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Jay County Indiana Biographies Surname A

James G. ADAIR. The ADAIR family has been a continuing influence in Jay county for seventy years, this influence ever having been exerted in behalf of community betterment.  The family had its origin here with the coming from Ohio in 1852 of James G. and Sarah ( HUTSON ) ADAIR and their little daughter Nan, who settled in a little log cabin in the lower part of Bearcreek township, three miles north of Portland and a quarter of a mile west of the Pleasant Ridge church. Afterward this cabin was "sided" and given new window and door frames and long served the family as a home.  In the historical section of this work there is presented a picture of the old James G. ADAIR homestead place.  This old home was typical of many such homes hereabout in the days of the pioneers and the picture preserves for the present generation a comprehensive viewpoint from which to make comparisons concerning living conditions then and now.  James G. ADAIR was a Pennsylvanian by birth, but was reared in Jackson county, Ohio, where he married and where he made his home until he came to Jay county. He had received excellent advantages in the way of schooling and also had been ordained as a "local" minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, so that when he settled on his "eighty" here in Bearcreek township in 1852 he instinctively sought an outlet for his talents and in addition to looking after the affairs of his farm spent his winters teaching school and on Sundays filling the pulpits of such of the neighboring churches as were open to his ministrations.  It has been written of him that James G. ADAIR never missed teaching a term of school during his residence in Jay county, and taught every winter until his death in 1873.  He was thorough and efficient in his school room work, taking a great interest in the welfare of the boys and girls under his instruction.  He believed the safety of democratic institutions rested in the minds and hearts of the young people, and he felt it was his duty to prepare them as best he could for the exalted duties of American manhood and womanhood.  He put into his duties as a teacher the same fervent spirit that he pronounced from the pulpit, believing that the church and the school were indissolubly bound together in the upbuilding of Christian character and exalted citizenship.  He was a Democrat, advocating the principles of his party with moderation, yet exercising and believing in the sovereign right of every man, who loves his country, to let conscience dictate the casting of his ballot.  Along this same line, it was written further of this pioneer that it was part of his ministerial duties to preach the funeral of many of his old pioneer friends and to console as best he might the grief of the neighboring relatives.  He united in the bonds of wedlock many of the young men and women of the community, who plighted their troth that another home might be established in the rapidly growing county.  He was the counselor of those who were in trouble and the adviser of many who sought his judgment in matters of business. James ADAIR was a modest, honest, cheerful, industrious citizen and the inspiration of his fireside is reflected in the sturdy citizenship and the exemplary achievements of his patriotic sons and daughter in the community in which they now reside.  He gave to his time the best of his thought and his labors, and he gave to posterity an example of integrity and sincerity of purpose worthy of the highest emulation. James G. ADAIR was master of Jay lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, at Portland, at the time of his death on November 30, 1873, and he was given a Masonic burial in the old cemetery at Bloomfield.  His widow survived him for nearly a quarter of a century, her death occurring on February 22, 1898, and she was laid to rest in Green Park cemetery at Portland, to which spot his body then was removed for a final resting place beside her.   To James G. and Sarah  ( HUTSON ) ADAIR were born five children, the daughter Nan, who was born in Jackson county, Ohio, and who married A. J. LEEDY, of Portland, and four sons, Oscar H., Charles P., Alpheus A. and John A. M., the latter of whom is now  (1922)  engaged  in departmental  work at Washington.  John A. M. ADAIR has for years been one of the leaders of the Democratic party in Indiana.  From the days of his youth he has been interested in civic affairs.  His first public service was rendered as clerk of the city of Portland.  He afterward was county clerk.  For ten years he served this district as representative in Congress and in 1916 was his party's nominee for Governor of Indiana. He is president of the First National Bank of Portland and has other interests in that city.  The late Oscar H. ADAIR, the first of this family born in Jay county, was born in December following the coming here of his parents in the spring of 1852.  He completed his schooling in Liber College and at Valparaiso University, from which latter institution he was graduated in 1876.  At the age of seventeen he had begun teaching school in this county and was for some years thus engaged during the winters.  Not  long after receiving his diploma from Valparaiso he began reading law in the office of Headington & LaFollette at Portland and in 1880 was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court and thus entered upon a career which made him one of the most conspicuous members of the local bar.  He died in 1904, while in his prime as a lawyer, and, as is noted elsewhere in this work, universal regret was expressed at his untimely taking off, for he was measured by the community and by his associates as an able, substantial lawyer.  The next son, Charles P. ADAIR, turned his attention to commercial pursuits and became a successful druggist at Portland.  He is now living retired in that city.  The third son, Alpheus A. ADAIR, completed his schooling by two years in the Portland high school and then for two years taught school in this county.  Attracted by the lure of the West he then went to Kansas and became engaged in the grocery and provision business at Medicine Lodge. Two years later he went on farther west and located at Chivington, Col., where for two years he was engaged in the same line of business.  About that time good reports were coming out of Oklahoma and he went to Guthrie and started up in the same line, but two years of life in Guthrie proved sufficient and he then returned to Portland and has been engaged in the drug business in that city since 1894. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.158-160.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.   

GEORGE W ADAMS  proprietor of a feed store at Portland and for years one of the best known business men of that city, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here nearly all his life.  Mr. ADAMS was born on a farm in Wabash township on March 21, 1861, and is a son of William Thompson and Margaret ( ARBAUGH ) ADAMS, both members of pioneer families in that section of the county.  William Thompson ADAMS was born in. Columbiana county, Ohio, and was but a child when he came to Indiana with his parents, David ADAMS and wife, who settled on a quarter section of land which the former had entered [land] in Wabash township, this county, and became influential pioneers of that neighborhood.  Of the eight children born to the pioneer David ADAMS and wife, three are still living, John and Joseph ADAMS and their sister, Sarah.  William Thompson ADAMS grew to manhood on the home farm in Wabash township, completed his schooling in the old academy at College Corner and had been for several years engaged in teaching school in addition to his farm work, when the Civil war broke out.  Despite the family obligations he meanwhile had assumed he enlisted for service in the Union army and went to the front as a member of the Thirty-ninth regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for more than three years.  Upon the completion of his military service Mr. ADAMS returned home and resumed his farming operations, also for some time thereafter continuing to teach school during the winters, his total term of service as a teacher in the schools of his home township covering nearly ten years.  He acquired a good farm in Wabash township and remained there until 1883, when he moved to Portland and there engaged in the lumber business, continuing thus engaged for four years, at the end of which time he disposed of his interests here and went to Kansas.  Three years later he went to New Orleans, but after a year's experience in that city returned to Indiana and located at Columbus, where his last days were spent, his death occurring there in 1918, he then being eighty-four years of age. George W. ADAMS grew up on the home farm in Wabash township and received his schooling in the neighboring schools. He was married at the age of twenty-one and the year following became engaged with his father in the lumber business at Portland.  When that business was disposed of he went with his father to Kansas, but after several years returned to Portland and became connected with the operation of the old Centennial mills at that place, remaining with that concern for fifteen years, at the end of which time he was made manager of the Holmes grain elevator.  Four years later he gave up the elevator business and in 1910 became engaged in the general feed business at Portland, the line he has since followed with considerable success.  Mr. and Mrs. ADAMS are members of the First Christian church and are Republicans.  It was in 1882 that George W. ADAMS was united in marriage to Sarah R. WELLS, who was born in Noble township, this county, and to this union three children have been born, Dessie, Lula and Ray V. (deceased).  Dessie ADAMS married Cloyce BADDERS  and has nine children, Donald, Diana, Mary, Margaret, Deloris, Harold, James, George and Lula.  Lula ADAMS married William WELLER and has had two children, Troyla and Tod (deceased). SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.92‑93.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FRANK ALBERSON , proprietor of the ALBERSON hotel and cafe in West Main street, Portland, and one of the best known residents of that city, has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his childhood.  He was born at Champaign, III., in January, 1875, and is the son and only child of James and Catherine ( WILLIAMSON ) ALBERSON, the former of whom was born and reared in Adams county, this state, later becoming a resident of Orange county, where he is the owner of a farm of 120 acres.  Frank ALBERSON was reared at Bryant, this county, and received his schooling in the schools of that village.  From the days of his boyhood he had been a fancier of fine horses and as a young man became engaged in the work of training horses for the track, a vocation he followed for years, becoming one of the best known figures in racing circles in this part of the state. In 1905 Mr. ALBERSON gave up the work which had for so many years interested him and bought the hotel and cafe which he since has been operating at Portland.  In 1907 Frank ALBERSON was united in marriage to Edith HANKS, who was born in Jay county, daughter of Frank and Ella ( JOURNAY ) HANKS, and who died on September 12, 1920. Mr. ALBERSON is a member of the Portland Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,  History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.94‑95  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.           

JOSEPH S ALBERSON who formerly and for years was engaged in the mercantile business at Poling, in this county, and is now the proprietor of a well improved farm in Jackson township, where he makes his home, rural mail route No. 3 out of Bryant, is a native Hoosier, a member of one of the pioneer families in this part of the state, and has lived in Indiana all his life.  Mr. ALBERSON was born on a farm in the neighboring county of Adams on July 15, 1863, and is a son of Henry and Rachel ( SHIGLEY ) ALBERSON, the latter of whom was born in Ohio, but had been a resident of Adams county since the days of her girlhood.  Henry ALBERSON was born in Randolph county, this state, and was ten years of age when his parents, Josiah ALBERSON and wife, who were among the pioneers of Randolph county, moved from that county up into Adams county.  He grew to manhood on a pioneer farm there and after his marriage established his home on a farm of his own, coming to be the owner of 160 acres in that county, and there he remained until his retirement from the farm when he made his home with his son Joseph in this county, where Iris last days were spent.  He and his wife were the parents of four children, three of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Barbara and Mary.  Reared on the home farm in Adams county, Joseph S. ALBERSON received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and remained on the home farm until he was twenty-eight years of age when he became engaged in the mercantile business at the village of Domestic, in Wells county.  Some years later he disposed of his interests there and moved down into Jay county and bought a store at Poling, where he remained in business until 1907, having thus been engaged in the mercantile business for thirteen years, when he traded his store for the farm on which he is now living in Jackson township and has since made his home there.  Mr. ALBERSON has a well improved farm of 160 acres and is doing well in his operations.  Among the improvements he has made since taking possession of the place is the erection of a fine new barn 38 by 72 feet in dimensions.  He gives considerable attention to the raising of pure bred Chester White hogs and feeds out about seventy‑five head a year.   Mr. ALBERSON is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political affairs.  Joseph S. ALBERSON married Emma TAYLOR, daughter of Henry and Mary E. TAYLOR, and to this union four children have been born, Artie, Orel, Merle and Earl, all of whom are living save the first born.  Artie ALBERSON married Lawrence TINKLE and died on September 25, 1916, being then at the age of thirty years, six months and eighteen days, and left two children,  Vaughn  and  Donavan.  Orel  ALBERSON  married  Hazel STEWART.  He has been teaching since he was seventeen years of age save for the time spent in the army during the World war and is now a teacher in the Massey Business College at Houston, Tex.  During the World war he was in the service for about two years, a flyer in the aviation section, and attained the rank of second lieutenant.   Merle ALBERSON married Nellie HARTLEY.  Earl ALBERSON married Nellie EDGINGTON and has two children, Louise and Hugh. The ALBERSON’s have a very pleasant home and have ever taken an interested part in the community's general social activities.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.354‑355.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

ELMER W ANDARS , a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, justice of the peace in and for Richland township and a well known grocer at Redkey, where he has been in business for years, is a native of the old Keystone state, but has been a resident of Indiana since he was eleven years of age and of Jay county since 1906, in the spring of which year he located at Redkey, where he has since resided, now the oldest grocer continuously engaged in that line in that city.  Mr. ANDARS was born on a farm in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, January 24, 1865, and is a son of George W. and Mahala ( STONE ) ANDARS, whose last days were spent in Delaware county, Indiana.  George W. ANDARS also was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and early became engaged there in farming, a vocation he followed in that state until 1876, when he disposed of his interests there and came with his family to Indiana, locating in Delaware county, where he bought a farm of seventy-nine acres.  For about twenty years he made his home on that farm and then bought a place of ninety-eight acres in Perry township, same county, where he established his home and where he spent the remainder of his life.  He and his wife were the parents of ten children, of whom five are still living, Mr. ANDARS having four sisters,  Sarah Ellen, Elizabeth A., Margaret N. and Allie V.  The deceased children of this family were Catherine, Rebecca, Mary A., Daniel and Lorenzo B.  As noted above, Elmer W. ANDARS was but eleven years of age when he came to Indiana with his parents in 1876 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Delaware county, receiving his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood.  He married when twenty years of age and was engaged in farming and in carpentering in Delaware county for ten years or more thereafter, or until the spring of 1906 when he moved to Redkey and there, on March 6, 1906, became engaged in the grocery business.  On January 1  of the  following year Mr. ANDARS opened his present grocery store and has ever since been engaged in business there, the oldest continuous grocer in Redkey. Mr. ANDARS is a Democrat and in 1910 was elected justice of the peace in and for Richland township.  He has been twice re-elected to this office and is now serving his third term as justice.  He was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court some years ago and is thus a practicing attorney as well as justice of the peace.  Mr. and Mrs. ANDARS are members of the United Brethren church and he is a Freemason and a member of both the subordinate lodge and the encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Redkey. It was on November 28, 1885, that Elmer W. ANDARS was united in marriage to Mary E. BREWER, who was born in Perry township, Delaware county.  To this union seven children have been born.  Of these five are living, namely:  Ray B., now living at Pontiac, Mich., who married Jessie PETTY, of Delaware county;  George R., who married Bessie WEGMER, who died on October .6, 1914; Clay H., who is unmarried and at home; Gwendolin, who married William H. BOLTZ, of Winchester, Ind., and has one child, a daughter, Bernice; and Nilah L., who is at home.   The ANDARS family have a pleasant home at Redkey and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.131‑132.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ALFRED A ANTLES

Alfred A. ANTLES, a well known retired farmer and former stockman and a substantial landowner of this county, now living at Portland, where he has made his home for more than twenty years past, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families of the county, and has lived here all his life.   Mr. ANTLES was born on a farm in Bearcreek township on February 10, 1851, and is a son of David and Rebecca A. ( STANLEY  ) ANTLES, the latter of whom was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, in 1829.  David ANTLES was born in Wayne county, Ohio, in 1830, and was about eleven years of age when in the summer of 1841, he came with his parents to Indiana, the family settling in Bearcreek township, this county.  There David ANTLES grew to manhood and on April 7, 1850, married Rebecca A. STANLEY, who was about nine years of age when she came to this county with her parents in the spring of 1839, the STANLEY’s settling on the south half of the section 14 .in Bearcreek township, where Grandfather STANLEY died in March, 1849.  David ANTLES followed farming all his life and was the owner of an excellent farm of  100 acres in Bearcreek township, where he died on October 14, 1892.  He and his wife were the parents of eleven children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Frank and Fred ANTLES.  Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, Alfred A. ANTLES received his schooling in the old Center school house and from the days of his boyhood was a valued assistant to his father in the labors of the farm. He remained on the home farm until he was twenty-seven years of age, when he began farming on his own account and after his marriage established his home on a farm and continued farming until December, 1898, when he left the farm and moved to Portland, where he became engaged in the live stock business, buying mostly for the Buffalo market.  In this business he continued until his retirement in December, 1917.  He continues, however, to give some personal attention to his farms, of which he owns two, one of 120 acres in sections 10 and II of Wayne township and one of 100 acres in section 22 of Noble township.  When he was eight years old, in the summer of 1859, Mr. ANTLES attended a summer school taught by Miss Alice Avery in a little frame house which stood on what is now the corner of Wayne and Walnut streets in Portland.  In the fall of 1885, in a house on that same corner he was married.   In September, 1905, he bought that lot and the house which stood on it and he and his wife have since been living there, very comfortably situated.  It was on September 6, 1885, that Alfred A. ANTLES was united in marriage to Addie HANLIN, who was born in Jackson county, Ohio, and who was but a child when her parents, James and Irena ( STEPHENSON ) HANLIN, came to Indiana with their family and settled on a farm in Wayne township, this county.   James HANLIN became one of the substantial farmers of that township and was the owner of a fine farm, of 240 acres. He and his wife had three children, two of whom are still living, Mrs. ANTLES and her sister, Jennie. Mrs. ANTLES completed her schooling at Ridgeville College and has ever given her thoughtful attention to the cultural affairs of the community. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.68‑69.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut. 

FRANK ANTELS

Frank ANTLES, a well known farmer and landowner of Bearcreek township, now living retired at his pleasant farm home on rural mail route No. 11  out of Portland, was born in that same township, a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county, and has resided there all his life.  Mr. ANTLES was born on December 9, 1853, and is a son of David A.. and Rebecca Ann (STANLEY) ANTLES, the latter of whom was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and was a daughter of Thomas C. STANLEY, who came to Indiana. with his family in pioneer days and settled in Bearcreek township, this county.   David A. ANTLES was born in Wayne county, Ohio, in 1830, and was a son of Joseph and Mary (HOUGH) ANTLES, the latter of whom was born in Union county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of David and Elizabeth (BYRON) HOUGH.  Joseph ANTLES was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1810, and was a son of David and Elizabeth  ( McCULLOUGH )  ANTLES, who became residents of Wayne county, Ohio, about 1818.  In this latter county Joseph ANTLES grew to  manhood  and  in  the  fall  of  1829 married  Mary  HOUGH.   He remained in Wayne county until in June, 1841, when he came with his  family to  Indiana,  driving over with two  yoke of  oxen,  and bought an "eighty" in section 23 of Bearcreek township, this county, where he put up a log cabin and established his home.  On that pioneer farm Joseph ANTLES spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in the spring of 1852.  His widow survived for about twelve years.  They had ten children, David, Elizabeth, Nancy, Sarah Jane and Isaac, who were born in. Ohio, and Fidelia, Dennis, Joseph and Hymelious and Cornelius (twins), born in this county.  David A. ANTLES, father of the subject of this sketch, was eleven years of age when he came with his parents to Jay county and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Bearcreek township.  On April 7, 1850, he then being under twenty years of age, he was united in marriage to Rebecca Ann STANLEY, who also had come over here from Ohio with her parents in the days of her girlhood.  After his marriage Mr. ANTLES located on a farm in section 22 of Bearcreek township and not long afterward bought an "eighty" in that same section.  Ten years later he moved to a farm in section 27 and in 1871 bought the place now owned and occupied by his son Frank in that township. On this latter place he spent the remainder of his life and developed there an excellent piece of property.  David A. ANTLES was a Republican and for some years served as justice of the peace in and for Bearcreek township.  He and his wife were members of the Baptist church and their children were reared in that faith.  There were ten of these children, three of whom are  still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Alfred A. and Frederick M. ANTLES. Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, Frank ANTLES received his schooling in the old Center school and in the Higgins school.   He was  about  seventeen years  of age when the  family moved to the farm he now owns in Bearcreek township and he helped develop the same into a well equipped home farm.  He married when twenty-seven years of age and then established his home on a.  tract  of  sixty  acres  off  the  south  end  of  the  farm,  which  he  bought from his father and twenty-five acres of which he had cleared. After his  father's death  Mr.  ANTLES  bought  from  the  other  heirs  the remaining 100 acres of the home farm and has since owned 160 acres. which he has developed in admirable fashion.  For some years past he has been living practically retired from the active labors of the farm, operations there now being carried on by his son-in-law, Ned E. BEALS.  There are eleven oil wells on the ANTLES farm, the leases for the same being carried by the Emerald Oil Company of Bryant, and Mr. ANTLES has for years been deriving a considerable revenue from this source.  Mr. ANTLES is a Democrat and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political affairs, but has not been a seeker after public office.  On April 24, 1881, Frank ANTLES was united in marriage to Elizabeth BISHOP, who also was born in Bearcreek township, and to this union two children have been born, daughters both, Lona O. and Edna, the latter of whom married James A. FIFER, now supervisor of  production control in  the big plant  of the Goodyear Rubber Company at Akron, Ohio, and has three children, Madeline, Marceil and James C. L. FIFER.  Lona O. ANTLES married Ned E. BEALS. who is now operating the ANTLES farm, and has one child, a son, Ivan.  Mrs. ANTLES is a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (PRILLIMAN) BISHOP, who in their generation were among the best known residents of Bearcreek township.  Peter BISHOP was an European by birth, born in the city of Dresden, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Saxony, and was nineteen years of age when he came to this country and not long afterward became a resident of this county and in time the owner of a farm of 160 acres in Bearcreek township, where he spent his last days.  His wife, Elizabeth PRILLIMAN, was born in Miami county, Ohio.  They were the parents of eight children, four of whom are living, Mrs. ANTLES having two sisters, Lydia and Susanna, and a brother, Wilson M. BISHOP. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.390‑392.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FREDERICK M ANTLES

Frederick  M. ANTLES, superintendent of highways for district No.  10, Jay county, and proprietor of an excellent farm in Bearcreek township, where he makes his home, on rural mail route No. 2 out of Bryant,. is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived in this county all his life. Mr. ANTLES was born on a farm in Bearcreek township on August 15, 1873, and is a son of David A. and Rebecca A. (Stanley) ANTLES, both natives of Ohio but who had been residents of this county since the days of their childhood, both having come over here with their respective parents in pioneer days, as is set out elsewhere in this volume, together with further reference to the ANTLES family in this county.  David A. ANTLES, who was for years one of the best known residents of Jay county, a former justice of the peace in and for Bearcreek township, was a good farmer and a man of influence in his community.  He and his wife were the parents of ten children, of whom bat three are now living, the subject of this sketch and his brothers, Alfred A. ami Frank Andes. Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, Frederick  M. ANTLES received his schooling in the old Higgins school house (district No. 10)  and remained at home, a valued assistant in the labors of the farm, until his marriage at the age of twenty‑five when he began farming on his own, renting a part of the home place. Six years later he bought the place on which he is now living in Bearcreek township and has since resided there, he and his family being very comfortably situated.  Mr. ANTLES has a well improved farm of forty‑nine acres, having erected a new dwelling house since taking possession of the place and remodeled the barn along modern lines.  He has given considerable attention to under draining and has put in 1,200 rods of tile, and in other ways has brought his place up to standard.  Mr. ANTLES is a Republican and is serving his second term as superintendent of highways in his district, his consistent advocacy of better roads having been helpful in promoting the good roads movement in that section of the county.  He and his wife are members of .the Pleasant Grove Methodist Protestant church.  On November 23, 1898, Frederick M. ANTLES was united in marriage to Lura E. SHEPHERD, also a member of one of the old families of Jay county, and to this union two children have been born, Alma E., born on February 25, 1900, and Ira A., June 14, 1901, the latter of whom was graduated from the Bryant high school with the class of 1921,  Alma E. ANTLES. who was for five years a teacher in the schools of Bearcreek township, married Emerson R. WALL, who is now farming in the New Corydon neighborhood, and has one child, a daughter, Arloein R.   Emerson R. WALL is a veteran of the World war and has a record of having served overseas for two years and nine days.  He was attached to the Ammunition Supply Corps of the First Division of the United States army.  Mrs, ANTLE was born in Wabash township and is a daughter of John and Catherine ( EIS ) SHEPHERD.  She was reared in that township and her schooling was received in the Center school. The ANTLE’s have a very pleasant home in Bearcreek township and have ever taken an interested part in the community's general social activities.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.236‑237.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

MARTIN T ARMANTROUT

Martin T. ARMANTROUT one of the progressive and enterprising young  farmers of Bearcreek township and the proprietor of a well improved farm in that township, on rural mail route No. 2 out of Bryant, was born on the farm on which he is now living and has lived there all his life.  Mr. ARMANTROUT was born on February II, 1890, and is a son of Jonathan and Huldah ( CHAPMAN ) ARMANTROUT, both of whom are now deceased, the former dying in 1901.  Jonathan ARMANTROUT was the owner of an excellent farm of 105 acres in Bearcreek township.  He and his wife had four children, all of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers. Barton and William ARMANTROUT, and a sister, May.   Martin J. ARMANTROUT was but eleven years of age when his father died and he early began to assume mature responsibilities on the home farm.  He received his schooling in the Rogers school and remained on the home farm, establishing his home there after his marriage. Upon the death of his mother he added to his inheritance by the purchase of the interests of two of the other heirs and has a well kept place of eighty acres, he and his family having there a very comfortable home.  The farm is under lease to an oil producing company and there are six productive wells on the place, the royalties on which prove quite an additional source of revenue.  Mr. ARMANTROUT is a Democrat, is a member of the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen at Bryant and he and his wife are members of the Limberlost Church of Christ.   On March 23, 1909, Martin J. ARMANTROUT was united in marriage to Lulu HOOVER, who also was born in this county, and to this union four children have been born, Arthur L., Vernon S., Fern N. I.,  and Claude E., the last named of whom died at the age of one month and seven days.  Mrs. ARMANTROUT was born in Bearcreek township and is a daughter of James A. and Naomi ( GLENTZER ) HOOVER, both members of pioneer families in this county. James A. HOOVER is a substantial farmer of Bearcreek township and he and his wife have four children, Mrs. ARMANTROUT having two sisters, Josie and Fronie, and a brother, Archie HOOVER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.156.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.


JOHN C ARMSTRONG

John  C. ARMSTRONG, who for many years was one of the best known agriculturists of Madison township, a substantial landowner and one of the leaders in community affairs thereabout, who died at his home in that township in the fall of 1921, left a good memory at his passing and it is regarded as but fitting that some modest tribute to that memory be paid here.  Mr. ARMSTRONG was a native of the old Buckeye state, but had been a resident of Jay county for more than a half century and had thus been a witness to the development of this county since what might be considered as pioneer days.  He was born in Licking county, Ohio, July 19, 1843, and was a son of John V. and Leanna ( TROUT ) ARMSTRONG, who later became residents of Franklin county. Ohio.  John C. ARMSTRONG was ten years of age when his parents moved to Franklin county and there he grew to manhood and received his schooling.  He married there and about two years later, in 1867, came over into Indiana and settled on a farm in Madison township, this county.  Mr. ARMSTRONG's first investment here was in a tract of forty acres in Madison township, but as his affairs prospered he added to his holdings until he became the owner of  160 acres and was accounted one of the substantial farmers of that neighborhood.  He created a good farm there and continued to make that his home until his death, which occurred on October 28, 1921.  Mr. ARMSTRONG was a Democrat and was a member of the Masonic lodge at Ft. Recovery.  John C. ARMSTRONG was twice married.  On October 18, 1865, while living in Franklin county, Ohio, he was united in marriage to Celia Ann ARTMAN, of that county, who died in Jay county on January 18, 1872, leaving one child, a son, Charles A. ARMSTRONG, who is now farming in the vicinity of Versailles, Ohio.   Charles A. ARMSTRONG married Mrs. Jennie ( CRAMER ) STEVENS and has two children, Celia and Gerald, and a stepson, George STEVENS.  On November 27, 1873, John C. ARMSTRONG married Asenath MONEY, of Madison township, a member of one of the real pioneer families of Jay county, and to this union five children were born, all of whom are living save Nicholas, who died on January 29, 1908, at the age of twenty-two years, three months and two days, the others being William R., Nellie, Grace G. and Arrah A., the latter of whom married Melva MONEY and is now employed in the office of the American Express Company at Hartford City, Ind.  The late Nicholas ARMSTRONG, who at the time of his death was employed as a railway brakeman, making his home at Logansport, Ind., married Rilla FORD and left one child, a son, Willard.  William R. ARMSTRONG, who is now proprietor of a book and stationery store at Portland, married Catherine COPE and has five children, Helen, Roger, Lucile, John and Catherine.  Nellie ARMSTRONG married George M. FOSTER, a well known and progressive farmer of Madison township, living on rural mail route No. 3 out of Ft. Recovery (Ohio), and has two children, Dalton and Gordon.  Grace G. ARMSTRONG married Charles FRAZIER, a farmer in the neighboring county of Wells, and has three children, Eldon, June and Keith.  Mrs. Asenath MONEY ARMSTRONG, widow of John C. ARMSTRONG, is a daughter of William and Asenath (  DENNEY  ) MONEY, the latter of whom was born in North Carolina.  William MONEY was born in the vicinity of Steuben, Ohio, October 27, 1809, a son of William and Anna ( ANDERSON ) MONEY, and was reared in Mercer county, Ohio, his parents having been among the pioneers of that county.  The elder William MONEY was a Virginian and a soldier of the War of 1812.  In the days of his young manhood, even before Jay county was organized as a separate civic unit, the junior William MONEY came over here into Indiana and settled on a pioneer farm in what later came to be organized as Madison township.  Here he married Asenath DENNEY, a daughter of one of the first settlers of that section, and he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives here, useful and influential members of the community which they helped to develop from the days of the beginning of a social order hereabout.  William MONEY not only was an influential factor in getting schools started in the community, but was ordained a minister of the Church of Christ and was for many years a leader in the services of that communion in that part of the county.  His wife died in December, 1882, and he survived until June 15,  1893,  he  then  being  in  his  eighty-fourth  year.   This  earnest pioneer couple had eight children, those besides Mrs. ARMSTRONG having been Mrs. Anna DENNISTON, William MONEY, Mrs. Mary Jane HILLFIKER, Alexander MONEY, Mrs. Sarah D. DAVIS, Nicholas J. MONEY and James Alpha MONEY. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.190‑191.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.


JOSHUA ARMSTRONG

Joshua ARMSTRONG, one of Jay county's well known octogenarians and a substantial retired farmer, and landowner who died at his home in Madison township early in 1922, was a native of the old Buckeye state, but had been a resident of Indiana and of Jay county for fifty-six years.  Mr. ARMSTRONG was born on a farm in Licking county, Ohio, December 4, 1835, and was a son of George and Alice ( VANCE ) ARMSTRONG, the latter of whom was born in Virginia but became a resident of Licking county (Ohio) when a child, her parents having settled there upon moving into Ohio from Virginia.   George ARMSTRONG was born in  Pennsylvania, but became a resident of Licking county, Ohio, where he married and where he made his home until 1853, when he moved with his family to Franklin county, same state, where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives.  George ARMSTRONG was the owner of a farm of 150 acres in Franklin county and his family was reared in comfort.   He and his wife were the parents of ten children, but one of whom is now living, a daughter, Lucinda.   The late Joshua ARMSTRONG was eighteen years of age when the family moved from Licking to Franklin county and he took an active part in the work of developing the home farm In the latter county, he and his two elder brothers,  Samuel and Charles H. ARMSTRONG, managing the place for their father.  After the latter's death the brothers disposed of their interests in Ohio and came over into Indiana and bought a tract of 200 acres in section 2 of Madison township, this county, locating here on November I, 1865.  They built a new house on the place in 1875 and in other ways brought the farm up to a high state of development.  The brothers farmed the place together for more than twenty-five years and then Joshua ARMSTRONG acquired sole ownership and continued to manage the place until in 1918 when he divided the farm among his children, retaining a tract of thirty-five acres surrounding the home, and had since lived retired from the active details of management, his death occurring there on January 8, 1922.  Mr. ARMSTRONG was a Democrat.   He was a Freemason, his affiliation having been with the local lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons at Ft. Recovery, and he had for many years taken a warm interest in Masonic affairs.  In March, 1863, two years and more before he came to Jay county, Joshua ARMSTRONG was united in marriage in Franklin county, Ohio, to Emeline V. TRISH, who was born in that county in 1845, a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth ( SHEFFER ) TRISH, the latter of whom was born in France in  1825.   Adam  TRISH  was  born  in  Germany  in  1818  and  when eighteen years of age came to the United States, locating in the vicinity of Tiffin, Ohio.  Of the nine children born to Adam TRISH and wife five are still living, Mrs. ARMSTRONG having three sisters, Barbara, Mary and Josephine,  and a brother, Adam TRISH.  To Joshua and Emeline (TRISH) ARMSTRONG have been born five children, Samuel A., Alice E., Maggie, Emma and Charles, all of whom are living, Alice E. ARMSTRONG continuing to make her home with her widowed mother.  Samuel A. ARMSTRONG, a well known teacher in the schools of this county and a farmer of Madison township, married Serena A. WOTEN and has had four children, three of whom are living, Elmira, Ruth and Russell.   Maggie ARMSTRONG married Sheridan WHITACRE, a farmer of Madison township, and has seven children, Pearl, Mabel, Earl, Dwight, Charles, Paul and Esther WHITACRE.  Emma ARMSTRONG has been twice married.  Her first husband, Henry LOWERY, died leaving one child, a son, Cecil LOWERY.  By her marriage to John WHITACRE she has one child, Marion WHITACRE.  Charles ARMSTRONG, who is now living in the vicinity of Rapid City, Mich., married Margaret EMMONS and has one child, a son, Charles Alva. The ARMSTRONG home place is on rural route No. 3 out of Ft. Recovery, Ohio, ( Mercer County) and has ever been noted for its genial hospitality. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.264‑265.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut


SAMUEL A ARMSTRONG

Rev. Samuel A. ARMSTRONG, a minister of the Christian church, a veteran teacher in the schools of this county and a substantial farmer and landowner of Madison township, proprietor of a well-kept farm on rural mail route No. 3 out of Ft. Recovery (Ohio), where he makes his home, a former township trustee and one of the best known citizens of that part of the county, is a "Buckeye" by birth, but has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his infancy.  Mr. ARMSTRONG was born on a farm in Franklin county, Ohio, December 27, 1863, and is a son of Joshua and Emeline V. ( TRISH ) ARMSTRONG, the latter of whom was born in that same county, a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth  ( SHAFFER )  TRISH, the former of whom was born in Germany and the latter in France.  Joshua ARMSTRONG was born in Licking county, Ohio, November 4, 1835, a son of George and Alice  ( VANCE )  ARMSTRONG, and was eighteen years of age when the family moved to Franklin county, where he married and engaged in farming, remaining there until the fall of 1865, when, in company with his elder and unmarried brothers, Samuel and Charles H. ARMSTRONG, he came with his family to Jay county and established his home on a tract of 200 acres the brothers had bought in section 2 of Madison township.  The three brothers made an excellent piece of property out of that farm, and there Joshua ARMSTRONG made his home until the end, his death occurring there on January 8, 1922, he then being in the' eighty-seventh year of his age.  To him and his wife were born five children, all of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having three sisters, Alice E.,  Mrs.  Emma  WHITACRE  and  Mrs.  Margaret  WHITACRE,  and  a brother, Charles ARMSTRONG.  As will be noted by a comparison of above dates, Samuel A. ARMSTRONG was under two years of age when his parents came to Jay county in the fall of 1865. He grew to manhood on the home farm in Madison township, and his early schooling was received in the Lotz district school.  He was an apt student and through the aid received in his studies at home early became qualified as a teacher, and when hardly more than a boy taught two terms of school in the district schools of his home township.  He then for two years attended the Normal School at Portland, in further preparation for teaching service, and has ever since been engaged in teaching, a record of service covering nearly forty years, all but five years of this service having been rendered in the schools of his home township.  In addition to his school duties Mr. ARMSTRONG also early began to turn his attention to study for the gospel ministry, and in due time was ordained as a minister of the Christian church.  During the years 1894-96 he preached for the congregation of the West Walnut Street Christian church at Portland, and at the same time carried on classes in the old Normal School in that city, teaching from three to six hours a day.  During the years 1897-98 Mr. ARMSTRONG served as pastor of the Christian church at Oxford, Ind., and at the termination of that service returned to his home in Madison township and bought a tract of forty-six acres in that township, a part of the farm on which he is now living, and has since resided there, he and his family being very comfortably situated.   Since taking possession of this place Mr. ARMSTRONG has added to his holdings by the purchase of an adjoining tract of sixty‑three acres and thus now has a fine farm of 109 acres, well improved and profitably cultivated.  In addition to his continuous service as a teacher in the schools of his home township Mr. ARMSTRONG continues to maintain his ministerial service, and on call preaches in churches not too remote from his established home and also responds to calls for "supply" preaching in the churches of his faith hereabout.  He also gives his thoughtful attention to local civic affairs, and during the years 1887-88 served as trustee of Madison township.  He is a member of the local camp of the Modern Woodmen at Salamonia. On October 16, 1885, the Rev. Samuel A. ARMSTRONG was united in marriage to Serena A. WOTEN, who was born in Madison township, a member of one of the real pioneer families of that part of the county, and whose schooling was received at the Center school. Mrs. ARMSTRONG's parents, the Rev. Benjamin and Mary A. ( PEDEN ) WOTEN, both were born in Madison township, the WOTEN’s and the PEDEN’s having been among the earliest settlers of that part of Jay county.  The Rev. Benjamin WOTEN, formerly a well-known minister  of  the  Christian  (Disciples)  church  and  a  substantial  land owner of Madison township, was born in that township on .December 1, 1836, and was a son of Hugh and Elizabeth ( GOLDSMITH ) WOTEN, who were married in that vicinity in December, 1835, this region then having been a part of the northern extension of Randolph county, for that was before Jay county had been set off as a separate civic entity.  Hugh WOTEN had come to this region in October, 1833, with his parents and became the owner of a quarter section of land in section 27 of Madison township.  In 1878 he was ordained a minister of the Christian Conference and was widely known as a "local'" preacher among the churches of that communion hereabout.  His son Benjamin, father of Mrs. ARMSTRONG, also became widely known as a minister of the Christian church, but his useful career was cut short by death in his forty-third year, August 12, 1879, and he was buried in the Salamonia cemetery, and his widow was left with five children.  To the Rev. Samuel A. and Serena A. ( WOTEN ) ARMSTRONG four children have been born, Elmyra M.,  Ruth Elva, Russel Irvin and Oliver W., the latter of whom died in infancy.  Elmyra  M. ARMSTRONG married Harry C. BICKEL, a farmer of Noble township, and has one child, a daughter, Erma Marcile BICKEL.  Ruth Elva ARMSTRONG married Alva C. BIBLER, also a Noble township farmer, and has two children, Edna M. and Carl BIBLER.   Russel lrvin ARMSTRONG, a. veteran of the World war, who is now giving his attention to the operation of his father's farm, entered the service of the National army at Portland on April 26, 1918, and was sent to Camp Taylor. Three weeks later he was transferred to Washington Barracks and thence, after ten days, to Camp Merritt in preparation for overseas service.  A week later he sailed with a detachment of the Engineers Corps and landed at Brest on June 28.  A month later he was assigned to the 324th Heavy Field Artillery, and on September 26, 1918, arrived with that command on the battle front.  After two months of strenuous service with that command he was transferred to the 32d Heavy Field Artillery, which had been heavily depleted in action, and he remained in action with that command until the armistice was signed on November II.  After the armistice he became a part of the Army of Occupation and was in Germany until orders came to return to the United States.  He arrived on home shores in the last week in May, 1919, and from Camp Mills was sent to Camp Sherman, where he received his discharge on June 4, 1919, and straightway returned home. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.150‑152.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ORVILLE D ARNOLD

Orville  D. ARNOLD, president of the Emerald Oil Company of Bryant and manager for the Sub-Trenton Oil Company of Portland, for years one of the most active figures in the local oil fields, with offices at Bryant, where he has long made his home, is a native son of Indiana and has lived in this state all his life.  Mr. ARNOLD was born in Bluecreek township, in the neighboring county of Adams, March 31, 1886, and is a son of James S. and Frances ( CARMENE ) ARNOLD, the latter of whom was born in Mercer county, Ohio.  James S. ARNOLD was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, but early became a resident of Indiana, locating in Adams county, where he for years was engaged in promoting the timber, industry and later practiced law.  He and his wife were the parents of nine children, eight of whom are living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Everett C., Myrtle, James F., Ben H., Grace, Mina and Mark.   Orville D. ARNOLD received his early schooling in the Bryant schools and supplemented this by one year in the Indiana Law College at Indianapolis and a year in the old Voorhees Business College in that city, gaining there a good working knowledge of commercial law and general business forms.  He and his brother, James F. ARNOLD, then became engaged in business at Bryant as general salvage brokers, opening up a local market for the disposition of various forms of "junk" within a wide territory hereabout, and developed quite a business in that line, a form of commercial activity they have maintained for the past nineteen years.  In the meantime, in 1911, they became attracted to the possibilities of continued oil development hereabout and entered upon their present successful business of buying and selling oil leases and at once took a prominent place among the leading producers of this section, this business being carried on under the firm name of the Emerald Oil Company, of which Orville D. ARNOLD is the president.  When the ambitious project was promoted in the spring of 1921, for the development and exploration of the possibilities of oil in the sub-Trenton stratum in this section of Indiana and the Sub-Trenton Oil Company of Portland was organized Mr. ARNOLD was made manager of that company's affairs and set about the desired exploration by means of what promises to be a series of deep wells in Bearcreek township, where some of the best wells in the Indiana field have been brought in.  Mr. ARNOLD also has been instrumental in the organization of other oil companies, has leases in this county as well as in Texas and has a wide and interesting acquaintance among oil men throughout the country.  He is a Republican and a member of the Elks lodge at Portland and he and his wife are members of the Church of the Immaculate Conception (Catholic) at Portland.  On January 6, 1910, Orville D. ARNOLD was united in marriage to Mary M. FORD and to this union one child has been born, a son. Jay Ford ARNOLD, who is now attending school at Bryant.  Mr. and Mrs. ARNOLD have a pleasant home at Bryant and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community.  Mrs. ARNOLD was born in Jefferson township, in the neighboring county of Adams, daughter of Daniel B. and Dill ( LAUGHLIN ) FORD, and completed her schooling by a course of four years of instruction in the Sacred Heart Academy at Fort Wayne.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.134‑135.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

WHEELER ASHCRAFT

Wheeler ASHCRAFT, attorney for the Hawkins Mortgage Company of Portland and for the past fifteen years and more a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, a resident of Portland since 1905, is a native son of the old Buckeye state but has never regretted the choice which led him over into the Hoosier state.  Mr. ASHCRAFT was born on a farm in Muskingum county, Ohio, July 19, 1878, and is a son of Jacob and Helen ( McDONALD ) ASHCRAFT, both also natives of Ohio, the latter born in Muskingum county on May 21, 1856, and both of whom are still living in that county.  Jacob ASHCRAFT was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, January 12, 1844, and was reared to farming.  He married in Muskingum county and there established his home.  He is the owner of a farm of 160 acres and he and his wife are the parents of six children, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Lucy Belle, and four brothers, Mansfield, Robert, Wendell  J. and Jennings B. ASHCRAFT.   Reared on the home farm in Muskingum county, Wheeler ASHCRAFT received his common schooling in the neighborhood schools and supplemented this by attendance at the Conesville (Ohio) high school and the normal school at Ada and in the winter of 1903-04 taught school in Coshocton county.  In the meantime he had been giving his serious thought to the study of law and pursued the course of study along that line laid down by the Sprague Correspondence School, remaining at home until in 1905 when he entered the law office of S. A. D. Whipple at Portland and under Mr. Whipple's preceptorship was prepared for admission to the bar.  In the following year (1906) Mr. ASHCRAFT was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court and then entered into an association with Mr. Whipple in the practice of his profession.  This association continued until 1909 when Mr. ASHCRAFT opened an office of his own at Portland and was thereafter engaged in practice alone, carrying on a general practice but making a specialty of corporation law, until December 1, 1921, when he entered upon his present connection as attorney for the Hawkins Mortgage Company of Portland and is now giving his whole attention to the affairs of that extensive corporation.  Mr. ASHCRAFT is a Republican and ever since he became a citizen of Indiana has given his thoughtful attention to local and state political  affairs.  On July 27,  1912,  Wheeler ASHCRAFT was united in marriage to Mary Nelle McFARLAND, former superintendent of the Portland Hospital, and to this union three children have been born, namely:  Anna Helen, born on November 8) 1913; Wheeler, Jr., February 6, 1916, and Hale Harlan, March 28, 1920.   Mrs. ASHCRAFT is a member of the Presbyterian church.  She was born at Millgrove, in the neighboring county of Blackford, July 9, 1882, and is a daughter of  Dr. John E.  and Anna  ( McFARLAND )  McFARLAND, who are still living at Millgrove and who have one other daughter, Josie.  Mrs. ASHCRAFT was reared at Millgrove and completed her schooling at the Marion Normal College, after which she entered the school for nurses conducted in connection with the Protestant Deaconess Hospital at Indianapolis and in due time was graduated from that institution, after which she entered upon her duties as a professional nurse and was so occupied until her marriage to Mr. ASHCRAFT, and for one year (1908-09)  served as superintendent of the old hospital at Portland.  The ASHCRAFT’s have a very pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the general social and cultural activities of the city. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.227‑228.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut


WILLIAM M ASHLEY

William M. ASHLEY, one of Jay county's well known and substantial farmers and landowners and proprietor of an excellent farm in Pike township, on rural mail route No. 8 out of Portland, where he makes his home, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life.  Mr. ASHLEY was born on a pioneer farm in Pike township on January 1, 1855, and is a son of Warren and Anna C. (BICKEL) ASHLEY, the latter of whom was a daughter of George W. and Nancy (GLASSFORD) BICKEL, Pennsylvanians, who came to Jay county from Ohio and were among the earliest settlers in Pike township.  Warren ASHLEY was born in North Carolina, son of a Revolutionary soldier, and in that state spent his youth.  As a young man he came West and located in Jay county, where he presently married Anna C. BICKEL and established his home on a farm in Pike township and became one of the useful factors in the agricultural development of that neighborhood.  On that farm he spent the remainder of his life.  He and his wife were the parents of seven children, six of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having one sister, Nancy, and four brothers, Luther, Dennis, Charles and Andrew J. ASHLEY.  Reared on the home farm in Pike township, William M. ASHLEY received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and when he began farming on his own account rented a farm in that township.   He worked that place for about twenty years and then bought the farm of eighty acres on which he is now living in that township and has since resided there.  Since taking possession of this place Mr. ASHLEY has erected a new set of buildings and now has a well equipped farm plant.  He is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Antioch Methodist Episcopal church.  In February, 1896, William M. ASHLEY was united in marriage to Laura BRAGG and to this union two daughters have been born,  Etta and Nettie, both of whom are married and have children of their own. Etta ASHLEY married Howard WILLIAMS and has two children. Roger and Laura, and Nettie ASHLEY married Leo FARRELL and has two children, Ray and May.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.380‑381.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

JAMES M AVEY

James M. AVEY, a well known and substantial agriculturist and landowner of Jackson township, is an Ohioan by birth but has been a resident of this county since he was twenty-five years of age and has thus for years regarded himself as thoroughly identified with the interests of this county as though native here.   Mr. AVEY was born. on a farm in Butler county, Ohio, June 1, 1851, and is a son of Jacob and Rachel (McDANIEL) AVEY, whose last days were spent in that county.  Jacob AVEY also was born in Butler county, a son of one of the pioneers of that section of Ohio, and grew up as a farmer, a vocation he followed all his life. the owner of a farm of forty acres. He and his wife were the parents of eleven children, three of whom arc still  living,  the  subject  of  this  sketch  having  a  brother,  George  W. AVEY, and a sister. Mollie.  Reared on the home farm in Butler county, James M. AVEY received his schooling in the local schools and from boyhood followed farming.  He married at the age of twenty-two and three years later came up into Indiana and bought a tract of eighty acres in the woods of Jackson township, this county, where he established his home and proceeded to clear the place and get it in shape for cultivation.   Clearing and draining was a big job, but he presently got it accomplished and now has a well improved farm, the drainage of which is aided by 1,300 rods of tile.  Mr. AVEY is  a  Republican  and, is  a  member of  the local  lodge of  the  Royal Order of Moose at Montpelier.  It was on September 8, 1874, that James M. AVEY was united in marriage to Louisa Jane McKEE, who was born in Pennsylvania, a daughter of Thomas and Mary McKEE, and to this union eight children have been born. Omer, Elmer, Taylor, Sell, Goldie, Lula, Alice and Hawsie. all of whom are living.   Omer AVEY is married and is living in British Columbia.  Elmer AVEY married Edith PRIEST, of this county, and has four children, Thelora, Marjorie, Cloyse and Allean.  Taylor AVEY married Katie MICHAELS and has seven children.  Sell AVEY married Minnie DOWNEY, of this county.  Goldie AVEY married Rolla BROOKS and is now living in Oregon.  Lula AVEY married Louis WELCH and also lives in Oregon. Alice AVEY was married on March 1, 1922, to Charles MYERS of Oregon City, Oregon.  Hawsie AVEY married May ALEXANDER, of this county, and has one child, a son, Robert. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.396‑397.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut


C HARRY  AYERS

C. HARRY AYERS, former mayor of Portland and for years actively engaged in the real estate business in that city, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his boyhood.  He was born in Auglaize county, Ohio, Tune 24, 1868, and was thirteen years of age when he came into Indiana and became a resident of Pike township, this county.  He completed his schooling in district school No. 2 in that township and early became engaged in buying and hauling timber, a line he followed for eight years or more, or until about 1898, when he moved to Portland and became engaged there as custodian of the high school building.  From the time of his arrival in Portland Mr. AYERS took an active interest in local civic affairs and in 1903 was elected mayor of the city for a term of two years.  So satisfactory were his services in this capacity that in 1905 he was re-elected for a term of four years and thus served as mayor of the city for a period of six years, at the end of which term of service he became engaged in the real estate business in Portland and has ever since been thus engaged, one of the most active factors in the realty market in this section of the state.   Mr. AYERS is a Republican and has long been recognized as one of the leaders of that party in this county.  He is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen and 'the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland and he and his wife are members of the Christian church.  On July II, 1890, C. Harry AYERS was united in marriage to Nora SILVERS,  who was born in the neighboring county of Randolph, and to this union have been born two daughters, Goldie M., who married Russell BERGMAN, of this county, and has one child, a son, Jack BERGMAN, and Marie, who is at home with her parents.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,  History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.94.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut


PAUL R AYERS

Paul  R. AYRES, a well known and progressive young lumber dealer at Dunkirk and one of the active factors in the business life of that place, was born on January 1, 1895, and is a son of Carey C. and Annabelle ( POLLOCK ) AYRES, of Redkey, this county.  Carey C. AYRES, proprietor of the AYRES Lumber Company, of Redkey, was. born in the neighboring county of Blackford, where he was reared and received his schooling.  He early began work as a carpenter, but after awhile became connected with the work of the Mercer Lumber Company at Hartford City and there became thoroughly familiar with the details of the lumber trade, a business to which he has since devoted himself, and not long afterward established himself in business at Redkey as head of the AYRES Lumber Company, the Dunkirk branch of which is managed by his son, Paul R. AYRES, the subject of this sketch.  Carey C. AYRES and wife have had nine children, two of whom, Edna and Basil, are deceased, the others being James E., Blanche, Hazel, Edgar E., Paul, Marguerite and Leroy, all of whom are married save Blanche.  James E. AYRES married Minnie BRADLEY, who was born in Canada.  Hazel AYRES married Homer W. McDANIEL.  Edgar AYRES married Ada StCLAIRE of Delaware county.  Marguerite AYRES married Gordon E. BRADLEY, of Canada, and Leroy AYRES married Minnie MINSCH.  In 1915 Paul  R. AYRES was united in marriage to Opal E. HUNT, who was born in Adams county, this state, and to this union two children have been born, Robert Dale and Frances Marcelle.  Mr. and Mrs. AYRES are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are Republicans. Mr. AYRES is a Royal Arch Mason and an Encampment Odd Fellow at Dunkirk and a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Redkey.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,  History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.119‑120.  Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut








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