WADE, (nee NEFF) Cynthia


WADE, Cynthia (Neff); b: 15May1892, Pike Co., IL; d: 10Dec1981, Pittsfield, IL; bu: Blue River Cemetery, Pike Co., IL; m: Owen Wade (date and Place not stated); fa: Alvin Neff; mo: Mary Schafer. Husband preceded in death. Survived by the following children: Mrs. Cecil (Thelma) Swartz, Walter Wade, Raymond Wade, Mrs. Ford (Edna) Knapp, and Mrs. Mac (Pearl) Priest, all of Florence, and Mrs. Charles (Helen) Davis of Winchester; 19 grand and several g-grand and g-g-grandchildren; and three sisters: Eva Baird of Exeter, Mrs. Ada Nichols of Peoria, and Mrs. Mildred Waters of Haughton, Kansas. Preceded by five brothers and a sister.



WADE, Margaret Imogene


Obit; Winchester Times 5 June 1992 Vol. #108, Page 1, Col 1.

MARGARET IMOGENE WADE, 84 of Winchester died Monday, June 1, 1992 at the Scott Co. Nursing Center. She was born Dec. 24, 1907 in Scott County, a daughter of HOMER and BESSIE JACKSON EVANS. She married ROY W. WADE on June 28, 1930 in Pittsfield. He died Dec. 25, 1962. She is survivd by two sons, BILLIE HOMER WADE of Rock Island and JIMMIE DUANE WADE of Glenarms; three grandchildren, DEBORAH of Springfield, COGAT of Alabama and JASON of Winchester; two great-grandchildren two brothers, DOCTOR DUDLEY EVANS of Freeport and EDWIN EVANS of Winchester; three sisters; Mrs. BOB [ LAVERN ] ALBERS of Jacksonville and Mrs. ED [EVELYN] HAGGARD of Winchester. She was preceeded in death by a infant daughter, LEOTA and one brother, JOHN JR. EVANS. Mrs. WADE was a member of the Sandridge Baptist Church. She worked at Brown Shoe Company in Pittsfield for 25 years and was an aide at Jacksonville State Hospital until her retirement in 1982. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Wed. at Coonrod Funeral Home in Winchester with burial at Winchester City Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the Winchester Emergency Medical Services.



WADE, Roy W.


The Winchester Times Vol. 95 Friday Dec. 28, 1962 #22 Page 1, Col. 2.

ROY W. WADE, 53, passed away at 6:20 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 25, 1962 at Passavant Hospital in Jacksonville, Morgan Co., IL. He was a carpenter by trade.

Mr. WADE was born in Pike CO., IL. Jan. 27, 1907, the son of THOMAS and MARGARET DOLBOW WADE. He was married in Pittsfield in 1930 to MARGARET EVANS. She survives with two children, BILLY WADE of Jacksonville and JIMMY WADE of Winchester, a Daughter died in infancy. The following sisters and a brother survive; ELLIS, Hillview; Mrs. BESSIE KESSINGER, Florida; Mrs. ESTELLA JONES of Alton and Mrs. INA REA of Woodson. Two brothers preceeded Mr. WADE in death. Funeral services will be held at the Woodcock Funeral Home at 2 p.m. today [ Friday ] with Rev. Dean Spencer of Winchester officiating. Internment will be in the Winchester City Cemetery.


WALKER, John


The Quincy Herald - Monday, February 04, 1895, Page 1


He Was Over A Hundred - But How Many Years More No One Knows - A Remarkable Negro Who Died Near Barry Last Week -- Bought His Freedom for $300 and Paid Nearly $3,000 for His Family -- A Wealthy Man

Something more than a brief passing notice should be given to Uncle John Walker, the colored centennarian who died at Hadley, five miles east of Barry, last week. No more striking character ever lived in this section. He was certainly over 100 years old, how much more no one knows positively. His children say he was fully 112. The Pike County history considers him deserving of quite a long biography.

John Walker was born a slave in Louisa County, Virginia. He was owned by several masters until the year 1834, when he bought himself from his master, Ostan Sanders, for the sum of $300. He had saved up this amount, and something more, by devoting all his spare time to working a "patch" of ground which his master allowed him. After doing a hard day's work in the field, John would spend a part of the night at work on his "patch," cultivating his corn, tobacco, onions, beans, etc., which he was allowed to sell, and retain the proceeds. He would sometimes go hunting and trapping, and would catch rabbits, mink, coon, muskrat, and sell the pelts. He would also trap and shoot quail, which he generally sold for a fair price. By working in that way for fifteen years, he finally succeeded in saving up enough money to buy himself a cheap team. He then rented a small piece of land, on which he raised corn, tobacco, beans, etc. Owing to a peculiar law in Virginia he could remain but one year after obtaining his freedom; but through the intercession of a friend he got the law so changed as to allow him to remain three years longer. He continued to work his rented ground in the summer and trap the game in the winter, and at the same time buy butter, eggs, poultry, etc., through the country, which he would take to market and sell at a profit. He worked along that way until 1838, when the man who owned his wife and children was about to move to Missouri, so, in order to be near them, he too moved to Missouri.

He had a good team, and money enough after he got there to purchase eighty acres of land, which he did, and went to farming, raising tobacco, corn and hogs, and at which he was quite successful. In 1850 he purchased two of his children - Letty, a daughter, and Peter, a son -for $400 each. In the year 1858 he purchased his wife Lucy, (who was then 50 years old, and had been a slave all her life), and his son Oregon, who was 18 years old, for whom he paid $1,100. He remained in Missouri until March, 1861, at which time he was the owner of 460 acres of land and a large amount of personal property, consisting of horses, mules, cattle and hogs. After the purchase of his wife he became dissatisfied with Missouri, and in 1861 he sold his land and a large portion of his other property and moved with his family to Pike County, Illinois, where he purchased a good farm on section 22, in Hadley Township. Here he has resided ever since. He now owns 500 acres of good land, with very good buildings, where he and his family are living in comfort. At the time he moved to Illinois he left one daughter, one son and two grandchildren (slaves) in Missouri, and in 1862 he returned and purchased the four at a cost of $1,000, and brought them home with him, where they are now living. The rest of his children were freed by the emancipation proclamation. John is the father of sixteen children, eleven of whom have deceased, and five are now living. He is the grandfather of twenty children and the great-grandfather of five.

Mr. Walker was one of the wealthy men of Pike County. He made it all by hiw untiring industy and economy. He had no education whatever, but he had a natural ability rarely found with the uneducated. He was a man of strict moral and religious habits, and has always lived quietly and peaceably with all men. He is very highly respected in the neighborhood in which he lives, and his word is considered as good as his note.



WARD, (nee WELLS) Rachel A.


The Quincy Daily Journal - March 3 1900, Pg 3

Double Funeral for Rachel A. Wells Ward (aka Mrs. Harvey Ward) and her mother Cassandra Davis Wells (aka Mrs. Robert Wells) Sad Indeed - Another Double Funeral Near Rushville To-day. Follows the One That Took Place Yesterday -- An Afflicted Community.

Yesterday's Journal contained a notice of the double Funeral at Rushville of William Carty and wife, and from the same little city today comes the news of the double funeral to take place from the home of Al Wells near that place, of which the Citizen (Rushville Citizen Newspaper) says: "The shadow of death hovers over the home of Al Wells, about a mile and a half west of Sugar Grove South, Tuesday night his sister, Mrs. Rachel A. Ward, died suddenly, and Thursday morning Mrs. Cassandra Wells, his mother, passed away. The double funeral was held from the Christian Church at Ripley this morning at 11 o'clock, Reverend Beach officiating. The interment was in Ripley Cemetery.

Mrs. Ward had been in poor health for some time. While sitting in her chair about midnight Tuesday she had a coughing spell, followed by hemorrhage of the lungs, expiring in a short time. Mrs. Ward was born May 6th, 1848. Her husband, Harvey Ward, went to Wichita, Kansas, some time ago, to locate, and Mrs. Ward was to follow him this spring. She was a member of the Methodist church and leaves several children.

Mrs. Wells had been in poor health for some time. She suffered a paralytic stroke some months ago, from which she never entirely recovered, death coming painlessly at 4 o'clock Thursday morning. Mrs. Wells was in her 80th year. She had been a resident of Pike and Cass Counties, where she was widely known, but for the past three years she made her home with her son. She was a zealous Christian, having been a member of the Christian Church for thirty-nine years."


WELLS, AGNES


Agnes M. Wells, 84, formerly of Barry and New Canton, died Sunday, October 3, 2004, at Pittsfield Healthcare Center in Pittsfield.
>br> She was born January 11, 1920 in Hull to Lewis and Ida Kincaid Orr. She married Kenneth Wells, November 27, 1968 in Quincy. He died September 11, 1974.

Mrs. Wells enjoyed baking, embroidery work and fishing. She was a member of the Calvary Baptist Church in Quincy.

Survivors are one son, Harold Whittaker of New Canton, one daughter, Dolores Mansfield of Fayette, Missouri; six grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; five great-great-grandchildren; and one brother, Herbert Bradshaw of Quincy. She was preceded in death by one brother, two sisters and one grandson.

Funeral services will be held today, Wednesday, October 6, at 10 a.m. at Kirgan Funeral Home in Barry. Visitation was Tuesday, October 5, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home. burial will be in Akers Chapel Cemetery in Hull. Memorials are to the Parkinson Disease Fund.


WELLS, (nee Davis) Cassandra


The Quincy Daily Journal - March 3 1900, Pg 3

Double Funeral for Rachel A. Wells Ward (aka Mrs. Harvey Ward) and her mother Cassandra Davis Wells (aka Mrs. Robert Wells) Sad Indeed - Another Double Funeral Near Rushville To-day. Follows the One That Took Place Yesterday -- An Afflicted Community.

Yesterday's Journal contained a notice of the double Funeral at Rushville of William Carty and wife, and from the same little city today comes the news of the double funeral to take place from the home of Al Wells near that place, of which the Citizen (Rushville Citizen Newspaper) says: "The shadow of death hovers over the home of Al Wells, about a mile and a half west of Sugar Grove South, Tuesday night his sister, Mrs. Rachel A. Ward, died suddenly, and Thursday morning Mrs. Cassandra Wells, his mother, passed away. The double funeral was held from the Christian Church at Ripley this morning at 11 o'clock, Reverend Beach officiating. The interment was in Ripley Cemetery.

Mrs. Ward had been in poor health for some time. While sitting in her chair about midnight Tuesday she had a coughing spell, followed by hemorrhage of the lungs, expiring in a short time. Mrs. Ward was born May 6th, 1848. Her husband, Harvey Ward, went to Wichita, Kansas, some time ago, to locate, and Mrs. Ward was to follow him this spring. She was a member of the Methodist church and leaves several children.

Mrs. Wells had been in poor health for some time. She suffered a paralytic stroke some months ago, from which she never entirely recovered, death coming painlessly at 4 o'clock Thursday morning. Mrs. Wells was in her 80th year. She had been a resident of Pike and Cass Counties, where she was widely known, but for the past three years she made her home with her son. She was a zealous Christian, having been a member of the Christian Church for thirty-nine years."



WELLS, Levi


The Quincy Daily Journal - July 24 1857, Pg 2
Levi Wells Death and Life Sketch (1793-1857) - Levi Wells, Esq.

We mentioned in a short notice, a few days since, the decease of this excellent man. It is but just to the man and his memory that we now publish a more extended notice of his life and death, which has been kindly furnished us by Rev. J. J. Marks, of this city, who has long and intimately known the deceased.

Mr. Wells was born in Wethersfield, Conn. on the 4th of September, 1793. He left the parental home for the West in 1818, and came to Illinois when the American settlements were few and far removed. His first location in our State was at Belleville, St. Clair county; here he was married in 1821, and emigrated to this region in 1824. At this time the entire "Military Tract" was known as "Pike county." In 1825 the county of Adams was organized, and Mr. Wells was elected one of the first Commissioners of the county. By these officers Quincy was mapped, the streets surveyed and named. Thus Mr. W's name is identified with the earliest history of our place.

In the year 1828, Mr. W. removed with his family to Galena and engages in the lead business. After remaining there one and a half years, he returned to Quincy, and from that time, this city was permanently his home.

These were years when the burdens of life were many and heavy. The savages were numerous and troublesome. A most desperate and piratical race of white men swarmed upon the Mississippi. In nearly every year there was the scourge of a long summer sickness, and frequently every member of the family was prostrated with fever at once - without assistance - without medical advice - alone for long days and weary nights. They often longed to died and be at rest in the grave. Often has the writer heard Mr. Wells allude to those years and scenes, as illustrating how much suffering we endure and yet live. In the year 1830, the 1st Congregational Church was formed, with fourteen members, and Mr. W. was one of the number.

Mr. Wells' house, so long and well known as "Brown & Dimock's Corner," was the second frame house built in Quincy. The main apartment, back of the store, was the dining and sitting room of the family, and the church, on the Sabbath - used for years for the "Sabbath School" and "Public Worship, " "Four Days Protracted Meetings, " on week evenings for "Temperance Meetings," "Singing Schools" and "Library Meetings." Was not that room the fountain of much of our virtue, piety and prosperity?

In the year 1839, the 1st Presbyterian Church was formed. and Mr. Wells and Mr. A. Hoffman were elected the Elders. With a great sacrifice of property and personal comfort, he contributed most liberally to rear the church edifice. Thus was Mr. Wells the compeer and fellow laborer with Mr. Wood, Mr. Keyes, Judge Snow, Major Rose, J. T. Holmes, etc, etc., in rearing this city in the wilderness and in creating the institutions of education and religion.

Less than a year since he followed to the grave his youngest daughter, Miss Lucy Wells, a young lady of pre-eminent beauty of person and character. She was coffined in her bridal robes, and much that rendered life desirable to her father, ascended with her to heaven. From this time Mr. W. was more than ever dead to the world.

Mr. Wells was happy in seeing his surviving children educated and occupying useful and important positions in society. he was happy in having lived through the embarrassment and harassments of former years, and his age was affluent and prosperous. And before his natural strength had abated, when for many months he was in the enjoyment of more than ordinarily good health, when to his home and friends it appeared more than ever essential that he should live, he was called from us.

The cause of his death was a small wound made with the point of his pen knife in the large muscle above the knee. This at first was unperceived and painless, but soon spread, and inflammation ensued over the entire limb, and at length issued in death. On Sabbath, 5th inst., the inflammation fell upon the vitals, and from this time until his death his suffering were intense and constant. But there was no murmuring, not even a prayer for the removal of the cup, but patient, humble submission to the will of God.

To those who ministered at this bed side and witnessed the "pains, the groans, and dying strife" was often given the assurance that "he was peaceful," and while the body was dissolving in the furnace of suffering, the soul was tranquil and joyful. During his illness he often spoke with most prefect calmness of his approaching change - death had for him no terrors.

A few hours before his departure, he called the members of his family around his bed - kissed them, blessed them and bade them farewell until they should meet in the Kingdom of God, and closed the touching scene with the prayer "That God would accept him, forgive him, and glorify himself by his life and death." From this time he held but little communion with the weepers around him, and soon fell asleep in Jesus. On the following Sabbath, 12th, his funeral was attended by an immense concourse at the 1st Presbyterian Church. And probably in the history of our city no death has occurred producing so deep and wide spread regret. It was felt to be a public calamity. If we look into the peculiarities of his character and life we can find the causes of that universal respect in which he was held. For years hundreds had fixed their eyes upon him with reverence, for he was one of the fathers of our city, and there was felt toward him the respect and affection due to those who bore the burden and the heat of the early days of toil and sacrifice. And many honored him as one of the number who planted and nourished that vine of which was eat the fruit and under the shadow of which we rest.

His life was known of thousands, and they regarded him as a man pre-eminently just and blameless. The language of Gov. Wood, spoken by the dying bed a short time before his departure, "I have known him for twenty-seven years, and I have prior known a more just man, or one more scrupulously honest." is the testimony of thousands. He defrauded and oppressed no man, he was not only just, but generous to all. Mr. W. possessed all those moral qualities which beget in our minds confidence and security. United to the delicacy and modesty of a woman, was the most unbending firmness in maintaining what considered right. "Policy and expediency" were words never used in his vocabulary. A friend he never forsook - he never concealed his opinions - he never wavered in defending the right - he was never unfaithful to the truth. With this firmness there was none of the unreasoning passionlessly of a stubborn man. He was always firm, because, in the depths of an eminently truthful and conscientious nature he felt bound to defend, the right. The world often speaks of such men, while alive, as "impracticable and self-willed," but when dead, garnish their sepulchers as the benefactors of the race and the martyrs of truth. In the character of Mr. W., under the veil of great diffidence there were all the elements of a man of power. His understanding was vigorous and discriminating. His memory was stored with mush of the finest poetry of our language. His judgment was singularly excellent - his perception of character had the unfailing accuracy of instinct. Like all persons of a deep and sensitive nature, he loved but few, but those with an intense and never wavering affection. Those to whom he had been once attached ever lived in his memory as fresh and green as yesterday.

The loss of such a man to his home - his children - to the church - to his friends - is irreparable. Where shall we find another so sagacious, so truthful, so firm, so loving? The mould in which such man are cast is but rarely used.



WHITAKER, Emilie


The Quincy Daily Journal - Wednesday, March 13, 1912, Page 9
Paragraphs From Perry - Politics and The Fraternal Societies - Lodge News - Death of Miss Whitaker
Perry, Illinois, March 13, 1912 - Miss Emilie Whitaker was born at Perry, Illinois, January 23, 1849, and passed to her eternal rest, at her home in Perry, March 8th, 1912. The deceased had been in failing health for two years, and during the lasy year she had been a constant sufferer. She had been in a hospital in St. Louis, but was unable to find relief. She returned to her home in Perry last June, and was never able to leave the house since. The funeral was held from the family home the following Sunday afternoon, and was conducted by Reverend G. G. Maple of the Methodist Church. The floral offerings were many and very beautiful. The remains were laid to rest in the McCord Cemetery.


WILLIAMS, HARRIET, Mrs.


The Quincy Morning Whig - Saturday, August 31, 1895, Page 8

Death of Mrs. Harriet Williams - At the residence of her son, at Nebo, Illinois, on the afternoon of August 14, 1895, Mrs. Harriet Sawin Williams, wife of the late Reverend George W. Williams, of Newtown, Illinois, quietly passed away in the 78th year of her age. She had been an invalid for several years, but there was no intimation that the end was near until about twelve hours before her death. She retained her consciousness until the last and met the change without fear, rejoicing that the summons to go up higher had come. According to her request, the funeral services were very brief, consisting of the signing of some of her favorite hymns under the direction of Professor Thatcher, and reading of the scriptures, prayer and a short address by Reverend Forman, of the christian Church, after which her body was laid to rest in the little hillside cemetery near where she died. Four children survive her -- Dr. W. T. Williams of Nebo, at whose home she spent her last days; Miss Martha Williams of Chicago; Mrs. John C. Collett, of Callao, Missouri, and Mrs. Joseph F. Slipper of Liberty, Illinois.


WINDMILLER, JACOB, Mrs.


The Quincy Daily Journal - Tuesday, July 18, 1911, Page 2

RESIDENT OF PITTSFIELD - Died In Hannibal - Mrs. Jacob Windmiller Passed Away Yesterday - Child Accidentally Killed at Nebo - A Bad Runaway Saturday Morning - Interesting News Items
Pittsfield, Illinois, - July 18, 1911, The death of Mrs. Jacob Windmiller occurred on Monday morning at Hannibal where she had been taking treatment for several weeks. She was suffering from a complication of diseases. The family have resided on their large farm north of town since Mr. Windmiller retired from his official duties, he having served as sheriff and county treasurer. The deceased is survived by her husband and two sons, Loren and Harry, and two daughters, Mrs. Robert Veihl of Fort Worth, Texas, and Mrs. Lee Johnston of New Salem. The funeral arrangements have not been completed.