B. are as yet unidentified.
Methodist Church, 1908 Postmark:
Lovington Jul 20 1908 5 PM


Addressed to:
Mrs. O H Scott
Arcola Ill


Message:
7/20

Come over tomorrow eve or Wed and bring over some Can fruit so I can take to Gro.

Sue

Missent


This is the first Methodist church building, which was destroyed by fire about 1920. A card showing its replacement appears below.

Another postcard to the Scott family, with additional genealogical information concerning both the sender and addressee, is here.
Methodist Church, 1910 Postmark: none

Addressed to:
Mr. and Mrs. Jno. McKenzie
King City
Mo.


Message:
Lovington Ill
Oct 15 1910

This picture doesn't do justice to the church & parsonage, but will give some idea of it. There are some fine residences here.

Yours as ever,

A.D. Davis & family
Methodist Church, 1911 Postmark:
Terre Haute & Peoria R.P.O. TR 61 Aug 14 1911


To:
Mr. S.W. McKaig
1474 N. College
Decatur Ill.


Message:
I am having a fine time my cousin is going to have a party for me Tuesday night. We are going fishing this week. I don't think I will come back

Edna


The postmark recalls the days when trains served as mobile post offices.
Methodist Church, 1912 Postmark:
Lovington Jul 13 1912


Addressed to:
Merj Gorenz
Livingston
Box 132
Madison Co.
Ill.


Message:

[This is hard to read due to the penmanship and the language, which appears to be a German dialect, rather than standard German. My best effort is given below, but if you can provide a better reading, please let me know. The signature of the writer is equally unclear, and two guesses as to his identity are given below.]

Merj sin ist ihr Unr (unser?) luflick; wir kannen in Die Kirke gern; Sillen geriffe
Son mir
Jos. Resal


A prospective and partial translation follows.
Merj
How are you? We (verb unclear) the church gladly/thankfully.
(Unknown text)

Write me
Joseph Resala


Matejo Gorenz was born in Slovenia about 1868. In 1910, he was living with his family in Olive Twp., Madison Co., and was a loader in a coal mine.
The name 'Merj' may be a contraction of 'Matejo' (Matthew), but may also have been the nickname of a burley coal worker; 'merj' is Slovenian for 'wild boar'.
The penmanship is not clear, but there's a clear reference to attending the church.
The name of the sender most closely resembles that of Joseph M Nessl, born about 1872 (born in Illinois, but father was German), a farmer also of Olive Twp. Madison Cty.

However, based on occupation, a more likely alternative was Joseph Ranko/Renko, born about 1885, and like Merj, a loader in the mine. He lived next door to Matejo in 1910, and may have moved to Lovington to work in the new mine.
Methodist Church, undated Postally unused.

This is the current building, which was dedicated in 1922.