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Mount Morris Index, Mount Morris, IL

May 4, 1911 p. 1 - 2




First Death in this Family in Fifty Years - Store to be Continued Without Change or Interruption

After an illness of almost three months, John Sprecher died on Saturday morning, April 29. As had been noted in the Index from week to week, there were times when his recovery was hoped for, but during the last month he gradually weakened until the end came by his quietly sleeping away.

He was ready and willing to go at all times, but was so devoted to his family he wished that his life might be spared a few more years. He said through his sickness, "Not my will but Thine be done."

Funeral services were held in the Chapel on Monday afternoon, conducted by Elder J. G. Royer, assisted by Elder Emanuel Newcomer and Elder D. I. Miller. Burial was made in the Old Cemetery. The pall bearers were: Samuel Stone, Melchor Newcomer, George W. Young, Andrew Gigous, Clinton Price and Filmore Blake.

Mr. Sprecher was born in Washington County, Md., Sept. 22, 1832. with his parents he came to Mount Morris in 1839, and has resided here, being one of the few early pioneers of our community. Soon after reaching manhood he entered the mercantile business, in which he continued to the time of his death.

In 1857 he was married to Lydia Palmer, with whom he lived a happy wedded life of over fifty-four years, their golden wedding having been celebrated four years ago. To this union was born a family of ten children, all of whom survive but one, who died in infancy fifty-two years ago. Thus while the family was a large one, death had not darkened the home for over half a century -- a record which few families has known.

The children surviving are: George, who resides in Colorado; Frank and Fred of Coffeyville, Kans., John and Wentworth, of Leaf River; and Charles, Ella, May and Catherine, who are at home. Of his ten brothers and sisters but one remains -- Mrs. George Windle.

As a man, Mr. Sprecher had the respect and confidence of the entire community. Men might not agree with his views, but they did respect him as one who strove to do the right as he saw it. Since his conversion 11 years ago, his has been a life of extreme devotion and one worthy the emulation of all. Sympathy for the needy and oppressed was strong in him and many were the acts of charity which he performed, leaving "not the left hand know what the right hand doeth." Ostentation and display had no part in his life.

As a business man he was characterized especially by his sterling honesty and his promptness in meeting obligations. His word was good and none questioned when once it had been given.

He was very much interested, even in his sickness, in his business interests, which he had seen grow under his guiding hand from year to year, and he requested that both his stores be continued after his death without change or interruption.

As an evidence of esteem and token of respect our merchants sent a beautiful floral piece of lilies, and all places of business were closed during the funeral services.

Card of Thanks

We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to our friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the sickness and death of our husband and father. -- Mrs. John Sprecher and family.

Contributed by Peg Allen Arnold

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