If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.
~
J. R. R. Tolkien
(1892 - 1973)

 
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Grandma's Kitchen

 

Here's a collection of old recipes and household tips submitted to various Indiana newspapers by our Boone County grandmothers in days long past. One newspaper in particular, The Indianapolis Star, had a feature in the Women's Section titled, "Dishes That Tempt and Other Information." The Star each Monday awarded $10 in cash prizes of $1 each for the ten best contributions.

So come on in to Grandma's kitchen and sit a spell ... fresh, hot coffee is perking on the stove ... and, yummm ... is that Grandma's special gingerbread I smell baking?

Do you have a favorite old family recipe that has been handed down through the generations from your Boone County ancestor? Send it in and tell us about its history ... we'll add it to the cookbook here!


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
September 1, 1908

EGGS, POTATOES AND CAKE

Three ways to pack eggs to keep them for winter use.

Place them, small end down, in a box well covered with coarse salt, never allowing the eggs to touch each other; have small holes bored in the bottom to drain off the moisture.

Pack them in oats. To one-half peck of unslacked lime add one ounce of cream of tartar and one-half pound of salt.

Boiling Eggs -- To boil eggs, three minutes will boil them very soft, five minutes will cook hard, all but the yolks and eight minutes will cook them hard all through.

Cupped Potatoes -- Boil and mash potatoes and season the same as for the table. Wet a teacup and press some of this into the cup, turn out on a tin as many as wished for dinner, beat one egg and rub over each cake; then set in hot oven until nicely browned.

Silver Cake -- Whites of seven ____ beaten to a stiff froth, two cups of powdered sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, one-half cupful of milk, one spoonful of soda, three cupfuls of ____ and four drops of almond essence. ___ in a loaf for half an hour.

Mrs. Chas. Leeke
Lebanon, Ind., R. R. No. 5

Transcribed by: T. Stover - August 15, 2007


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
Wednesday, October 28, 1908
Page 9

FOR BOILED POTATOES

After draining the water from plain boiled potatoes, take the kettle to the open door or window so the air can strike the potatoes and give a vigorous shake. It will render the soggiest potatoes light and mealy.

Mrs. L. C. Thayer
Thorntown, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - April 14, 2007


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
Wednesday, October 28, 1908
Page 9

A FEW ITEMS

Cook beets until tender; cut into slices; put into kettle, cover with milk, add sugar, salt and pepper. Take one tablespoon butter and one-half of flour smooth to a paste and add. Let come to boiling point.

When cooking wild duck stuff with sauerkraut.

When making cornbread, beat nearly as long as in making cake.

Add a "bit" of salt to grated pineapple.

Try putting a dust cloth over an old whisk broom, one that has become thin with wear, and then dust as though painting.

Keep a child's broom in the kitchen. Fine for sweeping under the cabinet and range in the corners.

Mrs. Alice Gillam
Lebanon, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - April 14, 2007


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
Wednesday, October 28, 1908
Page 9

NUT CAKE

Cream one cupful of granulated sugar with a cupful of butter, then stir in the well-beaten yolks of three eggs and a quarter of a cupful of milk. Have sifted together one-half teaspoonful of soda and two level teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar and add to the other ingredients; then flavor with either one teaspoonful of lemon extract or the grated rind of one lemon and stir in one cupful of desecated cocoanut or half of a fresh nut grated and half a cupful of sliced citron. Last of all whip in the thoroughly beaten whites of two eggs and bake in a moderate oven for forty minutes. When cold frost with boiled icing made of two cupfuls of granulated sugar boiled with one-half cupful of water until it forms a soft ball when dropped in cold water; then remove from the fire and pour over the well-beaten whites of two eggs, stirring quickly, and add one cupful of grated cocoanut.

Nut Candy -- Brown blanched almonds in the oven, then chop, but not too fine; to a cupful of brown sugar add two tablespoons of milk and three of cream, or all milk may be used if half a teaspoonful of butter be added, and boil until it forms a ball when a little is dropped in cold water; flavor with ten drops of almond extract and stir in a cupful of the brown chopped almonds. Beat for two minutes, then turn out on a buttered dish and mark in squares as soon as it cools.

Mrs. Essie Sanders
Whitestown, Ind., R.R. No. 26

Transcribed by: T. Stover - April 14, 2007


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
December 7, 1909

HINTS ON CAKE BAKING

Make ready all the material before beginning to put any cake together, that is, see that flour, butter and sugar are weighed or measured as the recipe calls for.

Pans should be greased with sweet lard or unsalted beef fat, as butter scorches so easily.

Line them with paper and grease the paper slightly. If the paper is thin not at all.

Mix cakes in an earthen bowl and always with a wooden spoon or the hand.

Never beat eggs until the last possible moment before using. Eggs will beat up lighter if left on ice until chilled.

Baking powder should be sifted with a part of the flour and added with the white of an egg.


Mamie E. Hoggins
Whitestown, Ind, R. R. No. 26, Box 10

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
January 6, 1910

NOTES ON BREAD MAKING

Use only good yeast; if it is dry, or discolored it is too old; if rank smelling it is not properly made and will spoil the bread.

If bread does not rise fast enough set crock in warm water. This will give it an even temperature; add warm water every half hour. Bread should double its bulk at the first rising in four hours and at the second in one hour.

For greasing baking tins use butter, lard, flour or a piece of laundry wax, rubbing on the pan while it is hot. Do not grease tins for white bread.

To prevent bread from rising unevenly in the oven turn the loaf end for end when it has been in the oven just five minutes without regard for the way it looks at the time.

Always pulverize salt, cream of tartar, soda or baking powder before using.

For shortening, a mixture of dripping, lard and the fat of veal or chicken is very nice.

Always use a wooden spoon for stirring batter, soups or fruits, as it will not wear out a sieve, stain or spoil the flavor; to keep it white always dip in hot water before using so it can not absorb much of anything else.


Miss Mayme Hoggins
Whitestown, Ind. R. R. No. 26. Box 10

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
December 27, 1909

WHITE FRUIT CAKE

Take one pound of sugar, one pound of butter, which must be washed, whites of fourteen eggs, one small teaspoonful of soda; cream butter and flour and add sugar to them, then add the whites of the eggs, beaten stiff. Have ready one pound of shredded almonds, one-half pound thinly sliced citron, one small cocoanut grated, one-quarter of a pound of shredded candied orange peel. Flour the citron and candied peel and stir slowly in the batter; lastly stir in almonds and grated cocoanut. Bake in a moderate oven.

Mrs. Reginald Stewart
Lebanon, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
January 22, 1910

FRENCH CREAM PIE

Two cupfuls of sugar, four eggs, two cupfuls of sweet milk, two tablespoonfuls of flour. Let milk come to boil, stir flour, eggs and sugar together and add to milk. Have crust baked. Use orange flavor.

Mrs. Nathan Swails
Lebanon, Ind., R. R. No. 3, Box 81

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
February 4, 1910

FILLING FOR MEAT SANDWICHES

Two cupfuls of cream pr milk, two large tablespoonfuls of flour, yolks of four eggs and butter the size of an egg. Add a teaspoonful of salt, a teaspoonful of mixed mustard and black and red pepper to taste. Beat the yolks of the eggs well, mix in all the other ingredients and put in a double boiler and cook until thick thick, stirring constantly to prevent lumps. When cold beat in a gill[?] of lemon juice. Then add any finely ground meat, such as veal, tongue, ham or chicken. Fish may be used, both fresh and salt, roe, sardines, etc., or it may be varied by using finely chopped watercress, lettuce, parsley or olives. Potted meats may be used with this filling.

Mrs. C. W. Gill
Lebanon, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
February 11, 1910
Page 9, Col 6

POTATO VOLCANO

Mash potatoes very smoothly, season with salt, pepper and a very little milk. Form (on a plate that can be put in the oven) into a conical shape with a hollow in the center as large as a teacup. For the filling-in use half a cupful of melted butter, four large spoonfuls grated cheese, yolk of an egg well beaten and a little pepper and salt. Stir thoroughly and pour into the crater of the mound. Spread the sides of the crater with melted butter, sprinkle with cracker crumbs and bake in a hot oven for twenty minutes and serve.

Mrs. Lilah [?] King
416 West Chicago street
Lebanon, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
June 16, 1910

CHERRY SHERBET

One quart cherry juice, juice of one can shredded pineapple, juice of five lemons, two quarts of water or one of cream, one quart of sugar, whites of five eggs, when cream is used the sherbet should be partly frozen before cream is added.

Mrs. L. Sterling
Lebanon, Ind., 506 East Main street

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
October 28, 1908

ANGEL FOOD CAKE

Whites of eleven eggs, beaten very stiff, teaspoonful cream of tartar, one and one-half teacupful of sugar, one cup of flour sifted five times, teaspoonful vanilla. Beat whites of eggs and cream of tartar together, then add sugar and vanilla, then the flour, then place in ungreased pan in a moderate oven; let bake about twenty-five minutes before looking at it, then increase the heat by degrees for the next thirty-five minutes. When done, test with a toothpick.

Tomato Pickles -- Slice tomatoes, let stand over night in a weak salt water, then in the morning take part vinegar and water, put in a few tomatoes at a time, let cook until tender, take out in a colander, let drain. Then place in jars a layer of tomatoes and layer of spices (cloves and allspice unground) and a little sugar to suit taste, add horseradish; so on until jar is filled. Then pour on enough vinegar to cover them while hot.

Household Hints -- To drive away ants place sulphur on the pantry shelves.

To keep starch from sticking to your irons put a little coaloil in the starch before starching clothes.

To whiten and remove stains from clothes place a little borax in the wash water.

To make windows shine bright, after washing and drying, take a piece of tissue paper and rub the window pane very briskly.

To kill all germs in a room, place a cup or pan of water on the stove, day and night. The room will always be fresh and clean.

By placing a cupful of water in an oven will prevent a cake from burning.

Greasing a pan around the top will prevent anything (like candies and icing) from boiling over.

Miss Lotta Dengir
R. F. D.. No. 7
Lebanon, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
October 28, 1908

TOMATO SOUP

One quart of tomatoes to one quart of boiling water. Stew until soft, then add a teaspoonful of soda, one quart of boiling milk, a little rolled crackers, salt, butter and pepper to taste. Boil a few minutes longer, then serve. Add a spoonful of sugar if desired.

Hattie Harkins
Whitestown, Ind., R. F. D. 26

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
January 11, 1910

OATMEAL COOKIES

One cupful granulated sugar, one cupful lard and butter mixed, one-half teaspoonful baking soda dissolved in one cupful of sour milk, one cupful of oatmeal, two teaspoonfuls baking powder sifted with enough flour to make a stiff dough. Roll out thin. Cut and bake in a moderate oven.

Mrs. C. W. Harshbarger
Whitestown, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Indianapolis, Indiana
December 22, 1909

SUET PUDDING

One egg beaten light, one cupful sorghum molasses, one cupful chopped suet, one cup buttermilk, one teaspoonful soda dissolved in part of the milk, pinch of salt, one-half pound raisins dredged in flour. Flour to make like cake dough. Put into a granite pan that has been greased and sprinkled with flour, place in the steamer over boiling water and steam three or four hours. Dry in the oven for a few minutes.

Dip -- One egg beaten light, one cupful sugar, one-fourth cup butter, steam fifteen minutes minutes and cream well before steaming.

Mrs. Kise McCormack
Jamestown, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - December 26, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
Friday, October 2, 1908

Cocoanut Drops

One cocoanut, the white of one egg, powdered sugar. Grate the cocoanut, weigh it, and take one-half of its weight of the sugar. Beat the white of an egg to a stiff froth, stir all together then with a dessert or small spoon drop upon buttered white paper or tin sheets and sift sugar over them. Bake in a slow oven twelve to fifteen minutes.

Leap Year Cake

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, one-half cupful of milk, whites of three eggs, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

Frosting

One and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one-half teaspoonful of almond extract, yolks of three eggs.

Potato Salmon Cakes

A good way to use your leftover mashed potatoes. Mix them thoroughly with a can of salmon and just enough cornmeal to make them stick together in flat cakes and fry them in hot lard.

Miss Gladys Laughner
Whitestown, Ind
 

Transcribed by: T. Stover - November 4, 2006
 


The Indianapolis Star
Friday, October 2, 1908

Lemon Sponge Cake

Into a level cupful of flour put a level teaspoonful of baking powder and sift it, grate the rind of one lemon, separate the whites from the yolks of four eggs, one scant cup of granulated sugar and beat it to a cream with the yolks, then add the grated rind and one tablespoon lemon juice, stir all until thick and creamy. Beat the whites to a stiff froth then quickly and lightly mix without beating one third of flour with the yolks, then one third of the whites, then more flour and whites until all are used. Mixing must be very light rather than beating it. Beating eggs makes them light, but beating batter makes the cake tough. Bake immediately until a straw run in can be withdrawn clean.

Miss Fern Ogden
Lebanon, Ind., R. R. No 3, Box 73
 

Transcribed by: T. Stover - November 4, 2006
 


The Indianapolis Star
Sunday, October 11, 1908

Mixed Pickles

One gallon of small cucumbers, one gallon of cabbage, chopped fine as desired, one gallon of green tomatoes, chopped, one-half gallon of very small onions, three dozen sweet mangoes, ripe and green, chopped fine; one-half gallon of ripe cucumbers, peeled and cut in small squares; three heads of cauliflower, chopped fine. Put all in separate vessels under pretty strong brine over night, then drain well and mix together.

Dressing - One dime's worth of tumeric,[sic] one dime's worth of prepared mustard, two and one-half teacups of flour, five pounds of sugar, one-fourth pound of white mustard seed. Mix thoroughly; then add one gallon of cider vinegar. Cool until thick; pour dressing over mixed pickles and cool all for thirty minutes, stirring constantly while cooking. Can while hot. This will make fourteen quarts.

Mrs. E. E. Clay
704 South Lebanon street, Lebanon, Ind.
 

Transcribed by: T. Stover - November 4, 2006
 


The Indianapolis Star
September 1, 1909

Ginger Cookies

One cup of Orleans molasses, one cup brown sugar, one cup lard or butter, one egg, one tablespoonful soda, one tablespoonful each of ginger and cinnamon, one teaspoonful of cloves, four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, flour to make a very stiff dough. Roll thin and bake in a moderate oven.

Mrs. Louise Langjahr
139 Indianapolis avenue, Lebanon, Ind.


Transcribed by: T. Stover - November 4, 2006
 


The Indianapolis Star
September 3, 1909

Good, Cheap Candy

First Part - Two pints of sugar, one pint of sirup, [sic] one-half pint of water; cook until it will hardens in water.

Second Part - One pint of sugar, one-half pint of water, cook until it hardens in water. Have the whites of three eggs beaten stiff and pour the first part over the eggs and heat, then pour the second part over eggs and beat. Lastly add a cup of chopped nuts and beat stiff, pour out in buttered pan and cool. White sirup [sic] is best; colored will do, but makes it darker. This makes a nice lot of candy.

Pearl Stevenson
Lebanon, Ind., R. R. 6


Transcribed by: T. Stover - November 4, 2006


The Indianapolis Star
September 16, 1909

Green Bean Salad

Select six medium-sized, smooth tomatoes; cut off stem ends, and with a sharp spoon remove the inside. Three stalks celery, one cupful cold cooked green beans; chop celery and one cupful of the tomato pulp fine and mix with the beans, adding salt and pepper to taste. Fill the tomato shells with the mixture, pour a tablespoonful of mayonnaise dressing over each one and serve on a lettuce leaf.

Mary L. Garner
404 West North street
Lebanon, Ind.


Transcribed by: T. Stover - November 4, 2006


"We may live without poetry, music and art;
We may live without Conscience and live without heart;
We may live without friends, we may live without books;
But civilized man cannot live without cooks."
~
Anonymous