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JOHN BLEAUEAU, a well known citizen of Eldorado, departed this life November 7, 1918. He was a good man and was well respected by his many friends and acquaintances. Mr. Bleaueau leaves a wife and one child, Myra Miller of Equality, four grandchildren and one brother, and a host mourn his death, and will be greatly missed by all. The funeral was conducted by Rev. W. W. Stevens, followed by interment at Rhine cemetery.

LELAND STANFORD LATIMER, son of S. R. and Elizabeth Latimer was born at Omaha, Illinois, December 31, 1887, departed this life at the St. Louis Mullanphy Hospital Monday evening, November 4, 1918, aged 38 years, 10 months and four days. His childhood and youth were spent at the family home near Omaha, as a youth he was dutiful and of a joyous and energetic disposition. In early manhood he removed with the family to Eldorado, where he made the acquaintance of Romayne Whitley, to whom he was married Feb. 5, 1917. He was always thoughtful of the comfort and happiness of his parents, also his brothers and sisters, and the same spirit was manifest in his own home where he was most concerned about the comfort and welfare of his wife. In his business life his ambition was to build up a home, and to his great joy a babe came to bless this union, September 25, 1918, Emma Elizabeth was the delight of his heart, and one of the first requests of ...( line obliterated in tear of paper) Christened and thus dedicated to a life of Christian purity and service. For a few years he was engaged in the clothing business in Eldorado, where he made many friends among his associates, but recently he was employed by the Aetna Life Insurance Company, in the claims department in St. Louis. He joined the Omaha Lodge A. F. & A. M. No. 723, and about one year ago he was admitted to the Eldorado Lodge 730 A. F & A. M. He united with the first M. E. Church in Eldorado in 1916, and lived a quiet but constant Christian life. The funeral services were held at the S. A. Whitley home on Thursday at 1:30 p.m. conducted by Rev. Geo. R. Goodman, assisted by Rev. T. C. Stokes of Omaha, Mrs. Madge Robertson sang the beautiful solo. The remains were interred at Wolf Creek, where the Masonic order had charge.

Local & Personal--The little eleven months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence BLADE died Friday night at their home in the west part of this city. Last Saturday the third child in the family of Jas. SHORT at Muddy being victim of the dreaded influenza. The children's ages were 12 years, 4 years and fourteen months. The little three year old child of Mrs. Tom WHISTLE was buried at Wolf Creek yesterday by the side of the father, who died of influenza a few days ago. The mother and four children are very ill. The two year old child of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. EADIE died yesterday morning at their home in this city from influenza. Deceased is survived by parents, two sisters, and three brothers. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made yet, as they are undecided as to whether to have interment here or at Springfield, Ill., their former home. The fourteen months old child of Mr. and Mrs. George LAWRENCE died Wednesday at their home in east Eldorado, resulting from bowel trouble. The funeral and interment occurred yesterday.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SHAVER, son of Simp and Etta Shaver, was born in Saline County, Ill., April 18, 1875,and died at his home in Eldorado, Ill., November 8, 1918, aged 43 years, 6 months and 20 days. He spent the early part of his childhood on a farm, near Eldorado. He was married to Teora Thompson March 31, 1895, and to this union four children were born, Paul, Julia L., Hallie L. and Marie, all of whom except Paul survives their father. He leaves two grandchildren, Harry and Pauline Halcomb; mother, two brothers and three sisters: Everett, Elmer, Mrs. Mary Carlile, Mrs. Blanch Nave and Mrs. Irene Bradley, and a host of loving friends. He was ill eleven days of influenza. At the time of his death he was a member of the U. M. W. of A., and also a member of Lodge No. 434, I. O. O. F., Junction, Ill. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Robert Dawson at the home of the deceased at 11 o'clock Saturday morning, after which the remains were laid to rest at Wesley cemetery near Eldorado.

22 November 1918

The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Esco GRAM were saddened when they learned of the death of their oldest son, COYNE, who died at their home Wednesday morning. The family were suffering with influenza but Coyne seemed to be improving when pneumonia set in and in a very short time they realized that he was in a very seriuos condition. Everything was done for him that loving hands could do, but to no avail and his life passed on to the other world, where, transplanted into the garden of God's choice flowers, he may grow and blossom into a beautiful likeness of his ideal. Coyne was seven yeras old and in the second grade at the Lincoln school. He was very bright and intelligent, being able to discourse intelligently on many things that have puzzled other heads. He was a kind and loving child and it always hurt him to hear words spoken which he had been taught at home were wrong to say. He was an obedient and trustful child always looking for that which is good. He leaves beside his parents, two little brothers and the youngest of whom is still very ill with pneumonia. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the bereaved family. Mr. Gram is the proprietor of the Eldorado laundry. A short funeral service was held at the house and burial at Wolf Creek cemetery. The death angel again visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Esco Gram Saturday night and took their baby, CARL. The oldest son was laid to rest only last week and the grief stricken parents are distracted over the loss of another of their little family. Carl was three years old, the age when the little ones are the sweetest, and was a bright, playful little child. Funeral services were held at the home on Locust street Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock and the body laid to rest in Wolf Creek cemetery.

Card of Thanks: To the many friends who so kindly gave their assistance during the illness and death of my wife, I desire to extend heartfelt thanks. Especially I wish to thank that noble organization, the Red Cross, for their aid in a time of need, also Miss Grace Long, who so faithfully attended our loved one during her illness. May God bless you each and everyone.--A. J. SWAIN, Mrs. S. M. Swain.

DEATH'S HARVEST; MRS. A. J. SWAIN passed away at her home on Saline street Sunday afternoon after a several days illness of influenza and pneumonia. Deceased was a highly respected young woman, held in high esteem by her many friends. She is survived by the husband and two children, one a baby six weeks old. CLARENCE GARRISON, the 4 year old son of Oman Garrison, died yesterday at the home of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Garrison, of influenza and complications. Funeral services were held at the Zion church Monday morning at 11 o'clock and interment made in Zion cemetery. The little babe of Fred MITCHELL died Friday and was laid to rest in Wolf Creek cemetery Saturday by the side of the mother, who was buried last week. The remains of MRS. HENRY WRIGHT who died in Harrisburg Thursday, were brought to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Endicott, Saturday morning. Funeral services were held at the residence and the body interred in the Dodd cemetery. The 14 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Luther BOYLES died Friday morning at the home in Grayson. The entire Boyles family are ill with the influenza. Also the little two year old child of Mr. and Mrs. Noah HENDRICKS passed away, after a several days illness of influenza. MRS. LONNIE HOPPER, who has been seriously ill for the past few weeks with the influenza and pneumonia, died Friday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Hopper moved to this city from Kentucky some time ago and have made esteemed by her many friends and neighbors and her death is deeply regretted. She is survived by the husband and two children. Funeral services were held at the home on Madison street Saturday afternoon and the remains laid to rest in Wolf Creek cemetery. MRS. LUTHER BOYLES died at her home in Grayson Monday night of the influenza. Last week the 13 year old daughter died and the entire family of seven have been seriously ill. The Red Cross has sent a nurse to their aid and it is now hoped that the other members of the family will recover. The sorrow that has come to their once happy home is deeply regretted by their many friends. The 18 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. TUCKER died at one o'clock Tuesday afternoon after suffering an attack of influenza which developed into pneumonia. Everything that could be done to save the little babe's life was done, a trained nurse was called from Evansville, and loving hands tried in vain to restore the baby to health. Funeral services were held at the home south ot the city Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 conducted by Rev. Goodman. WM. G. MOORE died yesterday morning about two o'clock at his home in the high school addition, following a several days' illness of influenza. Deceased was about 32 years of age and leaves a wife and three children. Funeral services were held at the home at 3:30 this afternoon under the auspices of the W. O. W. and interment made at Wolf Creek cemetery. Little VIRGINIA DAVIS died Saturday, aged three years. She was the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Davis and was an exceptionally bright child who will be greatly missed by the parents and her numerous friends. Funeral services were held at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Swain, last Sunday followed by interment at Lawler.

Obituary: Little EULA PEARL HINES, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hines, died last Friday, Nov. 15, at their home near Junction after suffering from influenza. She was five years, eight months and four days of age at the time of her death. Little Eula was the only daughter in the family and the pride of the home; she was exceptionally bright and intelligent for one of her tender years. She was a favorite with her many acquaintances old and young, an attendant at church and Sunday school and took delight in responding to requests to speak her favorite "peace"--Little gifts from Loving heart, show that we want to do our part."

Card of Thanks: to the friends and neighbors who so kindly remembered us during the illness and death of our beloved daughter. We desire to extend our sincerest heartfelt thanks; also to those who sent flowers.--Mr. and Mrs. B. J. McKINNEY

29 November 1918

Labor leaders and Republican politicians in Saline county were shocked Friday morning when a telegram came from Springfield announcing the death of EVAN D. JOHN, which occurred at 6:45 o'clock a.m. in St. John's hospital at the state capital. Mr. John was one of the most widely known men in the state, expecialy in Southern Illinois, where he has lived so long. His home was at Carbondale, but we understand he is to be buried in Springfield. Evan John has been affliated with the coal mines all his life. He has held many offices in that line, both for the miners and for the operators. When the various departments of state government were put under individual managements, Mr. John was appointed director of state mines and minerals by Governor Lowden, and he was serving in that place with distinction. His death will be deplored by his acquaintances all over the state. He was stricken with the Spanish Influenza about five weeks ago and was taken to St. John's hospital about three weeks ago.

MRS. LETHA ROSS, wife of Dewey Ross, died Sunday night at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Wilson, Just south of Wasson. Death came as a result of influenza and pneumonia. Funeral and interment occurred at Wolf Creek cemetery Tuesday afternoon. The husband is just recovering from a very severe attack of the influenza. Several members of the Wilson family also have been very ill with the influenza.

MARY E. CHALLIER was born Nov. 18, 1838, in New York. When but a small girl her parents moved to New Jersey at which place she received most of her education. At the age of twelve the parents moved west on account of poor health and located near Mt. Vernon, Indiana, where she spent the rest of her girlhood days. At the age of eighteen years she was married to Alanson ALLYN. This union was blessed with eleven children--three of whom have predeced her to glory, Bertis and Allison, who died in infancy, and Anson who was reared to manhod but who died two years ago. The ones living are: Mrs. G. F. Downen, of Cottonwood, IL.; Mrs. Joseph F. Mills, Mt. Vernon, Ind.; Mrs. Verge Mills, Shawneetown; Mrs. Geo Downen, Miami, Arizona; Mrs. Josie Taborn, Chicago, Ill.; Emanuel Allyn, Evansville, Indiana; Ezbon Allyn and Mrs. Lawrence Mills, Eldorado. She professed faith in Christ in her early life and united with the General Baptist church at Mt. Vernon, Ind., at which place she held her membership until her death. At the age of 52 a great sorrow came into her life when her faithful companion was taken from her to battle alone. From this time on she made her home with her children. About twelve years ago she moved with her son to near Eldorado but for the past few years she has lived in Eldorado with her daughters, the Mrs. Mills'. Her life was full of love and sunshine, always forgetting self and thinking only of the welfare and happiness of her loved ones, and with all with whom she came in contact. To know her was to love her. She was held in high esteem by the members of the M. E. Aid with whom she worked from time to time. Every member was always glad when "grandma" was present. Her pew in the church was always occupied when her health would permit. She lived her life that others may...(lost in crease of paper).... the Red Cross was organized here she spent most of her time knitting for this. He life was a busy one, always sacrificing for others. She loved her home and children with an ardent love and was always instructing them in the ways of righteousness. She was a daily reader of the Bible often commenting on same to her children. Truly her life has been spent in usefulness and her children can rise up and call her blessed; Grandma's presence is gone but her life still lives. "Blessed ar they who die in the Lord for their works do follow them." She was sick only a few days and she bore it with that sweet patience that characterized her life. On Friday in the early morn she fell asleep at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mills, at the age of eighty years and four days.

Texas City--DOROTHY RIPPERDAM, the fifteen year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Ripperdam, died Friday night of influenza and pneumonia. The funeral services were held at Adkin church Saturday afternoon and interment in the Adkin cemetery.

JOHN F. COLBERT, one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of Eagle Creek township died at his home near Derby last Monday. Funeral services and interment at the Colbert graveyard Tuesday. Mr. Colbert was one of the oldest citizens and was known by a large circle of friends who will be grieved to hear of his demise. He was a useful citizen and will be greatly missed in the community--Equality Independent.

Local & Personal--WILLIAM WARREN (Uncle Bill) an old veteran and well known citizen of Carrier Mills, died at his home in that city yesterday. The little son of Mr. and Mrs. Robt. YATES, died last Thursday of influenza, also the 15 days old son of Mr. and Mrs. Garland LITTLEFIELD died Friday morning. MISS RUTH SALES died last Thursday afternoon at her home in Beulah Heights following an attack of influenza. Funeral services were held Friday at 10:00 o'clock with internment at Cottage Grove cemetery. The small child of Mr. and Mrs. Noah HENDRICKS died Monday night at their home at Grayson, making two children that Mr. and Mrs. Hendricks have given in death resulting from influenza. They have the sympathy of many friends. MRS. SUSAN NATION, an aged lady, died last Thursday at the home of her son, John Nation, in the High School addition, death resulting from influenza. Mrs. Nation was a well respected and good Christian lady and her death is deeply regretted. MRS. SAM SELF, died Monday night at her home in the fairview addition following several weeks illness. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon with interment at Wesley cemetery. Mrs. Self was a respected and well known lady. She leaves the husband and two foster children who have the sympathy of many friends. H. G. DUCKWORTH died last Saturday after taking a relapse from influenza. He had recovered sufficiently he thought to justify him in going back to work at No. 10 mine but he was not out of danger, taking ill again and death following. He moved here sometime last year coming from Hamilton county his former home. He and his four children resided on West Grand avenue, Mrs. Duckworth having passed away fourteen years ago. Funeral services were conducted at the family home by Rev. D. P. Barnett Sunday afternoon followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. Little JUANITA DAVIS, the nine month old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Davis died Monday night of influenza and pneumonia. Funeral services were held Wednesday at the home of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Swain, on Saline street, with interment at Wesley church cemetery. This is the second child Mr. and Mrs. Davis has given in death the past two weeks and they have the sympathy of the entire city. The remains of MRS. LAWRENCE CARTER were brought here for burial at Wolf Creek cemetery Wednesday afternoon. Mrs. Carter passed away at her home in Johnston City Monday night following an attack of influenza and double pneumonia. Mr. and Mrs. Carter and little daughter were residents of this city until some months ago when they moved to Johnston City. Mrs. Carter was a respected lady and her death is deeply regretted by her many friends in Eldorado.

HORACE MANN FERRELL, son of Mr. and Mrs. John G. Ferrell, was born near Sulphur Springs, Saline County, Ill., March 7, 1888; killed in action on the battlefields of France September 29, 1918; aged 30 years, 6 months and 22 days. He is survived by his parents, a grandmother and three brothers, John and Herbert, both in the army, and George of Ridgway, Ill. Horace grew to manhood on his father's farm and completed the common school course at the home school. He afterwards taught in his home district at other places. He was an excellent teacher, well qualified, efficient and most agreeable. He turned his attention to music, being a student of Prof. James Baldwin of Junction, Ill., for several terms. Afterwards he completed music courses at Carbondale, and Dixon, Ill., and Lawrenceburg, Tenn. At the time of his call to be examined for military service last March he was student-teacher in Braden Institute of Basic, Virginia. As a teacher of vocal classes his services were in great demand. As an evangelistic singer he was very successful, winning the respect of all as he led in singing the Gospel. His solos were rendered very effectively. The Ferrell Quartette, of which he was leader and manager, never failed to please the audiences which heard it. He did efficient work as a conductor of music in teachers' institutes. He was the originator and first president of the Saline County Singing Convention. This organization has been a potent factor in Southern Illinois for good singing in our churches. Similiar conventions have been organized in other counties. He is the author of several musical compositions, some of them being in use now in song books. On April 29, 1918, he left home for the army service, going to Camp Dix, New Jersey. Sailed for France May 26, 1918, as a member of Company A, 303 Engineers, Division 78 N. A. Just five months from the time he left home he was killed on the battlefield. Horace was converted in the fall of 1899, and in May, 1900, when twelve years old was baptized into the fellowship of Sulphur Springs Baptist church. He always took a great interest in the work and welfare of his church. In his death the church suffers a great loss. As his pastor and close friend I will say that I believe I voice the sentiment of those who knew Horace when.... (lost in fold of newspaper).... exceptional worth, of good, pure, steady habits, a cheerful disposition that won many friends, an humble, consecreated Christian, and no doubt but that his army life was known to us we would call him a good true soldier. A great host of friends in many parts of the United States sympathize most tenderly with his sorrowing loved ones.--Ed. W. N. Babb, Ridgway, Ill.

6 December 1918

A. H Kinsall received a telegram Tuesday informing him of the death of his nephew, DELBERT JOURDAN, who was killed in action October 2nd in a battle north of Verdun. he was the son of Aleck Jourdan of Enfield. Mr. Kinsall received letters from his other two nephews , Grant and Cyrus Gentry, who have been on the firing line for some time, which were written the morning of the 11th of November, telling him that they were safe.

6 December 1918

One of the saddest, horrible and fatal accidents to occur here recently was the death of GEORGE R. SIMPSON, well known citizen and resident of Eldorado which happened Monday night at the Gerhardt stop on the interurban, a short distance east of Wasson. He was hit by a swiftly moving interurban car headed for Eldorado. He had gone out to the place on the six o'clock car to serve some legal notices on residents in that vicinity and was intending to return on the next car and it was then that the fatal accident occurred. The motorman of the interurban made the following statement as to how it happened: "I was going north about six minutes late. As I heard the Gerhardt stop, I slowed up some to see if we were to be flagged. Not seeing anyone, I applied the power again and my car began to pick up speed. Just as we passed the stopping place, Mr. Simpson stepped out from behind a post or telegraph pole and the best I could see he was attempting to wave a handkerchief. I passed him and did not know that the car had struck him. Thinking the man wanted to go to Eldorado, I stopped the car as quickly as I could and backed up. We could not see him at first, but after a moment's investigation we found him lying out in the ditch. Being hit by the car step his head was horribly mashed, death being instantaneous. The body was removed to the Martin undertaking parlors in this city, and later to the residence on Glenwood avenue. Funeral services were held at the home yesterday conducted by Rev. C. W. Freeman of Harrisburg followed by interment at the Wesley Chapel under auspices of the Odd Fellow lodge of which he was a member. Deceased had a large circle of friends, was well known in this city and in the county, has been constable for a number of years, he was a kind friend and neighbor and always took pleasure in accommodating his friends. He is survived by the wife and four children, Lieut. Earl Simpson, now in France, Miss Dorothy, Mrs. Ed Minter, Mrs. Randall Davenport; two brothers, Ed and Ola A. Simpson.

MISS ELSIE SKINNER died November 26th at the home of her sister, Mrs. Taylor Perkins, in the Parish addition. Her original home was Stugis, Ky. Death was a result of tuberculosis and influenza. She was 20 years, ten months and fifteen days old at the time of her demise. Interment occurred at Cottage Grove cemetery.

Card of Thanks: We wish to thank our neighors and friends for their kind assistance during the illness and death of our daughter and sister, Elsie Skinner.--Mrs. Kate Skinner, Thomas Skinner, Miss Willie Skinner, Mrs. Taylor Perkins, Mrs. Harry Massey, Mrs. Chas. Imboden, Mrs. Robert Watts.

Local & Personal--The small child of A. J. SWAIN died Monday night at the home on Saline street following an attack of influenza. The small child of Oman GARRISON died Monday night of influenza. This is two children that have been taken from the Garrison home with influenza. MRS. CLYDE HALL passed away at her home in the Parrish addition Tuesday night following a several week's illness. Mrs. Hall had many friends who mourn with the husband and children the loss of wife and mother. MRS. ETHEL MAY DAVIDSON, wife of Harry Davisdson, died at her home in Hoxie, Ark., November 24th,. Mrs. Davidson was a former resident of this city being a daughter of H. L. Jones, a former jeweler. Her husband, Harry Davidson was a former city treasurer of Eldorado. The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter PEMBERTON, died Wednesday night at the home on Saline street, death resulting from influenza. Funeral services were held from the home today with interment at Elmwood cemetery, Equality. NEAL JONES, well known and highly respected farmer residing just east of this city, died Wednesday night after a lingering illness. He was in advanced years and has been in poor health for sometime. Besides a host of friends and acquaintances he leaves to mourn his death, the wife, one son, Robert F., of Worland, Wyoming, and two daughters, Mrs. Hancel Choisser and Mrs. John Miner of this vicinity. Funeral and interment will occur today at two o'clock at the Wesley church and cemetery.

Center Twigg--(first part torn)..attended the funeral of MRS. WILLIS JONES Saturday. Interment at Digby cemetery.

MRS. JOE RAPP died at her home in the Parish addition Sunday night following a short illness of influenza and pneumonia. She is survived by the husband and two children. Funeral services were held Tuesday from the home followed by interment at Raleigh Masonic cemetery.

Obituary: The Death Angel visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. John RIPPERDEN last Saturday morning and took from them their oldest child, DOROTHY MAY. Deceased was born October 31, 1903. Died November 23, 1918. She leaves to mourn her departure a father and mother, three brothers and one sister, besides many friends and relatives. No funeral was held on account of no one in the family being able to attend. The remains were laid to rest in the Adkins cemetery.

13 December 1918

After all, almost the saddest of the over sea casualties yet reported is that of ROY McADOO on November 20, who was killed by the accidental explosion of a German mine while engaged in helping to clean up some war debris, and that it should happen ten days after the close of the war makes it all the more distressing. The news came from the war department on Monday to his only sister, Miss Nelia, who was in her classes at the Township High School when the sad painful message was delivered. The brother and sister were the only ones left of the family, the father, NEALY McADOO, having been killed many years ago by a load of piling falling on him and the mother, who was formerly Miss MAHALA CLAYTON, dying several years later. Being left without a father and mother, they became very devoted to each other, the sister keeping house for the brother and both going to school. Deceased had reached the age of 21 years. He was a graduate of the class of 1916. Many times during his school days he was compelled to lose time out of high school to earn money with which to keep himself and sister in school. With all these handicaps he succeeded, and was devoting his life to the welfare of his sister, who has made her home with the family of her cousin, Worthy Clayton, since her brother entered the service of his country. His devotion to his sister is further demonstrated by the fact that he carried for her not only the regular $10,000 insurance most soldiers have but several heavy policies in regular insurance companies. Thus even his death will not take from her his loving protection and assistance in enabling her to complete the schooling in any profession she cares to pursue, a thought no doubt that must have filled his last hours with the satisfaction that he had done his whole duty to his sister and to his country.--Benton Republican.

Mrs. Emiley Munster, corner of Fourth and Jackson streets, received word this week from the war department announcing the death of her son, CHAS. LESTER of the 53rd infantry, Co.I, with the American Expeditionary Forces. His death was from pneumonia which occurred October 24th. He was thirty two years of age and besides his services overseas he was in the regular service being with General Pershing in Mexico.

CORNELIUS A. JONES was the son of William and Madeline Jones. He was born near Morganfield, Ky., March 5, 1839. Departed this life near Eldorado, Ill., Dec. 4, 1918. Aged 79 years, 8 months and 29 days. On September 30, 1863, he was married to Louisa V. Tate. To this union were born eight children--three boys and five girls. Three children, Mrs. Julia A. Edminister, Candy H. Jones and an infant son preceded him in death. The other children are Mrs. Amelia Dugger, near Raleigh, Ill., Robert F. Jones of Worland, Wyo., Mrs. Lelah Miner, Mrs. Emma Endicott and Mrs. Bessie Choisser, all near Eldorado. In 1869, he came to Illinois and bought a farm on which he spent the rest of his days. About twenty seven years ago he was converted and united with the Social Brethren church at Pee Dee, and at that place held membership until death. More than three years ago he became afflicted with heart trouble of which he was a patient sufferer until relieved by death. Besides the loved ones previously mentioned he leaves to mourn his departure a wife, one sister, Mrs. Nannie Harris of Sturgis, Ky., and a large host of friends.

Card of Thanks: May God bless each and all who were so good to visit and spoke kind words of sympathy during the long illness and our sad hour of bereavement following the death of our dear husband and father, Cornelious A. Jones. We want to especially thank Rev. Roalding for the comforting service at the home and the Baptist Ladies' Aid for the beautiful floral offering. Mrs. Louisa V. Jones, Mrs. Amelia Dugger, Mrs. Lelah Minor, Mrs. Emma Endicott, Mrs. Bessie Choisser.

Local & Personal--The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alex RAYNO, who died Monday morning, was buried at the Catholic cemetery. The little son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter WILKINSON who died of blood poisoning, was buried Sunday at Wolf Creek cemetery. The remains of MRS. MABEL OWEN HEATH, wife of Truman Heath, was brought to this city last Thursday night from Pueblo, Colo, and taken to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jake Heath, on Benton street, where funeral services were held on Friday afternoon with interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. W. S. Summers received word Saturday of the death of E. L. REYNOLDS at his home at Jeffersonville, Ill. Mr. Reynolds was a former resident of this city and married Miss Maggie Reed, sister of Van Reed, and a stepdaughter of W. S. Summers. The remains of Mr. Reynolds were interred at Fairfield Wednesday.

W. P. ALLDREDGE, father of Mrs. R. E. Hopkins of this city, died last Monday at his home in Omaha, Gallatin county, aged 78 years. Death was due to heart trouble. Interment occurred Tuesday at the Smith cemetery in White county. Deceased is survived by four children.

20 December 1918

WALTER, oldest son of Arvavis and Mollie BERRY, died at the home of his parents in Cottage Grove township Wednesday evening. Walter was a fine young man of exemplary habits and character and his death will be lamented by a large circle of friends who have known him from boyhood. Funeral services were held at Cottage Grove M. E. church today and the remains interred in the cemetery adjoining that church where his ancestors for three generations are buried.--Equality Independent.

Local & Personal--Little HELEN LOUISE DENNY, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chester Denny, died at her home in Wasson Sunday. The remains were taken to Wheatcroft, Ky., Monday for burial. CHARLES WIRT passed away at his home on Locust street last Sunday night. Mr. Wirt had been in poor health for some time suffering from tuberculosis, when he was stricken with influenza which resulted in his death. He was a good man and had many friends. He leaves to mourn his death the wife and one daughter, Lena. Funeral services were from the home Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock conducted by Rev. H. B. Cox, with interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

The remains of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Erman C. HAYS was shipped to Kennett, Mo., today for burial. Mr. and Mrs. Hays and baby were visiting here at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Will Moore when the baby contracted influenza which resulted in death. The home of James Phelps in Rector township was the scene of a double funeral last Sunday, one of the little daughter, MARY ELIZABETH (PHELPS), aged about one year, and the other a brother of Mr. Phelps, CECIL PHELPS, aged 18 years. The services were conducted by Rev. Ferrell, followed by interment at Douglas cemetery. MRS. CARROL WATSON passed away Wednesday night at her home in the north part of town. Mrs. Watson had been in failing health for some time when she was stricken with influenza which resulted in death. She leaves to mourn her death the husband and one little child. Funeral services today at the First Baptist church; at two o'clock conducted by Rev. H. B. Cox, followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

OBITUARY; CARL ROSS, son of Meeks W. and Effie HALEY, died at his home near Liberty, one and one half miles southwest of Harrisburg, December 14, 1918, aged 18 years 4 months. Though a strong, stalwart boy, Carl contracted the dreaded disease, influenza, which later developed into pneumonia and though everything that could be done by physician and loved ones, the disease refused to yield, and even before friends were aware, Carl realized that death was near and being anxious to assure his mother that he was prepared to meet the ordeal, he called her telling her that he was all right and when asked if he was ready to go he assured her that he was, he then bid her goodbye. His mother, though broken hearted, told him to go to sleep and wake in heaven with Jesus and the Angels. He said yes, I hear them singing now, and they are calling me. He then bade his brother good-bye telling him to not be afraid; he wasn't and his sister he loved so well, telling her that he was ready. It seemed by those witnessing the scene that one colud almost feel the presence of the Angels shrouding in Glory the terrible sting of death as they witnessed the departing of the pure sweet soul of Carl. The funeral services were held at the family residence by Rev. Whiteside who paid a beautiful tribute to the young who die in the Lord. Thus has ended the eighteen years of this noble young man.

Card of Thanks: We wish to express our deepest thanks to our many friends who so kindly remembered us during the fatal sickness of our son, CARL. We especially wish to thank the Independent Telephone girls who were so kind, to our neighbors and friends for their beautiful floral offerings and to Rev. Whiteside for his comforting words to us.--Meeks W. Haley, Effie Haley, Alvin Haley, Ruby Haley.

OBITUARY: JOHN W. CLARK, one of Eldorado's highly respected citizens, died at his home on North Walnut street last Saturday abour 12 o'clock following an attack of influenza. Thus, another good man has passed away from our midst. Funeral services occurred Monday afternoon at two o'clock from the home with interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. John W. Clark was born February 17, 1873; died December 14, 1918. He was the son of John and Minnie Clark. Born and raised to manhood in Hardin county, Illinois, coming to Eldorado twenty years ago, where he lived ever since. He was married to Cora E. Smith, and to this union nine children were born, three of which have gone on before. He leaves a faithful wife and six children to mourn their loss, namely: Lyman, Madeline, Jewel, Oval, Edith and little Ruth. He leaves the bright hope behind that he is at rest. He had been heard to say many times that all that lived right would die right, and thus his life has always been honest and upright in all his dealings. A dear husband and father, and his happiest moments were spent around his own fireside with his loved ones.

27 December 1918

MARY ELIZABETH PHELPS, daughter of J. S. and M. E. Phelps, was born June 1917. Died December 14, 1918. Aged 17 months and 14 days. She leaves a father and mother and one sister and a host of relatives and friends to mourn her death. Little Mary, as she was known, was a very sweet child of a lovable disposition to her friends. She always had a smile and was ready to reach her hands to go from one to another. To the bereaved let me hold out to you the hope and knowledge that you can meet Little Mary again, as Christ said: "suffer the little ones to come unto me and forbid them not, for such is the Kingdom of Heaven." Funeral services at the residence conducted by Rev. A. A. Ferrell, followed by interment at Douglas cemetery Sunday , Dec. 15, 1918.

Local & Personal--CECIL BRYAN PHELPS, son of A. W. and S. G. Phelps, born September 3, 1900. died Dec. 12, 1918, aged 18 years, three months and nine days. On December 12, 1918, the Angel called at the home of James Phelps of Rector township and touched Cecil who fell asleep to awake at that last day, thus leaving the home shrouded in gloom as the parents had preceded him to the Great Beyond and thus the break of the home of eight children, and a host of relatives and friends to leaving four brothers and three sisters to mourn his death. Cecil was just entering manhood with all its golden opportunities before him, yet he was called away, thus ending a life in the bloom of youth. In life we are in the midst of death. Cecil was liked by all who knew him, being of a kind and lovable disposition. He was always ready to assistance in need. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. A. Ferrell at the residence. Interment at Douglas cemetery Sunday, December 15, 1918.

3 JANUARY 1919

Local & Personal--The remains of the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter PEMBERTON who died Sunday were taken to Equality Monday for burial.

10 Janaury 1919

Oyster Bay, N. Y., January 6th--THEODORE ROOSEVELT, seven years president of the United States, died at his home at Sagamore Hill at 4:15 o'clock this morning. The famous American, exponent of the "strenuous life," who had fought in the Spanish-American war and risked death in hunting big game and exploring the jungles of Africa and South America, passed away peacefully while asleep, the victim of a blood clot in the lung, resulting from inflammatory rheumatism traceable to an infected tooth from which he suffered twenty years ago. (continues with long article of his accomplishments...)

Local & Personal--The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. F. H. HENDERSON died Monday and interment at Raleigh Masonic cemetery.

17 January 1919

West Frankfort--At Pleasant Grove Baptist church near this city, December 27, there was held a funeral that in many respects was remarkable. Two brothers married sisters, worked together at a mine, took the influenza the same day and in each case it developed into typhoid. They died on the same day and were buried in a double grave. The brothers were STANFORD and LAWRENCE KERLEY.

Local & Personal--Carl Oehm went to Mt. Vernon last Saturday being called there by the death of a relative.

Obituary: SARAH A., daughter of James and Eliza BLACK, was born near Sacramento, Illinois, February 13, 1852, and died at her home near Galatia, Illinois, January 8, 1919. Aged 66 years 10 months and 25 days. March 20, 1878, She was married to Abner W. Robinson, at Carmi, Ill., by Rev. A. S. Montgomery. To this union seven children were born--two boys and five girls: They made their home near Broughton, for several years, then about 13 years ago moved to a farm near Galatia, where her husband died May 8, 1910. She was married twice. The second time to Michael Millsqaugh of Norris City, Sept. 1913, he having died in 1917. Sister Millsquagh had spent some months in Washington with her children who live there, returning to her home a few months ago. When she was but a child she professed faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, and united with the Presbyterian church at Sacramento, of which she was a faithful member until she was married, afterwards uniting with the M. E. church at Broughton. July 20, 1917 when she united with the Mount Moriah Methodist Episcopal church, of which she was a beloved member until death. She was not only a Christian by profession, but lived her religion every day, and was known by her neighbors as one who loved her family and her friends, and was always willing and ready to lend a helping hand to the needy. With the exception of a sprained limb, which had caused her to be confined to her bed for a month, she was in fairly good health, and making rapid recovery, until Tuesday night about seven o'clock She was suddenly attacked with heart trouble and at twelve o'clock and fifteen minutes "She was not, for God took her to her Eternal Home." Her sudden going was a great shock to all her family and friends. She was resigned to the will of Him who doeth all things well, and her only regret being about five minutes before she passed away said: "If I could only see my dear son, Chalon, who is in France, then I would be happy." Those who survive her are: five children--Mrs. Florence Etta Middleton, Blaine, Washington; Mrs. Minnie Pearl Stokes, Bath, Ill.; Albert Paris Robinson, Seattle Washington; Orba Ruth Johnson, Galatia, Ill.; and Sergt. Chalon Wright Robinson,in France. Five grandchildren: Harry and Lillie Dudley, Robert and Barbara Robinson, Velma Stokes. Two brothers; John W. Black, Salem, Ill.; A. G. Black, Norris City, Ill., and a host of relatives and friends to mourn her departure. Funeral services were held at the home near Galatia, Sunday, January 12th, and interment at Enfield, Ill., cemetery, with services conducted by the pastor of the M. E. church, Rev. Todd.

Obituary; CLAYTON EARL CARPENTER was born June 26, 1879, in Defiance, Ohio. In 1908 he was married to Minnie Ellen Poppins. To this happy union three children were born, Ralph Carpenter, aged fourteen years, Roland aged seven and Walter three. He also leaves a dear wife and one brother, Elmer. He professed faith in Christ and joined the Social Brethren church at Shiloh, of which he was a member till death. He has been too far away from his home church to attend regularly. One time the church asked the clerk to write to all members away from this home church. Mr. Carpenter's answer to the clerk was: "My wife and I are living up to the ten commandments." He also sent a contribution. Mr. Carpenter was liked by all who knew him; always willing to help anyone in need of help. He was an obedient son, a good husband and a good father, and a good neighbor and friend to everyone he knew. One year last July he and family went to Florida as his health was failing, but God's will must be done, and he departed this life January 6, 1919, at 3:30 p.m., aged 39 years, six months and eleven days. Funeral at Poplar Janaury 10, 1919, conducted by pastor, John Baughum.

24 January 1919

Herrin News--To begin this sad story, let it be remembered that the father, H. L. Smith of Nokomis, Ill., had but one son when the war broke out, but received two dead bodies from the government for burial just before the war cane to an end this fall. The sad story of the father's puzzled predicament has all been brought out in a letter which has come to his friends in this city. There registered here in June, 1917, JAMES SMITH, aged 26, who at that time was employed at the Rend mine at Weaver. On May the 8th last the local board inducted and entrained James Smith for Fort Thomas, Ky., where after a brief stay, he was transferred to Camp Custer, Mich. On October 11th, last, H. L. Smith received a message from Camp Custer that his son had died of pneumonia and that the body was being shipped to him at Nokomis for disposition. In due time the corpse arrived, sealed and was laid away with the usual ceremonies. The very next week came a telegram to the bereaved father saying that his son, James P. Smith had just died at Camp Custer, Mich., and that the body was being forwarded to him. The father, driven almost crazy by the thoughts of having another body shipped to him when he had just buried the only son he had in service, began immediately to work out the puzzle, but to no avail thus far. In the course of a day or two the station agent called Mr. Smith up and told him that the body of his son was at the station awaiting disposition. The father then had to explain that he had just buried the only son he had and that he would have to refuse this second shipment, which he did very painfully. Since that day, Mr. Smith has been trying to figure out if he has buried his son, or if the last corpse sent him was that of his son, and if so where it went to. The local board has advised him of the facts as are shown by the registration of James Smith who left for Ft. Thomas, Ky, in May last.

HEZEKIAH BRAMLET, one of Saline county's best known and most highly respected farmers, passed away at the home of his son, Ed Bramlet, in this city Sunday night at 9:00 o'clock. He had been ill only a few days, suffering from blood poisoning which developed from an injury received when he stuck a nail in his hand. He came to town Thursday afternoon to have the hand treated and became so ill he went to his son's home, where he was persuaded to stay to be near the physician. Saturday his condition grew worse and friends gathered around his bedside waiting and hoping for a change for the better. Death ended his suffering at 9:00 o'clock. Uncle Hez, as he was familiarly known, was 71 years of age and has spent a greater part of his life on a farm west of town. He was a man of strong character,a devoted Christian and a kind friend and neighbor. He leaves the wife, three sons, Ed, Everett and Warner, and one daughter, Mrs. Ewing Glascock, all of Eldorado and a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Tuesday at Union Grove church, followed by interment in the Bramlet cemetery.

Local & Personal--Mr. and Mrs. George Stoudt returned home Tuesday from Carbondale where they had been called to attend the funeral of MRS. PETE STOUDT. G. C. CUSHMAN, aged 28 and married, well known baker, died yesterday morning at his home in Equality from influenza. He was a highly respected young man and had many friends in Eldorado.

Resolutions Woodmen of the World --deceased members, Thos. Whistle & Wm. C. Moore

31 January 1919

Officers and workmen at the power house in Muddy were horrified Tuesday afternoon, when TROY DeWITT, one of the electricians met instant death when a "live" wire caught him. The tragedy occurred at 2:40 o'clock when Mr. DeWitt, who was an experienced electrician, was engaged in his work installing new machinery at this big plant. Deceased leaves a wife and young son to mourn his untimely death. He was recently transferred here from Mattoon by the C. I. P. S. Co., and his wife and baby boy had been here only a few days. His body was shipped to Nokomis for burial Wednesday.

Obituary: Uncle HEZEKIAH BRAMLET was born January 14, 1848, died January 19, 1919, at the age of seventy one years and five days. He was born, reared and has lived on the same farm near Union Grove church, Saline county. He professed a hope in Christ at the age of sixteen, and united with the Union church (now Raleigh) where he held membership until after the organization of Union Grove church to which he moved his membership and has since held it there and has been a most devoted Christian and church worker. The church feels, and will continue to feel, the weight of his loss. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Jones August 1, 1869. To this union ws born five children, three boys and two girls, namely: W. R., on the farm near Eldorado; Nannie (who in March 1888, passed to her reward); Ed, living in Eldorado; Mrs. Catherine Glasscock, near Eldorado; and Everett, in Eldorado. There are also nine grandchildren living and four dead. He began teaching at at early age and taught a number of terms in the public schools of Saline county. He has served a number of terms in county and township offices. He leaves the life companion, the above named children, one brother, Ruben Henderson, who lives in the west; one sister, Aunt Martha Stricklin, and many other relatives and an innumerable host of friends who will greatly mourn his untimely departure.--G. E. Slavens

Local & Personal--MRS. SARAH SULLIVAN, wife of Wm. Sullivan, died at her home Saturday night with smallpox and other complications. The husband and six children survive. The body was laid to rest in Cottage Grove cemetery Monday morning.

Galatia--The little eight year old daughter of C. C. PEMBERTON, living just north of town died on Monday the 27th, and was buried at Tate's Chapel Tuesday afternoon.

Obituary: ALEXANDER MATHES was born in Green county, Tenn., Nov. 17, 1835, and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. T. L. Coffee, at Marion, Ill., Jan. 4, 1919; aged 83 years one month and 17 days. Was married to Mary Dodd in the year 1860, to which union seven children were born--four boys and three girls--four of them living, namely; Mrs. Etta Coffee, and Mrs. Amy Rabourn of Marion, Ill., John C. Mathes, Spokane, Washington, and Mrs. Eva McBride, East St. Louis, Ill. Mr. Mathes came to Galatia with his family soon after the Civil war, and had been a citizen here ever since, until recently he went to live with his children at Marion, his companion having died April 22, 1913. He was a soldier in the Southern army for four years, from his native state, Tennessee, but chose as a permanent residence after the conflict, this part of the country. His greatest visit of interest to his boyhood land was in the Autumn of 1917, when the Blue and the Gray had a reunion at Vicksburg, Miss. Mr. Mathes was an honest, industrious and hard working man, and while he had not accumulated much of this world's goods, he was always willing and ready to help the one who was unfortunate, and was charitable to all. He professed faith in Christ when a boy, but never united with the church until many years later. He was a member of the Baptist church at Galatia for many years. Just a short time before he died he said to his children: "I am going soon; do not worry about me. It will soon be over." His remains were brought to Galatia, and funeral services and burial were at Webber Campground Sunday afternoon, January 5, 1919.

8 February 1919

District 63--Several from this community attended the funeral of MRS. GUSS BRIGHT at Texas City last Friday. Rev. Baughman of Eldorado conducted the services after which the remains were laid to rest at Poplar cemetery.

Center Twigg--Rev. T. B. Hunt and Wm. T. Huffstutler attended the funeral of AUNT MARY COX Wednesday at Knight's Prairie.

Obituary; JULIET DAVIS was born December 1, 1866, near Stonefort, Ill. Moved with her parents to Saline county when a small girl. She was united in marriage August, 1885, to G. H. Bright. To this union was born five children--one having died in infancy; the other four living are: Robert, Claud, Cletis and Mrs. Lutishia Graves. They were all present at the time of her death, except Cletis, who is with the American E. F. Sister Bright was converted during the great revival at Texas City in 1905, and has remained a member of Poplar church ever since. Mr. Bright and family moved to East St. Louis some two years ago, which proved to be the most successful era of their married life, until Wednesday, January 28th, at near eleven o'clock, the death Angel called, and sister Bright answered. She leaves a devoted husband, four children, five grandchildren and one brother (Levi Davis); three sisters, and a host of friends and acquaintances. During the time they resided in Texas City Brother and Sister Bright were closely connected with the church work there, and we can say that the future looks clear for Sister Bright. She was 52 years, one month and 27 days old at the time of her death. The husband will find home vacant without the devoted wife. The children will not soon find another love so true as mother's. But we feel that our loss will bring joy eternal to her, and the way is being prepared for the future home of the family over there if they will all keep faithful to her Christ. Her desire was to live until Cletis returned, he being the youngest son.

Local & Personal--The three year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis RICE died Monday after a lingering illness. Funeral Wednesday afternoon followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. The seven year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. VAN MORTON died Monday of pneumonia following an attack of influenza. Funeral and interment occurred Tuesday morning at Cottage Grove. The remains of JOHN MORRIS, who took his life by shooting himself, was shipped here Thursday night of last week from Charleston, Mo., and taken to Cottage Grove where interment occured Friday. He was a brother of Zach Morris of this city. GUS FRITH died at his home in Naylor, Mo., last Saturday from infuenza. His former home was Galatia where he was in the shoe and harness repair business; also he was at one time engaged in the harness business in Eldorado being a partner to Jas. Hargrave. BEN ODLE, seventeen years of age, brother of Clyde and Richard Odle, died early Wednesday morning at the family residence in Muddy. The young man was stricken with influenza about one month ago which developed into pneumonia and caused his death. An operation was performed Tuesday morning in an effort to save his life, but due to severe suffering, both lungs were affected and this was impossible, and death came at five o'clock Wednesday morning. He was one of four brothers, Clyde, Dick and Leland, who have made their home with their grandmother in Muddy since the death of both their father and mother several years ago. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. W. Freeman, Christian minister, at Muddy Thursday morning. Interment in the Masonic cemetery. Those who attended from here were Misses Lucy Stiles, Irma Proctor, Mary Quick, Gladys Bramlet, Madeline Brewster and Mrs. Retta Bramlet.

The remains of MRS. G. R. McGHEE were brought here yesterday from her home at Hudson, Ill., where she had passed away at four o'clock Tuesday morning, and taken to the home of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. G. B. Rawlings, on Benton street. Mrs. McGhee was formerly Miss Halle Rawlings, being the youngest daughter of Dr. and Mrs. G. B. Rawlings, spent her girlhood days in the city, until her marriage to Dr. G. R. McGhee of this city about seven years ago, going at once to Hudson to make their home. Mrs. McGhee was an accomplished lady, and has many friends in this city who are grieved to learn of her death. Her parents were with her at the time of her death, going to Hudson Saturday in response to a message stating that she was seriously ill. The funeral will occur this morning at 11:00 o'clock at the Baptist church, conducted by Rev. John Leckie of Hudson, followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

The community of Hudson was shrouded in grief yesterday on learning of the death of MRS GEORGE R. McGEE, wife of Dr. McGee, which occurred at 4 o'clock in the morning. She had been ill since last Thursday, and everything that could be done by medical science to save her life was done without avail. Among the doctors consulted in the crisis was her father, Dr. G. B. Rawlings, of Eldorado, Ill., who arrived in answer to a summons. Mrs. McGee was born at Eldorado, Ill., in 1888. She was married to Dr. McGee seven years ago, and the couple came to Hudson soon afterward, and have made their home there since. Mrs. McGee was one of the most beloved women in Hudson, beautiful in person, winning in personality, church worker, a talented musician, and always with every good move for the community. She was a member of the Baptist church, and an enthusiastic worker with the Red Cross. She leaves her husband, her parents, Dr. and Mrs. Rawlings, of Eldorado, and two sisters, Miss Rose Rawlings and Mrs. Cummins of Eldorado. Short funeral services will be held at the house this morning, and the body will be taken on the 11:12 train for Eldorado for burial--Bloomington (Ill.) Pantagraph.

14 February 1919

One of the saddest deaths in the history of Equality occurred Tuesday morning when CLYDE CLIFFORD was burned to death in the home of Geo. W. Moore, which was destroyed by fire at three o'clock Tuesday morning. As we are informed Mr. Clifford had started to the mines to feed the mules at this early hour when it was discovered that the Moore home was on fire. He, with others, rushed in to remove the contents of the home, and in the confusion it was not noticed that he did not leave the house after all was done that could be done, and not until about ten o'clock, his regular hour to return home, was it discovered that he was missing. And relatives and friends were horror stricken when a search of the ruins of the home revealed his bones, all that was left of his body. Mr. Clifford was quite well known in this city, having some time ago worked here in the mines. He is survived by the wife and one small son, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lote Clifford, three sisters, Zula, Zora and Nannie; four brothers, Allen, Ray, and Temple of Equality and James of this city.

Card of Thanks: We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to neighbors and friends for sympathy and acts of kindness shown us during the funeral services of our dear companion, daughter and sister. We wish to especially thank the active pall bearers, the flower girls, and those who made the magnificent floral offerings; and the choir for the beautiful song service. Our prayers are that they may ever be spared the bitterness we have experienced. Dr. G. R. McGee, Dr. G. B. Rawlings, Ella J. Rawlings, Rose Rawlings, Laura Cummins, Clara McGee, Myrtle McGee.

Local & Personal--Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Green and family went to Omaha Saturday to attend the funeral of MRS. HARRIET BLACKARD. UNCLE JOEL BISHOP, well known in this city, died Monday night at his home near Wasson after a lingering illness. Funeral and interment at the Masonic cemetery near Raleigh. MRS. LUCY GLASCOCK, of near Wasson died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Bramlet, Wednsday night. She was advanced in years and has been very feeble for some time. She was the mother of Mrs. Dave Butler and well known in this city. Funeral services are announced for today at Union Grove church and interment at Webber Campground cemetery.

MRS. MAGGIE TURNER, an old and highly respected lady, passed away at her home in Equality Tuesday night after a several weeks illness. Aunt Mag, as she was familiarly known, was a splendid Christian lady and has many friends in Equality and here, as she has often attended the camp meeting here. Funeral services will occur this morning at Equality.

SARAH LAVONIA, the little six year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orval KARNS died last Friday night at their home on Saline street after an illness of Bright's disease being developments from the influenza. She was a bright little girl, their only girl and the pride of the family, and the parents are heartbroken in grief. Funeral services were conducted at the M. E. church, followed by interment at Wesley Chapel.

Card of Thanks" We desire to express our sincerest thanks to those who so kindly rendered aid and extended sympathy during the illness and death of our beloved daughter and sister. Expecially we want to thank the teachers and pupils and others who remembered us with.....(rest torn off)--Mr. and Mrs. W.O. Karns, Paul Herbert Karns, Willard Matthew Karns.

DANIEL KITTINGER, an old and respected citizen, passed away at his home in Beulah Heights Tuesday after many weeks illness. Mr. Kittinger had many friends here, he having lived here a number of years. He has been ill for a long time, and after leaving the hospital at Evansivlle he has been at his home patiently awaiting death to relieve him of suffering. He is survived by the wife and several children. Funeral services were held Wednesday at 1:00 o'clock at the Chrustian church. Interment at the Reed cemetery.

21 February 1919

The people of this city were greatly shocked last Saturday afternoon when it was learned that W. J. BIXLER, former postmaster, had taken his life by drinking carbolic acid at his home in the Parrish Addition. Mr. Bixler was a well known resident of Eldorado. For years he was a prominent farmer residing on his farm just south of this city. In 1916 he was appointed postmaster and moved his family to town, buying property in the Parish addition. He is survived by the wife and four sons, Ed, Guy and Van of this city, and Bert of Carrier Mills, and one daughter, Mrs. Lida Sutton. The funeral occurred yesterday at Wolf Creek church with interment in the Wolf Creek cemetery.

Two Die From Influenza: (article messed up).... deep sorrow since last Saturday when NATION who reside with her mother, Mrs. Nannie Garrett there has been deep sorrow since last Saturday when death claimed their little two year old daughter, RUTH, after a brief illness of influenza and pneumonia. The little body was laid to rest in Wolf Creek cemetery Sunday morning. On Monday this home was again visited by the death Angel, claiming their little six year old daughter, GUSSIE MAY, who had been ill only a few days with the same disease. This little body was interred at Wolf Creek cemetery Tuesday afternoon. This once happy home is now filled with deep sorrow, is the loss of two babes in three days. The bereaved relatives have the sympathy of many friends. (Note: On Page 90 of the Wolf Creek Cemetery records is listed Gussie Mae Nation, born 4 August 1913, died 17 Feb. 1919; on page 89 is listed Emma Ruth Nation born 30 January 1917, died 15 Feb. 1919.)

Obituary; RALEIGH E. COKER, son of Arthur and Lillie Coker, was born November 23, 1902, and departed this life February 14, 1919, at his home in Eldorado, Ill, aged 16 years, two months and sixteen days. Raleigh was stricken with influenza followed by pneumonia, but he gave a desparate struggle for life, but all that loving hands and the best medical skill could do, was of no avail, and the end came while he was just entering into manhood. Raleigh was a kind and affectionate boy, and his going will bring sadness to his immediate family, and to his many friends. Raleigh was industrious and intelligent, and had made a good progress in his school work. He always had a cheering word, and his friends were numbered by his acquaintances. He leaves to mourn their loss a father, mother, two brothers, one sister, two grandmothers, a grandfather and a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held in the First Baptist church, at Eldorado, Ill, February 16, 1919, conducted by the pastor, Rev. A.E. Prince. Interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

Local & Personal--Dr. H. A. Smoot, pastor of the Baptist church in Harrisburg, was called here Saturday to preach the funeral of WARREN WELLS, whose remains were taken to Morganfield, Ky., for burial. JOHN W. PRICE, residing with his son, Charles Price, in the north part of town, died last Friday afternoon, following a brief illness of influenza. Funeral and burial were at Equality Sunday. MRS. FRANK HANNAH passed away at their home on Illinois Avenue Monday morning following an attack of influenza and pneumonia. Mrs. Hannah was, before her marriage, Miss Willia Bozarth, daughter of Mrs. Fred Bramlet, has always resided here and has many friends who are grieved to learn of her death. Funeral services were held Wednesday at 11 o'clock at Wolf Creek cemetery. THOMAS OVERTON passed away at his country home near this city Sunday afternoon following a brief illness of influenza and double pneumonia. Mr. Overton was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Willard Overton, and was married several years ago to Miss Edith Jones. He was a highly respected man and has many friends who mourn with the family in the loss of son, husband, and father. Funeral and interment awas at Poplar Tuesday.

The remains of MRS. MAUDE WOODSIDE were brought here yesterday morning over the Big Four from her home in Marion and interred at the Wolf Creek cemetery. Mrs. Woodside was the wife of Frank Woodside, a building contractor of Marion, and came to her death about five o'clock Tuesday morning by a gun shot wound in the head. There being no one in the house at the time except the husband, who says she committed suicide. Mrs. Woodside is survived by the husband and one son, a mother of this city, one brother, Chief of Police Joel Mooneyham of Harrisburg, and eight sisters, two sisters, Mrs. E. J. Kaid and Mrs. John F. Williams reside in this city.

MISS EMMA WEST, whose home is near Poplar, northeast of here, came to the home of Otis Hedger in the High school addition, last Thursday and became ill of influenza the following day, passing away Monday of this week. She is survived by the father, J. P. West, and four sisters, Mrs. Susie Schorb, Mrs. Hannah Heath, Mrs. Eliza Gott and Miss Lula West, and two brothers, Gilford West of Omaha, and L. F. West of Atwell, Arkansas. Interment was at Poplar cemetery Wednesday.

28 February 1919

Obituary PAUL HARVEY OGLESBY, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Oglesby, was born March 9, 1918. died February 25, 1919; aged 11 months and 16 days. Little Paul was stricken with influenza about a week ago. Pneumonia developed and he suffered greatly during the whole time. All that could be done was done, but medical aid nor loving hands could do nothing for him, and the death Angel came at 6:00 o'clock a.m., and he fell asleep in the arms of Jesus. He leaves to mourn his death a father, mother, three sisters and two brothers. Funeral services were conducted at the home, after which the remains were interred in the Masonic cemetry.

Card of Thanks: We desire to thank the many friends and neighbors for the aid and comfort shown us during the sickness and death of our loved one, and we especially thank those who so greatly remembered us with the beautiful flowers. May you long be spared the grief of the like bereavement. Thomas Mahoney, Mrs. Mary Bramlet, Mrs. W. A. Moore, Miss Alice Bramlet, Mrs. J. J. Johnson, Mrs. S. H. Bozarth, Harmon Bramlet, Henry Bramlet, Franklin Bramlet.

Obituary:---MARGARET RUTH DOLLINS was born December 12, 1832, in Lincoln county, Tennessee. She was the youngest daughter of Hugh and Elizabeth Dollins. Her father died in the year 1836. After his death the family moved to Saline county, Illinois. From that time her vocation was teaching school, until January 17, 1864, she was united in mariage to Thomas D. Carnahan. This union was blessed with six children, two of whom have preceded her to Glory--Eva and Asa. The latter died in infancy, and Eva was reared to womanhood. Those living are Mrs. Phoebe Shaw, W. N. Carnahan, Mrs. Susan Carpenter of Eldorado, and Mrs. N. T. Elder of Raleigh. She professed faith in Christ at the age of 18 years, and united with the Primitive Baptist church at Cottage Grove, Ill., about the year 1865. In the year 1899, a great sorrow came into her life when her faithful companion was taken from her leaving her in this life to battle alone. She spent the rest of her life at her old home with her daughter, Mrs. Phoebe Shaw. Her life was full of live and sunshine. Always forgeting self and thinking only of the welfare and happiness of her loved ones, and with all whom she came in contact. To know her was to love her. She lived a life that others might see her good works. Her life was a busy one always sacrificing for others. She loved her home and children with that true and ardent love and was always instructing them in the ways of righteousness. She was a daily reader of the Bible. Truly her life has been spent in usefulness and her children can rise up and call her blessed. Grandmother's presence is gone, but her life still lives. She was sick only a few days, and bore it with that sweet patience that characterized her life. On Thursday, in the early morning, Feb. 20th, she fell asleep at her home at the age of 86 years, leaving to mourn her death, four children, fourteen grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and a host of relatives and friends.

Local & Personal--Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Wood and sons, Dan and Amos went to Enfield yesterday to attend the funeral of MRS. HARRY WOOD who died Tuesday at the home of her son, W. W. Wood at Ridgway. The funeral of MR. AND MRS. JOHN D. GWALTNEY were held Sunday afternoon, with interment at Big Hill cemetery near Norris City. Mr. and Mrs. Gwaltney were stricken with influenza about the same time and in each case pneumonia developed, resulting in death. Mrs. Gwaltney passed away Thursday, and Mr. Gwaltney lingered until Saturday when death relieved him of his suffering, leaving one little daughter with father or mother.

It is with deep sorrow that we chronicle the death of MRS. EMMA MAHONEY, wife of Thos. Mahoney, proprietor of the Mahoney hardware store. Mrs. Mahoney passed away about 5:00 o'clock Monday morning at her home in the High School addition, following a brief illness of influenza, which developed pneumonia. Mrs. Mahoney, who was before her marriage Miss Emma Bramlet, is well known throughout Saline county, having spent her girlhood days on a farm just a few miles west of this city. She was a good Christian lady, ever ready to lend a helping hand to those in need or in sickness, and it was while nursing influenza in the home of a neighbor, that she contracted the disease. She was conscious all through her illness and realizing that death was near, made arrangements for disposition of her possessions, and passed quietly away with no fear of death. She was a member of Union Grove Baptist church, and is survived by the husband; mother, Mrs. Mary Bramlet; four sisters, Mrs. Sherman Bozarth, of El Paso, Texas; Mrs. Ida Johnson, Mrs. W. A. Moore and Miss Alice Bramlet; three brothers, Henry, Harmon and Franklin Bramlet, all living in or near this city. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the First Baptist church of Eldorado, conducted by her pastor, Rev. G. E. Slavens of Harrisburg. Interment at the Catholic cemetery at Wolf Creek.

Obituary--THOMAS W. OVERTON was born June 11, 1892, in Saline county, Ill. He is the son of Willard Overton and wife. He resided in this county all of his life until the last few years, moving just in the edge of Gallatin county. He was married to Miss Edith Jones. To this union was born three children, namely: Thomas Harold, Eva Waneta and Jewell. He professed faith in Christ about ten years ago, and has been a member of Poplar church since. During the recent repairing of the church, he expressed his desire and interest by volunteering to help, and while working he stated that he thought people ought to be more sacrificing; that he felt like he might die and that he would like to be brought there with the church in good repair. He bore his sickness cheerfully. He was never known to complain. He often remarked that this is not bad to what the boys in the army had. He urged all to be good and kind. He leaves a wife and three children, a father and mother, one brother, Ora, three sisters, Deedrie Overton, Ada Wettaw, Della Wetaw, Fern McDaniel and Eva Williams. Also, a host of friends. He lived to be 24 years 8 months and 5 days of age. He went away from earth's toils and trials just at the period of life's joys, but the death Angel called February 16, 1919, and he answered. We hope to meet him on the shore of never fading glory. Funeral conducted at the home, with quite a large crowd of his friends present, but on account of the sickness of several members of the family, the body was taken to his father's home and also to the home of Virgil Wettaw. Funeral was conducted by his pastor, John Baughman of Eldorado, followed by interment in Poplar cemetery.

EMMA F. WEST was born July 25, 1883, near Omaha, Ill., where she lived with her parents until they moved where the present home is, near Poplar church, about fifteen years ago. Emma professed faith in Christ in Sister Nash's meeting at Omaha, when she was about fifteen years of age. Uniting with the Presbyterian church. Later they moved near Poplar Christian church, she, with her parents, became a member of the church there, about eleven years ago. Emma was a happy woman when she talked of Heaven and Divine things. She has had much sadness during her life. About three years ago her mother died, and since then Emma has been heard to say she had no certain home. Her brother, Orville, also died last fall, which added to her sorrow. She leaves a father, James P. West, two brothers, Lewis and Gilford, four sisters, Lula, Liza Gott, Susie Shorb and Hannah Heath. The church has lost a faithful member, the community has lost an example of Christian womanhood. But we rejoice with her in her new home with the redeemed of earth. Her struggles are over; her fear is ended. Her eternal joy is begun. Farewell Emma till we meet you on the eternal shore. She passed away February 17, 1919, at the age of 35 years, 6 months and 27 days. Funeral services were held at Poplar church February 19, conducted by her pastor, John Baughman, of Eldorado, Ill. Funeral directed by R. S.Martin of Eldorado. Interment in Poplar Cemetery.

Poplar Bluff, Mo., February 15--Mrs. Laura B. Stout, charged with the murder of her husband, GEO. C. STOUT, April 17, 1917, was last night found guilty of murder and sentenced to ten years in the penitentiary. The slain man was a cripple, having but one arm and one leg.

7 March 1919

Card of Thanks: We desire to express our sincere thanks to those of our friends and neighbors who so kindly aided and remembered us during the sickness and death of our beloved wife, daughter and sister. Especially to the telephone girls, the flower girls and all others who remembered us with flowersl--Frank Berry, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Elder, Harry Elder.

MRS. JOE DAVIS passed away last Friday night at her home northwest of town. Mrs. Davis was, before her marriage, Miss LELA ROBERTS, and is survived by the husband, one babe just a few days old, and a number of relatives and friends who are deeply grieved to learn of her death. Funeral services were held Sunday morning at Wolf Creek. Mrs. EVA PRITCHETT, residing in the east part of town, died Sunday afternoon following a several weeks illness of influenza. Mrs. Pritchett is survived by the husband and three children and many friends. The remains were taken Tuesday to Clay, Ky., for burial. CHARLES T. MARTIN, residing in Rector Township, died last thursday from influenza. The funeral and burial occurred at Mcleansoro Sunday. RAY UPCHURCH, a highly respected young man of Raleigh, passed away Sunday morning following a few days of influenza and pneumonia. Mr. Upchurch was the son of W. A. Upchurch, and the two were engaged in the merchandise business. JOHN DANKO died at his home in the north part of town Sunday. Mr. Danko had been ill for several months and is survived by a large family. GUY WHITLOCK, a young man who resided near Raleigh, died Monday morning following an attack of influenza and pneumonia. Mr. Whitlock is the brother of Bert Whitlock of this city and is survived by the wife and three children, and a large number of other relatives and friends.

Obituary: GUY WHITLOCK was born January 8, 1891, departed this life March 3, 1919, aged 28 years, l month and 23 days. Guy, when a young man, gave his heart to Christ in a meeting at Raleigh Baptist church in 1907. He was married to Miss Florence Martin, march 17, 1911. To this union four children were born, namely: Melissa, Ruth, Stanley and little Grace. Guy was a model husband; always thoughtful of his family, and always kind to all he came in contact with. He leaves to mourn his death a companion and four children; eight brothers; Tom, John, Elbert, Bert, Oscar, Homer, Wayne and Jack; four sisters; Sallie, Winnie, Maude and Grace. The end was expected for a day or two, but yet, when death came, it was a shock to the community; but we can only say, God's will be done. The deceased was a member of the miners' local No. 3447, at Raleigh, in which he was held in the highest esteem. Funeral services were held in the Baptist church ar Raleigh, conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman of Eldorado, and the remains were interred in the Raleigh cemetery.

ELSIE MAY, wife of Frank BERRY of Cottage Grove, died Monday afternoon at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Willis Elder, just west of this city, after an illinss of about three weeks from blood poisoning. Deceased was twenty one years of age, a highly respected young lady, well known and well liked, a graduate of the Eldorado Township High school and had taught one term of school before her marriage, October 1917. She leaves to mourn her death a host of friends besides the husband, a little babe, father, mother and brother. The bereaved have the sympathy of all in their sad hour of grief. The funeral services were conducted at the Wolf Creek church Wednesday morning by Eld. W. C. Kane of Harrisburg, followed by interment in the church cemetery. A large crowd was in attendance to pay their last respects to the deceased. Large and many were the floral offerings showig the deep esteem in which she was held.

DAN TURNER died at his home in Equality last Friday following a two weeks illness of pneumonia, which was preceeded by an attack of the influenza. Dan was well and favorably known. He was one of the old time baseball players of this section. He played in the Southern League and American Association years ago and was always considered more or less of a splendid athlete. He leaves two brothers and two sisters, in addition to other relatives--John W. Turner of Harrisburg, Mrs. Sallie Beagle, Mrs. Ella Hamil and Sam Turner of Equality. Funeral took place at the family home Sunday afternoon.

Long Branch--ROSWEL A. DURHAM, a prominent businessman of Galatia, died Saturday morning and was laid to rest in Durham cemetery at Hamburg Sunday. Mr. Durham was a brother of Mrs. Grover Sloan.

Obituary--MRS. MAUDE WOODSIDE came to her death February 18, 1919, by a gunshot wound at Marion, Ill., where she was living with her husband at the time. There is some mystery surrounding her death, but God, alone, knows whether or not it will be ever cleared up. Deceased was born near Golconda, Nov. 13, 1881; was married to Frank Woodside in December, 1901. She left a host of friends and relatives to mourn her untimely death; Ex-Sheriff Joel Mooneyham, her brother; Mrs. Oliver Cowsert, Mrs. W.H. Galey, Mrs. John Williams, Mrs. E. J. Kaid; all of Eldorado; Mrs. Joe Grant of Illmo, Mo., Mrs. Dickerson, of Galatia, Mrs. Dixon of Fort Worth, Tex., and Mrs. Snider of Parker, her sisters, and her aged mother, Mrs. Simpson, who lives in Eldorado. Maude was a kind, lovable woman who made many friends, and was always ready and willing to lend her aid to the poor and suffering of the community in which she lived. She was a member of the Missionary Baptist church and the Royal Neighbor lodge. Her death caused quite a sensation, and her relatives and many friends deprecate her sudden departure. But they all have the great consolation that she has gone to a better world. Her trials, troubles and tribulations are over; she sleeps the sleep of the Just. High above the turmoil and strife of this land she is enjoying the companion of those she loves so well and lost the while. Rest, sainted soul. Ours to bear the cross a little longer. Ours to suffer to mourn to die. But we will brave the stormy Jordan with a firm faith, and live with the blessed hope in our breast that some day, somewhere we shall meet you where troubles, tribulations, sorrow and sin and death do not enter. .

14 March 1919

Obituary: MRS. MARY ETHEL COLBERT, daughter of Mrs. Lou Siddens, was born June 25, 1895. Died at her home near Kedron, at 4:00 o'clock, March 5, 1919, at the early age of 23 years, 9 months and 10 days. In April, 1915, she ws united in marriage to Paul Colbert, son of James Colbert, deceased. Two children were born to this union, Virginia, age 3 years, and James Oscar, age 16 months. She professed faith in Christ in December 1919, and united with the Social Brethren church at Kedron, and lived a faithful Christian member until death. She was stricken with the dreadful disease of influenza and only lived a short time until God called her home. Ethel was loved by all who knew her. She was a good wife and loving mother. She bore her sickness with patience, never complaining. She leaves to mourn her death a husband, two small children, mother and step father (Robt. Siddens), one sister and four brothers, and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at the Barnett cemetery Thursday, by Rev. T. S. Rector, after whch the remains were laid to rest to await the resurreciton.

Local & Personal--Mrs. A. C. Purcell wa called to Ewing the last of the week on account of the death of her grandfather KING. MRS. BOB HALE died at her home in Raleigh Monday night, death resulting from pneumonia. Mrs. Hale was before her marriage, Miss Edna Blake. The remains of the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed COWAN, who passed away at their home at Grayson Sunday, were taken to Wheatcraft, Ky., Monday morning for burial. The four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Remus COX near this city died Tuesday after a brief illness of influenza and pneumonia. Funeral and interment occurred Wednesday at Oak Grove church. SCOTT SANDERS died Wednesday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Minor Harris, due to age and feeble health. Funeral services were held at the home Wednesday evening and yesterday morning the remains were shipped to Roseville, KY., for interment near his old home.

21 March 1919

The remains of MR. AND MRS. WALTER BANKS arrived here from their home in Madison, Wis., last Thursday night and were taken to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Carter, from which the funeral srevices were held Friday afternoon with interment at Wolf Creek cemetry. Mrs. Banks, who was formerly Miss Leona Writ, was well known in this city, having resided here for a number of years. She was married a few years ago to Mr. Banks, going to Madison to make their home. She is survived by her parents, and one sister, who reside at Cairo, and two sisters, Mrs. Dora Choisser and Pearl Carter of this city.

Obituary--CORNELIUS S. SHAVER was born in Macon County, Tenn., April 4, 1845. Died March 11, 1919; aged 74 years, 1 months and 7 days. Deceased came to Illinois with his parents when about ten years of age. He was married to Barbara A. Kittinger in 1868, and to this union five children were born, namely; John M., Alexander, Charlotte C., Sarah A. and Missouri. His wife and three children preceded him to the Great beyond in the year of 1879. He was converted and joined the Social Brethren church about 38 years ago, and has lived a Christian ever since. Deceased was a kind and loving father and neighbor and friend to everybody. He leaves to mourn his departure two daughters, Mrs. Thos. Simpson, Mrs. Chas. Hackley and two grandchildren, Barney and Fora Simpson. One brother and a host of relatives and friends.

Local & Personal--The mother of Charles and Smith GIBSON died at her home in this city Wednesday from influenza. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at the home conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman, followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

The body of MRS. J. H. GRACE will arrive here from Milroy, Ind., Friday morning and the funeral will be held in the afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gregg, 326 East Poplar street. Interment to be at Sunset Hill cemetery.--Harrisburg Register. Mrs. Grace is a sister of E. B. Organ of Eldorado who was called to Milory, Ind., in response to a telegram announcing her death. He, together with other relaitves, will arrive in Harrisburg today accompanying the remains there for interment. Until their arrival the particulars of her death will not be fully known.

28 March 1919

Local & Personal--the little babe of Mr.and Mrs. W. M. RODGERS died Tuesday, interment occurring Wednesday afternoon at Wolf Creek cemetery. E. S. Vickers, administrator for the estate of J. D. GWALTNEY, will conduct a sale of personal property at the late residence of the deceased, Friday April 4th.

ISAAC E. TURNER, prominent and well known resident of Equality, committed suicide Tuesday by hanging himself in his barn. The body was found by his son, Clyde. He had been despondent since the death of his wife and son, the latter dying last October while in army service in France. It is believed this is the cause of the rash act as he frequently talked and lamented over the death of the son. He was well known to all Eldorado people and well known throughout Saline county. Our citizens are grieved with the family over the death of this good and devout Christian man. He was prominently identified as an ardent supporter and leader of the Beulah Camp Holiness association which holds its annual meetings in this city. Deceased was fifty six years of age, and is survived by three chidren, Mrs. Ray Purcell of Eldorado; Andrew of Shawneetown, and Clyde of Equality. Funeral services were held yesterday morning at the M. E. church in Equality conducted by Rev. W. A. Sharp. followed by interment in the cemetery at that place.

JOHN M. RAPP of Fairfield, Ill., collector of internal revenue for the Thirteenth District of Illinois, with headquarters at East St. Louis, died at the Barnes hospital Saturday, March 22, 1919, after an illness of several months. Heart trouble was the immediate cause of death. He was a member of the Illinois Legislature from 1910 to 1914, and was appointed to the collectorship in 1913. During the adminsitration of Gov. Charles S. Deneen he was the minority member of the Board of Prison Industries. He was 56 yerars old and was born in Jeffersonville, Wayne county, Ill., and attended the schools of that town and afterwards graduated from the Ohio State Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio. Although he had been admitted to the bar, he did not practice law, and for thirty years had been owner and editor of the Wayne County Record, published at Fairfield, Ill. A widow, who was Miss Wilhelmina Holly and two sons, Peter and Lieut. John Holly Rapp, survive. The widow and his son, Peter, were with him when he died. The other son. Lieut. Rapp, is somewhere along the Rhine in the Eleventh Brigade, Fourth Division of the Third American Army, commanded by Maj. Gen. Joseph T Dickman, with headquarters at Coblenz, Germany. Collector Rapp was a prominent figure in the Democratic politics of Southern Illinois. During the six years he served as collector he did not move to East St. Louis, but had a room in that city at 410 North Eighth street.

Information is desired that will lead to the recovery of my son, ROY MILLER, who ran away from his farm home near Thompsonville, Illinios, March 19th. When last heard of he was in Galatia. He wore a dove colored hat, blue overalls, a very short brown coat,. He is fourteen years of age, height 5 feet nine inches, will weigh about 135 pounds, fair complexion, blue eyes, heavy head of dark brown hair. Think he would be most apt to apply for work on farm. A liberal reward is offered for information of where he is, or his safe return. Call me by telephone or write Frank Miller, RFD 5, Thompsonville, Ill.

4 April 1919

THOMAS ANDERSON (UNCLE TOM) JONES, aged 92 years, and the oldest resident of Saline county, died at 12 o'clock last night at his residence on South Main street. He was born in Wilson county, Tenn., July 28, 1825, and grew to manhood in that state. He came to Illinois in his early twenties and located in Harrisburg where he has lived since that time. He was a scholar and teacher for a number of years and was one of the leading politicians, serving in several different county offices. He retired from public life about ten years ago on account of his health, and has been an invalid since then. He suffered a paraletic stroke last Friday from which he did not recover and sank fast until he passed away last night. Uncle Tom, as he was familiarly known, was a member of the Masonic lodge and funeral arrangments which have not been completed, will be held under the auspices of this lodge. Relatives from out of town will arrive Wednesday.--Harrisburg Register.

As a result of the shooting of WILLIAM WALTER WOOD last Sunday night he died at the hospital in Evansville. In an effort to save his life he was taken to Evansville Monday and operated on but his condition was too serious and it proved fatal. It is said Mr. Wood was drinking and that on his way to his father's home Sunday night he lost his way and was wandering about the premises of Leonard Evans who it is said thought he was some strange intruder, fired through the door the charge taking effect in Wood's stomach. It is a sad affair and the grief stricken relatives have the sympathy of their many friends. The body of Mr. Wood was shipped home Wednesday night. Funeral services are being held this morning at the M. E. church conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman. Interment will occur at Wolf Creek cemetery. Deceased is the son of Mr. and Mrs. l. E. Wood, was 23 years of age, and leaves a wife and one child, besids a number of other near relatives and friends, who mourn his death.

Local & Personal--the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James BURNS, died at their home in the north part of town last Saturday morning.

11 April 1919

Cottonwood, a small inland town in Gallatin county, southeast of here, was the scene of a shooting affray Sunday afternoon about two o'clock, at which time BURTIS STARKEY, a well known resident of that neighborhood was shot by Lathan Johnson and instantly killed. The best information availbale is to the effect that Johnson was quarreling with another lad and Starky who was standing near, asked him why he did not pick on someone his own size, whereupon Johnson went to his father's home and secured a revolver. Upon returning started firing at Starkey who was attempting to get away from him, but Johnson fired four shots, two going wild and one striking his victim in the arm and the fatal shot striking in the breast and lodging in the heart. He was carried to his home, where he expired shortly after. Starkey is a man 30 years of age and Johnson is 17. An inquest was held by the Coroner Dr. W. E. McQuire shortly after the affair happened and Johnson was lodged in the Gallatin county jail at Shawneetown, where he is held without bail. The affair is greatly deplored by the citizens of that community.--Norris City Record.

MISS EULAH JONES, a former resident of this city, died of influenza Wednesday of last week at her home in Los Angeles, California. The body was shipped here for interment arriving Tuesday night over the L. & N. accompanied by her brother, Robbie Jones of Chicago. Funeral services were held at the M. E. church Wednesday at 10 o'clock a.m. conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman, followed by interment at Wesley Chapel. Deceased was about forty six years of age, a highly respected lady, well known to many in this city as she was a former resident of Eldorado. She is a sister of Doug Jones of Eldorado, Van Jones of Fargo, North Dakota, and Robby Jones of Chicago.

Local & Personal--VERA ELDENE EDWARDS, six months old infant of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Edwards, died Tuesday of Whooping cough. Funeral services were conducted at the Presbyterian church on Wednesday, by Rev. W. J. Caldwell. Interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. A large crowd was present at the funeral services. MRS. CECIL (HAM) PATTERSON died at her home on North Walnut street Wednesday morning after a lingering illness suffering with tuberculosis of the bowels. Deceased was about 24 years of age, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ham. Besides the parents she is survived by the husband, a five months old babe, and several other relatives. Funeral services were conducted yesterday afternoon by Rev. Barnett, followed by interment in Wolf Creek cemetery. The funeral of ALBERT REED was held at Wasson church Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. Tucker followed by interment at the Reed cemetery. Mr. Reed met death by electrocution coming in contact with a live wire in the Wasson mine last Friday at noon. He is survived by a wife and two children. Deceased was about 25 years of age and a son of Riley Moore, a farmer near Wasson. He was well known in this city and enjoyed a large circle of friends.

18 April 1919

JOE GOFF, Scotch, was accidently killed in Segrave mine Wednesday afternoon by a fall of rock. He was working as timberman in the ...(article faded in spots)...Deceased is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Goff of this city. He is survived by the wife (formerly Miss ...Taylor) and one child. Mr. Goff has lived in Eldorado several years and is well known being a member of the miners rescue team and an experienced first aid man. Funeral and interment will occur tomorrow afternoon at Wolf Creek.

Card of Thanks: We wish, through the columns of this paper, to thank the many friends and neighbors for the kindness shown us during the sickness and death of our beloved daughter, wife and sister. We especially wish to thank the friends for their beautiful floral offering. Respectfully, William Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. William Ham, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Butler, Leroy E. Ham.

25 April 1919

Local & Personal---MARTIN McGUIRE, 17 year old son of Thos. McGuire, met a sad and painful death last Saturday. While plowing his team became frightened and started to run away and in some manner he was knocked down and struck on the head by the plow point. Mr. McGuire is a prominent farmer residing between Eldorado and Ridgway and his many friends are sad over the news of the loss of his son in this manner. Funeral services were held at the Catholic church in this city Tuesday morning followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

Certer twigg--The remains of MADALINE JOHNSON of Kankakee was shipped here Tuesday and interred at Little Springs cemetery. She was the youngest daughter of Columbus Johnson, late of Chicago.

2 May 1919 (no obits)

9 May 1919

JOHN H. OWEN was born in Wayne county, Illinois, December 24, 1848, departing this life May 5, 1919, at the age of 70 years, 4 months and 12 days. Was united in marriage October 6, 1872 to Esther T. Knight of White county, Illinois, and to this union five children were born--three sons and two daughters. The companion, one son Arthur, and the two daughters, Alice and Maggie survive. The other two sons, Henry E. and George E. passed away in infancy ages one year and six months and twenty days, and one year and one day, respectively. Bro. Owen is the last brother of a family of six boys. His home life was a blessing to his wife and children with whom he lived life of cheerfulness and hopefulness. Relatives and friends mourn the death of Bro. Owen, but pray that he has gone over on th other shore where trials adn tribulations are no more. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman, pastor of the M. E. church, at the family home on Panama street, Eldorado, Ill. The remains were interrred in Wolf Creek cemetry.

16 May 1919

ANNIE M. (McMAHAN) SCOTT was born at Tunnel Hill, Johnson county, Illinois, July 8, 1872. She was the daughter of William and Mary McMahan. Was married to H. E. Scott of Elba, Gallatin county, Ill., July 22, 1914. To this union was born eight children, namely: Edith Scott, wife of Webber Butler of Galatia; Glen, Lillian, Ford, Don, Gladys, Vernell, and Latham Scott. The daughter Lillian died in 1903. The baby (Latham) is six weeks old. Mrs. Scott professed religion, being baptized and joined the Advent Christian church in 1898, and lived a devoted Christian life up to her death, which occurred on May 12, 1919. Her death was caused by heart failure. She leaves in addition to her husband and children, four brothers, W. C. and Loan McMahon of Texas, and P. G. and Hughey McMahan of Tunnel Hill and Goreville, Johnson county, and a host of friends to mourn her death.

The death angel visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Guy WATSON, Monday May 5, 1919, and took from their home their little babe, BERTIS C., aged five months and two days. He leaves to mourn his loss a father, mother, two sisters and one brother, and a host of relatives and friends. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. E Prince, interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

Local & Personal--JAKE SAYERS, aged 75, an old resident of Equality died at his home in that city Sunday and was buried Tuesday under the auspices of the Odd Fellows at the Elmwood Masonic cemetery nearby. He was a well known and respected citizen and had quite an acquaintance in Eldorado. Billy Evans and others of the Eldorado Odd Fellow lodge went down Tuesday to attend the funeral services. MRS. OTIS CARTER (nee ADDIE MOORE) after a lingering illness died Wednesday night at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Moore, in Rocky Branch community. She was stricken ill at ther home here but was later removed to the home of her parents where she might receive careful attention by the relatives. A nurse has been in attendance daily and every attention given her, but to no avail. She leaves to mourn her death, the parents, a husband and one child, two sisters, Mrs. Ray Berry and Mrs. Chas. Jones, the latter is also very ill at the Moore home. A host of friends in this city mourn the death of this splendid young woman. Funeral services are announced for 11 o'clock this morning to be conducted by Rev. Sharp of Equality followed by interment in Cottage Grove cemetery.

30 May 1919

Obituary: CORA BELL JONES (nee MOORE) was born July 21, 1885, and departed this life May 19, 1919, being 33 years, 9 months and 28 days. She was of a kind and loving dis...(obit not in order)...Charles Austin Jones September 4, 1904. To this union was born two children, Harmon Ruthford and Ralph Roy, age 13 and 6 years. She professed faith in Chirst at the age of fifteen, and was baptized by Bro. Stukey and joined the Primative Baptist church at Cottage Grove in 1902. She was stricken with influenza January 21st, which later developed into tuberculosis. She was of a kind and loving disposition, having a kind word for everyone. She bore her suffering with patience, very often expressing her willingness to go. Just before she passed away she told her mother she was going to rest. But the Lord knows best and does all things right, so we must submit to his will, not ours. She leaves to mourn her death a husband, two sons, father, mother, one sister, Mrs. Ray Berry, and one brother, Silas Moore of Rocky Branch. He sister Addie preceded her in death five days ago. But weep not dear parents and husband, for our loss is her eternal gain...funeral services were conducted at the home by Bro. Sharp, the text being: "My Grace is sufficient for Thee." The remains were laid to rest in the Cottage Grove cemetery.

Local & Personal--VIRGINIA WHITLEY BURNETT, the 16 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hal Burnett of Raleigh died Wednesday morning at the Walker Hospital at Evansville and the remains were brought here over the L. & N. last Wednesday night, and were taken to the country home of Mrs. Burnett's parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Whitley. Virginia was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Burnett and was the idol of their home, she had been ill for about three months, first suffering from the influenza, when complications developed all that the physicians could do was done. As a last resort she was taken to the hospital for an operation; but death relieved her of her suffering before the operation could be performed. The Journal joins the many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Burnett in extending them the heartfelt sypathy in this their sad hour. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman at the M. E. church yesterday at one o'clock. Interment was made at Raleigh Masonic cemetery.

Last Saturday evening an ugly affair occured just west of the bakery. GEORGE FORD, well known wealthy and retired farmer of Rector township, was assaulted by Pink Whitehouse, being struck a severe blow and knocked down, his skull being fractured by the blow or the fall to the concrete walk. Ford was picked up unconscious and remained in that condition for some time. He was removed to the hospital in Evansville where an operation was performed to save his life. He has been in a serious condition and reports are that his recovery is doubtful. Whitehouse shortly after the deed ___to the police court and plead guilty to a charge of assault. The seriousness of Ford's condition being learned later the authorities issued a warrant for his arrest and he was required to fill a bond of $5,000. The reports of Ford's condition being worse Tuesday the Sheriff ordered Whitehouse re-arrested and delivered to Harrisburg where he was placed in the county jail to await developments of Ford's condition and to answer to the law for the crime. It is said the trouble was the outgrowth of Ford being a witness against Whitehouse for selling liquor, in which the court indicted and fined Whitehouse. It is reported that Ford tried to buy whiskey of Whitehouse again Saturday and was refused, the assault following.

MRS. MARGARET A. WETTAW (nee) HAUSSER, daughter of J. J. and Clara Hausser was born Nov. 11th 1882, and passed away May 23, 1919, at the age of 36 years, 6 months and 26 days. She was united in marriage to Preston L. Wettaw, Sept. 25, 1907. To this union was born one daughter, Mary, who with the husband survives. Sister Wettaw, when but a mere girl, confessed Christ and became a member of the Poplar Christian church, where she held her membership at the time of her death. She was loyal to her church often attending the service there though living a great ways from the church. She was loyal to her home, ranking first class as a companion, housewife and mother. She was loyal to her God ever keeping before her the many precious promises of his word. We are assured that during her illness she realized her serious condition but held up in spirit in order that her family and friends would not be so heavy hearted. When the end was nearing she called Arthur and John, her brothers, to her side. Finally she bade them good-bye and holding till the last her fairwell to her devoted husband, who was constantly at her side. Finally she bade him good-bye with a charge of Mary, to tell her and the rest at home good-bye. She also thanked the nurse for her kindness during her illness. She leaves a husband and daughter before mentioned; one sister, Anna Hedger; four brothers, Albert, Arthur, Will and John Hausser. All were present at the funeral. She has departed while yet young in years. She is gone but her memory will be sweet, she is silent but yet continues to speak in tones of true womanhood. Funeral conducted by Pastor Rev. John Baughman of Eldorado, Ill., assisted by Rev. A. H. Bennett of Newton, Ill. Services were held at the residence at 1 p.m. and at Poplar church at 3 p.m. May 26th, 1919, interment at Poplar cemetery.

23 May 1919

AUNT JANE GOLLIHER, passed to her reward at eight o'clock, Saturday evening, Mar 3, 1919, at the age of 71 years, 1 month and 3 days. Sarah Jane Blake, daughter of William and Martha Blake, was born in Panola county, Mississippi, March 30, 1848. While yet a child her parents moved to Illinois and made their home one half mile west of Mount Moriah Church. December 7, 1865, she was united in marriage to William H. Golliher, who had just returned from the Union Army in which he had served three years and a half. To this union were born ten children, six boys and four girls. Mr. Golliher with his charming bride of seventeen years purchased the Blake farm and made their home here a happy, Christian one, until last Saturday when she bid all good-bye and went to that more beautiful home where sickness, sorrow, and partings are not known. At the age of fifteen she was converted to Christ and united with the M. E. Church at Bankston, afterwards she, with her husband and seven others, who were James and Margaret Baker, Martha Blake, Archie Wallace and wife and Benjamin Eaton and wife became the charter members of the Mount Moriah M. E. Church. Brother and sister Golliher have always been faithful to the church and to all the interests of the Kingdom. He being an exhorter in the church he has been able to lead over five hundred people to Christ. From her bed of affliction she urged all to be true to the Lord. Just before she left us she said, "I hear them singing and I am going to join in the great meeting." She leaves to mourn her departure her beloved husband and eight children, namely: Martha Caroline Adams, Galatia, Ill.; Ellen Abigale Barnes, Beebe, Ark.; Susan Elizabeth Robinson, Richmond, Va.; Archie Luther Golliher, Cutler, Ill.; James Tilford Golliher, Galatia, Ill.; Milton Garfield Golliher, Harrisburg, Ill.; Lida Valery Johnson, Galatia, Ill.; Orval Harrison Golliher, Raleigh, Ill; John William and Benjamin Franklin prededed her in death. Three sisters, Margaret Baker, Galatia; Susan Weaver, Raleigh and Eliza Neal of Winfield, Kansas; and one brother, W. H. Blake of Raleigh, Ill; 37 grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends with the church. She was a devoted wife, loving mother and a good neighbor. Funeral services were held and interment made at Mt. Moriah, May 5, 1919, Rev. B. H. Batson, the pastor, officiating.

Local & Personal--MRS. DAN McCAIRNS, well known Scotch lady, died Thursday night of last week at her home in the Reed addition, after a lingering illness. She is survived by the husband and family and a number of friends who greatly mourn her death. Funeral services were conducted Sunday at 2:00 o'clock p.m. conducted by Fr. L. Gilmartin,followed by interment in Wolf Creek cemetery.

MRS. CORA JONES, wife of Chas. A. Jones, of this city, died last Monday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Will Moore in Rocky Branch vicinity. She has been growing gradually worse from tuberculosis for the past year. Deceased was well respected and well liked by all who knew her. She is survived by the parents, the husband, three children and other relatives. A sister, Mrs. Otis Carter, passed away last week at the Moore home. Funeral services were held Wednesday morning followed by interment at Cottage Grove cemetery. The sympathy of neighbors and friends is expressed to the Moore family who are in deep sorrow on account of the death angels third visit to their home in the past six months.

Obituary: ADDA MAY CARTER (nee MOORE) was born May 23, 1893, departed this life May 14, 1919, at her fathers home near Rocky Branch, aged 25 years, 11 months and 21 days. She contracted influenza February 14th, which later developed into tuberculosis. She bore her suffering with great patience and realized her condition to some extent and said she did not fear death. Just a few nights before she died her nurse asked her if she had her eyes fixed on Jesus, and she said yes. She professed faith in Christ at the age of 14 years and lived a consistent Christian life ever since. She had a kind and loving disposition, being kind to everyone she came in contact with. A few days before her death a minister visited her bedside and he told her to trust the Lord, and with tears in her eyes she told him she was. All that loving hands and medical aid could do was of no avail, as the Lord saw fit to take her. The Lords' will be done, not ours. The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away. Blessed be the name of the Lord. She leaves to mourn her loss a husbnd, one daughter, father, mother, two sisters, Mrs. Charlie Jones and Mrs. Ray Berry, and one brother, Silas Moore of Rocky Branch and a host of friends and relatives. But weep not dear parents, brother, sisters and husband, for our loss is her eternal gain. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Sharp, the Methodist Minister of Equality. Interment at Cottage Grove cemetery.

Mrs. Ida Cora McKinnis, formerly Miss Ida Cora Pelt received a cablegram May 15th from Adjutant General Kerr of the War Department, stating that her husband, private WILLIS McKINNIS, previously reported wounded, degree undetermined, is now reported killed in action, August 9. Mrs. McKinnis had tried in every way to locate her husband, since he was reported wounded, and had never believed that he was killed. Among those who assisted her to locate him were, Governor Frank O. Lowden, congressman T. S. Williams, the Red Cross and Salvation Army.

6 June 1919

JOE LONG died at his home in this city at 5:45 Wednesday evening from double pneumonia which developed following wounds inflicted by pistol shots fired by Policeman Lamb, Thursday, May 22nd. Last week Long's condition was favorable to recovery but later developments were otherwise and for the past two or three days death has been expected. He received every medical aid and attention but death claimed him, as above stated Wednesday evening. Deceased was 29 years, four months and seven days of age, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Long. He is survived by the parents, several sisters, a brother, the wife (nee Grace Bradshaw) and two children, besides other relatives and near friends. Funeral services will be held this afternoon, 2 o'clock, at the home, conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman, followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

13 June 1919

The coroner jury called to inquire into the death of JOE LONG met Monday evening at the Martin undertaking parlors and conducted an examination. The jury held out for sometime in its deliberations finally bringing in a verdict exhonerating Policeman Henry Lamb. It is said there is some dissatisfaction with the decision of the coroner's jury and that the case will be investigated further by a special grand jury.

Local & Personal--MRS. SAM BEAN of Ridgway died at her home last Tuesday after a brief illness. Funeral services were held yesterday morning. She was a sister of Mrs. Jess Quick of this city.

20 June 1919

Card of Thanks: We wish to express our thanks and appreciations to the many friends who visited and sympathized with us during the suffering and death of our beloved husband and father, son and brother, and for the many beautiful floral offerings.---Grace Long and children, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Long and family.

Center Twigg--A large crowd attended the memorial services of ANGUS MILLER at New Salem who was killed in action last July in France.

Local & Personal--MRS. FRANK HOPSON of Equality died Sunday morning at the home of her mother, Mrs. Lee White in this city, succumbing to tuberculosis. She is survived by the husband and two children. Funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon by Rev. A. E. Prince, pastor of the First Baptist church, interment at the David cemetery near Elba.

GEORGE LIMERICK passed away at his home in Galatia Tuesday. Mr. Limerick who had been ill for several weeks, was 85 years old. He was born in Alabama and came to Saline county with his parents when he was 12 years of age. He engaged in farming during his life until about 25 years ago when he retired and has been living a peaceful life since. He is the father of Grant, Lanie and Bert Limerick, known in all parts of Saline county as the mercantile firm of Limerick Brothers. They were in business at Galatia for years. This firm is now engaged in the same business at Carrier Mills. In addition to these three sons deceased leaves the aged widow and a daughter, Mrs. Charles Bailey of Springfield. George Limerick was a veteran of the Civil war and was one of the very few surviving members of the 29th Illinois regiment. He was a devout member of the Methodist church and also a life time member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Residents of this county will learn with a feeling of keen regret the passing of this venerable and respected citizen. The funeral will be conducted at two o'clock today from the family home in Galatia, to be conducted by Rev. Batson of the Galatia Methodist church, also Rev. McNeil of Carbondale.

27 June 1919 (no obits)

4 July 1919

Local & Personal--the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank LEE (FRANK JR.) age 7, died at the hospital in Evansville Wednesday following serious illness. He was given every attention by a specialist but death claimed him. The remains were shipped in here Wednesday night funeral service will be held this afternoon at two o'clock conducted by Rev. A. E. Prince, followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. The grief-stricken parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this city.

11 July 1919

Local & Personal--MRS. LEONARD WYATT died at her home at Grayson Sunday morning following supposed to be the results of the effects of influenza and pneumonia last winter. She is survived by the husband and several small children. The remains were shipped to Belton, Kentucky, for interment near their former home. Mrs. Guy Westbrook and mother, Mrs. Margaret Smith, went to DuQuoin Tuesday to attend the funeral of a relative, MRS. FRED DEAN of East St. Louis, whose death occurred at a hospital in St. Louis. Mrs. Dean was formerly Miss Kate Pope of DuQuoin.

18 July 1919

Local & Personal--FRANKLIN FOREST HOPSON, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hopson, of Equality, was buried Sunday at the Danner cemetery, northeast of Elba. The mother of the child died just one month ago. The father and one sister survive. Rev. A. E. Prince conducted the funeral services, which were held inthe cemetery. UNCLE JOHN STRICKLIN was born Feb. 5, 1839, died Sunday July 12, 1919, at the age of 80 years, 5 months and 7 days. He professed a hope in Christ at the age of nineteen in a meeting held by Uncle Matt Jones in the old Union, now Raleigh, church but did not at any time unite with any church giving as an excuse for this that he could not read nor write and therefore could not understand the scriptures. He was married to Miss Martha Bramlet, October 21, 1863, Eld. Mat J. Jones, now of Raleigh, officiating. To this union were born eight children: George E.; Mary S., Willie I., Francis M., Laura J. Coleman; John L. and Millie C. Two of these, John and Millie have preceded the father to the other world. There are fourteen grandchildren and six great-grandchildren, two of the latter are dead. Uncle John was the last of a family of ten to bid adieu to the earth. He enlisted in the army of 1861, in Co. E. of the 29th regiment, this regiment was gotten up by Capt. Parish but taken over by Capt. Burnett. He served only a short time, being discharged on disability the same year in which he enlisted. He, however, was not a pensioner as he lacked three days being in the service long enough to procure a pension. He settled and has since lived on the farm where he died. He and his family have worked hard and have acquired of this world's goods such a portion as gives them at his death a good living. The funeral was conducted by Eld. H. C. Mitchell of Marion and was attended by a host of family and friends. Interment at the Masonic cemetery.--G. E. Slavens

25 July 1919

Texas City--Mrs. Chas. Thomas was called to Maunie Thursday by the death of her brother-in-law.

1 August 1919

Local & Personal--MISS GRACE UPCHURCH, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Upchurch of Raleigh, died at Globe, Arizona, and her remains were shippped back for interment at the Raleigh Masonic cemetery which occurred Wednesday. She had gone west some time ago for the benefit of her health but grew worse. Deceased was a cousin to T. A. Grable of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Grable drove over to Raleigh Wednesday attending the funeral.

8 August 1919 (no obits)

15 August 1919

Sergent, KY., August 12--UNCLE JOHN SCHELL, 130 years old, of Greasy Creek, Leslie County, KY., will make a trip to the Blue Grass Fair early in September as a guest of the Commercial Travelers of Eastern Kentucky. It will be the old man's first ride in a modern passenger train and prove a great treat for the oldest man in the country. According to recent investigations by the National Geographic Society, Shell is the oldest man in the United States, today, and certainly most remarkable. The correspondent of the Globe Democrat several days ago visited Shell back on Greasy Creek.

Local & Personal--MRS. JOHN DURHAM aged 70 died Wednesday morning at her home near No. 8 mine from paralysis which disease she has suffered with several months. Funeral services were held at the home yesterday afternoon conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman, followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. She is survived by two sons, Sam and Charles. Her husband passed away five years ago being accidently run over and killed by a Big Four train.

DeQuoin, Ill., August 13--Every business house in Duquoin was closed this afternoon during the funeral of NORMAN S. MELVIN, hero of Chateau Thierry and St. Mihiel, who was killed in a mine accident here a few days after arriving home from eigheen months service in the front lines in France. One hundred overseas veterans formed a guard of honor and accorded the body military burial. Melvin was the first overseas veteran of DuQuoin to die on returning home.

22 August 1919

Center Twigg--Ores Johnson and Kemp Endicott attended the funeral of COLUMBUS JOHNSON Tuesday at Little Springs.

Green Hill--Mrs. Bess Green attended the funeral of PAUL PARKS at Zion Sunday.

W. H. GILLIAM, publisher of the Vienna Times, died at his home in Vienna Sunday at about the age of 61 years. Mr. Gilliam was born and reared in Ozark Illinois, where he was married in early life. He taught school for many years and for a number of years has been editor and publisher of the Vienna Times. He was a member of the First Baptist church of Vienna, was Superintendent of the Sunday School for many years, also a deacon. No man in his county was known by more people or more highly respected. He was a prominent figure in Southern Illinios newspaper circles. Not an office seeker, he always stood true to the political party he believed, missed for his church work, having taken a greater interest in the work of his church than most men. The funeral will be held Tuesday at the Baptist Church of Vienna. Deceased leaves a wife and one son, besides a number of other relatives.--Marion Post.

MRS. MATTIE BRADSHAW, a well known resident and highly respected Christian lady died at her home on High street early Friday morning of last week, after a lingering illness. Deceased was fifty four years of age at the time of her death. She was a kind and loving mother, ever administering to the wants of her children, and to neighbors and friends in distress, and a faithful member of the Methodist church. Funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. G. R. Goodman, Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Grace Long, Mrs. Madeline Foster and Miss Nellie Bradshaw, and one son, Harry, three sisters, Mrs. G. B. Rawlings, Mrs. George Bramlet and Miss Judity Sisk, and two brothers, Pete and Geo. Sisk.

Local & Personal--JAS. BOURLAND, aged 89, a wwell known resident of Cottage Grove died at his home Monday morning. He has been ailing in health and feeble for some time. Funeral and interment occurred Wednesday at Cottage Grove cemetery.

Texas City--Mrs. Joe Wallace was called to Fairfield Tuesday by the death of her sister, MRS. WALKER.

29 August 1919

Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend the all day Memorial services of HORACE MANN FERRELL at Sulphur Springs Church on September twenty-first.

Local & Personal--the funeral of GEORGE, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex WATSON, was conducted by Rev. A. E. Prince, at the family residence in the High School addition Thursday of last week followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

Obituary--MRS. CLARA (LONG) SIMPSON, the younger daughter of Ely and Margaret Long was born near Patricksburg, Indiana, October 15, 1888, and departed this life at Eldorado, Illinois August 26, 1919, at the early age of 30 years, 10 months and 11 days. She was united in marriage to Roma Simpson October 7, 1906, and to this happy union were born four children, two boys and two girls, namely Cyril, Lowell, Agatha and Evelyn. When but a child at the tender age of 12 years, she confessed faith in her savior and united with the Morgan Valley U. B. Church and has always been faithful to her vows and walked as best she could in the straight and narrow path that leads to life everlasting. When she was but ten years old the Grim Reaper, death, invaded the home and her dear mother was called from her to that better land. But we sorrow not as one who has no hope for they are now together up yonder where all is peace and joy and where tears never flow. The family circle now is broken and the darling mother is no more, but may it be united up yonder around the great white throne. She was a constant companion to her husband always ready and willing to render him and her little ones the best of her services. She had been in poor health for a time, but was not considered serious until August 18th when she was operated upon for appendicitis. She seemed to improve for about a week but took suddenly bad and died the 24th at about 11 o'clock on Tuesday morning. All that medical skill and loving hands could do to relieve this dear one of her intense suffering was done, but of no avail. She leaves to mourn her loss a broken hearted husband, four little children, an aged father, three brothers, one sister and a host of relatives and friends. Funeral services were held at the home near Dering No. 2 August 28, conducted by G. R. Goodman. The remains were interred in Wolf Creek cemetery.

5 September 1919

OBITUARY: JAMES A. BOURLAND was born in Saline county, Illinois, November 30, 1830, died August 19, 1919. Age 88 years 8 months and 19 days. Married to Nancy Strong September 22, 1853. To this union was born eight children; Gabriel A. Bourland who died at Equality October 7, 1909; Mrs. A. G. Proctor at Winslow, Arizona; Dr. . N. Bourland, and Mrs. Chas. Guard, Sr., of Equality; Gertrude Pearce of Cottage Grove; Mary and James A. who died in infancy; and T. D. Bourland of Cottage Grove where he died. He leaves one brother Gabriel Bourland of Cottage Grove and Susan Moore at Equality and Martha Mick of Eddyville. Twenty three grandchildren and ten great grandchildren. Funeral services were conducted at the home at two o'clock Thursday August 21, 1919, by Rev. W. C. Kane.

LAPRADE D. BROWN was born near Rockport, Kentucky, July 20, 1890, and was accidently shot August 31, 1919. Age 29 years, one month and seven days. He had been living in Illinois about ten years and has been mining at different places almost all the time. He was married to Miss Leona E. Thompson, daughter of Jonah and Lydia (Gould) Thompson Sept. 1, 1913, and two children were born to this union. Albert, age five years, and L. D. Jr. six weeks old. Besides his wife and children he leaves a father, two brothers and one sister and many friends who deeply regret his untimely death. The funeral services occurred at the home of his father, Mr. E. F. Brown and was conducted by Rev. R. M. Davis of Boston, Mass. The body laid to rest in Wolf Creek cemetery. LaPrade as he was familiarly called had many friends wherever he lived, he was a genial, big hearted whole souled fellow, and was very much devoted to his wife and children. After the fatal shot until death he spoke of his little family and died praying. The family have the sympathy of many friends in this their sad hour. May they all be reunited in the great beyond where there are no more partings.

Card of Thanks: We desire to thank the many friends and neighbors for their kindness and synmpathy rendered us in the sad hour of the death or our husband, son and brother. Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Clark Trout, Leona Brown, Carl Brown.

Arrangements are being made for a military funeral at 3 o'clock this afternoon at the Masonic cemetery near Raleigh in honor of CHAS. BRADEN son of Alex N. Braden, who died last Saturday at the U. S. hospital of Oteen, near Asheville, North Carolina. His remains were shipped here and taken to the home of his parents on North Carnahan street. The funeral party will start from the home at two o'clock this afternoon going direct to the cemetery where the funeral and interment will be conducted. He responded to the call to services in September in 1917, and the following January landed with the American expeditionary forces in France, spending eighteen months there experienceing hard service returning eight weeks ago he was placed in a hospital for treatment of his lungs which had been afflicted while in service. He was given every medical attention but could not recover. He was twenty five years of age and a splendid young man who had many friends who are grieved to learn of his early demise. He is survived by the parents, three sisters and two brothers. Elders W. C.Kane, Simon Reeder and Henry Joyce will assist in the funeral srevice.

Center Twigg--Mr. and Mrs. Wily Roberts of Lostant (?) Illinois were called to the bedside of her brother, B. H. HUGGINS who passed away to the great beyond Sunday evening. Rev. T. B. Hunt and wife attended the funeral of B. H. HUGGINS at Knight's Prairie, Monday afternoon.

12 September 1919

HENRY G. SANKS, county clerk of Gallatin county, and well known and favorably known in that section, passed away last Thursday, September, fourth. Deceased had been in ill health for several years and his death has been expected by his friends. Sanks had been in public life, having held various county offices in that county for a quarter of a century.--Norris City Record.

Local & Personal--JOHN WESLEY ELDER, well known and pioneer citizen of Eldorado, aged 70, died last Friday at his home in the east part of the city, after a lingering illness suffering from kidney trouble. His death was mourned by a host of friends and relatives in this city and vicinity. He is survived by the wife, three sons, Dr. Emil Elder, and Dick Elder of this city, and Dr. Chas. Elder of Harrisburg; three daughters, Mrs. Ida Choisser, Mrs. W. D. Upchurch, and Mrs. T. B. Robertson; three sisters, Mrs. Jennie Bramlet, Mrs. Margaret Elder and Mrs. Cynthia Blankenship, and one brother, W. C. Elder of Alton. Funeral services were held at the residence conducted by Rev. G. R. Goodman, followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

19 September 1919 (no obits)

26 September 1919

Local & Personal--JOSEPH C. HICK, 80 years old died at the home of his granddaughter, Mrs. Lon Bowers, in the Carnahan addition Thursday night. He was well known in this city and had been in feeble health due to old age. He was a veteran of the Civil war and a member of the local G. A. R. post. He is survived by one son, Perry, and one daughter, Mrs. George Endicott. Funeral services will be held at the residence tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock followed by interment in the Dodd's cemetery.

3 October 1919

Local & Personal--C. E. Gram and sister, Mrs. Della Kane were called to St. David last Friday on account of the death of their brother, THURMAN GRAM, who was killed by a live wire. He was head electrician at the Big Creek mine and in his rounds of duties came in contact with a live wire causing instant death. A copy of the local newspaper containing a full account of the accident was received at this office too late for reproduction in this issue but will be given in detail next week. Friends here are pained to learn of his sudden death. MRS. NANCY COLEMAN died last Friday at Shawneetown, aged 67 years. Her remains were shipped to this city Saturday and funeral services were held Sunday, conducted by Rev. Prince of the Baptist church, followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. Deceased was a highly respected lady and was well known here, being a former resident. She is survived by three brothers, A. P. , James and Francis Watson and sisters, Mrs. John Ashby of this city and another brother, Tom Watson of Memphis, Tennessee; three daughters, Mrs. A. B. Capel of Shawneetown, Mrs. Victor Karcher of Cairo, two sons, Oscar and James of Shawneetown.

10 October 1919

ARTHUR N. COLE lost his life Monday afternoon at the east side Dering mine. He and his buddy were at work putting a machine ___ ___ when he accidently fell against a live wire electric controller sending thousands of volts of electricity through his body death resulting almost instantly. Immediately his buddy lifted him from the lever but death had already claimed him. He had been at work at the mine only a few days as he only recently returned home from overseas service. He was a highly respected young man and had a legion of friends. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Cole of this city. The sad accident is greatly deplored. A solemn and impressive funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at the Baptist church, the funeral sermon by Rev. A. E. Prince. A long procession followed the remains to its last resting place at Wolf Creek cemetery. The miners local attending in a body, six ladies in Red Cross uniforms were flower bearers, a large number of soldier boys in uniform under command of R. G. Putnam attended, six of the number acting as pall bearers. After the miners concluded their services the deceased was honored by as soldier when a firing squad under command of Lieut. Earl B. Simpson fired the salute over the grave and taps were sounded by Denver Adams. Another and further mention of his death is given by another writer on page six of this paper. (large article on his death describing the accident plus the following genealogical material--THURMAN E. GRAM was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Gram and was born in Texas City, Saline county, on June 23, 1890. His father is dead but his mother survives and is visiting at the Gram home at the present time having come here this week from her home in Eldorado. Mr. Gram was united in marriage about seven years ago to Miss Eva May Price, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Price of St. David. She survives, together with two children, Vivian, aged six and Lloyd two years. He is also survived by two brothers, Otto and Thomas Gram, and two sisters, Stella and Della. Thurman Gram was one of the leading citizens of St. David. At the time of his death he was serving his second term as alderman and was chairman of the finance committee in the present council. He was also a member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge and of the United Mine Workers of America. He was held in highest respect by his fellow members on the board and by citizens generally and his sudden and tragic death has cast a pall of gloom over the entire city. The funeral services will be held in the Methodist Protestant church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, the St. David Knights of Pythias in charge. Interment took place this evening in Greenwood cemetery. The body was taken to the home of the family at St. David.

Obituary: ARTHUR N. COLE. Arthur was born in Posey county, Indiana, September 17, 1898. He came with his parents to Illinois some years ago and for some years they have lived near Eldorado. He spent two years in the service of his country and was discharged only a few weeks ago. He was in Co. A. 12th machine Gun Battalion, 4th Division. Fifteen months of the time he spent in the service was spent overseas......by an accident in the mines day before yesterday, the lamp of his life was blown out in a minute. .....Arthur was not a church member. In his early life he did not take the interest in the church that his mother hoped he would. But the experiences on the far away battlefields of France brought him a new experience. He left home with his copy of the New Testament, and in this is found the pledge which he signed somewhere while gone.....A father and mother, three brothers and three sisters, and other relatives and friends are left to mourn his departure. ....

17 October 1919

Card of Thanks: We wish to thank the many friends each and every one who so kindly sympathized and assisted us in our deep sorrow, the loss of our dear son and brother. Mr. Nathaniel Cole and family, Allan Cole and family, Leland Ashby and family.

Additional Locals---MRS. MORGAN DAVIS died Sunday night at the home of W. R. Hafford in Beulah Heights. Funeral services were held Tuesday morning conducted by Rev. J. F. Brown followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. Deceased was 78 years old has been in poor health for some time and her death was mourned by many relatives and friends. Will A. Short was last week convicted and sentenced to twenty years in the penitentiary for the murder of RAYMOND McGHEE of Eldorado. The crime was commtted two years ago, and until recently Short has eluded officers. The trial last week occurred at Picher, Oklahoma. Short work was made of the trial--consuming just one day. Five witnesses for prosecution and four for the defense were examined.

(Thursday's Register) Another distressing and heart rending accident occured at the big power house in Muddy at 2:45 o'lock Wednesday afternoon. O. L. GRAVES and THOMAS LAWRENCE, two men employed as boiler makers assistants, are dead as a result of the accident. The two men met death by being scalded. Lawrence died at 7:45 Wednesday night after suffering agony that words cannot describe. Graves lingered until 8:00 Thursday morning, when death relieved him of his pains and suffering. Just who was responsible for the horrible blunder, we are not attempting to say. The circumstances as we relate them were told to us by employees at the plant. At 2:45 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, First Engineer Theo. Herple, heard the screams of two men in the big building. The first thought to enter Mr. Herple's mind was that some one had become entangled in some live wires. Herpel rushed over to the mamoth switchboard and jerked every key that affected the wires in the big building. He rushed into the boiler rooms, and with other men, ran up and down the room, endeavoring to find the men in trouble. The screams became audible and upon glancing up to the eight large boilers, Graves was seen falling out the front end of No. 6 boiler. Mr. Herpel and the other men climbed up to the prostrate man and he was assisted to the floor. Then it dawned upon those nearby that another man was also in the boiler. Up the ladder rushed the men. Lawrence had by that time managed to crawl or swim in the boiling water to the exit of the boiler. The man was assisted out of the steaming boiler, and a horrible sight was beheld. As the prostrate man was being assisted down the steps the skin from his face, hands and arms peeled off and almost touched the floor. Both injured men were rushed to the Harrisburg sanitarium on a special car, where every effort was made to save their lives, but it was generally believed that they were mortally injured. Mr. Lawrence died at 7:45 that evening, and Mr. Graves passed away Thursday morning at eight o'clock. As stated we do not attempt to state who is responsible for this heart rending accident. There are eight boilers that are in use at the power house. Some days all are not in operation. Wednesday, No. 6 boiler was "dead." the fireman, Thomas Wiley and Silas Sheldon, were busy with the fires, getting up all possible steam for the heavy work that always takes place beginning at four o'clock. No. 7 boiler, adjoining No. 6, became too hot and Wiley,"Blowed it off." The eight boilers are conected with a large pipe, but each boiler has an individual shut off valve. The two men who went into the boiler to clean it out and make some few repairs had so we were informed told Mr. Shelton but Mr. Wiley did not know of their presence in the No. 6 boiler. These may be facts, and they may not, however, when Wiley started to "blow off" No. 7 boiler the valve leading to No. 6 was wide open and the boiling water poured in on the helpless men and they had to swim and crawl to the opening. The body of Lawrence was badly scalded. Only the breast and the knees down escaped the boiling water. the fact that the breast was not scalded is due to the fact that his clothing did not touch that part of his body when he was crawling. The fingernail of every finger was completely burned off. The body of Mr. Graves was not badly mutilated. The face and the hands were most severely burned and his death is thought to be due to the fact that he inhaled some steam and probably swallowed some of the boiling water. Both men were married. Mr. Lawrence lived on North Jackson St. and had no children. Mrs. Lawrence is now in a critical condition and the terrible accident may prove damaging to her. Mr. Graves lived with his wife and three children--Elsie, James and Everett and Maranda, at Carrier Mills where he moved from Dorrisville a short time ago. Coroner Ozment empaneled the following jury and the bodies were inspected: G. H. Dorris, foreman; L. E. Coffee, George Parks, Homer Probasco, Bert Tavender and Mark Smith. The inquest will be held Saturday night at eight o'clock at the court house. This marks the third fatal accident that has occurred at the power house since its inauguration. About two and a half years ago, Milo Piland met death by coming in contact with a live wire, and a few months ago Troy DeWitt, an electrician, was killed instantly when he was hit by a live wire. The funeral of Mr. Lawrence will take place in New Burnside, Friday, where the body was to be taken this (Thursday) morning. Interment will take place at Zion cemetery. Mr. Graves will be buried Friday afternoon at two o'clock. Interment will be made at Sunset Hill cemetery. The stricken widows and children and other relatives have the profound and deep sympathy of our united people.

24 October 1919

The saddest death to occur in Eldorado recently was the sudden and unexpected demise of Rev. J. H. JONES, the new pastor of the Methodist church of this city which happened last Sunday night. He had been here only a few days, his wife and little son joining him Saturday, and the other members of the family were to come later. Rev. Jones had only resumed his new charge Sunday and had preached at the morning and evening services, and no intimation or warning came of his approaching danger. But shortly after the night service he became violently ill with an attack of indigestion and passed away in an hour. Rev. Jones came here from Belleville and during the very brief acquaintance had made warm friends and admirers. In the service which he held the members and congregation was favorably impressed and are now greatly grieved at his being taken away from among them. On account of the household goods not all being unpacked and straightened out, his body was taken to the home of C. C. Skelton on North Second street where it lay in state until Tuesday morning when it was conveyed to the train for shipment to Metropolis his former home, for interment. Rev. Jones was born in England 55 years ago. At the age of 18 he entered the ministry and for 37 years has faithfully labored as a servant of God. He leaves to mourn his departure, the fond wife, three daughters, Mabel, Mary and Viola, and three sons, John H. of Mason city, Iowa, Ernest A. of Nebraska, and Kenneth, who is here. The church people and our citizens are saddened by his death and extend the sincerest sympathy to the bereaved family and friends.

Obituary: WILLIAM A. JOHNSON, was born in Saline county, Illinois about six miles north west from Galatia, March 1st 1835, and died at Galatia Oct. 19th 1919, aged 84 years, 7 months and 18 days. He was married to Caroline Cleavelin, January 4th 1863, to which union one child, a daughter, Savilla Kathryn, (now Mrs. P. J. Walker) was born. His faithful companion having died March 20th 1914, he made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Walker, where he has been the object of their tender care and love in his declining years. Most of his life has been spent on the farm near where he was born, and although beginning in a small way as the poor boy must, in these early pioneer days, yet with industry and economy and the aid of a good wife he succeeded in accumulating a competency of this worlds' goods; and, at an early date was considered one of the most prosperous farmers in his neighborhood, as a reslut of hard work and honest dealings with his fellow man. 12 or 15 years ago, he retired from active work on the farm, and erected a nice home in Galatia, where he lived happily with his companion until her death, since which time he has lived with his children. His interest in and association with his little great-grandchildren has been his chief comfort during many long and lonesome days since his dear wife has been called away. Brother Johnson became a Christian many years ago, and united with the Pleasant Valley Baptist church more than forty years ago, in which conneciton he continued a faithful and honored member until Sunday night at 10 o'clock he was called upon to enter the Church Triumphant to receive the reward for a life well spent in the service of his Master. He was a Deacon in the church and, one of its best supporters during his long affiliation as a member. Surely a good man in Israel had fallen--"Uncle Bill," as many of us called him was a man of few words; he lived a quiet life; patience and gentleness were marked qualities of the man. He was a devoted husband, a kind father, a good neighbor had a patriotic citizen whom we all shall miss from this community. He leaves to mourn his departure, one daughter, Mrs. P. J. Walker, two grandchildren, Vernelia Wrenn Walker Upchurch and Pinkey David Upchurch, one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Williams and a host of friends......Funeral service conducted by Rev. H. C. Mitchell of Marion from the family residence at 1 o'clock Tuesday afternoon and burial at Ebenezer cemetery.

31 October 1919

The funeral of MARTIN RHINE, who died Thursday on the train at Paris, was held at the family residence on Third street Saturday afternoon followed by interment at Wolf Creek cemetery. An obituary mention of the deceased is published elsewhere in this paper.

Benton, IL--October 25--CANTRELL SMITH, 14 years old, son of Attorney and Mrs. Robert E. Smith, died today as the result of being shot Thursday night by Professor Frank Philips of the Lincoln School, when a crowd of students attempted to charivari Phillips and his bride. Phillips was taken to jail in Marion for safe keeping. Phillips and Miss Ethel Benbrook, both of Hamilton county, eloped to Evansville, Ind., a year ago and were married. Later they both secured places in Benton schools, and Thursday made announcement of their marriage and went to housekeeping. (continued on October 26th) At the coroner's inquest last night into the death of CANTRELL SMITH yesterday, the jury returned a verdict that he came to his death by a gunshot would inflicted at the hands of Frank Phillips, teacher of the seventh grade at the Lincoln School, and it was recommended that Phillips be held without bond to await action of the grand jury. Although forty or fifty were witnesses to the shooting, among them being teachers and pupils of the Lincoln School, testimony was taken from only a dozen. Phillips, who is in jail at Marion was not at the inquest. Evidence showed that students had contributed money to buy Phllips and his bride wedding presents and they told Phillips they would visit him and Mrs. Phillips Thursday night. Phillips said he "would plug" them if the did it. After school Phillips is alleged to have visited a hardward store and purchased cartridges. When the crowd assembled at the Phillips home he appeared, gun in hand, and talked to them in an enraged manner, according to the testimony, and threatened them if they entered the house. He then raised a window and was told that the students only called for a social time whereupon two shots rang out.

Card of Thanks: We desire to express our heartfelt thanks to all our friends and neighbors, to each and every member of Seagraves Local, who gave us such valued assistance and sympathy during the illness and death of husband and father, MARTIN RHINE. We do especially thank Mr. Lewis Dodd and Mr. A. Brettic for administering so kindly and patiently to his wants and needs in the last hours. And to those who remembered us so kindly with floral offerings. Mrs. Della Rhine, Uell Rhine, Jewel Rhine, Berneta Rhine, Harold Rhine.

MARTIN N. RHINE, son of John and Hanna Rhine, was born July 30, 1875 and departed this life October 23, 1919, aged 44 years two months and twenty three days. On October 7, 1900 he was married to Delia I. Brown, with whom he had lived until he was called to the spirit world. To this union were born four children, Namely Jewell, Uel, Bernita and Harold, all of whom survive. He had one brother, Chas. Rhine, one sister, Mrs. Clara Jenkins of Enid, Oklahoma and three half brothers, namely, Thomas, Herman and Mark Hethman. Besides all these he has a host of relatives and friends to mourn his loss. Some time ago he united with the M. E church, in which communion he lived until he was called up higher. He was an industrious man, and was spoken well of in the community as being a valuable citizen. He was an affectionate husband and father and honest in his dealings with his fellow men. For some months he had been dreadfully afflicted and suffered much in surgical operations. The family and relatives have the deep sympathy of the entire community. Rev. Caldwell preached an appropriate sermon at the home Saturday at 2 p.m.

7 November 1919

MARTHA OWENS, daughter of Jno. B. and Ellen ALVEY was born in Perry county, Indiana, September 5, 1860; was married to J. P. Owens December 5, 1897. To this union were born three sons, Cecil, William and Theodore. These with the husband and four sisters, Mary DeVillez and Emaline Cummings from Eldorado, Ella Lake of Chrisney, Indiana and Alie Basinger of Evansville, Indiana. Two brothers John and Lindsey Alvey of Harrisburg are left to mourn her death.

Local & Personal--Linsday Alvey and Mary DeVillez went to Anna Monday to accompany the remains of MRS. JOHN OWENS to this city, who died Friday in the hospital at Anna.

Last week word was received in this city by Illa Choisser, of the death of his cousin, JOSEPH E. CHOISSER of Forsyth, Montana. Mr. Choisser was well known in this city having lived until grown at Galatia, Illinois and his death brought sorrow to many of his relatives and friends in our city. Mr. Choisser was a man of strong character and sterling qualities as shown by the following editorial, copied from the Billings Montana Gazette: In the death of Joseph E. Choisser of Forsyth, the state of Montana has sustained a distinct and well nigh irreparable loss. He was one of the factors in developing the resources of the Treasure State in which he had unbounded faith. His enthuisiasm was inspiring, and practicing that which he preached, it is not a matter of surprise that in a score of years he amassed a splendid competency. Chairitable to a degree, none appealed to him in vain, while loyalty to his friends was one of his outstanding attributes. He served with distinction during the war period as chairman of the Rosebud County council of defense and also on the state doing that at home while the "boys" were doing at the front, and his efforts were not in vain. Joe Choisser was a man to whom most appropriately might be applied the old maxim that "his word is as good as his bond." Scrupulously honest and solicitious of the welfare of his friends, it is little wonder that Roesbud county feels his departure. The sypathy of his friends who were legion, goes out to the bereaved family.

JOHN CUTHBERSON, son of William and Jesse Cuthberson was born in Kilmernock, Scotland, May 24, 1847, and died at Eldorado, Illinois, November 4, 1919. Aged seventy two years, five months and ten days. He was first united in marriage to Catherine Weir,. To this union were born two sons, William and James. He was married the second time November 26, 1875, to Jennette Stewart. To this union were born ten children; six survive, namely, John, Hugh, Jesse, Robert, Andrew and Alexander. All reside in the United States except William who lives in Scotland. He has worked in the mine sixty three years. Some years ago he emigrated to this country and has been engaged in mining here. He was brought up in the Presbyterian church, was a member of the miners' union. For some time he has been in feeble health, and said he was prepared to go. Besides the above named relatives he leaves over twenty grandchildren and a host of relatives and friends to mourn his loss. Services will be held at the home by Rev. W. J. Caldwell, Friday at 2 p.m. and interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

14 November 1919

Several from this city went to Equality last Sunday to attend the funeral and interment of MRS. RAY C. PURCELL, among the number were: Mr. and Mrs. Riley Murray, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Purcell, Mr. and Mrs. Clement Trout, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Plumlee, Mr. and Mrs. John Hausser, Preston Wettaw and little daughter, Mr.and Mrs. Jud Rowe, and probably others whose name we were unable to get.

Local & Personal--Relatives at Grayville exhumed the body of ANNA MARIE JENKINS, age 6, dead sixty one years. The body was in a perfect state of preservation and aroused a community wonder. It was displayed at an undertaking establishment for two days. --McLeansboro Leader.

MURIEL INEZ, daughter of Isaac and Myra E. TURNER was born in Equality Illinois, May 28, 1890. She passed peaceabley to her reward while in Evansville, Indiana, November 7, 1919, at the age of 29 years, 5 months and 9 days. She had not reached in life the average of years, but being weary she lay down to rest a while to be awakened by her Heavenly father. Early in life she gave her heart to Jesus and united with the M. E. church April 13, 1902, and has been a faithful follower of Christ ever since. She was married to Raymond C. Purcell August 18, 1915. One little daughter, Ruth Inez was born to bless this union. She leaves her husband and baby, two brothers, with other relatives and friends to mourn her loss. She was a patient sufferer, never murmuring or complaining, resigned to her Heavenly Father's will. She will be missed here, but has only gone on a little while before, to await our coming, and will be there to welcome us.

Obituary--SARAH (FRENCH) BRAMLET, was born 1883 (should be 1833), died November 4, 1919, age 86 at the home of her daughter Ida, in Jeffersonville, Mo. She was married to Thomas Bramlet at the age of 19 years. Moving to Missouri from Saline county, Illinois, at the close of the Civil War in 1865 with her husband and three children. After rearing a family of nine children, 3 boys and six girls. One child and her husband preceeded her to the great beyond. She remained a widow until death, making her home with her daughter. She professed faith in Christ at an early age and united with the Missionsry Baptist church and remained a member until her death. She leaves behind to mourn her departure three sons and five daughters, a number of grand children and other near relatives and friends. The surviving children are: William Bramlet of Cedar City, Mo.; Jas. Bramlet, of Jeffersonville, Mo; Mrs. Emma Hughs of Taft, Cal.; Mrs. Lilly Gordon of Nixon, Texas; Mrs. Jennie Nerming, of Rock Island, Ill.; Mrs. Lizzie Page of Ardmore, Okla; Thos. Bramlet of Rock Island, Ill.; Mrs. Ida Fisher, Jefferson City, Mo. May God's blessings rest upon the bereaved children. Funeral services were held at Wolf Creek church, Friday 3 p.m. November 7, 1919, conducted by Rev. A. E. Prince, pastor of the First Baptist church. Interment at Wolf Creek cemetery.

Eldorado and Saline county citizens were saddened Saturday when news reached this city of the drowning of seven prominent Harrisburg men being drowned Friday night in the Mississippi river above Memphis when the pleasure boat capsized. News of the sad affair is herewith printed from their home paper, also a report from the Memphis Commercial-Appeal: (From the Harrisburg Register) --the Dead: HENRY BAKER, farmer; ALBERT HARRIS, Marble works; SAM DAVIS, farmer; CLYDE DAVIS, farmer; HENRY NICHOLS, coal miner; BERTRAM PEAK, coal miner; SAM RUSSELL, master mechanic. Gloom, sorrow and sadness surrounds this city and holds Harrisburg and Saline county in their grasp this Monday afternoon, there are seven well known and prosperous Harrisburg citizens buried in the treacherous waters of the Mississippi river north of Memphis. Their names are given above. The terrible catastrophe which resulted in the death of these seven men occurred at 10:10 Friday night. It was the ending of a happy hunting party that left Harrisburg last Tuesday, bound for Lake Providence, La. Three of the rescued--Wilson Pankey, Joe Pierson and Fred Potts returned to the city Monday morning. Harry Hancock, the Eldorado boy, who was also rescued, refused to leave the scene of disaster and remained over with four other Harrisburg men. Leaving Harrisburg lst Tuesday were seven local men, who motored to Shawneetown, taking with them supplies for the big trip. In this party were Albert Harris, Henry Nichols, Fred Potts, Bertram Peak and Sam Russell. Leaving on the night train Tuesday for Shawneetown were Sam and Clyde Davis, Henry Baker and Harry Hancock, the latter from Eldorado. The party was intending to get out of Shawneetown that night but repairs and additions were made on the gasoline launch and it was 12:10 Wednesday afternoon when those happy and jubilant men pulled out of the Gallatin county capital. They reached Cairo about nine o'clock that night, tied up and remained over night. We have been told that they endeavored to get an experience driver pilot at Cairo, but on account of the treacherous condition of the river, none would venture the trip. Not daunted by fear, the Harrisburg citizens got out of Cairo at 8 o'clock Thursday morning. They found the Mississippi river at its very dangerous period. The tremendous floods of the past few weeks had made the king of rivers a dangerous proposition. The main channel was filled with logs and other obstacles, rushing down the stream at a fearful rate of speed. However, the local party were making it all right. They were now nearing Memphis, where they intended to remain over night Friday. At ten minutes after ten on that fateful evening when the maddened waters were roaring out their danger one of the men on the frail craft stumbled over the ignition wires on the boat and they were snapped. That stopped the engine and the boat began to flounder. Joe Pierson was called, and he had just made a new connection when a strong wind threw the boat against a log and it bounced back into a big tree top. Without a seconds warning the boat was capsized and then disaster followed. Joe Pierson, Wilson Pankey, Harry Hancock and Fred Potts, who happened to be on the outside of the boat enclosure, were thrown into the water and their screams could be distinctly heard by those within who were unable to get out. What followed is described below in an interview made to the Memphis Commercial Appeal and given the Daily Register in a special telegram late Saturday night: Late in the night, four hours afterward Pierson, Pankey, Potts and Hancock were rescued by fishermen on the Arkansas side of the river. Pierson and Pankey were taken into Memphis on a river packet, but Mr. Potts was too badly injured to be moved, he and Hancock remaining with some fishermen. At midnight Saturday, The Daily Register received the following telegram from the Memphis Commercial Appeal: Memphis, Tenn. Nov. 8--When their motorboat, the "Dubalong," was swamped in the Mississippi river by an overhanging tree, above Memphis, last Friday night, seven of the ten members of the Harrisburg Hunting Club of Harrisburg, Illinois, probably were drowned. The remaining three members of the Club, with the Club's steward, were saved. Two of the survivors arrived at Memphis at 11:30 o'clock Saturday morning on a steamer. The other two are yet in a serious condition, were being cared for by men who saved them on the Arkansas side at the mouth of the Old river. The personnel of the Harrisburg Hunting Club party was made of prominent men of the little Illinois city, a few miles north of Paducah, Ky. They left home Wednesday bound for Lake Provicence, La., for a month of hunting. Those who are almost sure to have drowned are as follows: Sam Davis and his son, Clyde, who left wife and three children; Samuel Russell, chief electrician at the Saline mine, left wife and five children; Burton W. Peak, coal miner, left wife and one child; Henry Baker, farmer and stockman, left wife and child; Henry Nichols, coal miner, left wife and three children; Albert Harris tombstone dealer, left wife and four children. Those saved were Joe Pierson, automobile dealer; Harry Hancock, steward; Wilson Pankey, baker (condition serious); Fred Potts, coal miner, condition too serious to be moved to Memphis. Joe Pierson, who arrived at Memphis Saturday morning with Pankey who was taken to the home of his friend, Leo Abney, 150 Court Avenue for medical treatment, said to a reporter for the Memphis Commercial Appeal soon after he arrived at the local wharf: "We were coming along fine about ten o'clock Friday night, as the current was a big asset, and all were happy at the prospect of soon reaching Memphis where we intended to spent the night with Abney, who came here from Harrisburg to make his home about sixteen months ago. In passing the engine, Bertram, Peak hung his foot in the ignition wires, snapping them. That stalled the engine. Peak called me and we made a new connection. Just as I cranked the engine the motorboat, which was 40 by 8 feet, with eighteen horse power engines, was swept against an overhanging tree. The current tripped it under and in a flash the boat was upside down. Some of the boys were caught in the cabin and never had a chance. I climbed through the engine room window onto the trunk of the tree, the boat with the current, tugged at that had caused it all. The weight of it and our weight was much and the tree went down with us. Pankey had caught amid some willows and his cries brought Warner Smith and Albert Adams, fishermen, in a skiff. They got Pankey out, and then, returning to the bank, aroused Hollis Gibson, who got his motorboat. The three came at full speed down the river and picked me up at 2:15 a.m. We went under about 10:10, and all but Pankey had floated on drift wood for four hours. When those good fellows pulled us into the boat, I fell to the deck and lost consciousness. Next thing I knew Lon Yarbo, a brawney Negro, was carrying me up the bank at the mouth of the Old river, where I was put to bed. Poor Fred Potts was bleeding from the mouth when they got him, and was too weak to be brought to Memphis. We left him at Adam's and Smith's home, near the river, I came on down to Memphis on the packett with Pankey. I don't believe any of the others are living. One went down within four feet of me and two or three, maybe more, never got from the cabin of the boat. It sank bottom up. Most of the others in the water struck out for the middle of the river. I called to them and reached the boat. Hancock, with a life preserver was said he heard some of the boys struggling inside the cabin. I made him turn loose and take hold of some logs. We had 10 dogs and they were in the water barking and yelping. Pankey got hold of a dogs' tail and was pulled out some distance toward the shore. The dog tired and turning, climbed on Pankey's shoulders, ducking him. Pankey released him and caught a piece of driftwood. .....(part of article lost in fold of paper) to Harrisburg, a party of Harrisburg citizens hurriedly chartered an engine and coach on the Big Four and were rushed to Cairo, where they caught the fast Illinois Central for Memphis, arriving there at 7: 00 Sunday morning. this party was composed of the following: W. T. Cable, Dick Davis, John S. Hawkins, J. J. Morris, B. W. Rude, A. Franks, Earl Russell, U. J. Hamilton, B. F. Davis, W. A. Grant, W. E. Pankey, J. T. Smith, J. H. Rude, Lana Weaver, M. S. Coleman, Harry Woolcott, C. V. Parker and Dr. G. C. Stephenson. These citizens at once got busy and secured the help of experienced river men. Some of the local party, J. J. Morris, M. S. Coleman, C. V. Parker, Joe Pierson, J. T. Smith and Dr. G. C. Stephenson accompanied six river men in a boat to the scene of the disaster. It was the most dangerous and treacherous trip ever attempted on the Mississippi river out of Memphis. They left Memphis 10:30 a.m. Sunday morning and returned at 7:30. Their trip was without avail, as is told in an official statement made by them in this paper. On account of the fearful high waters, and due to the fact that the hunting boat, with its death cargo of Harrisburg men, had been torn loose from its resting place and it is not known when the boat will be found. There is no telling where it is. Neither is it known how many of the bodies are in the boat. It is almost certain that one or two of the men succeeded in getting out, but who they were is not known, and their bodies have not been found. The Harrisburg party with the exception of five, returned home Monday monring. In the party are Joe Pierson, Wilson Pankey, and Fred Potts. The Hancock boy could not be induced to leave the place of the terrible accident. With him at the river are Earl Russell, son of Sam; Dick Davis, son of Sam; B. F. Davis, brother of Sam; Otis Baker and Bert Rude. They are going to remain and assist the government men in the contineud search for the bodies of the dead. It is the most horrible and most distressing calamity that has ever happened to Harrisburg or Saline county. Nothing compares with it, with the exception of the explosion in O'Gara No. 9 mine, in 1912, when eight men lost their lives. The wives, children and mothers with other relatives of the dead, now buried in the Mississippi river are frantic an deserve the heartfelt sympathy of our united people. It is sad, so distressing that we cannot command words that will suitably describe it.

21 November 1919

Local & Personal--The 14 months old son of Dr. Frank HANNAH died last Friday morning after a prolonged illness. Funeral service was held Saturday morning. It's mother died last winter during the flu epidemic. THOMAS MITCHELL, aged 25 died yesterday at his home in the Burnett & Elder addition. Funeral services will be held at the Baptist church at 2 o'clock this afternoon conducted by the pastor Rev. A. E. Prince, followed by interment at Wolf creek cemetery. GABRIEL BOURLAND, an old and respected pioneer citizen of the county died Monday at the home of his son, Mitt Bourland at Cottage Grove, aged 86 years. He was feeble and had been in failing health for several months, and his death is mourned by a host of relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Tuesday, conducted by Simon Reeder, and interment followed at Cottage Cemetery.

Obituary: MISS IDALLA CAMPBELL was born February 15, 1872, in Wayne county, Illinois. She was united in marriage August 24, 1890, to Mr. Joe Wallace. To this union were born nine children six of whom are still living. Four boys, Preston, Charles, Chalon and Colin (?); two girls, Mrs. Pearl Proctor, and Miss Mayme. She was converted twenty four years ago but never did unite with a church, but she was a devoted mother, loving companion and a good neighbor. Her life was one of Christian principles. She was 47 years, eight months and 28 days of age at the time of her death, November 13, 1919. She had been through much affliction in her last years but she met death bravely and without fear. She leaves beside the children named before, three brothers, George, John and Chas. Brener and one sister, Emma Brener; two grandchildren and many friends. Services were conducted in the home November 15th by Rev. John Baughman of Eldorado, assisted by Rev. J. T. Brooks of Carbondale, Illinois. The body was then shipped to Crossville where a second service was held at Stokes Chapel by Rev. Arnold of Carmi, assisted by Rev. John Baughman of Eldorado. Interment in cemetery near church.

28 November 1919

RALPH, the fourteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. WEST of Jonesboro, Arkansas, was accidently killed last Saturday by a Fordson tractor rearing up and falling backward on him, crushing him beneath its great weight. He was assisting his father in threshing their big crop of rice, and was operating the tractor in hauling the grain from the field. The remains were shipped to this city, arriving Tuesday night over the Big Four and were taken to the home of J. P. West near Poplar church. The funeral was conducted by Rev. Baughman of this city, followed by interment at Omaha, the old home. Mr. West and family resided in Eldorado many years and have many friends here who sympathize with them in their sad bereavement.

Obituary: THOMAS MITCHELL, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mitchell, was born June 21, 1894. Died at the home of his parents November 20, 1919, aged 25 years, four months and 29 days. He is survived by a father and a mother, three sisters and one half brother and one half sister. One sister and one half brother preceeded him in death. In his early years Thomas was not a Christian but during his last illness he professed faith in Christ. He spoke often of his new found hope and urged and exhorted his loved ones to accept Christ and be saved from the consequences and the wages of a life of sin. In his agony and suffering as the end drew near, he often prayed to be permitted to pass into the life beyond. He requested those who watched with him to sing some songs that were dear to him, and up to the last moments he would lift his voice and join in the singing. Without fear or shudder of sorrow he passed gently at the last into death his one regret was that he had not yielded his life to Christ in earlier years. His last message to loved ones and friends alike was a warning to prepare to meet God. Funeral services were held at the First Baptist church in this city, Friday, November 21, 1919, at 2 p. m., conducted by the pastor, Rev. A. E. Prince. The body was laid to rest in Wolf Creek cemetery.

Center Twigg--Little LOTTA SYBAL, seven months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilford HUGGINS was buried at Knights Prairie, Friday, funeral services by Rev. F. F. Hidges.

5 December 1919 (no obits)

12 Decamber 1919

Obituary: JACOB J. BUTLER, son of Mr. and Mrs. Armstead Butler, was born in Crittenden county, Kentucky September 3, 1851. He moved to the state of Illinois when about ten years of age and has lived there since that time. He was one of a familyof eleven children the father and mother and all of the children except one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth McConnell of Raleigh, preceded him in death. He was united in marriage to Miss Rena Elder on March 26, 1881. To the union were born three children. One son died in infancy. One daughter, Mrs. Ira Steinsultz, and one son, Mr. Harry Butler, both of this city survive him. Mr. Butler professed faith in Christ about fifteen years ago during a revival meeting conducted by the Rev. Mr. Hicks. He never united with any church but preferred the Presbyterian church. He was deeply interested in the work of the church at all times has lived in this community for many years and was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. His death occurred at his home near Wolf Creek church last Saturday morning. His wife and children were with him in the last moments to witness his departure. He had been in poor health for several years but was not in a critical condition until a few bdays before his death. The funeral services were held in the Wolf Creek church Sunday afternoon. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. A. E. Prince, the pastor of the First Baptist church in this city. The choir of the Baptist church sang at the funeral service. There was a large crowd present to pay their respects to his memory. The body was laid to rest in the Wolf Creek cemetery.

Obituary: JEWELL CURTIS DAVIS, son of Louie and Nellie Davis was born September 15, 1919, died November 25, 1919, age 2 months and 10 days. Its' life was but of a few days, but it found a place in the hearts of the family and will be a tie to bind them closely to the world where Jesus so tenderly prepared the home for the child. Its toils never came, sin never entered its life, suffering was its only pang which is ended, and the sweet rest of the waiting dead is its blest assurance. It leaves a father and mother and many near relatives among whom are its grandmother, Nan Funkhouser, who tenderly cared for it during its suffering and Uncles Ora and Ira who became very much attached. Many other friends of the family also. Funeral srvices were conducted by Rev. John Baughman of Eldorado, Illinois at Poplar church, November 29, 1919. Jewell Curtis, son of Louie and Nellie Davis was born September 15, 1919, and died November 25, 1919, aged 2 months and 10 days.

Obituary: RALPH OSBORN WEST was born September 18, 1905, when the parents were residing in Eldorado, Illinois. He is the son of Louis and Alta West. He is one of four children, three boys and one girl. One brother, Frank and one sister, Wilma survive him. About five years ago his parents moved to Gilkeson, Arkansas, where they resided at the time of his death. He came to a very untimely death. While working with a tractor none of the immediate family being present. He was 14 years and 4 days of age, at the time of his death, November 25, 1919. When consistent he attended Sunday school, but had no opportunity for church attendance where they lived. At his age we are assured that the master's plans includes him if he but trusted in his power to save as he was not at the age to develop sinful traits or habits. His parents are members of the Presbyterian church at Eldorado, Illinios. He leaves to mourn a father and mother, one brother, one sister, as before named, and many, many friends and acquaintances. The funeral services were conducted at Omaha, Illinois, by Rev. John Baughman of Eldorado, Illinois, November 28, 1919

Obituary: NORA MURPHY FIFE, wife of Raymond Fife and daughter of J. C. and Magge Murphy was born September 6 (?) 1888. Departed this life December 7(?) 1919. Aged 31 years 3 months and one day. On Sunday evening about 7 o'clock death visited the home of Raymond Fife, taking away a precious wife and mother. Several years ago she was seized by the great White Plague, tuberculosis. She suffered much pain during her long illness, but was wonderfully patient and cheerful, bearing all her trials in a marvellous way. All that physicians and loving hands could do was done. She professed a hope in Christ many years ago and asserted that she was ready to go. She died shouting God's praises. She was a devoted wife and mother and made many friends wherever she went. She leaves to mourn her death a husband, three little sons, Kenneth, Kingsley, Everett Murphy and an infant daughter, Lucille, who preceded her in death one year ago. She also leaves a mother, father, three sisters, Mrs. Mary Fife, Mrs. Blanche Bowers and Miss Faye Murphy; two brothers, Lawrence, and Everett, the later residing iat Detroit, Michigan, besides many friends. Funeral services were held at the Raleigh Baptist church conducted by Rev. Slavens, interment at Raleigh Masonic cemetery.

19 December 1919

The jury in the William Colyer murder case reeturned their verdict on Sunday morning of guilty and they set the sentence as life imprisonment. It is understood that ten of the jurors favored the death sentence, but on account of the extreme youth of the defendant compromised on a life term. Colyer had an argument on the morning of August 31, with the father of Harry Jackson and was put in the city jail of Herrin. In the afternoon he was released from jail and his gun returned. Colyer then went to Freeman Spur where he met Harry Jackson and L. D. Brown in an automobile. Colyer jumped on the running board of the auto and opened fire on Jackson. Jackson was killed with the first shot and a stray bullet killed Brown who was sitting in the same seat with Jackson. About 20 shots were fired. Colyer was a brother-in-law of Jackson.--Herrin News.

Local & Personal--Rev. J. W. Cummins of Marion was called here Tuesday to preach the funeral of MRS. FREEMAN SISK at Cottage Grove cemetery. MRS. NANCY KINDER, aged 89 years, died Sunday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. P. A. O'Neal, on south State street. Funeral services Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the family residence, followed by interment in wolf Creek cemetery. The body of MRS. FREEMAN SISK, who died at her home in Marion Sunday was shipped here and taken to Cottage Grove for interment. Deceased was reared just east of this city and is a sister of John Cloud. MRS. SARAH KANADY, wife of Geo. Kanady died at their home in this city Sunday after a lingering illness of several months. Mrs. Kanady was the mother of Mrs. Ewing Allen of this city. The remains were taken to Ridgway Monday for funeral and interment.

26 December 1919

Obituary: MRS. SARAH ELLENDER KANADY, died at her home on Broughton st. Eldorado Illinois, December 14th at the age of 67 years, 26 days. She was born near Shawneetown, Gallatin county, Illinois, November 18, 1852, where she lived for several years, where she was beloved and a highly respected citizen. When young she professed faith in Christ and for the past twenty two years has been a true and faithful member of the Methodist church at Fairfield, Illinois. On October 7, 1875, she was married to Mr. George Kanady. Eight children came to bless their home, one son, Earl, who died at the age of 17 months, 21 days. The others surviving are: Mrs. Dasy Zeeb, Mulgerry Grove, Ill.; Mrs. Bertie Davis, Knoble, Ark.; Mrs. Pearl Allen, Eldorado, Illinois; Charlie, of Faiffield; W. C. Kennady, Decatur, Ill; Clyde of Chicago, Mrs. May Cook, Grand Rapids, Mich; and a husband, two brothers, Ben Bruce, Emporia, Kan; Marshall Bruce, Omaha, Illinios. Tuesday morning Mrs. Kanady was taken to Ridgway on the L. & N. train where quite a number of friends met the train at 12:30 p.m. and followed the funeral procession to the M. E. church where the funeral services were conducted at 1:30 by Rev. J. H. Davidson who spoke words of comfort to the assembled friends and relatives. She was tenderly laid away in the Crawford cemetery beside her parents to await the coming of Christ.

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