Search billions of records on Ancestry.com

   Home | Main Page | Search | Submit Data | What's New | FAQ's The Decade Was 1890's
Home
Up
The Decade Was 1840's
The Decade Was 1850's
The Decade Was 1860's
The Decade Was 1870's
The Decade Was 1880's
The Decade Was 1890's
The Decade Was 1900's
The Decade Was 1910's
The Decade Was 1920's
The Decade Was 1930's
The Decade Was 1940's


 

The Decade Was 1890's

1893 - Natural gas found in Indiana provides power for an estimated 300 new factories.
1897 -
Indiana General Assembly passes labor law prohibiting children under the age of 14 from working in manufacturing; no one under 16 or no woman under 18 is allowed to work more than 10 hours a day or 60 hours a week.
1899 -
Robert Parker and his partner, Harry Longbaugh, better known as Butch Cassidy and "The Sundance Kid," lead their "Wild Bunch" in a series of bank and train robberies across the West. When they eventually flee to South America in 1901, the era of the outlaw band comes to an end.

The Decade Was 1890's


Various newspaper items concerning Boone County and its residents in the 1890's. You'll find a bit of everything ... deaths, births, accidents, crime ... and even humor. All items are transcribed exactly as they appeared in the publication, so please bear in mind that it was a different time and sometimes those editors wrote with a bit of flair, and describing gory details seemed to be their specialty! Even if you don't find an ancestor or two among these pages, you'll still find it interesting to read the news of their day. And if you *do* find a relative in some of these news clips, you might turn up a real surprise or two!

Use the "find" feature on your browser to locate particular surnames


The New York Times
May 31, 1895, Wednesday
Page 2

Lebanon, Ind., May 30. -- Thomas Tyre, an attorney, fell from the fifth story of Castle Hall this morning. In his descent he struck a baby on the pavement, killing it instantly. Tyre's neck was broken.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - September 23, 2007


The New York Times
May 24, 1895, Wednesday
Page 1,

Killed His Son by Mistake

LEBANON, Ind., May 23. -- Thomas Irving, who lives three miles west of here, hearing footsteps in an adjoining room last night, without saying a word, shot the supposed intruder, inflicting a fatal injury.

Irving discovered that he had killed his oldest son. He tried to kill himself, but will recover. He is a wealthy farmer.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - September 23, 2007



The New York Times
November 5, 1891

Cora Neese of Lebanon, Ind., smoked a cigarette two weeks ago. She became ill and died, and the physicians who attended her say her death was due to nicotine poisoning.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - September 23, 2007


The New York Times
February 19, 1890, Wednesday
Page 1

SHOT AT A PRAYER MEETING

LEBANON, Ind., Feb. 18. -- During a prayer meeting at Edward Randall's, five miles south of this city, last night an unknown assassin fired a shot through the window, and Mrs. Randall screamed that she was wounded. During the excitement that followed, the assassin made his escape. The ball went through the stovepipe and struck Mrs. Randall in the corner of the eye. She is alive but is fatally injured. No motive is known for the crime. The family is one of the most respected and prominent in the county.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - September 23, 2007


The New York Times
April 25, 1894

Minister's Son Shoots Wife and Self.

LEBANON, Ind., April 24. -- E. J. Workman, a young man of twenty-five and a son of the Rev. T. F. Workman, a Methodist minister, attempted to kill his wife and himself to-day. The couple have been separated for some time. Last night Workman begged his wife to return to him, but she refused. This morning he met her on the street and, drawing a revolver, sent a bullet into her back, the missile passing almost through her body. A second shot missed her, and as she ran to escape a third bullet struck her in the back of the head, ranging downward. She fell to the pavement, and Workman stood over her for a moment. He then turned the weapon on himself and sent a bullet into his head. He fell to the ground, rose to his feet again and discharged the revolver a second time into the side of head. He then tumbled headlong across the prostrate form of his wife. Both will probably die.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - September 23, 2007


The New York Times
July 16, 1895, Wednesday
Page 1

Clubbed to Death by a Policeman.

LEBANON, Ind., July 15. -- The body of Earl Cobb, the racehorse man, arrived yesterday from Franklin, Tenn. the story that he had been kicked to death by a horse proves erroneous. It has developed that young Cobb was killed by a policeman named Bond, who mistook him for another man who had insulted Miss Bond. After being fatally clubbed, he was placed in jail, where he remained without attention all night. The next morning he was removed to the residence of the Chief of Police and his family sent for, but he died before they arrived.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - September 23, 2007


The New York Times
June 2, 1896

MURDER OVER AN ELOPEMENT.

Shooting Affray in Front of the Post Office at Lebanon, Ind.

LEBANON, Ind., June 1. -- Thomas Allen, a wealthy stock dealer, and Wallace Riley, a prominent citizen, fought in front of the Post Office this morning.

Riley was instantly killed, and Allen's son, who was sitting in his father's carriage, was seriously injured.

The fight was the outcome of the runaway marriage of Allen's son, aged seventeen, and Riley's daughter, aged twenty-four. With the assistance of a friend, who swore that the boy's age was twenty-one, they secured a license, and were married Saturday morning. When Allen, Sr., learned of the marriage he was angry. Riley learned this, and went gunning for Allen. He found him in front of the Post Office, and opened fire. Allen jumped from his carriage and fired, killing Riley instantly.

Young Allen will probably recover. Allen is in jail, and claims he acted entirely in self-defense.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - September 23, 2007


The New York Times
May 21, 1893

Shot Dead in the Courtroom

DANVILLE, Ind., May 20. -- Caleb Brown, President of the Lebanon Natural Gas Company, shot Samuel Wesner, one of the most prominent lawyers of Indiana, this afternoon, killing him instantly. The shooting occurred in the courtroom, directly in front of the Judge's desk.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - September 23, 2007


The Daily Review
Decatur, Illinois
May 11, 1892

Mrs. Ed Green, living in the southern part of Boone county, Ind., has been arrested charged with forgery. She is alleged to have signed the name of Moses Higgins to a check for $15. She gave security for appearance and claims to be innocent of the charge.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - August 20, 2007


Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
February 11, 1897

The late Solomon Runnion of Boone county, Ind., left $5,000 in cash and $8,700 in notes that had never been listed (?) for taxation. The assessor has now placed the amounts on the tax duplicate.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - August 20, 2007


The Daily Review
Decatur, Illinois
August 26, 1892

Tom Cronan of New Ross, Ind., while talking with County Coroner Bronough, became violently insane and tried to shoot him. He failed to injure him.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - August 20, 2007


The New Era
Humeston, Iowa
July 8, 1891

John Davis, of Whitestown, Ind., was blown from a Big Four train at Lebanon, Ind., and instantly killed.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - August 20, 2007


Lima Daily News
Lima, Ohio
February 11, 1891

James H. Davis, a farmer near Lebanon, Ind., eloped with Mrs. Bramblett, a neighbor. He leaves a wife and six children, she four children. He was a member of the New Light church.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - August 16, 2007


Lima Daily News
Lima, Ohio
June 10, 1891

Revenue Laws Violated

Lebanon, Ind., June 11 -- Charles Oden, city marshal of Lebanon, and Moses Brown were yesterday arrested by United States marshal for violating the revenue laws. They gave bond.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - August 16, 2007


Lima Daily News
Lima, Ohio
August 22, 1890

Harry McCarty is held at Lebanon, Ind., for committing highway robbery at Frankfort, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - August 16, 2007


Steubenville Daily Herald
Steubenville, Ohio
February 24, 1896

Killed By a Falling Tree

Lebanon, Ind., Feb. 24 -- While assisting his father in felling a tree, Charles Grimes was pinioned against the stump and killed.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Steubenville Daily Herald
Steubenville, Ohio
October 14, 1895

They Wasted No Time

Lebanon, Ind., Oct. 14 -- Samuel Richards, 84, and Mrs. Martha Heath, 77, both wealthy, met for the first time last Saturday, were together a half hour, fell in love and arranged the details of their marriage which occurred here Friday.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin
August 26, 1896

In the 2:28 trot at the racing meet at Lebanon, Ind., Thursday John Gott was thrown from his sully and fatally injured.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Freeborn County Standard
Albert Lea, Minnesota
May 29, 1895

Near Lebanon, Ind., Thomas Irving, a wealthy farmer, mistook his eldest son for a burglar and shot him fatally.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Freeborn County Standard
Albert Lea, Minnesota
May 22, 1895

Albert Sackett and Frank Jones were blown to atoms by the premature explosion of dynamite while plowing stumps near Lebanon, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Freeborn County Standard
Albert Lea, Minnesota
December 10, 1890

At Lebanon, Ind., Dr. Williamson, aged __ years, a practicing physician for thirty-five years, was run over by a buggy and fatally injured.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Lima Daily Times
Lima, Ohio
March 30, 1893

The Saw Burst

Lebanon, Ind., March 30 -- John Peese, a young man who just began work in Kellogg's sawmill yesterday morning, was instantly killed about 11:30. A large circular saw burst and a piece struck him in the head.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Decatur Morning Review
Decatur, Illinois
October 18, 1890

THE NEWS IN BRIEF

William Budd, who lived near Lebanon, Ind., dropped dead when he heard that his wife had applied for a divorce.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Lima Times Democrat
Lima, Ohio
August 13, 1894

All Settled Now

Green Bay, Wis., Aug. 13 -- Albert Lane, who abandoned his wife and child about three weeks ago at Lebanon, Ind., and eloped with a woman from Indianapolis, was found here Saturday night. They had rented a store and started in the notion business, representing themselves as husband and wife. When they came here two weeks ago the chief of police thought the man answered the description of Lane, and he communicated with Indianapolis. Saturday night a member of Lane's firm, accompanied by Lane's wife, arrived and located the parties. Matters were satisfactorily settled and Lane will return home with his wife.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Daily Republican
Decatur, Illinois
June 12, 1896

Killed By a Thrown Ball

Bloomington, Ind., June 12 -- Jackson Sheridan, a member of the Indiana University ball team and one of the best known students, was umpiring a game between the fraternities yesterday when a ball from the third baseman struck him on the temple. He was carried from the field unconscious, but soon rallied, and until an hour before his death it was thought he would recover. His home was at Lebanon, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Daily Republican
Decatur, Illinois
May 8, 1896

DREAMED OF BURIED MONEY

He is More Than Twelve Hundred Dollars Ahead

The citizens near Lebanon, Ind., are all agog over the strange stories told by William M. Richardson, a farmer. About two years ago Mr. Richardson's mother died. During her last years she was very eccentric, and before her death she told various persons that she had buried large sums of money on different parts of the farm, but she always refused to divulge the hiding places. After her death a large part of the door yard and garden was dug up, but no trace of the hidden wealth was found, and the matter was dropped.

About three months ago Mr. Richardson had a dream in which he was told to visit a clairvoyant of Indianapolis and he would learn something regarding the hiding place of the money. This dream, Mr. Richardson says, was repeated at frequent intervals, and he finally decided to test the fortune teller's ability. Going to Indianapolis, he gained an audience with a gypsy palmist, who he says, told him he would find $1,200 buried at a point in his orchard.

With much skepticism Mr. Richardson followed her directions, says the Cincinnati Commercial-Gazette, and recovered a tin can containing $1,243.50. With this money he paid off a mortgage on his farm, and had about spent the entire amount when his sister demanded half of the funds as one of the heirs of their mother, and a law suit was for a short time imminent, but the claim was finally compromised.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Hamilton Daily Republican
Hamilton, Ohio
January 31, 1895

Natural Gas Explosion

Lebanon, Ind., Jan. 31 -- A natural gas explosion occurred at the home of Wm. Isenhour, two miles east of the city Wednesday afternoon. On account of the cold weather Isenhour concluded to build a fire in his cellar, and had just started down stairs when escaping gas ignited and the explosion which followed blew the roof of the house thirty feet away. Mr. Isenhour was badly burned about the face and body, a woolen shirt which he wore being entirely consumed. He will hardly recover. His little son, who was near him, miraculously escaped injury.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Hamilton Daily Republican
Hamilton, Ohio
December 21, 1894

An Aged Man's Fall

Lebanon, Ind., Dec. 21 -- William L. McCormack was arrested on a grand jury indictment, charged with the forgery of his daughter-in-law's name to a deed. McCormack is nearly seventy years of age, and had hitherto borne a good reputation. He has taught school in this and adjoining counties for the past forty-three years.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - July 16, 2007


Lebanon Patriot
Lebanon, Indiana
Monday, December 21, 1891

Dover

-- James Thorp's little girl is sick.
-- Rev. Powell is holding a revival at Pleasant View.
-- Ret Hazelrigg will spend Christmas at Richmond, Ind.
-- Charles Green thinks he has a fast horse, especially when it gets scared.
-- J. W. and M. F. Swails attended a festival at Shepherd one night last week.
-- James McDaniel, of Lebanon, was looking after his interests here last Friday.
-- James Farlow, one of our good citizens, has moved southeast of Indianapolis where he will follow gardening.
-- Some of our youngsters who had been trying their muscle near Max, opened their hearts and pocket books before Squire Wall last Friday.

Ward

-- Dan Rian is improving his farm with some wire fence.
-- Howard Shelly had a corn husking and dinner one day last week at which the neighbors enjoyed themselves.
-- Benny Wise and George Brasier had a misunderstanding last week -- each donating to the school fund in Squire Ross' court at Advance.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - May 8, 2007


Fort Wayne Weekly Gazette
Fort Wayne, Indiana
March 26, 1896
Thursday, Page 6

Indiana Patents

List of patents granted during the past week to citizens of Indiana, reported expressly for the GAZETTE through the patent and law offices of O. E. Duffy, No. 707 G street, N. W., Washington, D. C., from copies can be had:

William Graham, Indianapolis, embossing machine; E. Graves, Kokomo, buckle; J. A. Hadley, Brazil, fastening for pipe sections; S. B. Sweener and B. F. Clark, Zionsville, street car bridge for protection of fire hose; J. Teeter, Hagerstown, letter holder.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - April 14, 2007


Fort Wayne Weekly Gazette
Fort Wayne, Indiana
November 19, 1896
Thursday, Page 9

Indiana Patents

List of patents granted during the past week to citizens of Indiana, reported expressly for the GAZETTE through the patent and law offices of O. E. Duffy, No. 707 G street, N. W., Washington, D. C., from copies can be had:

T. Hand, North Vernon, nut lock; H. Keyes, Terre Haute, mine trap door; J. W. Lanbert. Anderson, gas engine governor; J. C. Laughlin, Columbus, duplicate desk; R. P. Lockhart, Patoka, harvester and binder; S. H. Schenck, Zionsville, combined camp stool and cot; Francis Schenker, Vincennes, ink-stand; F. P. Scott, Terre Haute, telegraph switch mechanism; C. Eckert, Losantville, insole.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - April 14, 2007


Daily Republican
(Decatur, Illinois)
January 18, 1896

TELEGRAPHIC NOTES

The secretary of the interior has issued an order disbarring from practice before the department, for violation of the pension laws., David B. Davis, of Thorntown, Ind.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - April 14, 2007


Crawfordsville Journal
March 19, 1894

The notorious Webb Mitchell has again come into a bad prominence. He is a colored man of Thorntown and a few years ago was sent up for stealing the Canine cattle. He was released and retired to his father's home in Thorntown. Yesterday he eloped with his 16-year-old sister, Clara. He was followed by his 3 brothers, who overtook him at Colfax. He forced them to beat a retreat however and proceeded on into this county. His brothers enlisted the aid of Bill Boyd, the Colfax marshal and again started in pursuit. They overtook the eloping couple on the New Richmond Pike but Webb drew his revolver and forced Boyd to fly for his life. Great indignation prevails over the action of the unprincpaled [sic] brute. Web Mitchell and no one need be surprised to hear of his sudden demise.

Transcribed by: Karen Zach - Coordinator Montgomery County, INGenWeb - March 11, 2007


Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
April 12, 1895
Page 6

INDIANA NEWS NOTES

Elizabeth McDonald, an old woman living near Lebanon, dropped dead in the barnyard, where she had gone to milk cows.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, December 18, 2006


The Fort Wayne Gazette
Fort Wayne, Indiana
June 20, 1895
Page 1, Col 7

Investigating a Contempt Case

Lebanon, Ind, June 19 ~ Lee [Leo?] Campbell, of Thorntown, was yesterday fined for contempt of court in not appearing as a witness in a case against Ira Graham, a liquor dealer in that city. Campbell claims that he was forcibly detained by Graham, and the case will be investigated.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, December 18, 2006


The Fort Wayne Sentinel
Fort Wayne, Indiana
Thursday, August 21, 1894

State News

Hiram McDonald Dies

Hiram McDonald, who was struck over the head by John Sexton in the fight at Thorntown, died of his injuries on Saturday evening, and Sexton was transferred to the Lebanon jail to answer a charge of murder.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel
Fort Wayne, Indiana
February 13, 1895
Page 1, Col 4

SEXSON FOUND GUILTY
Sentenced to Twenty-one Years Imprisonment


Danville, Ind., Feb. 9 -- The jury in the Sexson murder trial returned a verdict of guilty at 5 o'clock last evening, and fixed the punishment at twenty-one years in the penetentiary.[sic] Sexson was tried for the killing of Hiram McDonald, in Thorntown, Ind., on the 17th of last August. Sexson was in the company of Charley Patterson and John Gott, and McDonald was accompanied by Charles Sutton and Chris Fisher. About 8 o'clock on the evening mentioned the two trios met near the Christian church in Thorntown, and a general fight ensued, in which McDonald was struck over the head with some blunt instrument, causing his death in a few
minutes.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, December 18, 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 4, 1894

Doubly Fatal Runaway

Lebanon, Ind., Oct. 4 -- The team of William King, a farmer living north of this city, ran away yesterday. His wife jumped from the carriage and received injuries from which she died in about an hour. The team ran into a fence, throwing Mr. King out and inflicting internal injuries from which he will also die.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
September 8, 1894

Man Supposed to Have Been John Connor of Lebanon
Killed by the Cars Near Indianapolis


Killed on the Track

Indianapolis, Sept. 8 -- A man supposed to be John Connor of Lebanon was struck by a Monon train on the outskirts of the city yesterday and killed.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne Sentinel
Fort Wayne, Indiana
Thursday, August 9, 1894

SHOT HIS SON-IN-LAW

The Murder of Christian Wesner at Lebanon, Ind.

He Was Jealous of His Pretty Wife and This Led to
Trouble and His Killing by His Father-in-Law

Lebanon, Ind., Aug 9 -- On May 24, 1893, Judge Christian S. Wesner was shot and killed in the Danville, Ind., court room by James Coley Brown, after making the argument of his life. His dying words were, "God pity my poor boy," and at 8 o'clock last night that same poor boy, Christian S. Wesner, jr., [sic] was murdered by his father-in-law, James Livingston.

The cause of the trouble dates back to the time of Wesner's marriage, three years ago. Wesner was very jealous of his pretty wife and this led to many quarrels. A short time after his marriage Livingston attempted to censure his son-in-law and was badly cut about the face in return. Since then they have had numerous quarrels and last night's trouble was not unexpected.

Tuesday night Wesner went home and drove his wife, mother and sister from the house. They took refuge at the home of Mrs. Kise, a neighbor, and yesterday morning sent for Deputy Prosecutor Winton A. Dutch, who prepared warrants for Wesner's arrest, but the women were afraid to sign them, as Wesner was very abusive and had often threatened their lives.

Wesner remained the sole occupant of the house that night and part of the day. Last evening he began a search for his wife and with that view went to the home of his father-in-law on West Busby street.

As he opened the gate Livingston appeared at the door and asked him to leave. He replied that he had come for his wife and was going to have her, whereupon Livingston reached behind the door and secured a double barreled gun and with the remark, "I told you I would fix you," fired both barrels into the body of his wayward son-in-law. His victim fell to the ground and cried: "Jim you have killed me," to which the murderer replied: "I don't give a ___ if I have."

His wife, who was hiding in the house, hearing the shots ran to the side of her now dying husband, and at the sight of his wounds fell prostrate across his body. She quickly recovered herself and refused to leave him.

Coroner Porter was sent for, and Deputy Prosecutor Dutch took the man's dying statements. He was removed to his home on North East street. He received the entire contents of both barrels of the gun and died at 10 o'clock last night.

Livingston was immediately arrested and lodged in jail. The only thing he will say is: "I am sorry, but I had to do it." Young Werner was a remarkably bright young man and quite pleasant when not under the influence of liquor, but when drinking was quarrelsome and considered a dangerous man. He had been in numerous scrapes and was quite handy with a gun. He was under indictment for attempting to kill a companion with a razor and last winter shot at George Hall, who was passing by his home, claiming Hall was against him in the trial of Brown for the killing of his father. Like his father he was a lawyer, and bore many characteristics of that well known attorney. The afflicted families have the sympathy of the entire community.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 8, 1894

Crushed To Death

Lebanon, Ind., Oct. 6 -- Napoleon B. Osborn, a prominent farmer and contractor living near here, while engaged in removing gravel from a pit, was caught under a mass of falling gravel and so badly crushed that he died from his injuries in a few hours.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 8, 1894

Indiana Briefs

Mrs. Rose McMannis, a young widow of Lebanon, received a whitecap notice warning her to move within 10 days.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
November 15, 1894

Indiana Briefs

Delia Murphy and Rose McManis assaulted the jail turnkey at Lebanon. He had to hold them at bay with a revolver until assistance came.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 9, 1894

Absent For Cause

Lebanon, Ind., Oct. 8 -- David Campbell, who in 1891 married Frances Allen, aged 19 and weighing 400 pounds, and who became heir to her property, was not on hand when his father-in-law's suit for a part of the estate was called in court. The fact that Mr. Allen had proof that Campbell had another wife in Kentucky at the time of marrying Miss Allen explains his absence. The property was reconveyed [sic] to the father.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 12, 1894

Police Superintendent Hurt

Lebanon, Ind., Oct. 11 -- During a parade yesterday afternoon incident to the dedication of the new K of P hall, George W. Powell superintendent of the Indianapolis police force, was thrown from a horse against a curb. For a time it was thought he could not recover, but he rallied later and was removed to his home last night. The celebration was a decided success, attracting a great crowd of visitors.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 16, 1894

Lost an Arm In a Belt

Lebanon, Ind., Oct. 16 -- John Brown, while attempting to adjust a belt in an engineroom, was caught in a large wheel in the Globe machine shops and was thrown violently to the ceiling. His arm was badly torn and will have to be amputated.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 30, 1894

A Dreadful Accident

New York, Oct. 29 -- A special to The World from Lebanon, Ind., dated Oct. 28, says: A wagon containing a party returning from a dance was struck by a Big Four train this morning and five of the merrymakers were killed. The dead are Gertrude and Grace Davis, Tenna George, Carl Gowans and May McDaniel.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
November 13, 1894

Indiana Briefs

Mark Booher was accidentally shot by Elza Klingler near Lebanon while the two were rabbit hunting.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
November 13, 1894

Farmer Charged With Arson

Lebanon, Ind., Nov. 12 -- James D. Beard, a prominent farmer, has given bond on a grand jury warrant charging arson. He was indicted as being the person who set fire to Thomas Whistler's barn a year ago.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
November 15, 1894

Charge the Tragedy to Whisky

Thorntown, Ind., Nov. 14 -- Thomas Taylor, recently discharged from service with Jacob Schaefer, inspector for a local gas company, was shot twice by Schaefer after a quarrel. The latter has been drinking heavily of late.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
December 21, 1894

Accidentally Killed By His Father

Lebanon, Ind., Dec. 20 -- While Thomas Aston and his son were out hunting, two miles east of this city, Aston's gun was accidentally discharged and the entire charge of both barrels entered the breast of his son, who was standing directly in front of him. The young man died instantly.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
Saturday Evening, December 22, 1894

FATAL ACCIDENT
Well Diggers at Lebanon, Ind., Buried Alive.

Lebanon, Ind., Dec 22 -- While Samson Dale and Albert Harden were digging a well on the latter's farm, three miles east of here this morning, the well caved in, burying both men ten feet ___der [under] earth. Before they were ____ they were smothered to _______ .

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Fort Wayne Sentinel
Fort Wayne, Indiana
September 19, 1894

"Uncle Johnny" Marshall's Will

The will of the late "Uncle Johnny" Marshall, an old bachelor, who lived alone for years on a farm near Lebanon, develops a romantic incident. In early manhood he was a school teacher and he fell in love with one of his pupils, a bright girl of fifteen, the daughter of Jacob B_ _ s [unable to read name]. The parents objected to Marshall and the girl married Addison G. Myers, of Whitestown. This was back in 1852. Marshall thereupon eschewed society and built him a log cabin on a farm, where he remained for forty years and more. He worked hard and accumulated much property. Mrs. Emma Morrison, his only sister, died in 1890, leaving one son, who was named in honor of his uncle. After his mother's death the young man was invited to share his uncle's home, which invitation he accepted. The sweetheart of Marshall's youth is the mother of six children, one of whom is Gertrude, a girl of nineteen. After Marshall's death it was found that he made a will bequeathing his farm to his nephew, provided he married Miss Gertrude within two years, otherwise he was to receive but $5,000, the remainder of the estate going to other heirs. The young people had never met until they were brought together to hear the terms of the will. The stipulation was a great surprise to both, but it was favorably received, and it is said that a wedding will soon put beyound [sic] dispute all disposition on the senior Marshall's estate.

Transcribed by: T. Stover, August 2006


The Lebanon Pioneer
March 28, 1895

The Decade was 1890

The population in Boone County in 1890 was 26, 57_ [?]

Transcribed by: Amy Davis


The Fort Wayne Sentinel
Fort Wayne, Indiana
Monday, January 19, 1891

TRAGEDY IN AN ASYLUM

George Warburton, an Aged Cripple'
Murdered by a Whiskey-Crazed
Negro at Lebanon, IND.


Lebanon, Ind., Jan. 19 - Boone county records another murder at the poor farm. Yesterday morning at about 6:30 o'clock an inoffensive old charge, George Warburton, was brutally beaten to death by Samuel Beecham, a negro, who has been known as Sam Curtis during his stay at the institution. Beecham confesses to Sheriff Miller that the ownership of a chair was in dispute between him and Warburton, and that he went to the old man's room this morning, and, after a few words, he took from him his cane and struck him three times over the head. Warburton's skull was fractured in two places and he died within half an hour. Beecham made an attack on Sheriff Miller when arrested, characteristic of his vicious nature, which had manifested on several occasions, but was overpowered and lodged in jail. Warburton was aged seventy and badly crippled. He was once a well-to-do farmer of Boone county, but was reduced to poverty by adversity and affliction. He has three or four children living in the county. Beecham, aged forty-five, claims that he is from Zionsville. Curtis was a negro who had been given quarters at the poor house temporarily on account of his unfitness for work caused by drunkenness.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - 10/2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
July 30, 1896

Breach of Promise Suit

Lebanon, Ind., July 30 -- Hettie Childress, a young woman living in Indianapolis, has brought suit here against Samuel H. Davis of Zionsville, charging him with breach of marriage contract. The complaint alleges that Davis represented himself as a single man, but that in fact he is a married man and has been for several years. She claims $10,000 damages.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - 10/2006


The Fort Wayne News
Fort Wayne, Indiana
April 16, 1897

Run Down on a Bridge

Lebanon, Ind., April 20 -- Luke Covet was caught on the covered bridge east of Zionsville yesterday by a westbound Big Four passenger train and instantly killed. Papers found on his body indicate his home is near Elizaville, this county. He was about 70 years old.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - 10/2006


Fort Wayne Weekly Gazette
Fort Wayne, Indiana
November 14, 1895

Newspaper Changes Hands

Lebanon, Ind., November 13 -- Will and Harry Martin, editors and proprietors of the Daily Reporter, of this city, have sold their plant to Reed Holloman and Volney Wilson, two young attorneys. Messrs. Martin & Martin will locate in Franklin, where they have purchased the Franklin Republican.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - October 30, 2006


Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel
Fort Wayne, Indiana
August 15, 1895

ALLEGED FORGER ARRESTED

He Leads the Officers a Lively Chase Before Capture

Lebanon, Ind., Aug. 15 -- After a hunt of several days, James Sample, near Elizaville, has been captured and placed in jail to await trial for forgery. Last week he presented to Cashier Lane, of the First National bank, a note for $75, which he desired to sell. The man was unknown to the bank officials, but as the note was signed by Robert Stephenson, James Chalk, and James King, prominent farmers of good, financial standing, it was purchased, and the young man promptly left town. The bank officials made inquiry, and soon learned that the note was a forgery. The police were notified and began searching for Sample. Later it was discovered that he had purchased a buggy of Butler & Jett, and given two notes of $40 and $45 each, indorsed [sic] by James and Isaac Chalk, which were also forged. The officers followed Sample to Frankfort, and other surrounding towns, but he eluded them until Monday evening, when Policeman Caldwell captured him at his home, near Elizaville, but Sample escaped after being in custody but a few moments. He was afterward arrested at Kirklin, and he has made several attempts to escape since. When brought before Mayor Garrett he entered a plea of guilty, and was bound over to the circuit court. Sample has been in trouble before.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - October 30, 2006


Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel
Fort Wayne, Indiana
November 7, 1895

State News

Joseph Kelly, of Whitestown, after a separation of thirty-three years, has succeeded in locating his mother and sister, now living in Arkansas, and he has gone to visit them.

Transcribed by: T. Stover - October 30, 2006