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Jay County Indiana Biographies Surname D-E-F

 

DARST, JOSEPH V

Joseph V. DARST, an honored veteran of the Civil war and a former well known and substantial farmer and land owner of Jay county, who died at his home in Madison township in 1912, left a good memory at his passing, and it is but fitting that some modest tribute here be paid to that memory. Mr. DARST was a native of the state of Ohio, but had been a resident of Indiana since the days of his boyhood. He was born in Gallia county, Ohio, January 21, 1846, and was a son of William and Barbara (HALFHILL) DARST, who later became residents of Jay county and whose last days were spent here. It was in 1855 that William DARST came over here from Ohio with his family. He bought an ''eighty" in Madison township and on that unimproved farm established his home. As his affairs prospered he added to his holding's until he was the owner of 200 acres and was accounted one of the substantial men of that community. Joseph V. DARST was but nine years of age when he came to this county with his parents in 1855 and he received his schooling in the old Liberty school house in Madison township. Though he was but fifteen years of age when the Civil war broke out he got into the service of the Union army long before the war closed and served for more than two years as a member of Company E, 2d Ohio Heavy Artillery, enlisting on June 16, 1863, and receiving his discharge on August 23, 1865. Upon the completion of his military service he returned to his home in Madison township and resumed his place on the farm, aiding his father in the operations of the home farm until his marriage to Sarah DAVIDSON. After his marriage Mr. DARST began farming on his own account, renting a place from his father, a tract of eighty acres, and continued thus engaged for six years, at the end of which time he bought an "eighty" in Greene township and moved there. Eight years later he traded that farm for a tract of fifty acres in Madison township and presently bought an adjoining eighty acres, the place on which his widow still is living, and in that township continued farming the remainder of his life, his death occurring on December 21, 1912. Mr. DARST was a Republican and was one of the active members of Henry McLaughlin post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Salamonia. He was a member of Pleasant Hill Christian church, as is his widow, and was always helpful in good works in the community in which he resided. To Joseph V. DARST and wife four children were born, two of whom Frederick A. and Ethel are deceased, the others being Joseph W. DARST, who is now farming in the vicinity of Muncie, Ind.[Delaware Co.], and Edith, wife of William R. SORBRAY, a well-known and progressive farmer of Madison township. Mr. and Mrs. SORBRAY have a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 3 out of Ft. Recovery, [Mercer Co.] Ohio, and take an interested part in the general social activities of the community. They have four interesting children, Naomi, George, Sarah and Roberta, the two eldest of whom are attending school. Mr. and Mrs. SORBRAY are Republicans and Mrs. SORBRAY is a member of the Pleasant Hill Christian church. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.432-433. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

DAVIDSON, CHARLES R

Charles R. DAVIDSON, D. C., the senior chiropractic physician in Jay county in point of establishment and who has offices at Portland, where he has been practicing since 1916, is a native son of Jay county, born in Wabash township on October 17, 1887, and is a son of James and Cora E. ( GATES ) DAVIDSON, the latter of whom was born in Virginia. James E. DAVIDSON, who is now living retired in Portland, making his home with his son, Doctor DAVIDSON, was born in Ohio and there grew to manhood. After his marriage he, became a resident of this county, locating on a farm in Wabash township, but some years later moved to the neighboring county of Blackford, where he became the owner of a sixty-acre farm and where he made his residence until his retirement and removal to Portland. He and his wife were the parents of four children, two of whom are still living, Doctor DAVIDSON and his brother, J. R. DAVIDSON. Doctor DAVIDSON was but a child when his parents moved from this county to Blackford county, and his early schooling was received in the latter county. This was supplemented by a course in the Blackford high school and was supplemented a course in the Dunkirk high school and a course in a commercial school a Muncie, after which he went to Wyoming and was for a year there after employed at Thermopolis, that state. He then returned to Indiana and was for two years thereafter employed on the C. & E Railway at Huntington, after which he spent a year in school "brushing up," and. then entered the Palmer School of Chiropractic at Davenport, Iowa, from which institution he was graduated in September, 1915. Upon receiving his diploma. Doctor DAVIDSON locate at St. Cloud, Minn., where he remained for about a year, at the en( of which time he returned to the county of his birth and opened ai office for practice in Portland, where he has since been located, and where he has done well. Doctor DAVIDSON is a Democrat, is a Royal Arch Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In March. 1919. Dr. C. R. DAVIDSON was united in marriage to Ruth May POPE, daughter of E. D. and Emma POPE, and to this union has been born one child, a son, Charles Pope DAVIDSON. Doctor and Mrs. DAVIDSON have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the general social activities of the city. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.256-257. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

DENNEY, J RAY

J. Ray DENNEY, a well known young farmer of Madison township, living on rural mail route No. I out of Union City, Ind. is a native son of Jay county and has lived here nearly all his life. Mr. DENNEY was born at Portland on January 18, 1890, and is a son of Riley H. and Sadie ( HENRY ) DENNEY) both of whom also were born in Jay county, members of pioneer families here. Riley H. DENNEY, who for many years was engaged in the jewelry business at Portland, is now living retired in that city. To him and his wife four children were born, the subject of this sketch three sisters, Ina, Florence and Gladys. J. Ray DENNEY was reared at Portland and was graduated from the South ward school, after which he took two years in the high school. Some time later he went to Indianapolis and was for two years (1911-13) employed in the assembling department of the automobile plant of the Nordyke & Marmon Company in that city. In 1914, he returned to Jay county and became engaged in farming in Madison township, in partnership with his maternal uncle, Samuel HENRY, and continued thus engaged until Mr. HENRY's death on October 27, 1921, since which time he has been carrying on his farming operations alone, making his home on the old Henry place, where he has a very well equipped farm; plant and is doing well. Mr. DENNEY is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons at Portland and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of that city as well as of Delta chapter of the Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity at Portland. On May 30, 1909, J. Ray DENNEY was united in marriage to Mary Neva HALLAM and to this union one child was born, a son, James R. DENNEY, born on September 19, 1913, who is now a student at Center school. Mrs. DENNEY who died on October 13, 1918, was born in the state of Missouri, daughter of James M. and Fannie ( RICE ) HALLAM, but was reared and educated at Crawfordsville, Ind., where her father is engaged in the livestock business. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.138-139. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

DENNEY, Jacob F

Jacob F. DENNEY, former judge of the Jay Circuit Court, former mayor of the city of Portland and for nearly thirty years a member of the bar in this county, practicing law at Portland, is a native son of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Portland since the days of his young manhood. Judge DENNEY was born on a farm in Mercer county, Ohio, June 6, 1874, and is a son of Azariah and Lydia ( REIGEL ) DENNEY, the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania. Azariah DENNEY was born in Ohio and was seven years of age when his parents settled in Mercer county, that state. There he grew to manhood and was married, after which he established his home on a farm and there spent the remainder of his life, a substantial citizen and landowner of that county. Judge DENNEY completed his public schooling in the high school at Ft. Recovery and while going to school became attracted to the study of law. Upon leaving school he entered the law office of LaFollette &: Adair at Portland and under this preceptorship continued his study of law and in February, 1894, was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court and straightway opened an office in Portland for the practice of the profession to which he had devoted his talents. The Judge is a Democrat and from the days of his youth has taken an earnest interest in civic affairs, having thus for years been recognized as one of the leaders of his party not only in Jay county but throughout the Eighth district. Not long after his admission to the bar he was elected city attorney and has served several terms at one time and another in that capacity, and also has served one term as mayor of the city of Portland. In 1914 he was appointed judge of this judicial circuit and served a term in that important capacity. In 1916 Judge DENNEY was the Democratic nominee for Congress from this congressional district, hut "the fortunes of war" were against his election. Upon retiring from the bench the Judge resumed his practice and has since been thus engaged. He is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal Order of Moose. Judge DENNEY carried Olive BRYAN, daughter of George W. and Louise BRYAN, and to this union one child was born, a daughter. Florence, who died at the age of fifteen years. The Judge and Mrs. DENNEY have a pleasant home at Portland and have ever taken an interested part in the city's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.285-286. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

DENNISTON, JOHN C

John C. DENNISTON, manager of the Earl Cartwright farm in Pike township and known as one of the most progressive agriculturists in Jay county, has only been a resident of this county for the past twelve or thirteen years, but in that time has established a well defined place for himself in the estimation of those who have given large thought to the development of the agricultural resources and the live stock possibilities of this region. Mr. DENNISTON was born on a farm in Brown county, Ohio, May 23, 1873, and is a son of William M. and Elva (SAVAGE) DENNISTON, the former of whom was born in that same county and spent his life as a farmer there. He and his wife were the parents of four children, three of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Belle, and a brother, Henry DENNISTON. Reared on the home farm in Brown county ,Ohio, John C. DENNISTON received his schooling in. the common schools of that county and supplemented this by a course in a commercial college in Cincinnati and there also learned telegraphy. After working at the key awhile he returned to the home farm and after operating that for awhile went down into Kentucky and established himself on a farm in the vicinity of Lexington [Fayette Co.], where he remained for twenty-two years, or until in the fall of 1909, when he came to Jay county with his family and rented a farm in Pike township, where he lived for several years, at the end of which time he moved to a farm in Wayne township. Three years later he took over another farm in that same township and there lived for two years, or until he was put in charge of the Earl Cartwright farm of 240 acres in Pike township, where he since has made his home and to the operations of Which place he has given his best attention. Mr. DENNISTON carries on his farm operations in accordance with up-to date methods, gives proper attention to the raising of live stock, and has the place cultivated in admirable fashion. On October 10, 1895, while living in Kentucky, John C. DENNISTON was united in marriage to Susan EVANS, who was born in. Mason county, that state, a member of one of the old families there, and to this union three children have been born. Hazel, Allean and Harry, the two latter of whom are still at home with their parents. Hazel DENNISTON married Russell LAKE, a young farmer of Greene township, and has one child, a son, Warren D. Mr. DENNISTON is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Little Salamonia church. They have a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 10 out of Portland. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.422-423. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

DERBYSHIRE, GRANT ELLSWORTH

GRANT ELLSWORTH DERBYSHIRE, superintendent of the Portland public schools and for many years one of the active factors in the development of the educational interests of this part of the state, is a Buckeye by birth, but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of his childhood. Mr. DERBYSHIRE was born on a farm in the vicinity of Wilmington, in Clinton county, Ohio, December 20, 1868, and is a son of Joshua and Florence ( DEWEESE ) DERBYSHIRE, both of whom were born in Ohio, members of pioneer families in Clinton county. Joshua DERBYSHIRE, a veteran of the Civil war, is now living in Delaware county, this state, which has been his home for many years. He served as a soldier of the Union during the progress of the Civil war, a member of C Company, Twenty-fourth regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, this service covering a period of more than four years. Upon completing his military service Mr. DERBYSHIRE became engaged in farming in Clinton county, Ohio, and was there thus engaged until 1875, when he moved with his family to Indiana and located on a farm in Delaware county, but presently left the farm and engaged in the mercantile business at Cammack, in that county, where he is still living. Grant E. DERBYSHIRE was but six years of age when he came with his parents to Indiana and he grew to manhood in Delaware county. Upon completing the school course there he entered a business college at Delaware, Ohio, and was graduated from that institution. He supplemented this by a course in the normal school, of Valparaiso University and for five years thereafter was engaged in teaching in the district schools of Delaware county. He then for six years was engaged in teaching in village grade schools in that county, in the meantime continuing his studies at Indiana University, and in 1901 was graduated from that institution, after which for two years he was engaged as principal of the township school in the village of Cowan. Following this service Mr. DERBYSHIRE was employed as principal of the Garfield school at Muncie for three years, at the end of which time, in 1906, he was called to become superintendent of the city schools at Portland and has since occupied that important position. Mr. DERBYSHIRE is a Royal Arch Mason and he and his wife are members of the Church of Christ. Grant E. DERBYSHIRE married Margaret RINKER and has three children, Chase, Leiand and Carmon. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.55-56. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

DETAMORE, John

John DETAMORE, the veteran live stock dealer at Portland and one of the best known men in this section of Indiana, is a "Buckeye" by birth, but has been a resident of Indiana and of Jay county since the days of his childhood. Mr. DETAMORE was born in Preble county, Ohio, October 24, 1843, and is a son of Joseph and Barbara ( MOOTS ) DETAMORE who became pioneers of Greene township, this county, and in whose honor the traction station of the Muncie& Portland branch of the Union Traction Company of Indiana, just southwest of Portland was given its name of DETAMORE. Joseph DETAMORE was a Virginian, born in Rockingham county on December 25, 1810, who had gone to Ohio as a young man and in Preble county had married Barbara MOOTS, who was born in the kingdom of Wurtemberg, July 25, 1820. After his marriage he remained in Preble county until 1857, when he came over into Indiana with his family and bought a tract of 104 acres in Greene township, this county, this tract formerly having been included in the Indian reservation which covered two sections of that part of the county. On that tract he established his new home and reared his family, he and his wife spending the remainder of their lives there, helpful and influential residents of that community. They were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch alone survives, the others having been Elizabeth M., born on November 18, 1839; Christina, June 30, 1841; Samuel, May 25, 1850, and Mary Ann, December 28, 1845. John DETAMORE was twelve years of age when he came with his parents over here from Preble county and he took an active part in clearing the forest tract on which his father had located, hence he has many vivid recollections of pioneer conditions in that part of the county. He completed his schooling in old Liber College and as a young man gave his attention to the buying and selling of live stock, a business he thus has followed all his active life. For some time he carried on his operations from a farm of 145 acres which he had bought in Greene township, which he sold and later bought another of 100 acres, but years ago made his headquarters and shipping, point at Portland, where he has long carried on a quite extensive business, shipping annually about 1,500 cattle, 10,000 hogs and such sheep as are brought in, the most of this stock going to the Buffalo market. Mr. DETAMORE is a Republican and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. John DETAMORE was united in marriage to Mary Jane KINSEY, who was born in Greene township this county October 19, 1848, daughter of Henry KINSEY and wife, pioneers of that section, and who died on September 29, 1915. To that union were born six children, of whom but three survive, these being, Charles DETAMORE, who married Ethel HUDSON and has three children, Anna Mary, Robert J. and Edward C.; Harry DETAMORE, who married Frances BRYSON and has one child, a daughter, Jane S., and William H. DETAMORE, who married Catherine KELLY and has two children, John and Margaret Jane. Though nearing the octogenarian stage of his career, Mr. DETAMORE is hale and hearty, vigorous in his activities, and continues to maintain a lively and progressive interest in affairs generally. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.312-313. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

DRILL, Jacob A

Jacob A. DRILL, a substantial retired farmer and former landowner of Richland township, now living at Redkey, is a native Hoosier and has resided in Indiana all his life. Mr. DRILL was born on a farm in the vicinity of Union City (Randolph county) on January 19, 1861, and is a son of Jacob and Mary ( DOVER ) DRILL, whose last days were spent in Dayton, Ohio. The senior Jacob DRILL was born in Frederick county, Maryland, and was but nine years of age when his parents moved with their family to Ohio, locating at Dayton. A few years later they came over into Indiana and settled near Union City, in Randolph county. In this latter community Jacob DRILL grew to manhood and became a substantial farmer, the owner of a farm of 150 acres in the immediate vicinity of Union City, on which he lived until his retirement and removal to Union City, where his last days were spent. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Charles W. DRILL, and a sister, Mary C. Reared on the home farm in the neighborhood of Union City, Jacob A. DRILL completed his schooling in the schools of that city and early became engaged in farming on his own account As a young man he came up into Jay county and bought a tract of sixty acres just north of and adjoining the then village of Redkey and after his marriage established his home on that place. Mr. DRILL improved his farm in admirable shape and there continued to make his home until 1919, when he sold the place and moved into Redkey, where he is now living and where he and his wife are very comfortably situated. Mr. DRILL sold his farm for $200 an acre, which is said to have been the highest price up to that time paid for farm land in Jay county. It was in 1884 that Jacob A. DRILL was united in marriage to Nettie REESE, who was born in Richland township, a member of one of the old families of that section of Jay county. Mrs. DRILL is a daughter of Joel and Rachel ( DANIEL ) REESE who were among the substantial and influential residents of Richland township and both of whose families had beer represented here since pioneer days. Mr. and Mrs. DRILL are Republicans. Mrs. DRILL is a member of the Christian church at Redkey and Mr. DRILL is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias in that city. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.116-117. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

DUGAN, WILLIAM H

William H. DUGAN, who is the proprietor of an excellent farm in Greene township and a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 1 out of Portland, where he has resided for years, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. DUGAN was born on a farm. in Greene township on May 1, 1858, and is a son of James and Julia Ann (STEPHENS) DUGAN, who were members of pioneer families in this county. James DUGAN was born in Licking county, Ohio, and was seven years of age when his parents, James DUGAN and wife, came with their family to Indiana and settled on an uncleared "eighty" In Greene township, this county, where they established their home and spent the remainder of their lives, having been among the earliest settlers of that part of the county. The younger James DUGAN grew up on that pioneer farm and after his marriage to Julia Ann STEPHENS became a farmer on his own account and the owner of a well kept farm of eighty acres in Greene township. He and his wife had nine children, five of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Alex and John, and two sisters, Margaret and Ida. Reared on the old home farm in Greene township, William H. DUGAN received his schooling in the schools of that township and of Jefferson township and as a young man was engaged in farming with his father. He married when twenty-three years of age and then bought a tract of eighteen acre? from his father and built a home on that tract. Presently he sold that place to advantage and bought seventy-three acres of the place on which he is now living and has resided there ever since, having increased his holdings there to 139 acres, which he has improved in admirable shape. In addition to his general farming Mr. DUGAN gives considerable attention to the raising of live stock and is doing well. He is a Democrat and gives proper attention to local civic affairs but has not been a seeker after public office. Tt was on October 30, 1881, that William H. DUGAN was united in marriage to Sarah E. PETERSON, who also is a member of one of the old families in Greene township, and to this union four children have been born. two of whom, Charles and Fern, are living. Charles DUGAN married Echo SILVERS and has two children, William and Jay. Fern DUGAN married Charles STOLTZ and has two children, Harold and Glenier. Mrs. DUGAN was born in Greene township and is a daughter of John and Jane (WHALEY) PETERSON, both of whom were born in Ohio but who came to Jay county with their respective parents in the days of their childhood and were here reared. After his marriage John PETERSON began farming here on his own account and was a farmer the remainder of his life. He was twice married and by his first wife, Jane WHALEY, had three children, those besides Mrs. DUGAN being James and Joseph PETERSON. Following the death of the mother of these children John PETERSON married Ellen NOREGON and to that union one child was born, a daughter, Ola. The DUGAN's have a pleasant home on their farm and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community in which they live. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.443-444. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

EARHART, GEORGE I

George I. EARHART, of the EARHART Packing Company of Portland, and long regarded as one of the energetic business men of that city, is a "Buckeye" by birth, but has been a resident of Portland since the days of his youth. Mr. EARHART was born in Darke county, Ohio, October 11, 1877, and is a son of Samuel S. and Elizabeth ( SMITH ) EARHART, both of whom were born in that same county. Samuel S. EARHART, who is now living at Portland, associated with his son George in the operations of the EARHART Packing Company, was a brick mason in the earlier years of his active career and 'then became the proprietor of a grain elevator at Burkettsville, Ohio. After operating that elevator for about eighteen years he disposed of his interests at Burkettsville and moved to Portland, where for about ten years he was engaged in the grocery business before becoming connected with his present line of operations. He and his wife have four children, all living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Pearl, Earl and Ethel. George I. EARHART received his schooling in the schools of Darke county, where he grew to manhood, and after leaving school took up the trade of brick mason, following his father's early vocation, and was so engaged until 1915, when he and his father bought the ECKMAN packing plant at Portland, the only meat packing plant in Jay county, and have since been operating the same under the name of the EARHART Packing Company. Upon taking over this plant Mr. EARHART made extensive additions and improvements to the same, putting it into up-to-date shape and installing a refrigerating plant, and the company now is turning out around 900 head of cattle a year and about 2,500 head of hogs, their trade being largely confined to Portland and the nearby towns, their delivery system covering all parts of the county. In 1921 they established a retail meat market at Ft. Recovery. Mr. EARHART and his father arc Democrats. In March, 1903, George I. EARHART was united in marriage to Bertha ECKMAN, who was born in Mercer county, Ohio, daughter of William and Lottie ( HOFFMAN ) ECKMAN, and to this union two children have been born, Edward and Gladys. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.216. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

EASTERDAY, ORVILLE R

Orville R. EASTERDAY, manager of the local branch of the R. L. Dollings Investment Company at Portland, secretary treasurer of the Jay Garment Company, former cashier of the First National Bank and in other ways interested in the general commercial life of the city and county, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived here all his life. Mr. EASTERDAY was born on a farm in Wabash township on September 8, 1884, and is the son and only child of John G. and Elizabeth (SCHNEIDER) EASTERDAY, who for years have been residents of Portland. John G. EASTERDAY was born in Fayette county, Illinois, and was but a child when his parents, Christian and Barbara EASTERDAY, moved from that state to Ohio. Not long afterward Christian EASTERDAY left Ohio with his family and about the year 1878 came to Indiana, settling on a small farm in Noble township, this county, where he established his home and where he remained until his retirement and removal to Portland, where his last days were spent. After the marriage of John G. EASTERDAY he established himself on a farm in Wabash township, but in 1885 disposed of his interests there and moved to Portland, where, in 1890, he became engaged in the grocery business and has since been thus engaged, proprietor of an excellent store on North Meridian street. Orville R. EASTERDAY was but a babe in arms when his parents moved to Portland, and he grew to manhood in that city. He supplemented the course in the high school by a course in a business college at Indianapolis, and in 1904, he then being twenty years of age, entered the employ of the First National Bank of Portland. By successive stages Mr. EASTERDAY was advanced in the bank until in 1911 he was elected cashier of this institution, a position he occupied until in 1918, when he transferred his connection to the R. L. Dollings Investment Company, and was made manager of that concern's Jay county district, with offices at Portland, and has since then been thus engaged. In October, 1921, Mr. EASTERDAY was made secretary-treasurer of the Jay Garment Company, manufacturers of work garments, at Portland. He has ever taken an. interested part in the general commercial and industrial life of the community and has long been recognized as one of the city's "live wires" in a business sense. During the time of America's participation in the World war, Mr. EASTERDAY rendered valuable service in promoting the sale of Liberty Loan bonds in this county and was chairman of the first two "drives" in that behalf, doing much in this connection toward systematizing the local community effort. On June 10, 1908, Orville R. EASTERDAY was united in marriage to Esther GRIFFITH, also a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Mary Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. EASTERDAY are members of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. EASTERDAY is a Scottish Rite 32 deg. Mason and a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Mrs. EASTERDAY is the daughter of Isaac A. and Helen (HAWKINS) GRIFFITH, the latter of whom was a daughter of Judge Nathan B. HAWKINS, of whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere. Isaac A. GRIFFITH was formerly and for years one of the leading merchants of Jay county, as also is set out elsewhere. He was a Pennsylvanian by birth, became a school teacher in Ohio and in 1860 became a resident of Jay county, not long afterward becoming engaged in the mercantile business at Westchester, where for years he carried on an extensive business. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.340-341. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

EBERLY, WILLIAM L

William L. EBERLY, one of the oldest and best known men in Jay county, a veteran of the Civil war, formerly and tor many years justice of the peace in Penn township, formerly deputy postmaster at Balbec, and a substantial landowner who died at his pleasant farm home just north of Balbec on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville on January 1, 1922, was a native of the old Keystone state, but had been a resident of Jay county since he was twenty years of age, a period of nearly seventy years. Mr. EBERLY was born in the city of Philadelphia on November 7, 1833, and was a son of Daniel and Susan Ann ( BRUFF ) EBERLY, earnest Quakers, whose last days were spent in this county. The EBERLY's are of Swiss descent and the family in America had its origin in six brothers of the name who came to America in Colonial days and joined the Quaker colony in the vicinity of Philadelphia, settling in Lancaster county. Later one of these brothers, Abraham EBERLY, grandfather of William L. EBERLY, moved to Cumberland county and located in the vicinity of Carlisle. He served as a soldier of the patriot army during the Revolutionary war and was at Valley Forge. His brothers also were soldiers of the Revolution. Daniel EBERLY, one of the sons of Abraham EBERLY, was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, October 12, 1806, and was early trained as a tanner and currier of leather. He established a tanyard and wholesale leather house in Philadelphia and remained there in business until 1854 when he became interested in land investments and became a half partner in a 1,100-acre land deal in the heart of the Quaker settlement in Penn township, this county, and moved out here with his family and established his home in that township, putting up a tannery and taking his place as one of the leaders of the community. He retained for himself 400 acres of the land in which he had invested and in addition to carrying on the work of his tannery developed there a farm, and on that farm spent the remainder of his life. His wife, who was born on the east shore of Maryland in 1809, died in 1880 and he survived until February 15, 1895, he then being in his eighty-ninth year. Daniel EBERLY and his wife were the parents of nine children, of whom but one is now living, Joseph EBERLY, formerly and for years postmaster at Balbec, the others (besides the subject of this memorial sketch) having been Daniel, Peter, Robert, Anna, Sarah, Joseph L. and Rachel, the latter of whom was for years a teacher in the schools of this county. As noted above. William L. EBERLY was twenty years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents in 1854. He had received good schooling in Philadelphia and had some experience in commercial activities as a clerk in one of the leading stores in that city, afterward taking up chemistry with particular reference to the chemical reactions essential to the tanning of hides and had become under his father's instructions a practical tanner, so that when he came out here he was able to take an active part in the tanning business which his father developed here. When the Civil war broke out William L. EBERLY was commissioned a second lieutenant of the local company of Indiana Home Guards, his commission, signed by Governor Morton, having been dated November 5, 1861, and he served in that capacity until the company was disbanded, when he enlisted as a private in Company G of the 153d regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and went to the front, that command being a part of the Army of the Tennessee, with which he served until the close of the war and was mustered out at Louisville in the summer of 1865. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. EBERLY returned to Jay county and resumed his place in the community, looking after the tannery and also helping in the development of his father's farm, and after his marriage in the fall of 1869 established his home on the farm. In 1883 he became associated with his brother Joseph in the mercantile business at Balbec and continued thus engaged until his retirement from active business and his last days were spent at his home on his farm just north of Balbec, his death occurring there on New Years day, 1922. Mr. EBERLY was a Republican and for nearly thirty years served as justice of the peace in and for Penn township. For twenty years he served as deputy postmaster at Balbec, during the time his brother Joseph was postmaster. He was one of the promoters of Cartwright post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Pennville and was a past commander of that post. He also was a Freemason of many years standing and ever took a warm interest in lodge affairs. It was on October 29, 1869, that William L. EBERLY was united in marriage to Eliza GRIEST, who was born in York county, Pennsylvania, in 1840, a daughter of John and Hannah ( EDMUNDSON ) GRIEST, who were among the leaders in the Quaker settlement in Penn township and of whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere in this work, and to this union were born four children, Emma, John, Minerva and Sarah, all of whom are living save the first named. Sarah EBERLY married John HURST and has three children, William, Edna and Helen HURST. Mrs. Eliza (GRIEST) EBERLY died in 1920. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.297-298. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

EDGINGTON, PAUL

Paul EDGINGTON, of the firm of STABLER & EDGINGTON, druggists, at Bryant, former cashier of the Farmers and Merchants Bank of that place, a former member of the board of trustees of the town of Bryant, a former teacher in the schools of this county and one of the best known young business men in the county, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. EDGINGTON was born on a farm in Jackson township on September 28, 1890, and is a son of James W. and Eva G. ( LAMBERT ) EDGINGTON, who are still living in that township. James W. EDGINGTON is the owner of a fine farm of 160 acres in Jackson township, where he has resided for many years. Both he and his wife were born in Franklin county, Ohio. They have four children, the subject of this sketch having three sisters, Mrs. Nell F. ALBERSON and Helen G. and Mary F. EDGINGTON. Reared on the home farm in Jackson township, Paul EDGINGTON received his early schooling in the neighborhood school and then entered Bryant high school, from which he was graduated in 1910. He then began teaching school, a vocation he continued for seven years, teaching in the schools of Jackson township, and in the meantime took a course in civil engineering in the Tri-State College at Angola, Ind. In 1917 Mr. EDGINGTON was elected cashier of the Farmers and Merchants Bank of Bryant and occupied that position until in June, 1919, when he transferred his services to the R. L. Dollings Company of Indianapolis. This latter connection continued for one year, or until 1920, in which year Mr. EDGINGTON decided to engage in business for himself. With that end in view he opened a drug store at Bryant and has since been engaged in the drug business at that place. In March, 1921, he sold a half interest in this business to I. E. Stabler, of Portland, and the business is now carried on under the firm name of Stabler & EDGINGTON. Mr. EDGINGTON is a Republican and served for two years as a member of the town board at Bryant. He is a member of the Masonic lodge at Bryant and takes an earnest interest in lodge affairs. On September 28, 1911, Paul EDGINGTON was united in marriage to Enid L. WHITEMEN, who also was born in this county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and to this union three children have been born, James R., Joseph W. and Betty D. Mrs. EDGINGTON was born in Bearcreek township and is a daughter of James C. L. and Grace ( BURDICK ) WHITEMEN, the former of whom was for years a well known teacher in the schools of this county and a substantial farmer and landowner of Bearcreek township, and the latter a daughter of Wellington BURDICK of that township. James C. L. WHITEMEN was born in Bearcreek township, a son of James N. and Margaret I. ( JAY ) WHITEMEN, the former of whom was a son of James and Mary ( NORTH ) WHITEMEN, who came to this county from Maryland in 1837. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.109-110. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

EDMUNDSON, CLARREL V

Clarrel V. EDMUNDSON, a well-known and substantial young farmer and land owner of Penn township, director of the Farmers Federation of that township, formerly and for years a teacher in the schools of this county and the proprietor of a well-kept farm on rural mail route No. 4 out of Bryant, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. EDMUNDSON was born on a farm in Penn township on December 16, 1883, and is a son of William and Elizabeth S. (PAXSON) EDMUNDSON, both members of old families in this county, and further and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, together with further details regarding the pioneer EDMUNDSON and PAXSON families hereabout. Reared on the home farm in Penn township, Clarrel V. EDMUNDSON was graduated from the Pennville high school in 1903 and then began teaching school, a vocation he followed for thirteen years, teaching in the schools of his home township during the winters and farming during the summers. During this time he took a supplemental course one year in the University of Indiana at Bloomington. In 1917 Mr. EDMUNDSON retired from the school room and has since been giving- his undivided attention to his farm of eighty acres in Penn township. He has improved this farm in up-to-date fashion and has there a very comfortable home. In addition to his general farming, Mr. EDMUNDSON gives considerable attention to the raising of live stock and is doing well in his operations. He is a Republican and a Freemason, a member of the local lodge, F. and A. M., at Pennville. He long has taken an interest in local agricultural cooperative movements and is a present director of the Penn Township Farmers Federation, elected for a term of five years. In 1912 Clarrel V. EDMUNDSON was united in marriage to Valdella ROMANS, and to this union five children have been born, William, Miriam, Robert, Jesse and Nell Jean. Mrs. EDMUNDSON also was born in Penn township and is a daughter of Jesse and Sarah (BOUSE) ROMANS, the latter of whom was born in Fayette county, Ohio, her parents later becoming residents of Indiana, where she was married. The late Jesse ROMANS was born in Penn township, this county, and was a farmer all his life. He also for some time operated a tile factory at Fiat and was one of the best known men in that neighborhood. His death occurred in 1903. He and his wife had three children, two of whom Mrs. EDMUNDSON and her sister, Emma Mae, grew to maturity. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.335-336. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

EDMUNDSON, LEWIS W

Lewis W. EDMUNDSON, one of Jay county's best known and most substantial farmers and oil operators, proprietor of an excellent farm in section I of Penn township, where he has a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, was born in that township and has lived there all his life. The EDMUNDSON's are among the old families of Jay county, the first of this name here having been Thomas EDMUNDSON, a Maryland Quaker, who came here with his family from Ohio in 1837 and settled on a tract of land which he had entered from the Government the year before in what later came to be known as the Balbec neighborhood in Penn township. Thomas EDMUNDSON and his wife Elizabeth, grandparents of Lewis W. EDMUNDSON, were among the leaders in that community in its developing stage and left good memories at their passing. Their two elder sons, Thomas and William EDMUNDSON, entered lands there at the same time and thus the EDMUNDSON's early became substantial factors in the settlement. One of the younger sons of this pioneer pair, John EDMUNDSON, who was born in Maryland and who was the father of Lewis W. EDMUNDSON, was thirteen years of age when he came here with his parents and he grew to manhood on the pioneer farm in the Balbec neighborhood, in turn becoming a farmer on his own account and coming to be the owner of a well developed place of more than 300 acres. He also early became engaged in the sale of buggies and farm implements and it is said that he sold the first mower used in Jay county. On his place he started a broom factory, raising the broom corn on his farm, and developed quite an industry along that line as well as encouraging the growth of broom corn on the farms of his neighbors, continuing in this business until his death. John EDMUNDSON married Rachel Ann PUGH, who was born in Harrison county, Ohio, and who had come here with her parents when a child, and to that union were born nine children, five of whom are now living, Lewis D. EDMUNDSON and his brothers, William and Elwood EDMUNDSON, and sisters, Elizabeth and Marietta. Lewis W. EDMUNDSON was born on the home farm in Penn township on December II, 1866, and there grew to manhood. He received his schooling in the Balbec schools and from boyhood was a helpful assistant to his father in the operations of the farm and the broom factory, helping to raise the broom corn in the summers and operating" the factory during the winters, and kept this up for more than twenty-five years, or until about 1913, when the broom factory was abandoned. In 1886 Mr. EDMUNDSON bought a tract of eighty acres of land in section I of Penn township and has since resided there. To this tract he has added until now he owns 312 acres, which he has improved In admirable fashion and all oi which is under cultivation save thirty-five acres. In addition to his general farming he has given considerable attention to live stock, with particular reference to pure bred Poland China hogs, and has done well. Mr. EDMUNDSON has four producing oil wells on his farm, which were brought in 1917, and also has profitable oil leases iii other parts of the county. He is a Democrat and is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and Kiwanis Club at Portland, is past chancellor commander of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Pennville, a member of the lodge of the Pythian Sisters at that place and also is an active member of the local grange of the Patrons of Husbandry. Lewis W. EDMUNDSON married Delilah WILLIAMS, a daughter of James and Hannah WILLIAMS, and to this union eleven children have been born, nine of whom are living, namely: Zeila E., Esther M., Harry G., Albert L., Ertle, Harold L., Edwina, Marie and Ralph. Zeila EDMUNDSON married Charles CASH and has six children. Esther M. EDMUNDSON married D. C. PENROD and has four children. Harry G. EDMUNDSON married Millie RICHEY and has three children. Ertle EDMUNDSON married Dean RAINS and has four children. The other children of this family are unmarried and at home with their parents.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.315-316. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

EDMUNDSON, WILLIAM

William EDMUNDSON, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Penn township, now living retired at his well appointed farm home in that township, on rural mail route No. 4 out of Bryant, is a member of one of the real pioneer families of Jay county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in Penn township on October 5, 1856, and is a son of John and Rachel Ann ( PUGH ) EDMUNDSON, the latter of whom was born in Harrison county, Ohio, and had come to this county with her parents in the days of her girlhood, the PUGH's having been among the early settlers of Penn township. John EDMUNDSON was born in the state of Maryland and was thirteen years of age when he came to Indiana with his parents, Thomas and Elizabeth EDMUNDSON, the family locating in Penn township, this county, in 1837, on a tract of eighty acres of land in what later came to be known as the Balbec neighborhood that Thomas EDMUNDSON had "entered" from the Government in that township the year before the year in which Jay county was organized as a separate civic entity. At the same time Thomas EDMUNDSON entered this tract his two elder sons, William and Thomas EDMUNDSON, entered similar tracts in that same section and thus the EDMUNDSON's started here with quite substantial landholdings, which they quickly brought under cultivation after the first and difficult work of, clearing and draining had been accomplished. The EDMUNDSON'S were members of the Society of Friends and from the beginning" were influential factors in the considerable colony of Quakers which effected settlement in Penn township about that time and which has remained a continuing force for good throughout that region to this day. Upon leaving Maryland, Thomas EDMUNDSON and his family tarried for awhile in Ohio, but when the new lands over here in Indiana began to attract attention he saw the possibilities of the situation and wisely decided here to establish his family. The elder Thomas EDMUNDSON was one of the leaders of the new community and did much toward promoting the development of proper social and economic conditions in the new country. He and his wife spent their last days on that place and their descendants in the present generation form a quite numerous connection. John EDMUNDSON, one of the younger children of this pioneer pair and the father of the subject of this sketch was (as noted above) but thirteen years of age when he came here in 1837 and he grew to manhood on that pioneer farm. After his marriage he established his home on a part of the place and began farming on his own account, at the same time becoming a dealer in buggies and farm implements and also starting a broom factory. It is said that he sold the first mower used in this county and he also introduced other new farm machinery to the use of his neighbors. His broom factory was developed into quite an important industry for its day. As he prospered in his operations he increased his land holdings until he became the owner of more than 300 acres of excellent land and was accounted one of the most substantial citizens of that community. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, five of whom are now living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Elwood and Lewis W. EDMUNDSON, and two sisters, Elizabeth and Marietta. Reared on the home farm in Penn township, William EDMUNDSON received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood, in the development of which schools his grandfather and his father had been such valuable factors and from the days of his boyhood has given his attention, to farming. After his marriage he began farming on his own account, as a renter, but presently became engaged with his father in the operation of the broom factory and was thus engaged for fifteen years, or until his father's death, after which he located on the farm of 120 acres on which he is now living and has since made that his place of residence. Upon taking possession of that place Mr. EDMUNDSON began a series of improvements which gradually brought about the creation of one of the best farm plants in that part of the county and he has a very pleasant home. In addition to his general farming he for years was quite actively engaged as a buyer of live stock and in his operations did well. Though continuing to keep a supervisory eye on things, Mr. EDMUNDSON has been living practically retired from the active operations of the farm since 1920. He is an ardent Republican, a past chancellor commander of the Pennville lodge of the Knights of Pythias and a past master of the local grange of the Patrons of Husbandry, to the affairs of which organization he has for years given his earnest attention. William EDMUNDSON married Elizabeth Sophia PAXSON, also a member of one of the old families in the Pennville neighborhood, daughter of Benjamin F. and Sarah Ellen ( WOOD ) PAXSON, and to this union six children have been born, namely: Daisy, who married Forest BRADSHAW and has. one child, a daughter, Anna BRADSHAW; Clarel V., who married Valley ROMANS and has five children, William, Miriam, Robert. Jesse and Nelgean; Dell, who married Margaret SELL and has six children, Mary Elizabeth, James William, John, Barbara. Ellen and Lillian; Jessie Fay, who married William GEAR; Frank, who married Meda SCHNICKOLS and has two children, Cecil and William, and Nila, who married Howard IRWIN. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.290-293. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ELBERSON, MAURICE

MAURICE ELBERSON, a well known garage owner and local agent for the Overland and Cleveland automobiles at Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. ELBERSON was born on a farm in the vicinity of Westchester on December 25, 1890, and is a son of William H. and Jennie ( BROOKHEART ) ELBERSON, who are now living in Portland. William H. ELBERSON was born in Ohio, son of Samuel H. and Sarah ELBERSON and was reared in that state, where he received his schooling and early became engaged in farming. He married in that state and continued to reside there until he was thirty years of age when he came over into Indiana and rented a farm of eighty acres m the Westchester neighborhood in this county. Some time later he gave up farming and moved to the village of Bryant, where he became engaged in the hardware and drug business, and was so engaged at: that point for twenty-seven years, at the end of which time he retired from business and moved to Portland, where he is now residing, associated with his son Maurice in the management of the automobile establishment which they maintain in that city. To William H. ELBERSON and wife were born three children, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Bonnie, and a brother, James ELBERSON. Maurice ELBERSON was reared at Bryant and upon completing the course in the high school there went to Portland, where he became engaged in the automobile. business in association with James RUPEL. In 1914 he became engaged in business alone and so continued until the partnership with his father was contracted in 1920. The ELBERSON's have an attractive place of business on Main street. They hold the local agency for the Overland and Cleveland automobiles and the Pennsylvania and Ajax tires and have done well in their line, handling also a general line of auto accessories. On May 29, 1911, Maurice ELBERSON was united in marriage to Delia E. RUPEL, who was born in this county, daughter of James and Ara RUPEL, members of old families here, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Robert. Mr. ELBERSON is a Democrat. He is an active member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce and is affiliated with the local lodges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.93-94. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ELLIOTT, O EVERETT

O. Everett ELLIOTT, a well known young farmer and landowner of Richland township, proprietor of a well kept farm on rural mail route No. 1 out of Redkey, is a native of the neighboring county of Randolph, but has become well established as a citizen of Jay county. Mr. ELLIOTT was born on a farm in Randolph county on May 19, 1892, and is the son and only child of Miles and Minerva ( BALES ) ELLIOTT, both of whom were born in that same county, members of pioneer families in this section of Indiana. Reared on the farm, O. Everett ELLIOTT completed his schooling in the old Booth school house in Richland township, this county, and remained at home, a valued assistant in the labors of the farm, until after his marriage at the age of twenty years, when he began farming on his own account, establishing his home on a rented farm of forty-five acres, in addition to which he also rented adjacent fields. He was successful in his operations and four years later, in 1916, he bought the farm of ninety-four acres on which he is now living in Richland township and has since resided there. Since taking possession of this place Mr. ELLIOTT has made numerous improvements on the farm and his place is operated along up-to-date lines and his farm plant equipped in admirable fashion. In addition to his general farming Mr. ELLIOTT gives considerable attention to the raising of pure bred Poland China hogs, keeping only registered sows, and feeds out from sixty to seventy head a year. He also has a good bunch of cattle on the place. He and his wife are members of the Fairview Methodist Episcopal church and are Democrats. It was on August 17, 1912, that O. Everett ELLIOTT was united in marriage to Amy DeARMOND, of this county, and to this union two children have been born, Arthur M. and Nola M., the former of whom is a student in the Halfway school (district No. 5) in Richland township. Mrs. ELLIOTT also was born in Randolph county, but was reared in Jay county, her parents, John W. and Ona ( TURNER ) DeARMOND, having moved up here when she was a child. John W. DeARMOND is the owner of a farm of 145 acres in Jay county, and is well established. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.166-167. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

EWRY, CHARLES S

Charles S. EWRY, formerly and for many years engaged in the hardware business at Portland, one of the best known merchants and business men of that city, but who for the past few years has been giving his attention almost exclusively to the extensive chicken hatchery he has established in that city, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Portland since he was twenty-five years of age. Mr. EWRY was born on a farm in Montgomery county, Ohio, August 31, 1862, and is a son of William and Mary E. (PRUGH) EWRY, the latter of whom was born in the state of Maryland. William EWRY was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, and followed farming all through his active career, moving from Montgomery county to Darke county (Ohio) in the latter '60s, in which latter county he spent his last days. He and his wife were the parents of five children, all of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, the Rev. David S. EWRY and Frank EWRY, and two sisters, Anna C. and Viola. Reared on the home farm in Darke county, Charles S. EWRY completed his schooling in the high school at Ansonia and at the age of seventeen years began teaching school. For two winters he was thus engaged, and then at the age of nineteen years began farming on his own account. He was married when twenty-one and continued farming until he was twenty-five, when he left the farm and came over the state line and located at Portland, where he presently became engaged as cashier in the local office of the G. R. & I. Railroad Company. For seven years Mr. EWRY remained with the railroad company and then he resigned his position and in partnership with W. D. YOUNT became engaged in the hardware business at Portland. This partnership continued for twenty-one years, at the end of which time Mr. EWRY took over the business for himself. It was in 1918 that Mr. EWRY launched out on the hatchery project which he has developed so successfully. He started with one incubator of a capacity of 2,420 eggs. The next year he tripled this capacity; in 1920 he further increased his incubating facilities to a capacity of 28,000 eggs, hatching out that year more than 70,000 chicks. In 1921 he increased his incubating capacity to 37,600 eggs at one hatching, which at a standard weight of eggs would mean two and one-half tons of eggs, and during the season hatched out more than 100,000 chicks. He since has increased his incubating capacity to 43,000 eggs. Mr. EWRY has given his thoughtful attention to the development of the incubating business and has invented an egg turner on which he has secured patents covering the United States and Canada. His skill in the tinshop comes in well here, for he manufactures all his own incubators and thus has everything in the plant just to his liking. In his political views Mr. EWRY is "independent." He is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Portland and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, the congregation of which he has served as a member of the board of stewards. It was on January 1, 1884, that Charles S. EWRY was united in marriage to Lola B. WILSON, who was horn m Darke county, Ohio, daughter of Samuel and Mary C. (EYLER) WILSON, who were the parents of eleven children, six of whom are still living, Mrs. EWRY having five sisters, Minerva J., Minnie B., Edith G., Ida M. and Mary F. To Mr. and Mrs. EWRY have been born four children, three of whom are living, sons all, Ralph, Fred and Edgar. Ralph EWRY is the well-known general manager and editor of the Portland Sun. Fred EWRY, who is an oil well shooter, married Laura G. WILLIAMS and has one child, a daughter, Marjorie. Edgar EWRY, who is associated with his father in the operation of the big egg hatchery. married Marjorie LEDBETTER.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.355-356. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FENTERS, OTIS CLARENCE

Otis Clarence FENTERS, of the firm of Mills & Fenters, dealers in and shippers of live stock, at .Pennville, and one of the best known stockmen in Jay county, is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life. Mr. FENTERS was born on a farm in the vicinity of New Corydon, in Wabash township, December 25, 1888, and is a son of William and Clara ( WOODROW ) FENTERS, both of whom were born in Ohio, the former born in 1848 and the latter in 1856, and who are now living at New Corydon. William FENTERS grew up in his native Ohio and was married in Darke county. For some time after his marriage he continued to make his home there and then came over into Jay county and established his home on a farm in Wabash township, where he resided until his retirement and removal to New Corydon. He and his wife have four children, the Subject of this sketch having three sisters, Mrs. Mollie BUTCHER, Mrs. Martha MUTH and Mrs. Myrtle BUCKINGHAM. Reared on the home farm, Otis C. FENTERS received his schooling in the New Corydon schools and as a young man became engaged in the retail meat business at New Corydon and remained there for four or five years, at the end of which time, in 1908, the year following his marriage, he moved to Pennville and. opened there a retail meat market. For ten years Mr. FENTERS continued thus engaged, building up quite a business, and meanwhile became widely known hereabout as a judicious judge of live stock and a prudent buyer. In 1918 he formed his present connection as a member of the firm of Mills & Fenters and has since devoted his attention to the buying and selling of live stock, the firm's shipping point being Redkey. Mr. FENTERS is a Freemason and a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with the blue lodge at Pennville and the temple at Ft. Wayne. He is "independent" in his political views and he and his wife are members of the Christian church. It was on February 18, 1907, while living at New Corydon, that Otis C. FENTERS was united in marriage to Edith MUTH, who also was born in Wabash township, a daughter of Charles and Katherine ( MARTIN ) MUTH, both members of pioneer families in that part of the county, and to this union six children have been born, Robert, James, Sydona, Charles, Ruth and Esther. The FENTERS have a pleasant home at Pennville and take an interested part in ail proper social activities.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.316-317. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FIERS, JAMES WALTER

James Walter FIERS. The FIERS family were of English descent and became early settlers of Virginia. Thomas L. FIERS was born in Essex county, Virginia, August 30, 1798. At the age of about six years he came with his parents to Greene county, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. He served in the War of 1812 under General Harrison. After the war he married Anna LEWIS and brought up a family of twelve children. The family moved to Delaware county, Indiana, in the early '40s. Two sons, John and George, came to Richland township, Jay county, in 1855, and purchased a sawmill on the present site of REDKEY, and engaged in the timber business. There they lived the remainder of their lives. George FIERS was brought up as a cooper. He afterward engaged in farming, became a dealer in timber, and two or three times in life he was engaged in the mercantile business. He married Mary Jane REDKEY , the daughter of James REDKEY, the "father of the town." To this union there were born five children, J. Walter, Ella, William T., Laura M. and Henry O. The REDKEY family were of German extraction. Adam REDKEY was born in Pennsylvania in 1763. He served some time in the War of the Revolution under Washington. He married Mary, the daughter of Capt. Joshua DAVIS, who also served under Washington. He settled in Highland county, Ohio, in 1808, and in 1810 he started back to Pennsylvania to secure money to make a payment on his farm, but he contracted typhus fever and died, leaving his wife and six children among strangers. They early became members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and nearly all the REDKEY descendants have been of that faith. Joshua REDKEY, one of the sons of this family, married Mary E. WEYER. He served as a soldier in the War of 1812, leaving his young wife to endure the hardships of pioneer life, she being much annoyed by thieving bands of roving Indians during her husband's absence. To this union there were born seven children. James, the eldest son, married Elvira HARTMAN. Their children were Mary Jane, Martin, Nancy, Drusilla, John W., and Nathan. James REDKEY became a Methodist preacher, farmer and business man. In 1856 he bought of the first settler the land on which the town of REDKEY was afterward built, the town being named in his honor. J. Walter FIERS, the subject of this sketch, was born on February 27, 1860. His parents then lived in the hewed log house built by the Wade family, who were the first settlers on the site of the town of REDKEY. He was brought up amid what he calls secondary pioneer surroundings, but he early developed a liking for school and school work, and since he was old enough to attend school, with the exception of two years, he has spent all the winters of his life, and several summers in the school room either as student or teacher. He completed the work of the common schools and has spent some four years at Valparaiso University and the University of Wisconsin. However, he regards as the best and most practical part of his education that which he has acquired by home study. All his teaching has been done in his own home community. For a number of years he taught in the district schools and in the grades, but for many years he has been teaching in the REDKEY high school. One summer he went into the banking work, but did not like it, and when fall came he left the bank and returned to the school room with the purpose of devoting his life to the work of education. During his life Mr. FIERS has gained a knowledge of many kinds of business. In the long vacations between schools, as a boy, he worked on the farm, clerked in a store, helped build the L. E. & W. railroad, made and burned drain tile, and as he always had access to a shop filled with tools, he became skillful in various kinds of mechanical work. He gained a good working knowledge of the different building trades, studied architecture and has for many years devoted his vacations between schools to architectural work. In his youth Mr. FIERS was very fond of hunting and trapping, and spent much time in the great primeval forests, which he greatly loved. He regards the education which he received from this contact with nature as one of his most valuable acquisitions. In his work and in his sports he often carried a book in his pocket, which he studied at convenient times. One of his delights during the many long nights while alone burning tile was to lie on top of the kiln studying the stars. Throughout his life he has been interested in local history, and now has a large manuscript volume of the history of the towns and townships of his own locality. In 1884 J. Walter FIERS married Mary J. McKINTY, a prominent school teacher of the county. She was a granddaughter of Judge George C. WHITEMAN, who was born near Winchester, Va., and reared in Greene county, Ohio. George C. WHITEMAN settled in Greene township. Jay county, in 1837, organized and named the township, and became prominently identified with the early history of the county. He was a local Methodist preacher and is said to have married and to have buried more people up to the time of his death than any other man in the county. He served as probate judge from 1838 to 1852. In 1858 he was elected as representative to the legislature and served during the fortieth session. Mrs. FIERS died on March 18, 1908. She was the mother of three children, two of whom died in infancy. One son. Forest L. FIERS, grew to manhood, was graduated from the high school, attended DePauw and Butler universities, served on the Mexican border and in the United States army from August 13, 1914, to February 15, 1919. He married Elma WILKINSON, of Meridian, Miss. Both he and she had grandparents in whose honor towns were named. They now have two children, Mary Jane and James Henry. Forest L. FIERS is now employed in the post-office in Indianapolis [Marion Co.]. In his youth J. Walter FIERS united with the Methodist Episcopal church. He has served for more than twenty-one years as Sunday school superintendent. For many years he has been a teacher in the Sunday school. He is a very strong believer in the efficacy of prayer, and has prepared a booklet on that subject, in which he tells of many very direct and remarkable answers to prayer. For nearly forty years Mr. FIERS has been an ardent prohibitionist, and he now rejoices that he has lived to see the principles for which he so long worked embodied in the Constitution as a part of the organic law of the land. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.362-364. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

FINCH, SELMA

SELMA FINCH, a well known grocer, of the firm of FINCH & BROSHER, proprietors of the Central grocery and shoe store at Portland, one of the best stores of the kind in eastern Indiana, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all of his life. Mr. FINCH was born in Greene township on March 8, 1872, and is a son of Adam H. and Eliza J. ( ALLEN ) FINCH, the latter of whom was born in Preble county) Ohio, but was reared and educated in Indiana. Adam H. FINCH was born in Wayne county, Indiana, and was for many years a well known farmer and merchant at Collett, the pleasant little village south of Portland. He and his wife were the parents of two children, Lillie M. and Selma. They had besides an adopted son, Joseph. When Selma FINCH was eight years of age his parents moved to Pike township, this county, and there he completed his schooling. As a young man he worked with his father in the latter's store at Collett and later he started in business for himself at Collett and was thus engaged there for ten years, at the end of which time he sold his store there and bought an eighty-acre farm in Wayne township on which he established his home and which he farmed for three years. He then moved to College Corner, where he opened a grocery store, meantime retaining possession of his farm, and was in business at College Corner for about five years, at the end of which time he traded his farm for the Southside grocery at Portland and returned to the latter city, where he has ever since been in business and where he has done well. Mr. FINCH continued to operate the Southside grocery for about four years and then, in association with Sherman BRUBAKER and Albert H. BRUBAKER, bought the Central grocery, where he is now located. About a year later Messrs. FINCH and BROSHER bought the BRUBAKER interest in the store and have since been proprietors of the place, which is one of the best stocked and most admirable equipped stores in Portland. On the second floor of the establishment they conduct a shoe department. They also carry on a general retail meat business, and have eighteen persons employed in the establishment. Mr. FINCH is a Democrat and is a member of Red Cross Lodge No. 88, Knights of Pythias, at Portland. On March 29, 1902, Selma FINCH was united in marriage to Ella BOCKOVEN, who also was born in Jay county, daughter of Louis and Mary ( DEVOR ) BOCKOVEN, and to this union four children have been born, Mary, Sharon Lea, Glen and Frank, the first named of whom is now a student at Earlham College. The FINCH's have a pleasant home at Portland and have ever taken an interested part in the city's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.78-79. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FITCH, ROBERT S

ROBERT S. FITCH, district agent for the Prudential Life Insurance Company at Portland and one of the active business men of that city, is a native of the old Blue Grass state, but has been a resident of Indiana for years, having moved to Portland from Marion. Mr. FITCH was born at Flemingsburg, Ky., December 23, 1876, and is a son of David R. and Katherine ( COOPER ) FITCH, the former of whom was born at Fitchburg, Mass., which town was named for his grandfather. David R. FITCH was for years engaged in the general mercantile business at Flemingsburg. He and his wife were the parents of four children, but two of whom are living, the subject of this sketch and his brother, D. Wall FITCH, who is engaged in the insurance business at Anderson, Ind., those deceased having been Amanda and Benjamin C. FITCH. Reared at Flemingsburg, Robert S. FITCH completed the high school course there and was for ten years thereafter engaged in the dry goods business there. He then went to Cincinnati, where he took employment as a city salesman with the John Shileto Company. A year or more later he transferred his connection to the firm of Lansburg & Son and was engaged with that concern when two years later the death of his brother necessitated his return home. Not long afterward he became engaged in the newspaper business at Brookville, Ky., where he remained thus engaged for two years and a half, at the end of which time he disposed of his interests there and moved to Litchfield, Ky., where for two years thereafter he published a newspaper. He then accepted a position with the Osborn Paper Company at Marion, Ind. and moved to the latter city. Six years later he transferred his connection from this concern to the Prudential Life Insurance Company, his connection being with the Marion office of this company, and was engaged there in that line for three years, at the end of which time he had established a record for service with the Prudential which warranted his advancement and he was made a district agent, being given charge of four counties, including Jay, and has since made his home in Portland. In 1905 Robert S. FITCH was united in marriage to Minnie S. WALTON, who was born in Grange City, Ky., and to this union have been born three children, Rollo W., Annie Helen and Clyde R., the latter of whom died in March, 1913, at the age of three months. Mr. and Mrs. FITCH are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. FITCH is a Democrat. He is a Royal Arch Mason, an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias, is a member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce and also is affiliated with the local Kiwanis Club.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.90-91. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

FLAUDING, C OSCAR

C. Oscar FLAUDING, one of Jackson township's well known and progressive young farmers and landowners, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. FLAUDING was born on a farm in Bearcreek township, November 17, 1890, and is the son and only child of John V. and Jane Elizabeth (KESSLER) FLAUDING, the latter of whom was born in that same township, April 2, 1847, a daughter of Harmon and Sarah KESSLER, pioneers of that section of the county. The late John V. FLAUDING, who became one of Jay county's large landowners, was an European by birth but had been a resident of this country since he was fifteen years of age. He was born in the kingdom of Saxony, September 18, 1838, and was the only son of George A. and Barbara (SMITH) FLAUDING, who came to America in 1854 and settled at Buffalo, N. Y. In this city John V. FLAUDING grew to manhood. In 1860, not long after attaining his majority, he married. In 1866 he came to Indiana with his family and located on a farm of seventy-eight acres of timber land he had bought in Bearcreek township, this county. He proceeded to clear that land and make a farm. He was a good farmer and as his affairs prospered he added to his holdings until he became the owner of 500 acres of land in this county and was accounted one of its most substantial citizens. Mr. FLAUDING's parents accompanied him here in 1866 and both spent their last days here, his mother dying in the fall of 1874 and his father in the summer of 1877 and both are buried in Bloomfield cemetery. John V. FLAUDING also spent his last days here, his death occurring in 1909. He was twice married. His first wife, Julia Ann SOLOMON, whom he married in Buffalo, died in this county in the summer of 1880. To that union ten children were born. On September 18, 1883, John V. FLAUDING married Jane Elizabeth KESSLER, of this county, who died on February 14, 1913. C. Oscar FLAUDING, the only child of this latter union, grew to manhood on the home farm in Bearcreek township and received his schooling in the neighborhood schools, tie was eighteen years of age when his father died. He married at the age of twenty and not long afterward took charge of the home place, farming it in behalf of the other heirs until final distribution of the estate was made. In this distribution he came in for a tract of forty acres in Jackson township, a part of the farm on which he is now living, and established his home there. Since then he has made numerous important improvements to the place and has bought an adjacent tract of sixty-nine acres, which he likewise has improved, and thus has an excellent farm plant. In addition to his general farming Mr. FLAUDING has given considerable attention to the raising of live stock and has done well. It was on Washington's birthday, in 1911, that C. Oscar FLAUDING was united in marriage to Bertha DILLAVOU, who was born in this county, daughter of William and Rosa DILLAVOU, of Bearcreek township, and to this union two children have been born, Grover William and Rosa Jane. The FLAUDING's have a very pleasant home on rural mail route No. 3 out of Bryant and take an interested part in the general social activities of the community in which they live. Mr. and Mrs. FLAUDING are members of the Sardinia Christian church and are Republicans. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.435-436. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FLAUDING, JOHN E

JOHN E. FLAUDING, cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Portland and one of the best known bankers in this county, was born in Jay county and has been a lifelong resident of this county. He was born on a farm in Bearcreek township on June 21, 1876, and is a son of George and Rebecca ( KESSLER) FLAUDING, the latter of whom (now deceased) also was born in Indiana, a member of one of the pioneer families of this part of the state. George FLAUDING, who is now living retired at Bryant, was born in Germany, where his mother died before he was three years of age. Following this bereavement his father came to this country, bringing his children with him and for a while the family was located in New York state, presently moving to Pennsylvania and thence to Indiana, settling in Jay county, where George FLAUDING grew to manhood and after his marriage rented a farm and began farming on his own account. His affairs prospered and he presently became the owner of a farm in Bearcreek township, a tract of 120 acres, on which he continued farming until his retirement and removal to Bryant, where he is now living. To him and his wife were born ten children, all of whom are living save Jesse, the others besides the subject of this sketch being Elias, William, Cora, Charles, Lawrence, Clarence, Frank and Elsie. Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, John E. FLAUDING received his early schooling in the local schools of that neighborhood, supplementing this by attendance at the Tri-State College at Angola and became engaged in teaching school, a vocation he followed during the winters for seventeen years, his summers being occupied variously, two of these summers being given over to work on the railway section. In 1916 Mr. FLAUDING became employed as assistant cashier in the Farmers State Bank at Portland and on June 10, 1920, was elected cashier of that institution, the position he now occupies. Mr. FLAUDING is a Democrat, is a member of the Portland grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, the congregation of which he is serving as secretary of the board. John E. FLAUDING married Clara E. SHIMP, daughter of Tesse and Kate SHIMP, and to this union has been born one child, a son, Wendel. Mr. and Mrs. FLAUDINGhave a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.51-52. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

FLEMING, JAMES R

James R. FLEMING, former state senator from this district, and for nearly twenty years a practicing attorney at Portland, Ind., is a native Hoosier, a fact of which he has never ceased to be proud, and has lived in this state his entire life. He was born on a farm in Henry county, Indiana, November 8, 1881, and is a son of George R. and Sarah FLEMING, both of whom were born and spent their entire lives in Henry county. Mr. FLEMING's grandfather, Joseph FLEMING, came to Indiana in an early day from Fairmount, W. Va., and was a member of that family of FLEMING's which gave to West Virginia a governor, Brooks FLEMING, and many other distinguished sons. Mr. FLEMING after graduation from the Elwood, Ind., high school, entered the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and was graduated from that institution with the degree of L.L.B. in 1904. He selected Jay county as his future home and immediately entered the practice of law at Portland. In political faith, he is a Democrat and has been honored many times by his party. In 1906 he was elected prosecuting attorney for Jay county and two years later was re-elected to that office, serving two terms in all. Upon retiring from the prosecutor-ship, Mr. FLEMING formed a partnership with ex-Judge John M. Smith, which continued for several years. In 1912 he was elected to represent Jay county in the 1913 session of the Indiana General Assembly and at that session served as chairman of the important committee on railroads. In 1914 he was elected as state senator to represent the joint senatorial district of Jay and Randolph counties and in that capacity rendered splendid public service for four years. In the 1915 session of the Senate he was chairman of the important judiciary committee and in 1917 was chairman of the Democratic caucus in the Senate. In the legal profession, Mr. FLEMING has already attained marked success, and for many years he has been one of the Democratic leaders in his county and; state. In his home city and county he has actively participated in every movement leading to the betterment of his community. He is a confirmed optimist and has an enduring faith in America and her institutions. He believes with many other Jay county Democrats that his community possesses the ability and should have the right to manage its own affairs without too much interference from either Washington or Indianapolis. Mr. FLEMING is married, his wife being Jennie ADAIR, and to this union has been born one daughter, Marian, who is now a student in the high school in her home city. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.434. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

FLEMING, THOMAS H

Thomas H. FLEMING, mayor of the city of Portland and former sheriff of Jay county, for many years one of the best known residents of this county, is a native Hoosier and has made his home in this state all his life. Mr. FLEMING was born on a farm in the vicinity of Fort Wayne on May 5, 1857, and is a son of James W. and Nancy ( SUNDERLAND ) FLEMING, the latter of whom was born in Montgomery county, Ohio. James W. FLEMING was a Virginian, who became a resident of Montgomery county, Ohio, in the days of his young manhood and became a cooper by trade. In 1838, following his marriage in that county, he came over into Indiana and settled on a farm in Alien county, in the vicinity of Fort Wayne, where he established his home. His last days were spent in the city of Fort Wayne, to which place he moved upon his retirement from the farm. Of the children born to him and his wife, five sons grew to maturity, those besides the subject of this sketch having been William S. FLEMING, formerly and for years engaged in the mercantile business at Portland and former clerk of the courts of this county; Benjamin F. FLEMING, who went West and spent his last days at Helena, Mont.; Thornton J. FLEMING, formerly engaged in the mercantile business at Portland, and who later became a merchant at Fort Wayne, and James W. FLEMING. Reared on the home farm in the vicinity of Fort Wayne, Thomas H. FLEMING completed his schooling in the schools of that city, and in 1875, he then being eighteen years of age, came to Jay county and became engaged as a clerk in the store his brothers, William S. and Thornton J. FLEMING, had established at Bryant. He continued thus engaged for five years, at the end of which time he returned to the home farm in Alien county and was for about three years thereafter employed on his father's farm. He then became a fireman on the G. R. & I. railroad, making his home at Ft. Wayne, where he remained until 1891, when he returned to Portland. In 1912 Mr. FLEMING was appointed deputy to the sheriff of Jay county, and in 1916 was elected to the office of sheriff as the nominee of the Democratic party. In 1918 he was re-elected and thus served two terms, thus having been the first sheriff to serve in the new court house. Upon the expiration of his term of public office Mr. FLEMING announced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for mayor of Portland. In the subsequent primaries he received the nomination, and in the following city election, in November, 1921, was elected by a majority in excess of 600, which in view of the fact that the city of Portland normally is regarded as a Republican city, was regarded by his friends as a most fitting- and quite well deserved compliment. Mr. FLEMING was inaugurated mayor of the city of Portland on January 2, 1922, and is now serving in that important administrative office. On January 30, 1881, Thomas H. FLEMING was united in marriage to Mary E. OTTO, who was born in Ohio, and to this union have been born seven children, Nellie A., Beryl, Ollie B., Sadie I., Thomas C., Anna and James W., all of whom were graduated from the Portland high school and all of whom are living. Mayor FLEMING, as indicated above, is an ardent Democrat and has for years been looked upon as one of the leaders of that party in this section of the state. He and Mrs. FLEMING are members of the Congregationalist church and he has for some years been serving as a member of the board of trustees of the church. He also is a member of the local Masonic lodge. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.152-153. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FLESHER, JEREMIAH

Jeremiah FLESHER, one of Jefferson township's well known farmers and landowners, was born in that township and has lived there all his life. Mr. FLESHER was born on November 29, 1860, and is a son of Granville and Savilla ( LARE ) FLESHER, both of whom were members of pioneer families in this county. Granville FLESHER was born in Ohio and was two years of age when his parents, Adam FLESHER and wife, came to Indiana and settled in Jay county. Adam FLESHER was a Virginian who had married and settled in Ohio and who in 1836, the year in which Jay county was organized, came over here and entered a quarter section of land southwest of New Mt. Pleasant in Jefferson township, this county, where he established his home and where he spent the remainder of his life, one of the influential pioneers of that community. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, one of whom, Elizabeth, is still living. Granville FLESHER was the second in order of birth of these children. He grew up on the pioneer farm in the New Mt. Pleasant neighborhood, receiving his schooling in the primitive schools of that community, and remained with his father on the farm until he had attained his majority, when he bought an "eighty" across the highway from the home place. After his marriage he established his home there and continued to make that his place of residence for thirty years, at the end of which time he moved into the old home place and there spent his last days. At the time of his death he was the owner of 192 acres and was accounted one of the substantial farmers of the neighborhood. Of the two children born to him and his wife the subject of this sketch alone survives. Jeremiah FLESHER received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and from the days of his boyhood was helpful in the labors of developing the home farm. He remained with his father until the latter's death and inherited 112 acres of the home farm. Since then he has disposed of fifty acres and now has a well kept farm, in the operation of which he is ably assisted by his son William. Mr. FLESHER is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Redkey. He has a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 2 out of Redkey and he and his family have ever taken an interested part in the social activities of the community in which they live. On September 26, 1885, Jeremiah FLESHER was united in marriage to Charlotte OWENS, who was born in the neighboring county of Randolph, and to this union three children have been born, Joseph, Anna and William, the latter of whom is unmarried and continues to make his home with his parents, actively interested in the operation of the farm. Joseph FLESHER has been twice married. His first wife, Mac CLOYD, died leaving two children, and he later married Letha FRAZEE. To this latter union one child has been born, a daughter, Dorothy. Anna FLESHER married Jasper CARDER and has two children, Mary and Martha CARDER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.169-170. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

FLESHER, JOEL M

Joel M. FLESHER., widely and popularly known among his friends hereabout simply as "Joe" FLESHER, the well known live stock auctioneer at Dunkirk, is a native son of Jay county, a representative in the fourth generation of the FLESHER family in this county, and has lived here all his life. Mr. FLESHER was born on a farm in Jefferson township on November 16, 1886, and is a son of Jeremiah and Charlotte (OWENS) FLESHER, who were among the best known residents of that township. Jeremiah FLESHER was born in that township, son and only child of Granville and Mary ( MAY ) FLESHER, the former of whom was but eighteen months of age when his parents, Adam and Elizabeth FLESHER, came over into Indiana from Ohio in 1835 and settled on a tract of 200 acres of ground in what later came to be Jefferson township, Jay county, but which then was included within the boundaries of Randolph county, Adam FLESHER thus having been among the early settlers of this county. Jeremiah FLESHER, in his generation, followed in the footsteps of his grandfather and his father and became a substantial farmer, creating an excellent piece of property in Jefferson township. To him and his wife three children were born, the subject of this sketch having a brother, William O. FLESHER, who continues to make his home on the old home farm, and a sister, Anna, who married Jasper CARDER, of this county, and has two children, Mary and Martha. Reared on the home farm in Jefferson township, Joseph M. FLESHER received his early schooling in the schools of his neighborhood and supplemented this by attendance at the Redkey high school and a course in Chicago University. He also took a course in a school of auctioneering at Chicago and in 1909 announced himself in Jay county and in surrounding counties as a professional auctioneer, with special reference to the crying of sales of live stock in which he specializes, and has ever since followed this calling, one of the best known auctioneers in this part of the country. In 1921 Mr. FLESHER cried sales in no fewer than twenty-six states, these live stock sales having been confined pretty largely to pure bred Poland China hogs and dairy cattle, particulalry Holsteins and Jerseys. Mr. FLESHER remained on the home farm until 1915, when he moved to Dunkirk, where he has since resided and where he and his family are very pleasantly situated. Mr. FLESHER is a Republican. He is a Scottish Rite Mason and a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine and is also affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Joseph M. FLESHER has been twice married. In 1903 he was united in marriage to May CLOYD, of Randolph county, this state, and to this union two children were born, daughters both, Frances Deniah and Jewyideen. The mother of these children died on August 26, 1911, and in 1913 Mr. FLESHER married Aletha FRAZEE, who was born at Dunkirk, daughter of James H. and Frances FRAZEE, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Dorothy Eliza, born in 1914. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.388-389. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FOLTZ, FRED W

FRED W. FOLTZ, the well known local representative of the Haynes and the Buick automobiles at Portland, with salesrooms at 301 North Meridian street, and formerly widely known as a traveling salesman out of that city, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. FOLTZ was born in the village of New Corydon on May 1, 1883, and is a son of John W. and Margaret ( MARTIN ) FOLTZ, both of whom also were born in this county, members of old families here, and the former of whom was for years engaged in the drug business at New Corydon and later at Portland. Fred W. FOLTZ completed his schooling in the Portland high school and upon leaving school became engaged as a clerk, in the drug store of I.B. Little, where he remained for about four years, at the end of which time he went into the plant of the 0. A. Rawlings Lumber Company, now known as the Jay County Lumber Company, and was for seven years engaged working there as a cabinet maker. He then transferred his services to the Haynes Milling Company and for four years gave his full time to that company as a traveling salesman. For three years thereafter he gave the milling company but half his time, devoting the other half to the sale of the Haynes automobile. In 1918, Mr. FOLTZ also took the, local sales agency for the Buick automobile, retaining at the same time has agency for the Haynes car, and has since given his whole attention to the development of the sales of these two cars in this territory, with his sales rooms at 301 North Meridian street, in connection with which he also maintains a service station for these two cars. Mr. FOLTZ is a Republican. He is a 32 Mason, a member of the consistory at Fort Wayne, and is a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with the temple at Fort Wayne. He also is a member of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Portland and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. On November 15, 1904, Fred W. FOLTZ was united in marriage to Lillian May WARD, who was born at Ridgeville, in the neighboring county of Randolph, daughter of John C. and Eleanor ( BIDDLEBARGER ) WARD, both of whom were born in that same county. John C. WARD was for years engaged in the mercantile business at Ridgeville, later and for about nine years was a traveling salesman for A. H. Perfect & Co. at Fort Wayne and the last years of his life were spent as manager of the J. A. Hood wholesale grocery at Union City. Mr. and Mrs. FOLTZ have three daughters. Garnet, Marguerite and Georgia, the two elder of whom are students in the Portland high school. The FOLTZ's have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.69-70. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FORRAR, HORACE E

Horace E. FORRAR, senior member of the firm of FORRAR & Son, general merchants at Bryant, has been a' resident of Jay county for more than twenty years and has long been recognized as one of the active figures in the commercial life of this county. Mr. FORRAR was born at Swanders, in Shelby county, Ohio, September 23, 1874, and is a son of John and Sarah ( WALTZ ) FORRAR, both of whom also were born in Ohio, the former in Shelby county and the latter in Montgomery county. John FORRAR was a successful merchant at Swanders, Ohio, conducting for years a grocery store there, and he and his wife were the parents of twelve children, nine of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Margaret, Oliver, Ida, Lula, Pearl, Frank, John and Edith. Reared at Swanders, Horace E. FORRAR received his schooling in the schools of that place and was from the days of his boyhood well trained in business forms, acting as an assistant in his father's store. He married when twenty-one years of age and not long afterward was made manager of the local elevator of Alton Bros. at Swanders, a position he occupied for two years, at the end of which time he was offered the position of manager of the local elevator of Holmes Bros. at Bryant, this county, and moved over here, establishing his home at Bryant, where he ever since has resided. For twelve years Mr. FORRAR continued to act as manager of the grain elevator at Bryant and then, in 1911, decided to engage in business himself. With that end in view he opened a meat market at Bryant. Four years later he added to this business a general line of groceries and as the business expanded added to his stock until he had a well equipped and well stocked general store. In the fall of 1919, upon the return of his eldest son Harley E. FORRAR, from the army Mr. FORRAR admitted this son to partnership in the concern and the business since has been carried on under the firm name of FORRAR & Son, carrying on an extensive trade within the normal trade area of Bryant. On October 16, 1895, while still living in Ohio, Horace E. FORRAR was united in marriage to Lotta HUNT, who was born in the village of Botkins, in that state, daughter of Newell and Mary ( HELBERN ) HUNT, and to this union have been born four children, Harley E., Maurice S., Mary and Marguerite. Harley E. FORRAR, junior member of the firm of FORRAR & Son and a veteran of the World war, was inducted into military service on July 24, 1918, and served for twelve months overseas as a member of the 356th Butchery Company, Q. M. C. and was mustered out as a sergeant at Camp Dix, New Jersey, September 27, 1919. On July 4, 1920, he was united in marriage with Gertrude HARLEY, who was born at Shelbyville, Ind. To this union one child has been born, Merilyn Jean, born on January 5, 1922. Harley E. FORRAR is a member of Limberlost Post No. 124, American Legion, at Geneva, and both he and his father are members of the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen at Bryant. In their political views they claim the privilege of independence. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.110-111. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FOSTER, LEE E

LEE E. FOSTER, D. D. S. one of the best known young dentists in Jay county, with offices at Portland, where he has been in practice since his graduation from the Indiana Dental College in 1912, was born at Farmland, in the neighboring county of Randolph, on October 12, 1889, and is a son of M. B. and Hattie ( HEASTON ) FOSTER, both of whom were born in that same county, members of old families there. M. B. FOSTER was reared in Randolph county and early became a contracting plasterer, a business he followed with success. He was married in 1888 and he and his wife have five children, Doctor FOSTER having four sisters, Helen, Reba, Ruth and Inez, who are at home with their parents. Doctor FOSTER received his early schooling at Farmland and upon completing the high school course entered Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis, from which he was graduated in 1912, after a course of instruction covering three years. Upon receiving his diploma the Doctor located at Portland, where he opened an office for the practice of his profession and where he has since continued in practice. On June 8, 1914, about two years after opening his dental office at Portland, Dr. Lee E. FOSTER was united in marriage to Mary I. WICKERSHAM, who was born in Madison township, this county, daughter of Henry C. and Clara B. WICKERSHAM, and to this union two children have been born, Sarah Jane, born on January 20, 1916, and John E., December 12, 1919. Doctor and Mrs. FOSTER are members of the Presbyterian church. The Doctor is a Republican and a Freemason. He is a member of the Portland Rotary Club and is also affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.46. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FRANKS, HARVEY

Harvey FRANKS, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Madison township, proprietor of a well kept and well improved farm on rural mail route No. I out of Union City, Ind., is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. FRANKS was born on a farm in Noble township on October 20, 1855, and is a son of Chris and Sarah ( MINNICH ) FRANKS, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania, where they were married. In the early '40s they moved to Ohio and settled in the Greenville neighborhood, but not long afterward left there and came over into Indiana. Chris FRANKS entered a tract of 120 acres of land in Noble township, this county, paying the Government $1.25 an acre for the same, and there established his home and proceeded to make a farm out of the place. There he spent the remainder of his life and got a good piece of property around him, coming to be the owner of 240 acres. He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, of whom four are still living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Mrs. Sarah A. WEAVER and Mrs. Harriet V. HARTZELL, and a brother, Andrew J. FRANKS. The eldest brother, William FRANKS, died while serving as a soldier of the Union during the Civil war. The other children of this family were Samuel, Henry, Caroline, John J., Leonard, Levi and Mrs. Margaret TULLIS. Reared on the pioneer home farm in Noble township, Harvey FRANKS received his schooling in the old Premer school (a log school house) in that neighborhood and from the days of his boyhood was a helpful factor in the labors of developing the farm. He married in his twenty-first year and then began farming for himself on a tract of forty acres in Wayne township which he had secured in a trade for his share in the home place and there remained for about twenty-five years, meantime clearing all but six acres which he left for a wood lot. In 1899 Mr. FRANKS bought the farm of eighty acres on which he is now living in Madison township and moved to this latter place, selling his Wayne township farm in the following year. In 1911 he retired from the farm and moved to Salamonia, where he remained for five years, at the end of which time he returned to his farm and resumed management of the same and has since then been engaged in directing affairs there. Mr. FRANKS has erected on this place since taking possession of it a whole new set of buildings and has made other up-to-date improvements, now having a very well equipped farm plant, and he and his wife are very comfortably situated. It was on July 30, 1876, that Harvey FRANKS was united in marriage to Nancy E. FENTON, who had then been a resident of this county for four or five years. Mrs. FRANKS was born in Preble county, Ohio, November 27, 1857, and was about seventeen years of age when she came to Indiana with her parents, Stacey and Susanna ( NEARON ) FENTON, who settled in this county. Stacey FENTON was a substantial farmer and he and his wife were the parents of eight children, five of whom are still living, Mrs. FRANKS having a sister, Mrs. Olive A. PORTER, and three brothers, James, Isaac J. and Roy FENTON. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.133-134. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FREEMYER, GEORGE S

George S. FREEMYER, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Noble township, now living retired on his well kept place on rural mail route No. 4 out of Portland, is a "Buckeye" by birth, but has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his infancy and has thus been a witness to and a participant in the amazing development that has marked this region since the days of his boyhood. Mr. FREEMYER was born on his father's farm in Washington county, Ohio, April 23, 1849, and is a son of Joseph L. and Mary ( ELDER ) FREEMYER, both of whom also were born in that state. Joseph L. FREEMYER, a son of George FREEMYER, one of the pioneers of Washington county, Ohio, grew to manhood in that county and became the owner of an eighty-acre farm on which he made his home after his marriage, remaining there until 1850 when he disposed of his holdings there and came with his family to Indiana, driving through to Jay county and establishing his home on a tract of 148 acres which he had bought in Madison township. When he bought that tract but fifteen acres of it had been deadened and his first task was to erect a log cabin and hack through the woods for a mile to make a lane to the highway. He got the place cleared and drained and the most of it under cultivation in time and there he and his wife spent their last days. Joseph L. FREEMYER's farming operations prospered and he increased his land holdings until he became the owner of a half section of land in Madison township and was accounted one of the substantial citizens of that section of the county. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, six of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having five sisters, Nancy, Ann, Leah, Amanda and Harriet. As noted above, George S. FREEMYER was but an infant when he came to this county with his parents in 1850 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Madison township, thoroughly familiar with the rough work of clearing and draining a forest farm. He received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and remained at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-four years, when he bought a tract of eighty acres, the place on which he is now living in Noble township, and there established his home. This he had to clear and ditch and otherwise improve, but he finally got the job done and made a good farm, gradually increasing his holdings until now he is the owner of 208 acres in Noble and Madison townships, all in excellent state and improved with three sets of buildings. In 1911 Mr. FREEMYER retired from the active labors of the farm and has since rented his fields, though continuing to make his home on the farm, where he and his family are very comfortably situated. Mr. FREEMYER is a Democrat and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political affairs. He has been. twice married. His first wife, Elizabeth JONES, daughter of Edward and Mary JONES, was the mother of two children, Flora Myrtle and Charles. Upon the death of the mother of these children Mr. FREEMYER married Johanna PROUTY, who was born in the neighboring county of Wells, daughter of Thomas and Sarah ( WILLIAMS ) PROUTY, the former of whom was a native of Ohio, who had settled in Wells county, this state, where he was a blacksmith, farmer and landowner. Thomas PROUTY and wife had seven children, of whom four are living, those besides Mrs. FREEMYER being Thomas, Jessie and Clarinda. Mr. FREEMYER's daughter, Flora Myrtle FREEMYER, married Charles GAGLE and has four children, Arthur, Shirley Opal, Harold and Edith GAGLE. Arthur GAGLE married Edith HALTERMAN and has two children, Raymond lmel and George Robert. Shirley Opal GAGLE married Floyd LEEMASTER and has one child, a daughter, Remonda Mondonna LEEMASTER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.257-258. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

FRY, E W

E. W. FRY, D.V.S., a well known young veterinary surgeon practicing at Portland, with offices at 138 East Main street, has. not long been a resident of this county but during even this short period of residence has attracted much and favorable attention among the farmers and horsemen of the county by reason of his skill as a practitioner. Doctor FRY is a native of the neighboring "Buckeye" state, born in Darke county, Ohio, February 7, 1898, and is a son of Edgar and Margaret ( LYTLE ) FRY, both of whom also were born in Ohio. From the days of his boyhood Doctor FRY has been attracted to the science of veterinary surgery. Immediately following his graduation from the Ansonia, Ohio high school in 1917 he entered the Indiana Veterinary College at Indianapolis and after four years of study there was graduated from that institution with the class of 1921. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor FRY located at Portland, where in May, 1921, he became engaged in the practice of his profession in association with Dr. J. S. CULBERTSON, but a few months later opened an office. of his own and has since been engaged in practice alone. The Doctor was the youngest member of his class in the Indiana Veterinary College and is one of the youngest, if not the youngest, licensed veterinary surgeons in the state. On October 2, 1921, a few months after having become established in practice at Portland, Dr. E. W. FRY was united in marriage to Lota JOHNSTON, a graduate nurse, daughter of D. M. and Minnie JOHNSTON, of Indianapolis, and he and his wife reside at the corner of Main and Wayne streets in Portland. Mrs. FRY was graduated from the Fletcher Sanitarium school of nurses at Indianapolis in 1919 and for some time prior to her marriage had been following the profession of trained nurse. Doctor and Mrs. FRY have a pleasant home and since taking up their residence in Portland have taken an interested and helpful part in the general social and cultural activities of the city. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.275-276. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

FULTON, BENJAMIN F

BENJAMIN F. FULTON, formerly and for years one of the most active factors in the general commercial and industrial life of Portland and who died at his home in that city in the spring of 1911, had done much to promote the general interests of his home town and county and it is but fitting that there should here be carried something in the way of a memorial to his activities. Mr. FULTON was a native of the old Buckeye state, but for forty years his activities had been centered in and about Portland and during that period he had done much to impress his individuality upon the community. He was born at Sidney, Ohio, March 25, 1848, the first born of the four children born to Isaac and Jane ( TAYLOR ) FULTON, both of whom were born in that same city, where they spent all their lives. Reared at Sidney, Benjamin F. FULTON received but meager schooling, the circumstances surrounding his youth being such as early to force him to rely upon his own efforts for a livelihood. When eighteen years of age he entered the employ of Rhodehamel Bros., of Piqua, Ohio, and after an apprenticeship in their store there was put in charge of one of their novelty wagons, the territory he covered on his sales trips extending, as far west as Portland. He presently acquired also an interest in a general store at Covington, Ohio, and in 1870 gave up his road trips and devoted his attention to the store, continuing thus engaged until after his marriage in August of 1871, when he sold his interests at Covington and established his home at Portland, where he spent practically the remainder of his life. Upon locating at Portland Mr. FULTON became engaged in the grocery business. Four years later he sold that store and moved to Indianapolis where he bought another grocery store and was there engaged in business for about three years, at the end of which time he sold out there and returned to Portland, resuming there his vocation as a grocer. Two years later he sold his store to his brother, William FULTON, and he and his brother, James L. FULTON, became engaged in the hardware business, their store being on the site now occupied hy the Spades grocery on Meridian street, and this business was maintained by the brothers for about ten years. Meanwhile, about two years after they had become engaged in the hardware business the FULTON brothers took up the work of drilling gas wells and organized what then was known as the FULTON Gas Company, their operations becoming quite extensive hereabout. They presently bought out the plant of the Portland Gas Company and thus acquired control of all the gas business in Portland. When oil was being sought in this county Mr. FULTON drilled in the first producing well brought in Wayne township, and he continued his operations in this and adjacent territory until his death, one of the most active promoters of gas and oil interests in this section, his death occurring on April 2, 1911. Mr. FULTON was a Republican and was a member, of the Friends church, as is his widow. It was on August 8, 1871, that Benjamin F. FULTON was united in marriage to Sarah G. HAWKINS, who was born in Portland, and to this union were born two children, Ethan Allen and Jane Louise, the former of whom (now engaged m the promotion of the oil business in this county) served as an officer in the United States army during the time of American participation in the World War and is now captain of Howitzer Company of the 151st Infantry, United States National Guard of Indiana, at Portland. Capt. Ethan A. FULTON married Gertrude ROGERS and has had two children, Dorothy, who married Joseph CAMPBELL and died leaving one child, a daughter, Betty FULTON, and Pauline M. Jane Louise FULTON is a teacher of art in the Portland public schools. As noted above, Mrs. FULTON was born in Portland, where she is still living and where she is very pleasantly situated. She was born on November 27, 1850, a daughter of Nathan B. and Rebecca ( SHANKS ) HAWKINS, the former of whom, born on October 24, 1812, died on October 20, 1853, and the latter, born on February 22, 1816, died on April 1, 1882. Mrs. FULTON is a member of the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution by right of descent from her great-grandfather, Samuel HAWKINS, who was a soldier of the Revolution. The family in this country was established by Joseph HAWKINS, who came to the American colonies from Wales in 1685, and [the family] has been prominent in Jay county since pioneer days. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.38-39. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

FULTON, ETHAN ALLEN

Ethan Allen FULTON, captain of Howitzer Company of the 151st Infantry, United States National Guard of Indiana, former captain of Company G, 3d Infantry, Indiana National Guard, a veteran of the World war, first post commander of the Robert Guy Ayers Post of the American Legion at Portland and one of the best known citizens of that city, for years prominently and actively connected with the work of oil development hereabout, was born in Portland and has lived there all his life. Captain FULTON was born on May 6, 1872, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Sarah G. ( HAWKINS ) FULTON, the latter of whom also was born in this county, a member of the well known pioneer Hawkins family, and the former a native of Shelby county, Ohio, but for many years a resident of Portland, conspicuously identified with the oil and gas industry in this section from the days of the beginning of the development of that important industry, as is set out elsewhere in this work. Indeed, it is a matter of record that the late Benjamin F. FULTON "brought in" the first profitably producing oil well in Jay county that is, the first well that produced in sufficient quantity to warrant its connection with the pipe line. Ethan A. FULTON was reared in Portland and after four years of high school work entered the mechanical engineering course Purdue University. After two years of university work he return to Portland and became engaged with his father in the latter's extensive oil development work, drilling in the oil fields of Jay county, and presently formed a partnership with his father, a mutually agreeable association that continued for about fifteen years, at the end of which time the younger FULTON became engaged in the same line on his own account and so continued for five years or more, since which time his services have been rendered in behalf of other local producers, Captain FULTON's long connection with development work and thorough acquaintance with the local oil field giving to these services a special value. It was in 1908 that Captain FULTON started the movement which led to the organization of a local company of the Indiana National Guard at Portland G Company of the 3d Infantry regiment and he was for years captain of that company. The first "call to arms" this company responded to was in 1913 when it was sent to Indianapolis to enter guard duty at a time of a street car strike. Three years later, in 1916, when the trouble arose on the Mexican border, Company G was federalized, along with other units of the Indiana National Guard, and sent to the border, where Captain FULTON's command was kept on patrol duty until the "flurry" ended. When the United States entered the World war Company G was sent to Ft. Harrison as a unit and there federalized, but lost its identity, its members being assigned to various detachments. On June 6, 1918, Captain FULTON was commissioned a captain in the United States army and given command of Company B of the 22d Battalion, brigaded at Camp Stanley and Globe, Ariz., and continued in army service until mustered out some time following the signing of the armistice in the following November. Captain FULTON took an active part in the organization of Robert Guy Ayers Post, No. 211, American Legion, at Portland and was elected first post commander of that patriotic organization. In 1921 he was instrumental in effecting the organization of a new military unit in Portland to take the place of old G Company and was commissioned captain of the same. This company was recognized by the state on June 10, 1921, and by the War Department on June 25, and was assigned as Howitzer Company of the 151st Infantry, United States National Guard of Indiana. The Captain is a Republican and has ever given his interested attention to local civic affairs. He is a Freemason, affiliated with Jay Lodge No. 87, F. and A. M. at Portland, and is also affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the local aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. On June 10, 1896, Ethan Allen FULTON was united in marriage to Gertrude ROGERS, who was born at Farmland, Ind., but was reared and educated at Portland, daughter of Henry and Jane ( DICK ) ROGERS, and to this union two children have been born Pauline and Dorothy (deceased). Dorothy FULTON, who died on October 1. 1917. married Joseph CAMPBELL a lumberman living at Anderson. Ind.. and left one child a daughter, Betty F.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.182-183. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.



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