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Jay County Indiana Biographies Surname G & H


GARBER, ERWIN C

Erwin C. GARBER, M. D. a well known physician and surgeon of Jay county and for years a successful practitioner at Dunkirk, is a native son of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Indiana and of Dunkirk since the days of his boyhood. He was born at Salesville, Ohio, August 18, 1881, son of Dr. Jonathan B. and Alma H. ( HARTLEY ) GARBER, both of whom were born in Guernsey county, Ohio. and the latter of whom is still living. The late Dr. Jonathan B. GARBER, whose tragic death in the year 1913 is still a matter of lament in Dunkirk, was reared in Guernsey county, Ohio, where he received excellent schooling and took his preparatory reading in the study of medicine. He supplemented a course in the Miami Medical College at Cincinnati by a course in the Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia and was graduated from the latter institution in 1890. For a year following the receipt of his degree Doctor GARBER was engaged in the practice of his profession in the vicinity of Cincinnati and then, in the spring of 1892, came to Indiana and located at Dunkirk, where he was engaged in practice until the time of his untimely death, due to an automobile accident, in 1913. His widow is now living at Indianapolis. Dr. Jonathan B. GARBER and wife were the parents of three children, Dr. Erwin C. GARBER having two sisters, Nellie and Daisy. Dr. Erwin C. GARBER was but ten years of age when his parents moved to Dunkirk and he was graduated from the high school at that place in 1901. Under the able preceptorship of his father he prepared himself for entrance to medical college, having early decided to follow his father's profession, and after a four year course at the Ohio Medical College at Columbus was graduated from that institution in 1905. For a year following his graduation Doctor GARBER served as an interne in the Miami Valley Hospital at Dayton, Ohio, and then, in June, 1906, returned to Dunkirk and became associated with his father in the practice of his profession in his home town, a mutually agreeable arrangement which was maintained until his father's lamentable death in 1913, since which time the younger doctor has been continuing his practice alone. On August 22, 1907, Dr. Erwin C. GARBER was united in marriage to Ella Mae O'NEILL, who for several years had been a member of the excellent teaching staff of the Dunkirk city schools, and to this union have been born three children, J. Neill, Eleanor Jane and Alma Elizabeth. J. Neill GARBER is a member of the class of 1925, Dunkirk high school. Mrs. GARBER was born in Belmont county, Ohio, but was reared in Muncie, this state, and was graduated from the Muncie high school, after which she entered the ranks of Indiana teachers and, as noted above, was teaching school at Dunkirk prior to her marriage. Her parents, James and Laura ( GREGORY ) O'NEILL. had two children, Mrs. GARBER having a brother, John J. O'NEILL. Mrs. GARBER is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and Doctor GARBER is a member of the Baptist church. They are Democrats and in August, 1921, Mrs. GARBER was elected the Democratic member of the Dunkirk city school board, the first woman to be elected to that office. The Doctor is a 32nd Mason, affiliated with the blue lodge and the chapter at Dunkirk and the consistory at Ft. Wayne, and is a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with the temple at Ft. Wayne. He also is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Dunkirk. For a time during the period of America's participation in the World war Doctor GARBER rendered service in the Medical Corps of the army, having been commissioned a first lieutenant. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.164-165. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GARDNER, William

William GARDNER, one of Jay county's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, proprietor of an excellent farm on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, in Penn township, has been a resident of this county all his life. He was born on the "Twin Hills" farm in Penn township on June 19, 1866, and is a son of William and Mahalia ( HUNT ) GARDNER, who came up here from Wayne county in 1850, the year following their marriage, and settled on the ''Twin Hills" farm, where they spent the remainder of their lives, useful and influential members of that community, as is set out elsewhere in this work in the biography of Mr. GARDNER's elder brother, Jesse E. GARDNER, now the owner of the famous "Twin Hills," together with further details regarding the GARDNER family in this county. Reared on the home farm at the "Twin Hills," William GARDNER received his schooling in the neighborhood schools. His father became the owner of a farm of 270 acres and from the days of his boyhood he was a valued assistant in the labors of developing this farm. He married before he had attained his majority and after his marriage established his home on a forty-acre tract he bought in Jackson township and there continued to reside until he moved to his present place in Penn township, where he and his family are very comfortably situated. Mr. GARDNER is the owner of 247 acres in Penn and Jackson townships and in addition to his general farming he has long given considerable attention to the raising of live stock and has done well. He and his family are Republicans and he is a member of the local Grange and of the Pennville lodge of the Knights of Pythias. It was in 1886 that William GARDNER was united in marriage to Josephine BRUNSON, who also was born in Jay county, a daughter of Albert and Minerva ( ROONEY ) BRUNSON, and to this union have been born four children, namely: Ben, who married Grace HAINES and died on November 13, 1915, leaving three children, Duane, Doris and Don; Harry, who married Margaret HARTLEY; Mabel, who died in infancy, and Roy, who is unmarried and living at home. Mrs. GARDNER was born on a farm in Jackson township, where her parents began housekeeping after their marriage in 1867 and were in their generation among the leaders in the community life of that section. Albert BRUNSON, father of Mrs. GARDNER, was a veteran of the Civil war having served in Company B of the 138th Indiana Volunteer Infantry and years afterward served for some time as justice of the peace and for Jackson township. He was born in Montgomery county Ohio. in 1845 and was the eldest of the six children born to Timothy and Sarah ( JONES ) BRUNSON, the former of whom was born in the vicinity of Utica, N. Y., in 1814, and died in Jay county in 1870 having settled in Jackson township, this county, upon coming over here from Montgomery county, Ohio, in 1857. Albert BRUNSON was thus twelve years of age when he became a resident of Jay county, and he grew up here. As noted above, it was not long after the completion of his military service during the Civil war that he married Minerva ROONEY. who was born in Clinton county, Ohio, but who had come over into Indiana with her parents, James and Rebecca ( MURPHY ) ROONEY, when seventeen years of age, the family settling in this county, where her parents spent their last days. Though he started farming on a small tract of uncleared land, Albert BRUNSON was a good manager and presently became the owner of a well cultivated place of 320 acres, and on this place he spent his last days, his death occurring on July 6, 1920, he then being in his sixty-fifth year. He and his wife were the parents of five children, of whom Mrs. GARDNER was the eldest, the others being Burton, Harry, Essie and Jennie.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.323-324. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GARRETT, WILLIAM

William S. GARRETT, formerly and for years engaged in business at Redkey, now the owner of an excellent farm in Richland township, where he and his family have made their home for the past ten years or more, is a native Hoosier and has lived in Indiana practically all his life, the exception being a short period spent in the West. Mr. GARRETT was born on a farm in Delaware county, this state, January 25, 1863, and is a son of James P. and Jane (FEASEL) GARRETT, the former of whom was born in that same county, his father having been one of the pioneers and the owner of a farm of more than 600 acres there. James P. GARRETT was reared on the home farm in Henry county and at the age of twenty-two years took a trip West, going as far as Idaho. Upon his return and after his marriage he established his home on a farm and there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring when he was sixty-five years of age. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom three are living, the subject of this sketch having' a brother, Johnson GARRETT, and a sister, Lavina. Reared on the home farm in Delaware county, William S. GARRETT received his schooling' in the neighborhood schools and early became engaged as a timberman, a vocation he followed for three years, at the end of which time he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and was located at Redkey. He worked for the railroad about three years and then was made deputy city marshal, a position he occupied for four years. He then became engaged as a bartender in one of Redkey's saloons and was thus engaged for about ten years, at the end of which time he became engaged in the saloon business on his own account at Redkey and thus continued in business for ten years, at the end of which time, in 1907, he disposed of his interests in that city and bought a small farm in the neighborhood. He farmed this place for about three years and then went West, prospecting in the oil fields of Kansas. There he was painfully injured in an accident in the oil field about six months later and was compelled to return home. His recuperation required about a year and then he bought a tract of eighty acres just north of Redkey, on which he has since made his home. Since taking possession of that place Mr. GARRETT has made numerous substantial improvements on the same and as his affairs prospered has added to his holdings until now he is the owner of an excellent farm of 138 acres of Richland township land. In 1884 William S. GARRETT was united in marriage to Anna KEESIER, who was born in this county, daughter of Samuel and Clara C. (HOPPES) KEESIER, and to this union two children were born, Edna P. and one who died in infancy. Edna P. GARRETT married Harry TRONE and is now living at Dayton, Ohio.[Montgomery Co.] Mr. and Mrs. GARRETT also have an adopted son, Cassius Clay GARRETT. The GARRETT's are Republicans. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.377-378. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GARRISON, MORTON

MORTON GARRISON, a well known insurance underwriter at Portland, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life, a resident of Portland since 1912. He was born on a farm in Wabash county on January 16, 1862, a son of Elihu and Mary B. ( SHELL ) GARRISON, both of whom were born in Ohio, but who spent the most of their lives in Indiana. Elihu GARRISON was but a child' when he came to Indiana with his parents in 1839, the family settling in Wabash county, where he completed his schooling. After his marriage to Mary B. SHELL, who was born in Miami county, Ohio, he established his home on a farm in the vicinity of Wabash and became a substantial citizen of that community. He and his wife were the parents of three children, all of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Kenton GARRISON, who married Jennie V. and is living at Converse, Ind., and a sister, Rosa M., who married M. L. RAY and is living at Peru, Ind. Reared on the home farm in Wabash county, Morton GARRISON received his schooling in the schools of Wabash, going through the high school course, an upon leaving school took up the work of the home farm, continuing thus engaged for five years, at the end of which time he became engaged in railroad work, first employed by the Wabash Railroad Company as a brakeman and presently was promoted to conductor. He transferred his services to the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company and by this latter company was employed as a conductor. He continued thus employed until 1893, in which year he became engaged in association with his brother in the grain and milling business at Converse, this state. In 1904 he took up a special line of promotion work in behalf of the shippers of this state, in an effort to secure a more equitable regulation of the rates of transportation, and was for several months thus engaged, the movement in which he had thus interested himself eventually leading to legislation which brought about what is now known as the state railroad commission. In addition to their other line, the GARRISON brothers also were engaged in the real estate business at Converse and so continued until Kenton GARRISON's retirement from business in 1912, after which Morton GARRISON moved to Portland, where he since has been quite successfully engaged in the insurance business. In 1887 Morton GARRISON was united in marriage to Lola M. FINK, who was born in Dekalb county, Indiana, and to this union two children have been born, namely: Hugh GARRISON, who married Edith CATTERSON, of Martin county, Indiana, and Bessie, who married Rollin W. HARMAN, of Jay county and has three children, Harry, Robert and Ruth HARMAN. Mr. GARRISON is a Freemason. In his political views he is independent. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.87-88. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

GARRITY, WILLIAM

William GARRITY, grocer at Dunkirk and one of the best known merchants of that city, proprietor of an. up-to-date grocery store on East Center street, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a farm in the vicinity of Indianapolis, in Marion county, September 10, 1849, son of William and Eliza ( KASEY ) GARRITY, both of whom were born in Ireland and who were the parents of seven children, of whom William GARRITY now is the sole survivor. Mr. GARRITY's mother died when he was three years old and his father died when he was seven. Thus early doubly orphaned he was looked after by the older children of the family and upon completing the course in the district school in the vicinity of his home assisted his eldest brother, John GARRITY, in the operations of the farm and remained with him until he had attained his majority, after which for about five years he was engaged as a farm hand. He then rented a farm and began operations on his own account, continuing as a renter for ten or fifteen years, at the end of which time he bought a forty-acre farm in Blackford county, this state, and there established his home. About six years later, however, he sold this farm to advantage and moved to Dunkirk, where he became engaged in the real estate business. For about seven years Mr. GARRITY was thus engaged and then he bought the grocery store on East Center street, where he since has been quite successfully engaged in business. Upon taking over this business Mr. GARRITY made extensive improvements to the place and has a well stocked and modern store, the details of which are looked after in ship-shape fashion. Mr. GARRITY has been thrice married. His first wife, Sarah D. CREIG, lived about fifteen years after her marriage and left three children, Carrie E., Mary A. and Harry W., all of whom are married. About seven years after the death of his first wife Mr. GARRITY married Mrs. Mary F. ( TALBOTT ) DICKINSON, who died in 1915. On November 5, 1919, he married Mrs. Martha E. ( KELLY ) THOMPSON, who was born at Winchester, this state. Mr. and Mrs. GARRITY are members of the Congregational church at Dunkirk. Mr. GARRITY is a Mason, a member of the blue lodge at Dunkirk, and is a charter member of the local lodge of the Improved Order of Red Men at Dunkirk. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.164. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

GASKILL, GUY

Guy GASKILL, a well known and progressive young farmer of Penn township and proprietor of a well improved farm on rural mail route No. 4 out of Bryant, was born in the neighboring county of Wells but has been a resident of Jay county practically all the time since he was six years of age, the exception having been a period of two years during which he was sojourning in the West. Mr. GASKILL was born on September 14, 1885, and is a son of James and Harriet ( SUTTON ) GASKILL, the latter of whom is a member of one of the old families of Jay county. James GASKILL was born in the vicinity of New Holland, Ohio, and was reared in that state. As a young man he came to Indiana and located in Penn township, this county, where he presently was married, afterward moving to Wells county, where he established his home on a farm and remained until 1891, when he returned to Jay county and rented the old SUTTON homestead farm. Not long afterward, however, he bought a tract of eighty acres and settled down on his own place. He and his wife have five children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Walter, Orlie, Ethel and Charles. As is noted above, Guy GASKILL was six years of age when his parents returned to Jay county from Wells county and he received his schooling in the schools of this county. As a young man he went West on a general prospecting trip and was for two years engaged working on a horse ranch in Montana. Upon his return to Jay county he resumed farm work and presently was married, after which he bought an eighty acre farm in Jackson township on which he lived for two years, at the end of which time he traded that place for a general store at Nottingham and was for eighteen months engaged in business there. He then traded the store for a farm in Michigan and returned to Jay county and settled down on the place on which he is now living in Penn township. Mr. GASKILL has a well improved farm of eighty acres and is doing well in his operations, giving particular attention to the raising of purebred Chester White hogs. He rents an adjacent "eighty" and thus is operating 160 acres, carrying on his operations in up-to-date fashion. Guy GASKILL married Eva CAMPBELL, daughter of Alonzo and Harriet ( BRANER ) CAMPBELL and to this union one child has been born, Vivian GASKILL. Mr. and Mrs. GASKILL are members of the Friends church and are Democrats. They have a very pleasant home and take an interested part in the community's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.210-211. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GAUNT, CHARLES L

Charles L. GAUNT, mayor of the city of Dunkirk, secretary and treasurer of the Indiana Glass Company at Dunkirk, president of the celebrated Boosters Club of that city, former principal of schools there and for years actively identified with the best interests of the place, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. GAUNT was born on a farm in Knox township on September 1, 1883, son of David and Martha S. (HARTMAN) GAUNT, the latter of whom also was born in this county, a member of one of the pioneer families here. David GAUNT, who for years was one of the best known farmers in Knox township, was a native of the state of Ohio, but had been a resident of Jay county since the days of his boyhood and developed a good piece of farm property in Knox township. He and his wife were the parents of six children, all of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Joseph H. GAUNT, of Portland: Orlan F., of Dunkirk; Floyd, of Anderson, this state; Myron, also of Anderson, [Madison Co.], and Edith, of Dunkirk. Charles L. GAUNT was reared on the home farm in Knox township and was graduated from the Dunkirk high school with the class of 1902, after which he attended three terms of ten weeks each in the normal school at Marion, and thus equipped began teaching school in his home township, his first school there being the Oak Grove school, over the destinies of which he presided for two terms. He then, in 1904, was engaged as a teacher in the schools of Dunkirk, having the fifth and sixth grades in the South school. During- this period of service Mr. GAUNT made such an excellent record that the next year he was engaged as principal of the Central school, teaching the sixth grade. In the middle of that term he was transferred to the principalship of the South school, where he taught the eighth grade, and for three consecutive terms was thus engaged, at the end of that time being transferred to the principalship of the North school, where he taught the commercial department. In the meantime Mr. GAUNT had been giving his attention seriously to the thought of commercial and industrial undertaking's and in 1909 entered the office of the Indiana Glass Company at Dunkirk as bookkeeper and paymaster. In this dual position Mr. GAUNT served the establishment for seven years, at the end of which time he was elected secretary and treasurer of the company. That was in 1916 and ever since he has occupied that position, giving his undivided attention to the growing affairs of the important industrial concern with which he has so long been connected. The Indiana Glass Company employs about 550 persons when the plant is being worked to capacity and turns out over three car loads of glass a day, the output being confined to glass table ware, vases and lamps, the table ware. being pressed and the vases and lamps blown. The sand used in this plant is brought from Ottawa, Ill., the soda ash from Detroit. Mich., the lime from northern Ohio, and the coal from West Virginia and Kentucky. Prior to 1906 the company used natural gas, but since that time has manufactured its own gas. On September 1, 1906, Charles L. GAUNT was united in marriage to Bertha WILSON, who was born and reared on a farm in Grant county, this state, daughter of Jasper and Kate ( JAY ) WILSON, who were the parents of five children, those besides Mrs. GAUNT being Cleo, Merle, Ruth and James. Mr. and Mrs. GAUNT have one child, a daughter, Treva L., born on November 27, 1907, who is a member of the class of 1924, Dunkirk high school. The GAUNT's are' members of the Congregational Church at Dunkirk and Mr. GAUNT is a member of the board of trustees of the same. He is a Republican and in the fall of 1921 was elected mayor of the city of Dunkirk and was inaugurated on the following January 2. He also has served as a member of the local school board and is now a member of the library board. Mr. GAUNT has for years been recognized as one of the "live wires" in the social and industrial life of his home town and is the president of the Boosters Club which has been such an active and effective agent in promoting the interests of the city of Dunkirk. He is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Hartford City lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.352-353. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

GAUNT, JOSEPH

Joseph GAUNT, deceased, was one of Jay County's early pioneers, locating in Knox Township in March, 1837. He was a native of New Jersey, born August 2, 1799, a son of Jacob and Hannah ( HOLMES ) GAUNT, natives of New Jersey, and a grandson of Joseph GAUNT, who was a native of England. During the war of the Revolution, Jacob GAUNT was sent by his father with a message to General Washington, and was captured by the enemy and beaten with a sword to make him divulge the secret, but as he persistently refused to yield to their demands he was allowed to go home. Jacob GAUNT became a boat builder when he reached manhood, and in his early married life removed to Red Stone, Pennsylvania, and from there in 1805 to Columbiana County, Ohio, being among the early settlers of that county. There Joseph GAUNT was reared, living there until 1830, when he moved to Delaware County, Ohio, remaining there until February 1837, when he started for Jay County. He located on section 24, Knox Township, entering 160 acres of land on that section and 160 acres on section 26. He first built a log cabin, 16 X 16 feet in dimensions, all the men in his township, three in number, turning out to help him raise the logs. In this log cabin was preached the first sermon in Knox Township, by Elder TISDALE, a Baptist minister. Mr. GAUNT was married in 1819 to Phoebe Emily SEVERN, who was born in Bordentown, New Jersey, April 15, 1803, a daughter of Isaiah and Alkada SEVERN, her father being one of the first shoe manufacturers of Salem, Ohio. To Mr. and Mrs. GAUNT were born four children -- Redden N., Hannah HOLMES, Jacob and Elizabeth Ann. Redden N. enlisted in the war for the Union, a member of Company F, One Hundred and Fortieth Indiana Infantry, and died at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in 1863, in the forty-second year of his age. Mrs. GAUNT died March 13, 1870, and Mr. GAUNT November 8, 1875. He was in politics a staunch Democrat. He and his estimable wife were members of the Baptist church. SOURCE: p.308 "Biographical and Historical Record of Jay County, Indiana," Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1887. Reprinted by Mayhill Publications of Knightstown, Indiana, 1974. This is the reprinted Jay County section out of the original combined 1887 History of Jay and Blackford counties.Submitted to GenWeb by:Betty Creath

GEETING,WILLIAM W

William W. GEETING, former assessor of Madison township and for years recognized as one of the substantial and influential farmers and landowners of that township, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Jay county long enough to cause him to feel "perfectly at home" here. Mr. GEETING was born on a farm in Preble county, Ohio, May 5, 1860, and is a son of Adam L. and Mary ( HICKSON ) GEETING, both of whom were born in that same county, where they were reared and married. Adam L. GEETING was reared on a farm in Preble county and after his marriage established his home there. After the death of his parents he bought eighty acres of the home place and operated the same for ten years, at the end of which time he sold it to a brother and then came over into Jay county and bought an "eighty" in Bearcreek township. Here he made his home for three years, at the end of which time he traded this place for an "eighty" in Preble county and moved back into Ohio. After his wife's death on this latter place he retired from the farm and moved to Lewisburg, Ohio, where his last days were spent. He and his wife were the parents of six children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Laura, and a brother, Samuel GEETING. Reared on the farm, William W. GEETING received his schooling in the schools of Winchester, Ohio, and from the days of his boyhood has been devoted to farming. When about twenty years of age he began farming on his own account, renting a farm of 160 acres from his cousin, John GEETING, in Preble county for three years. He then came over into Indiana and for a year rented 180 acres in Randolph county. He then went back to Ohio and rented from his uncle, Isaac HETSLER, a 200-acre farm in Darke county. There, at the age of twenty-five, he married and for nineteen years thereafter made his home on this farm. He then bought a quarter section of the farm on which he is now living in Madison township, this county, and moved over here and established his home. Since taking possession of that place Mr. GEETING has made numerous up-to-date improvements on the same and also has enlarged his holdings until he now is the owner of a fine farm of 210 acres and one of the best farm plants in the neighborhood. Of late he has been "taking things easy," at least easier than during the earlier years of his farm life, and is renting his fields to his sons, who are carrying on the operations of the farm in "snappy" fashion. Mr. GEETING is a Republican and has long given his active attention to local civic affairs. For six years he served as assessor of' his home township, and there are few men in the county who have a more definite knowledge of land values hereabout than he. It was on March 12, 1885, that William W. GEETING was united in marriage, in Darke county, Ohio, to Tracie HUMMEL, who was born and reared in that county, daughter of Sebastian and Anna HUMMEL, and to this union have been born seven children, Albert, Ona, Nora, Charles, Clyde, Eva and Anna, two of whom, Albert and Nora, are married, the others continuing to make their home under the old home rooftree. Albert GEETING, who is now looking after the affairs of his father's farm, married Nora KUDER and has four children, Vernie, Ralph, Robert and Mary J. Nora GEETING married Clyde CROXTON, now a professor in the University of Illinois at Urbana, and has one child, a daughter, Mildred CROXTON. The GEETING's have a pleasant home on rural mail route No.10 out of Portland and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community in which they live. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.237-238. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GEMMILL, WILLIAM ROSCOE

William Roscoe GEMMILL, who formerly was engaged in the hardware business at Pennville, but who now is devoting his attention wholly to his extensive farming interests in Jay and Wells counties, residing at his farm home on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, in Penn township, was born on the place on which he is now living on October 8, 1882, and is a son of the late Grier Franklin and Amanda Jane (SPAHR) GEMMILL, the latter of whom also was born in this county, a daughter of James M. and Elizabeth ( SMITH ) SPAHR. The late Grier Franklin GEMMILL, a memorial sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, formerly and for years one of the most active and influential figures in the community life of Jay county, a miller and banker at Pennville, a large land owner and former member of the board of county commissioners, was born in Pennsylvania in 1833 and was two years of age when his parents, William and Frances (BLAINE) GEMMILL, came with their family to Indiana in 1835 and settled in Wayne county. In 1837 William GEMMILL came up into Jay county and located on a tract of land which he had entered from the Government in Penn township, where he established his home and remained until 1863, when he returned to his old home in York county, Pennsylvania, and there spent the remainder of his life. On the pioneer farm in Penn township G. F. GEMMILL grew to manhood, and in that township he established his home after his marriage. He early became engaged in the milling business at old Camden (now Pennville), was a widely known stock buyer, took an active part in local public affairs, became the owner of 455 acres of land and was vice-president of the Pennville Bank at the rime of his death, which occurred at his home in Pennville on April 17, 1913. He and his wife were the parents of four children, two of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Leona. The mother of these children died in 1887. William Roscoe GEMMILL received his schooling in the schools of Pennville and Penn township and from the days of his boyhood was a valued assistant in the labors of developing his father's agricultural interests in that township. After the death of his father he continued fanning until 1918, when he became engaged in the hardware business at Pennville and was thus engaged until in Tune, 1921, when he sold his store and has since been devoting his attention to his farms, the owner of 200 acres in this county and 200 acres in Wells county, and making his home on the old home place where he was born in Penn township. In addition to his general farming Mr. GEMMILL gives considerable attention to the raising of live stock and is doing well. He is a Democrat and is a member of the Pennville lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Mr. GEMMILL married Goldie THORNBURG, who also was born in this county, daughter of Harvey .and Sadie (McCLAIN) THORNBURG, and to this union two children have been born, William F. and Deloris I. The GEMMILL's have a very pleasant home and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community. Mr. GEMMILL is a stockholder and director of the Pennville Bank and is also a stockholder in the Blackford County Bank, at Hartford City, Ind.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.332-333. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GILPIN, LEVI LAMBDIN

Levi Lambdin GILPIN, son of Samuel S. and Rebecca ( ENGLE ) GILPIN, was born on August 13, 1844, in a round log cabin in Perry township, Tuscarawas county. Ohio, the first born of the eleven children seven sons and four daughters born to this parentage. The mother was eighty-seven and her youngest child forty-two years old when the first death of one of her children occurred, that of Samuel dark GILPIN. On her ninety-sixth birthday, October 20, 1919, her ten living children ate dinner with her in Portland. She died on February 22, 1920, and sleeps beside her husband in Green Park cemetery in Portland. Levi L. GILPIN's early years were spent on his father's farm, his schooling being confined to the winter terms. At the age of seventeen and of a weight of 112 pounds he enlisted, at Uhrichsville, Ohio, in Company E of the 51st regiment, Ohio Volunteers, for a term of three years, and went into training camp with the company, September 20, 1861, on the Tuscarawas county fair grounds at Canal Dover. On November 3 the regiment was transferred to Camp Dennison (Ohio) and on November 17 to Louisville, Ky., and spent the early part of the winter at Camp Wickliffe, some seventy-five miles southeast of Louisville. After the Ft. Donelson campaign the regiment was the third to march into the city of Nashville and the state, county and city officers and police having left the city, Col. Stanley Matthews was appointed provost marshal and his regiment detailed as provost guards to police the city and guard the state house and other public buildings and the immense amount of military stores and provisions which were brought in by rail and river for the use of the army. Colonel Matthews asked to be relieved from this duty and on July 3, 1862, the regiment was relieved by the 8th Michigan regiment and returned to its place in Nelson's division at the front. When Bragg's rebel army invaded Kentucky, Buells Union army started to head him off. Nelson's division left McMinnsville, Tenn., September I and marched to Nashville seventy-one miles and thence to Louisville, 185 miles by rail, but much farther by the roundabout way taken to get to Louisville ahead of Bragg. When this march began young GILPIN was less than one month past eighteen years of age, but on the longest day's march forty-one miles, when nearing Louisville, he marched into camp with the regiment at 11 o'clock at night and was then detailed for guard duty the remainder of the night, because the man who preceded him on the company roll a big, stout fellow, who with many others of the same build had laughed at GILPIN's size when he enlisted had been left in a fence corner along the pike. They ceased to laugh at him after that, for he never fell out of ranks on a march during his term of service. After the battle of Perryville, Bragg retreated toward Cumberland Gap. He was followed beyond Mt. Vernon, Ky., and then the Union army marched back to Nashville. After the battle of Stone River the regiment was put in VanCleve's division of the 21st Army Corps and took part in the Chattanooga campaign and in the battles of Chickamauga, Lockout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. In all of these battles GILPIN took part, when but little past nineteen. In January, 1864, he re-enlisted with his company and regiment for three years, as veteran volunteers, and with the regiment enjoyed a thirty-day furlough to Ohio. The regiment, then in the 4th Army Corps, took part in all the battles of the Atlanta campaign and at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain (Ga.), June 23, 1864, he was severely wounded in the right arm, just above the elbow, by a minnie ball. After six months and two weeks in hospital he was discharged January 10, 1865 because of a permanently crippled right arm. His father had moved in 1863 from eastern Ohio to Adams county, Indiana. Lacking seven months of his majority, young GILPIN naturally returned to his father and mother and as on account of his disabled condition he needed better education, he entered school, April 4, 1865, at Liber College, south of Portland. He attended the summer and fall sessions of 1865, 1866 and 1867, meanwhile teaching during the winters to earn money for his expenses. He spent the early part of 1868 at Berlin (Ohio) College and on September 1, 1868, began work in the office of the auditor of Jay county, helping to make a tax duplicate and copying the duplicate after it was made. He made and copied the duplicate in J. W. Headington's law office in 1869. In the winter of 1868-69 he taught the Portland public school, with Nancy HAWKINS, as assistant teacher. Levi Lambdin GILPIN and his assistant teacher, Miss Nancy HAWKINS, were united in marriage on September 12, 1869, and again taught the school the following winter. Mrs. GILPIN died on November 4, 1904. To this union were born six children, namely: Sarah Gertrude, who lives in Portland; Anna Rebecca, who died at the age of two years; Mary Helen, who married Jesse McKINNEY, a Dunkirk merchant; Gail and Grace (twin daughters), the former of whom died at the age of twelve years and the latter of whom married Levi S. GRIMES of Portland, and Garth G., who took a course in mechanical engineering at Purdue University and lives in Chicago. In 1870 Mr. GILPIN served as census enumerator for the townships of Penn, Jackson, Bearcreek, Wabash, Noble and Wayne, in this county, making the entire canvass on foot. In that census Camden (now Pennville) had 458 inhabitants and Portland, 462. In the fall of 1870 Mr. GILPIN bought the one-half interest of Nimrod Headington in the general store at Westchester and until in February, 1872, was a member of the firm of Griffith & Gilpin; selling, then his interest to Mr. Griffith and returning to Portland. Beginning on March 1, 1872, he served one year as deputy clerk of the court and during that time had the house built in which he has since lived, moving into it on July 29, 1872. On March 1, 1873, Mr. GILPIN began the study of telegraphy and the details of local railroad and express business, under the instruction of Clinton C. Humphrey, then local agent for the G. R. & 1. Railroad Company at Portland. On June 1, 1874, he succeeded Mr. Humphrey and continued as joint agent for the railroad company and the express company until he resigned the railroad agency in March, 1881, and was checked out on April 7, 1881. The express company's office then was moved from the railroad station and he continued in the express business until November 1, 1895, when he took charge of the office of county recorder, having been elected recorder of Tay county in 1894. In 1898 Mr. GILPIN was re-elected recorder and continued to serve in that public capacity until January 1, 1904, after which he resumed the local agency of the United States Express Company and was thus engaged until the express company went out of business and closed its office in 1914. When the Farmers State Bank of Portland was opened on June 26, 1915, Mr. GILPIN was elected president of that institution and served in that capacity for five years, at the end of which time he resigned his executive position because of a growing defect in his hearing. In 1918 he was elected a member of the county council and was chosen by the other members as president of that body, which position he now (1921) occupies. Mr. GILPIN also has served as a member of the Portland school board. He is one of the original members of the Jay County Fair Association and served three years as secretary of that organization and some twenty years as a member of the board of directors of the same. For fifty-two years he has been a Freemason and has served as secretary of Jay Lodge, No. 87, F. and A. M. He was a charter member of the Stephen J. Bailey post (No. 154) of the Grand Army of the Republic at Portland, was the second commander of this post, has served as commander at other periods since and has also served as a staff officer for department and national commanders of the G. A. R. He is a member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce and has always taken an active and interested part in movements having to do with the promotion of the best interests of the city and county.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.112-114. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GOODSON, LELAN H

Lelan H. GOODSON, one of the well known and progressive young farmers and landowners of Wayne township, was born in that township and has resided there all his life. Mr. GOODSON was born on August 13, 1894, and is a son of Thomas U. and Elizabeth ( LEE ) GOODSON, the latter of whom also was born in Indiana. The late Thomas U. GOODSON was born in Illinois and was six years of age when he came to Indiana with his widowed mother, the family locating on a farm in Wayne township, this county, where he grew to manhood. After his marriage he became a farmer on his own account and bought forty acres of the home farm, where he established his home. As his affairs prospered he added to his land holdings until at the time of his death he was the owner of 330 acres of land, eighty in Wayne township, ninety in Noble township, eighty in Bearcreek township and an "eighty" in the state of Michigan. Thomas U. GOODSON and his wife were the parents of nine children, three of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Orie and Jack GOODSON, the others having been Ethel, Edith, Berley L., James W. and two who died in infancy. Reared on the home farm in Wayne township, where he was born, Lelan H. GOODSON received his schooling in school district No.2 and from the days of his boyhood was a helpful factor in the labors of developing the farm. He married at the age of twenty and then began farming on his own on the home place and after his father's death bought the respective interests of the other heirs in the eighty-acre tract on which he is now living in Wayne township and has since been carrying on his farming operations there, having a well equipped farm plant and everything about the place in up-to-date shape. Mr. GOODSON is a Democrat. It was on September 20, 1914, that Lelan H. GOODSON was united in marriage to Elva M. GAGLE, of this county, and to this union four children have been born, namely: Gaynell Lucile, born on August 9, 1915; Helen Marie, February 8, 1917; Marvin Lee, January 4, 1919, and Marjorie Marcile, March 27, 1921. Mr. and Mrs. GOODSON have a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 6 out of Portland and take a proper interest in the general social activities of the community in which they live. Mrs. GOODSON was born in Gibson township, over in Mercer county, Ohio, October 10, 1893, and was but a child when she came to Jay county with her parents, Wesley and Alice ( BARGER ) GAGLE, the family locating on a farm in Madison township. Wesley GAGLE was born in Indiana and his wife in Ohio. He has a well kept farm of seventy-three acres in Madison township and he and his wife have eight children, those besides Mrs. GOODSON being Walter A., Zerma I., Lynville O., Dwight E., E. Lee, Ray and Marie. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.246-247. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

GOTT, CHARLES V

CHARLES V. GOTT, D.V.S., of Portland, one of the best known young veterinary surgeons in this part of Indiana, who served during the period of America's participation in the World war with the rank of second lieutenant, Veterinary Corps, U. S. A., is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Doctor GOTT was born on a farm in the vicinity of Waveland, Montgomery county, Indiana, November 19, 1888, and is a son of Press and Nannie ( DIXON ) GOTT, both of whom also were born in that same county and are still living there. Press GOTT and wife were the parents of three children, of whom Doctor GOTT alone survives. Reared on the home farm in Montgomery county, Doctor GOTT had his early schooling in the Waveland schools, and for about three years after leaving school continued on the farm, a valued assistant to his father in the operation of the same. From the days of his boyhood he had been attracted to veterinary surgery and he presently entered the Veterinary College at Terre Haute, from which he was graduated in 1914, after a course of three years study. Upon securing his diploma Doctor GOTT established himself in practice at Portland and was thus engaged when this country entered the World war. On July 18, 1918, he enlisted his services in behalf of the Veterinary Corps of the United States army and was commissioned a second lieutenant, continuing this service until mustered out on January 18, 1919. Upon the completion of his military service Doctor GOTT returned to Portland and resumed his practice. He is a member of the Indiana Veterinary Association and the Jay-Randolph VeterinaryAssociation. The Doctor is also affiliated with the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose. He is independent in his political views. On December 16, 1909, Dr. Charles V. GOTT was united in marriage to Clara WASSON, who also was born in Montgomery county, daughter of John and May ( OLIVER ) WASSON, who were the parents of three children, Mrs. GOTT having a brother, Ira WASSON, and a sister, Kate. Doctor and Mrs. GOTT have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.62-63. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

GRAY, EMERY A

Emery A. GRAY, a well-known and substantial farmer and land owner of Penn township, proprietor of an excellent farm on rural mail route No. 4 out of Bryant, was born in that township and has lived there practically all his life, the exception being a period of three years which he spent in the oil fields in Kentucky. Mr. GRAY was born on March 25, 1866, and is a son of Reese and Prudence (WILLIAMS) GRAY, both of whom were born in Ohio, the former in Monroe county and the latter in Belmont county. Reese GRAY came to Jay county in the days of his young manhood in the late '40s and became engaged as a carpenter in Penn township, which vocation he followed until after his marriage, when he bought an "eighty" of timber land in that township and started in to clear the same. When he had it about half cleared he sold it and bought another "eighty" in the same township, the place on which his son Emery is now living, and there resided until his retirement from the farm and removal in 1889 to Balbec, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was a good farmer and had increased his holdings from eighty to 150 acres and had a well-improved place. He and his wife were the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the only one now living. Reared on the home farm in Penn township, Emery A. GRAY received his schooling in old district No. I school and from the days of his boyhood was helpful in the labors of developing the farm. He early became interested in oil production and spent three years as a driller in the Kentucky oil fields, but his chief interest has been the old home farm in Penn township, eighty acres of which he owns and operates, making his home there. Mr. GRAY and his wife are members of the West Grove Spiritualist church and are "independent" in their political views. He is a Freemason and a member of the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America at Pennville. Emery A. GRAY married Susanna UPTYCRAFT, a. daughter of William and Emaline (ALBERTSON) UPTYCRAFT, and to this union three children have been born, Ethel Mea, Edna Murriel and Elmo C., the latter of whom served as a soldier during the time of America's participation in the World War, a member of Troop B, 13th Cavalry, United States Army. Ethel Mea GRAY married Russell DILLON and has three children, Donald, Dana and Doris. Edna GRAY married Ross STOUT and has two children, Margaret and Marrile. Elmo C. GRAY married Hattie GREGORY, of Rogers, Texas, August 31, 1921.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.349-350. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GREGG, WARREN CHASE

Warren Chase GREGG, a well known retired farmer and nurseryman of Penn township, now living at Pennville, long recognized as one of the successful horticulturists in Indiana, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. He was born at Pennville (then Camden) on June 25, 1858, and is a son of Hiram and Patience ( CALDWALLADER ) GREGG. both members of pioneer families in this county. Hiram GREGG was born in Belmont county, Ohio, and his wife was born in Warren county, same state, both members of Quaker families who afterward came over into Indiana and settled in Penn township, this county. It was about two years after the formal organization of Jay county that the Gregg's came here and settled on a tract of land entered from the Government. Hiram GREGG established his home on that tract after his marriage and later bought more land until he became the owner of a fine farm of 270 acres. He early turned his attention to the cultivation of nursery stock and did much to promote the development of orchards hereabout, having been the proprietor of the first recognized "nursery" in this county. He and his wife were the parents of five children, of whom three are living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Austin W. GREGG, of Hereford, Tex., and a sister, Rachel C. wife of William G. JONES. Reared on the home farm in the vicinity of Pennville, Warren C. GREGG received his early schooling in the excellent schools of that village and supplemented this by a course in the Miami Valley College at Springboro, Ohio, later attended two terms at the normal school at Valparaiso, lnd. and also attended the old normal school at Portland. He became qualified as a teacher of writing and taught a term of writing school, then for two terms was engaged as a district school teacher and then went West on a prospecting trip, spending nine months at Cherryville, Kan. and better than a year at Carthage, Mo. at the end of which time he decided that Jay county was good enough for anybody and came back here. For a year thereafter he was engaged as a salesman for the GREGG nursery, which meanwhile was being developed under the direction of his brothers. In the spring of 1883 he married and not long thereafter took up farming, with particular attention to the nursery business, on his own account, and it was not long until he had created a wide demand for the products of his place, these including not only apples, pears, peaches and plums, but raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, gooseberries and grapes, Mr. GREGG discontinued the nursery business in 1908, but continued to make his home on the farm until his retirement in 1918 and removal to Pennville, where he is now living. He still continues to maintain a warm interest in his pomological work, however, and on the farm of eighty-two acres which he has retained has about fifteen acres in orchard, to which he gives his close attention. For years he has been an exhibitor at local fairs and at the Indiana state fair, and last year at the state fair won more prizes than any other exhibitor. Mr. GREGG is an active member of the Pennville Grange and for two years was master of that organization. He is a Republican and a member of the local Meeting of the Society of Friends, while his wife is a member of the Christian church. It was on April 15, 1883, that Warren Chase GREGG was united in marriage to Lucinda B. TURNER, who was born in Randolph county, Indiana, daughter of William and Margaret ( MONKS ) TURNER, and to this union have been born five daughters, Leah, Margaret, Susannah, Mary and Florence, all of whom are living. Leah GREGG married Harper J. RANSBURG and has four children, Gregg, Harold, Edwin and Miriam RANSBURG. Susannah GREGG married A. C. OBLINGER and has two children, Frank Clifton and Sarah Jane OBLINGER. Mary GREGG married Fred I. HOOVER and has two children, Graden and Margaret Warine HOOVER. Florence GREGG married Lee R. HARTLEY and has one child, a son, Robert HARTLEY. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.185-186. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

GRIEST, WILLIAM

WILLIAM GRIEST, formerly and for many years secretary and general manager of the old Portland Natural Gas and Oil Company, the first assessor of Jay county, formerly and for years deputy to the treasurer of Jay county, a former justice of the peace in and for Penn township, the township in which he was reared, and later engaged in the insurance business at Portland, where he is now living retired, is a native of the old Keystone state, but has been a resident of Jay county since he was four years of age and few there -are who have a wider acquaintance throughout the county than he. Mr. GRIEST was born on a farm in York county, Pennsylvania, June 5, 1846, and is a son of John and Hannah ( EDMUNDSON ) GRIEST, both natives of that same county and both of colonial Quaker stock, whose last days were spent in Jay county, where they had established their home more than seventy years ago. John GRIEST, who died at his home in the Balbec neighborhood in 1874, was born on June 26, 1806, and was a son of John GRIEST, the son of Daniel GRIEST, who was a son of John GRIEST, who was of the family of GRIEST's who had come to this country from England in 1685, joining their fortunes with those of the Quaker colonists in and about Philadelphia, this last-named John GRIEST, the progenitor of the line from which William GRIEST takes descent, settling in 1737 near the York county line in Adams county, Pennsylvania, and William GRIEST has a record of the lineal descent from that line down to the present generation, as well as a walking stick brought by the GRIEST family from England in 1685, which he greatly prizes. The EDMUNDSON's are descended from William EDMUNDSON, the so-called Quaker Apostle, who was an officer in Cromwell's army, but later joined the Friends and was a contemporary of Fox and Penn and active in promulgating the Friendly faith, establishing his home in Ireland about 1660. He reared a considerable family, some of the members of which came to America early in the eighteenth century, the line from which Mr. GRIEST springs dating from Caleb EDMUNDSON, who was living in York county, Pennsylvania, in 1760 and who was the grandfather of Thomas EDMUNDSON, the Jay county pioneer, who moved with his family here from Pennsylvania in 1837, the year following the organization of Jay county, and became one of the most substantial and influential pioneers of Penn township. Mr. GRIEST has the marriage certificate of his EDMUNDSON grandparents, made out after the quaint and interesting form of the Friends discipline. John GRIEST was reared in the firm faith of the Friends and was given a sound education, for some years in the period of his young manhood being a school teacher. He was trained in the technical details of woolen mill operation under the direction of an uncle and in time became the proprietor of a woolen mill, but about the time of his marriage in 1833 to Hannah EDMUNDSON disposed of his factory and became engaged in farming, a vocation he followed in his home county until 1850, when in response to the good reports which his father-in-law, Thomas EDMUNDSON, had been writing back concerning conditions in Indiana, he disposed of his farm and with his wife and ten children came to Jay county, the family driving through with their household goods and some essential farm equipment, the journey consuming four weeks. It was in April that the GRIEST's made their trip out here and they settled on land adjoining the EDMUNDSON homestead in the Balbec neighborhood in Penn township, put up a log cabin and proceeded to clear a farm from out the unbroken forest. On that pioneer farm John and Hannah GRIEST spent the remainder of their lives, their deaths occurring within a year of each other, the latter dying in 1873 and the former in 1874. As stated above, William GRIEST was but four years of age when he came here with his parents in 1850 and he grew to manhood on the home farm, helpful in the arduous labors of effecting a clearing and developing the place. Though the school facilities of that time and place were meager, he had the advantage of home education, and after a supplementary course at Liber College began teaching school, a profession he followed from 1866 with but one interruption for twenty years, this interruption being a year he spent in the court house as deputy county treasurer during the incumbency of Albert Grissell. After his marriage in 1874 Mr. GRIEST continued to make his home on the old home place at Balbec and presently bought the farm, which he continued to operate, meanwhile teaching during the winters, until 1886 when David HOOVER, county treasurer, employed him as deputy treasurer and he moved to Portland, occupying this deputy ship during the two terms of the Hoover incumbency. In 1891, when under legislative enactment the office of county assessor was created, Mr. GRIEST was appointed assessor, the first to hold this office in Jay county, and served in the interim preceding the next election. It was in this same year, following his retirement from the treasurer's office, that Mr. GRIEST became engaged in the office of the old Portland Natural Gas and Oil Company as a bookkeeper. In 1904, he was elected secretary and general manager of this company and he continued to serve in that capacity until, after the failure of the natural gas supply, the company sold out and the plant was dismantled, as is narrated elsewhere in this work. Upon leaving the gas office Mr. GRIEST became engaged in the insurance business in association with John W. HOLMES and so continued until his retirement from active service on January 1, 1921, since which time he has been giving his attention largely to the collection and preservation of data for the archives of the Jay County Historical Society, of which he is one of the most active members and in the affairs of which organization he has for years been deeply interested. Mr. GRIEST is a birthright member of the Society of Friends at Pennville, to the simple and quaint forms and mystical views of which society he is devotedly attached, and is an active member of the Pennville Meeting. Mr. GRIEST is a Republican and has for many years been recognized as among the local leaders in that party's councils. During his long residence in Penn township he for eight years served as justice of the peace in and for that township and as Squire GRIEST became widely known throughout that section for the soundness and equity of his judgments in such cases as came before his court. He has retained the interest in school work acquired during the two decades in which he served as a member of Jay county's teaching staff and for seven years served as a member of the school board in Portland. For forty-four years Mr. GRIEST has been an Odd Fellow and is now (1921) district deputy of the Encampment branch of that popular order. William GRIEST has been twice married. In 1874 he was united in marriage to Frances BOURNE, who was born in Franklin county, this state, and who died in 1899. In 1910 Mr. GRIEST married Jessie RILEY, who was born in Ohio, a cousin of the beloved Hoosier poet, James Whitcomb RILEY, and daughter of Davis RILEY, a veteran of the Civil war and formerly and for years one of Jay county's best known citizens, who came here with his family from Ohio and located at Pennville, later moving to Portland, where his last days were spent. Mrs. GRIEST was reared in this county, having been but a young girl when her parents came here, and she completed her schooling in the old Portland Normal School. For thirty-five years she was a teacher in the schools of this county, the last twenty-five years of this long term of service being spent in the Portland public schools, and she thus has for years been recognized as one of the leaders in the general cultural activities of the community. She is the present (1921) regent of Mississinewa Chapter, No. 185, of the Daughters of the American Revolution, is a charter member of Alpha Lodge, Daughters of Rebekah (1.0.0.F.), an officer of the Presbyterian Sunday school and a member of the Twentieth Century Club. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.80-82. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GRIMES, WASHINGTON

Washington GRIMES, a worthy representative of one of the old pioneer families of Jay County, and an enterprising farmer of JacksonTownship, is a native of Frederick County, Maryland, born December 5, 1831, his parents, John and Elizabeth ( MILLER ) GRIMES, being natives of the same county. They reared a family of four children, named Henrietta, John H., Mary Ann and Washington. In 1837 the parents left their native State with their family and settled in Preble County, Ohio, and in 1843 came to Jay County, Indiana when they located on the farm which is now the home of our subject. The land at the time of the settlement in the township was covered with dense timber, and their first dwelling was a log cabin, 18 X 20 feet, with puncheon floor, clapboard roof, and stick and mud chimney. Here the father, assisted by his sons, cleared and improved their land until the GRIMES farm was considered one of the best in the neighborhood. Here the father lived until his death which occurred June 9, 1865. Mrs. GRIMES died August 28, 1876. Washington GRIMES grew to manhood in Jay County, being reared amid scenes incident to pioneer life. He began his education in Preble County, Ohio, and after coming to Jay County he attended the schools of his district. He has always followed the avocation of a farmer, and the surroundings of his homestead betoken the care and thrift of the owner. The old log cabin built in 1843 has disappeared, and in its place stands a fine two story residence, built in modern style, and comfortably furnished throughout, and the barn and out buildings are noticeably good. Mr. GRIMES was married September 18, 1855, to Miss Mary Ann PRIEST, and to this union were born seven children of whom only four survive -- James Newton, William H., John F. and George W. Two died in early childhood, and a daughter, Martha A., died January 27, 1885, aged twenty-two years. Mrs. GRIMES died September 10, 1876. Mr. GRIMES was married a second time, in Jay County, Indiana April 18, 1880, to Mrs. Esther Ann ( HOUSE ) STEPHENSON, who was born May 27, 1843, a daughter of Edmond and Mary ( GRAFTON ) HOUSE. Mrs. GRIMES was first married in Jackson County, Ohio, to James STEPHENSON, and to them were born three children -- James N., Richard E. and Irena Jane. Mr. STEPHENSON died January 1, 1874. Politically Mr. GRIMES affiliates with the republican party. He has never sought official position, yet at the wishes of his friends, he accepted the nomination for the office of county commissioner, and was elected by a majority of 204 votes which shows his popularity in the county. Financially he is numbered among the leading men of his township, and by his honorable dealings he has secured the confidence and respect of the entire community. SOURCE: p.304-305 "Biographical and Historical Record of Jay County, Indiana," Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1887. Reprinted by Mayhill Publications of Knightstown, Indiana, 1974. This is the reprinted Jay County section out of the original combined 1887 History of Jay and Blackford counties.Submitted to GenWeb by:Betty Creath

GRISELL, NATHAN

Nathan A. GRISELL, one of Jay county's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, now living practically retired from the active labors of the farm on his well kept place on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, in Penn township, is a member of the pioneer GRISELL family of which further and somewhat extended mention is made elsewhere in this work, the GRISELL's having been represented in this county since 1834, even before the county had a separate civic organization, it having been a part of Randolph county when Samuel GRISELL, the pioneer, came here with his family from Columbiana county, Ohio, and settled at the point where Pennville presently came into being, the mill which he established at that point having been the nucleus of later settlement in that neighborhood. The pioneer Samuel GRISELL was a Virginian by birth, a son of Thomas and Martha ( DINGY ) GRISELL, the former of whom also was born in Virginia, of Alsatian stock, and the latter in Delaware. The family later moved to Pennsylvania and thence to Ohio, settling in Columbiana county in the latter state, among the leaders in the colony of Quakers which proved so influential a factor in the development of that section of Ohio. Samuel GRISELL was about sixteen years of age when his parents settled in Columbiana county and there he grew to manhood and married Ann WHITACRE, daughter of Joseph and Jane ( WILSON ) WHITACRE, Virginians who had settled in Ohio. He continued to make his home there until 1834, when he came with his family into Indiana and entered a quarter of a section of land in section 34 of Penn township, in what two years later came to be organized as Jay county, and was thus one of the first of the substantial permanent settlers in that part of the county and became a man of large influence in the trying labors of developing the wilderness into a fit habitation and abiding place for those who should come afterward. He added to his holding until he became the possessor of nearly 1,000 acres of land in this county and left his family well provided for at his death in the summer of 1864. His widow survived him for four years, her death occurring in 1869. They were among the leaders in the local Meeting of the Society of Friends in Penn township and their children were reared in that faith. There were twelve of these children, all born in Ohio save Lewis, the last born, who was born in the spring following the family's settlement in this county. The others of these children were Sabina, who married Joseph WILSON; Martha, who married Martin HIATT; Amos, father of the subject of this sketch; Hiram, who died at the age of thirty-six; Maria, who married Peter S. MEREDITH; Sarah, who married Lukens GRIFFITH; Ann, who married James LeFEVRE; Lydia, who married Henry V. WALLING; Nathan, who died at the age of twenty; Albert who became treasurer of Jay county and of whom further mention is made elsewhere, and Mary J., who married W. W. HARTLEY. Amos GRISELL was about sixteen years of age when he came to Indiana with his parents in 1834 and he grew to manhood on the home place in Penn township. He married Elizabeth LUPTON, who was born in Champaign county, Ohio, and who was a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county, and after his marriage established his home on a farm in Penn township, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in the summer of 1876, he then being in his fifty-ninth year. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom but two are now living, the subject of this sketch and his sister, Margaret. Nathan A. GRISELL, who was born on March 19, 1856, grew up on the home farm in Penn township and received his schooling in the schools of old Camden (now Pennville) and one term at old Liber College. He was twenty years of age when his father died and after his marriage he continued to make his home on the home place for a year or more and then rented a farm in the neighborhood and continued to live there until 1906, when he moved to Oklahoma. There he spent six years, at the end of which time he returned to Jay county, but not long afterward returned West and located in Kansas, where he remained six years, engaged in farming. By this time he had had enough of the West and he returned to Jay county and bought the place of 120 acres on which he is now living in Penn township and expects to remain here the rest of his life. Mr. GRISELL's wife died on June II, 1920, and he and his sons are keeping up the home. It was on December 15, 1881, that Nathan A. GRISELL was united in marriage to Jennie SOMERS, who also was born in this county, daughter of Aaron and Margaret ( FIELDS ) SOMERS, and to this union two sons were born, Raymond and Frank, who are looking after the affairs of the farm for their father. During the time of this country's participation in the World war Raymond GRISELL served with the army for eighteen month and was with a detachment of engineers in France. Frank GRISELL married Eliza McPHEETERS, who died on January 28, 1921, leaving two sons, John and Albert. The GRISELL's are Republicans and are birthright members of the Friends Meeting at Pennville. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.206-208. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

GRISSELL, JAMES L

JAMES L. GRISELL, city engineer and superintendent of the light, water and power department of the city of Portland and an active and influential factor in the municipality, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life save for a period during which he served as deputy to the engineer of the neighboring county of Randolph, with his residence at Winchester. Mr. GRISELL was born on a farm in Penn township, in the vicinity of the city of Pennville, February 27, 1886, son of Lowell P. and Mary C. ( DAVENPORT ) GRISELL, the latter of whom was born in Wayne county, this state. Lowell P. GRISELL, a well known farmer of Penn township, was born in this county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and he and his wife were the parents oi three sons, James L. GRISELL having two brothers, Russell and Lowell H. GRISELL. Reared on the farm in Penn township,. James L. GRISELL received his elementary schooling in the district school in the neighborhood of his home and then entered the Pennville high school. Later entering the Tri-State College of Engineering, he took there the course in civil engineering and was graduated from that institution on March II, 1911. Thus admirably equipped for the profession to which he had devoted himself Mr. GRISELL accepted a position as deputy to the county engineer of Randolph county and was thus engaged for a year, at the end of which time he transferred his service to the Union Traction Company and was for a year thereafter engaged in electric railroad construction work between Muncie and Newcastle. He then returned to Winchester and resumed his former position as deputy county engineer, in which capacity he continued to serve until in January, 1918, when he accepted the position as city engineer at Portland and thus returned to his home county. A year later the positions of city engineer and superintendent of the light, water and power department of the city were merged and Mr. GRISELL has since been rendering service to the city in this dual capacity. On February 27, 1918, James L. GRISELL was united in marriage to Flora J. BECK, who was born and reared at Mansfield, Ohio, daughter of Henry and Emma ( DRACKERT ) BECK, and to this union two children have been born, daughters both, Julia Ann and Mary Emily. Mr. and Mrs. GRISELL are members of the First Presbyterian church of Portland and are Republicans. Mr. GRISELL is a member of the Portland Commercial Club and is one of the charter members of the Kiwanis Club of that city. He is a Scottish Rite (32) Mason, a member of the blue lodge at Pennville, of the council, chapter and commandery at Winchester and of the consistory at Ft. Wayne, and is also a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with the temple at Ft. Wayne. During the time of America's participation in the World war Mr. GRISELL rendered service as a student officer of field artillery in the Central Officers Training School at Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and he is a member of the local post of the American Legion at Portland, to the expanding affairs of which patriotic body he is giving his earnest attention, as are so many of the young men of this community. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.63-64. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

GUEDEL, WALTER M

WALTER M. GUEDEL, head of the GUEDEL Manufacturing Company of Portland and long recognized as one of the leaders in industrial circles in that city, is a native of Ohio but has been a resident of Indiana practically all the time since the days of his childhood. Mr. GUEDEL was born on January 1, 1886, and is a son of John and Mary ( LENNES ) GUEDEL, the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania. John GUEDEL was born in the republic of Switzerland. In 1868 he came to this country and located in Ohio, where he became engaged in farming and where he married. Some years later he moved with his family to Indianapolis and in that city became employed in the saw works of the E. C. Atkins Company and established his home in that city. He and his wife had ten children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Samuel, Malinda, Charles, Louis, William, Arthur, Clarence, Henry and John. Walter M, GUEDEL was but a child when his parents moved from the home they had first established in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where he was born, to Indianapolis and in the latter city he received his early schooling. Upon completing the course in the high school there he took a course in Indiana University and then entered the force of teachers employed by the Government in the Philippine Islands, manual training being his specialty, and was thus engaged in the islands for some time. Upon the completion of this term of service Mr. GUEDEL returned to the United States and for two years thereafter was employed as a bookkeeper in the office of the Bimel-Ashcraft Company at Dermott, Ark., being then transferred from that office to the office of the Bimel Company at Portland, since which time he has made his home in Portland. For seven years Mr. GUEDEL served as secretary and treasurer of the Bimel Company at Portland, or until in August, 1919, when he started in his present line, proprietor of the plant of the GUEDEL Manufacturing Company, and has built up a thriving business. Mr. GUEDEL's specialty is dashes for automobiles, the Ford Company being the chief consumer of his product in that line. Bread boards are a considerable by-product of the GUEDEL factory. Mr. GUEDEL is a member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce, is a member of the board of directors of the Country Club, a member of the board of directors of the Kiwanis Club, a 32 Mason and a member of the local lodge of Eagles. He is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. In 1910 Walter M. GUEDEL was united in marriage to Hazel BIMEL, daughter of Fred and Margaret BIMEL, of Portland, and to this union two children have been born, a son and a daughter, John and Barbara. Mr. and Mrs. GUEDEL have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.71-72. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HALEY, WILLIAM

William HALEY, a well known and substantial retired farmer of Noble township, now living at Portland, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the county's pioneer families, and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Noble township on September 12, 1860, and is a son of Sebastian and Lydia A. ( RADER ) HALEY, both of whom were born in Fairfield county, Ohio, where they were reared and where they were married. Sebastian HALEY continued to make his home in Ohio for some years after his marriage and then he came to Indiana, he and his wife and the three children that then had been born to them settling on a tract of eighty acres of Government land in Noble township, this county, for which he paid $300. He established his home there and as his affairs prospered added to his holdings until at the time of his death be was the owner of a well improved farm of 640 acres, and had long been accounted one of the substantial and influential residents of that community. He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, five of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having four sisters, Mary A., Amanda, Elizabeth and Allie. Reared on the home farm in Noble township, William HALEY received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and continued farming with his father until after his marriage in the summer of 1884, after which he bought-a tract of forty acres from his father and began farming on his own account. As time passed he added to his holdings and in 1919, when he decided to retire from the farm and sold his land, he was the possessor of 104 acres. Upon his retirement Mr. HALEY moved to Portland, where he and his wife are now living and where they are very pleasantly situated. For eight years Mr. HALEY served as an appraiser for the Jay County Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Portland. It was on June 30, 1884, that William HALEY was united in marriage to Jennie LAYCOCK, who was born in Guernsey county, Ohio. but who when eight years of age moved with her parents, Isaac B. and Rachel ( McGARY ) LAYCOCK, to Brown county, Kansas, the family later coming to Indiana. Isaac B. LAYCOCK, who was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, was a stonemason. His wife was born in Marshall county, Virginia. They were the parents of seven children, five of whom are still living, Mrs. HALEY having two sisters, Sarah A. and Ella, and two brothers, Richard and Ira LAYCOCK. Mr. and Mrs. HALEY have an adopted daughter, Hazel, who married Harry THORNBURG, of Muncie, and has three children, William, Catherine and Ruth. Harry THORNBURG is a veteran of the World war. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.248-249. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HALL, DONALD

Donald A. HALL, secretary-treasurer and general manager of the Portland Forge and Foundry Company and long recognized as one of the active figures in the industrial life of that city, was born at Portland and has lived there all his life with the exception of the time spent in college and a period of four years spent in Washington, where he was serving as private secretary to John A. M. Adair, former representative in Congress from this district. Mr. HALL was born on September 3, 1885, and is a son of George W. and Helen M. ( POOR ) HALL, the former well known for his many years of connection with the loan and insurance business at Portland. Reared at Portland, Donald A. HALL completed the course in the high school there and then took a course at DePauw University, supplementing this by a course at Cornell University, after which for four years he served as secretary to Congressman Adair. He then became associated with his father, George W. HALL, in the insurance and loan business at Portland and was thus engaged until 1913, when he became associated with the operations of the Portland Foundry and Machine Company. When this company in 1915 was reorganized as the Portland Forge and Foundry Company Mr. HALL was elected secretary and treasurer of the company and has since been serving in that capacity, the other members of the company being J. A. LONG, president; C. C. CARTWRIGHT, vice-president; and Clara J. HOLMES and Charles E. SCHWARTZ. Mr. HALL is a Democrat, is a Freemason, a Kiwanian, a member of the local lodges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. On November 30, 1909, Donald A. HALL was united in marriage to Vadia M. HOLMES, who also was born at Portland, a daughter of L. G. and Clara J. ( CREAGER ) HOLMES, and to this union two children have been born, Helen and Lee. Mr. and Mrs. HALL have a very pleasant home at Portland and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of their home town. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.129-130. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

HALL, George W

GEORGE W. HALL, for many years a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, now living retired at Portland, has been a resident of that city for nearly forty years and has thus been a witness to and a participant in the development that has marked all phases of the city's activities during that period. Mr. HALL is a native son of Jay county and has lived in this county all his life. He was born on a farm in the Dunkirk neighborhood on March 4, 1862, son of Amos and Elizabeth ( McKINNEY ) HALL, who were substantial and influential residents of that community. The late Amos HALL, an honored veteran of the Civil war, was a Kentuckian by birth, born in Montgomery county, in the old Bluegrass state, and was eighteen years of age when he came up into this section of Indiana and became engaged in farming, in association with his brothers, Thomas and John HALL. That was in 1853. He later bought a tract of forty acres in the vicinity of Dunkirk and after his marriage to Elizabeth McKINNEY, who was a member of one of the pioneer families of that neighborhood, established his home on the place and was living there when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and became attached to the 130th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served until the close of the war and was with Sherman on the march to the sea. Upon the completion of his military service Amos HALL returned to his farm in this county and again took up the pursuits of peace, continuing there engaged in farming until his retirement in 1880 and removal to Redkey, where his last days were spent, his death occurring in 1915. Amos HALL and his wife were the parents of four children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Oliver M. and Frank B. HALL, Mrs. Bertha ASHCRAFT and Oscar (deceased). George W. HALL was reared on the farm, completing his schooling in the schools at Redkey, and remained on the farm until his marriage in 1884 when he made his home at Portland and there took up the study of law under the preceptorship of Haynes and Cox. Upon his admission to the bar Mr. HALL became engaged in practice at Portland in association with S. W. Haynes, a mutually agreeable association which continued for eight years, after which Mr. HALL continued his practice alone until his retirement from active practice in 1920. Since his retirement Mr. HALL has continued to make his home at Portland, where he is very comfortably situated. He is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. It was on March 18, 1884, that George W. HALL was united in marriage to Helen Mar POOR, who also was born in this county, and to this union two children have been born, a son, Donald Adair HALL, and a daughter, Jean Johnston. Donald Adair HALL, who is now engaged with the forge foundry at Portland, attended DePauw University after finishing the course in the Portland high school and supplemented this schooling by a course at Cornell. He married Vadia M. HOLMES, daughter of L. G. and Clara HOLMES of Portland, and has two children, Helen and Lee G. Jean Johnston HALL completed her schooling at the Mary Baldwin Seminary at Stanton, Va., and married Francis B. STOKES, of Weatherford, Tex., to which union two children have been born, Marybelle, who died on October 30, 1920, at the age of eight years and three months, and Jean. Mrs. HALL is a daughter of David and Mary ( ADAIR ) POOR, the former born in Jackson county and the latter in Fayette county, Pennsylvania. David POOR came to Indiana in 1849 and became a substantial farmer in Wayne township, this county. He and his wife had four children, those besides Mrs. HALL being James, Cynthia and Hugh. Of this family Mrs. HALL is the only one now residing in Jay county. She is a charter member of Mississinewa chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, which was organized at Portland in 1909, was one of the active promoters of that organization and was the chapter's first regent. Mr. HALL is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. During the time of America's participation in the World war Mrs. HALL was chairman for Jay comity of the Red Cross knitting committee. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.251-253. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HALLIGAN, P H

P. H. HALLIGAN, local agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and the American Railway Express at Dunkirk, is a Hoosier by birth and has been a resident of Indiana all his life with the exception of a couple of years spent in the railway telegraph service at Chicago. He has been a resident of Dunkirk for the past ten years or more and there are few men thereabout better known than he. Mr. HALLIGAN was born in Jasper county, Indiana, November 27, 1871, and is a son of Patrick and Nora ( WALSH ) HALLIGAN, both of whom were born in Ireland, the latter having come to this country with her parents when she was but a slip of girl, her family locating in Ohio. Patrick HALLIGAN came to the United States in the days of his young manhood and soon became engaged in railroad construction work. He kept his eyes open and his wits about him and it was not long until he began to do contracting work on his own account, bridge and road construction, and he followed this line the remainder of his active life, the greater part of his contracts having been carried out in northwestern Indiana during the period of development which struck in that part of the state during the '70s and '80s. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Richard, John, Mary, James, Joseph and Margaret. Reared in Jasper county, P. H. HALLIGAN received his early schooling in the neighboring district school and completed the same by a course in the university at Valparaiso, from which institution he was graduated in 1895. In the meantime he had been learning railway telegraphy and upon leaving the university he became employed as operator for the Monon junction station at Wilder, in Laporte county. Two years later he was transferred to the telegraph department of the Monon general offices at Chicago and he remained there for about two years, at the end of which time he accepted a position as station agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Kouts, Ind. The company kept him at Kouts for four years and then transferred him to Hebron, where he remained for about four years, at the end of which time, in 1911, he was transferred to the station at Dunkirk, where he ever since has been located, serving both as freight and passenger agent, and where he also is serving as the local agent for the American Railway Express, to the affairs of both of which concerns he is giving his most thoughtful attention. In 1896, the year following his graduation from the university, P. H. HALLIGAN was united in marriage to Mary J. McDERMOTT, who was born and reared in Chicago, daughter of William McDERMOTT and wife, who were the parents of five children, four of whom are still living, Mrs. HALLIGAN having a brother, William McDERMOTT, and two sisters, Kittie and Anna. To Mr. and Mrs. HALLIGAN four children have been born, Pauline, Donald, James and Catherine, all save the first named of whom are still in school. Mr. and Mrs. HALLIGAN are members of St. Mary's Catholic church at Dunkirk and are Democrats. Mr. HALLIGAN is a member of the local council of the Knights of Columbus at Marion and is a member of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Portland.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.197-198. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

HALTERMAN, LAURA BEARD

HALTERMAN, Laura Beard Commercial Review Portland Jay County, Indiana Saturday, April 12, 1975 Centennial Celebration Mrs. Laura HALTERMAN, 615 Pleasant St., Portland, is celebrating her centennial birthday today. Mrs. HALTERMAN was born April 12, 1875 in Randolph County, the daughter of Paul M. and Adaline ( PLATT ) BEARD. She was married to John HALTERMAN on September 25, 1892. Her husband died in 1950. Hrs. HALTERMAN has two daughters, Mrs. Mildred WILSON, of Muncie, and Mrs. Thurman ( Georgie ) HISEY, Portland. A son, John L. HALTEMAN, resides in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and a brother, Roy BEARD, lives in Winter Haven, Fla. There are five grandsons, 24 great-grandchildren and 1 great-great-grandchild. Mrs. HALTERMAN has been active in the Friends Church in Portland and several other organizations, including Chapter No. 91, Order of the Eastern Star, which she joined in February of 1828. The OES visited Mrs. HALTERMAN this week and member of the her class at church presented her with the orchid corsage she is wearing in the accompanying photo.

HAMILTON, PETER L

Peter L. HAMILTON, a substantial landowner of Jay county and a well known retired farmer and oil man now living at Bryant, has been a resident of this county since the days of his young manhood and has done well his part in development work here. Mr. HAMILTON was born in Darke county, Ohio, September 15, 1852, and is a son of David and Caroline ( LANTZ ) HAMILTON, both natives of Pennsylvania, who were reared in Ohio, where they were married and where they continued to make their home until they came to Indiana in the early '60s. David HAMILTON had been trained as a cooper and for some years after his marriage operated a cooper shop in Ohio. Upon coming to Indiana he bought a tract of 100 acres in the vicinity of Anderson, [Madison Co.] established his home there and resided there the rest of his life. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, four of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Elizabeth and Catherine, and a brother, Isaac HAMILTON. Peter L. HAMILTON was about ten years of age when he came with his parents to Indiana and he grew to manhood on the farm in the Anderson neighborhood. He completed his schooling there and when eighteen years of age started out "on his own," working as a farm hand until his marriage at the age of twenty-one, when he began farming for himself, renting a farm over in Darke county, Ohio. He remained there for seven years and then came over into Jay county and bought a fifty-acre tract in Pike township. He established his home there and remained on the place about three years, at the end of which time he sold that farm and bought an "eighty" in Jackson township. In 1909 he bought an additional tract of 100 acres in that same township, his land holdings thus aggregating 180 acres. In 1894 Mr. HAMILTON leased the oil rights on his "eighty" and some excellent wells were developed there. In 1906 he bought this lease and began to operate in oil himself, later taking other leases in that neighborhood, and became quite an extensive operator. On his own land he had twenty-one wells, nineteen of which were successful producers. In 1920 Mr. HAMILTON sold out his oil interests to O. D. ARNOLD, of Bryant. He also has been for some time retired from his farming interests and is very comfortably situated at Bryant, where he has a pleasant home. Mr. HAMILTON is a Democrat and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political affairs. On January 23, 1874, Peter L. HAMILTON was united in marriage to Elizabeth RUPE, of Randolph county, and to this union six children have been born, Nora A., James O., Gusta P., Maudella, Minnie M. and Charles, the last three of whom are deceased, Maudella and Minnie dying in childhood and Charles on July 4, 1910. Charles HAMILTON was a well known young oil-well driller. He married Stella WHITACRE and at his death left two children, Dolores, who is a member of the class of 1922, Portland high school, and Donovan, a member of the class of 1924. Nora A. HAMILTON married Ed Markel, an oil-well driller, who died in April, 1901, leaving three children, Wren, Orla and Ralph. James O. HAMILTON, who is now engaged in the real estate business in Florida, married Josephine MORGAN and has four children, Claude, Mary E., Robert and Joseph. Gusta P. HAMILTON married Bert JUDAY and has one child, a son, Richard H. Mr. JUDAY is farming the HAMILTON home place in Jackson township. Mrs. HAMILTON is a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county. She was born in Darke county, Ohio, and is a daughter of Thomas and Mary ( JANES ) RUPE, the latter of whom was born in Indiana. Thomas RUPE was a Virginian who became a resident of this county, locating in Wayne township, but later moved to Randolph county, where he remained some years, at the end of which time he returned to Jay county and here spent the remainder of his life, a successful farmer. He and his wife were the parents of thirteen children, all of whom save Frances E. and Rebecca C., who died in childhood, are still living, those besides Mrs. HAMILTON being Samuel A., Rachel H., Wesley A., James H., Wilson A., Albert C., Silas M.. Sarah M., Carrie J. and John M. RUPE. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.320-322. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HAMMITT, BERT

Bert HAMMITT, formerly and for years engaged in the work of natural gas and oil development in this section of the country, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. HAMMITT was born on a farm in Jackson township on July 16, 1874, and is a son of Samuel and Isabel ( WHEAT ) HAMMITT, who thirty years ago became residents of Redkey. Samuel HAMMITT was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, and there grew to manhood, later coming to Indiana and settling on an eighty acre farm in Jackson township, this county. He made his home on that farm until his retirement in 1892, and removal to Redkey, where the remainder of his life was spent, his death occurring there in 1910. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Archibald, George, John, Mary, Ida and Clara. Reared on the home farm in Jackson township, Bert HAMMITT received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and was eighteen years of age when his parents moved to Redkey. He became actively interested in the work of gas and oil development during the height of activities along that line back in the '90s and presently became connected with the operations of the Indiana& Ohio Natural Gas Company, with which concern he remained connected for years, meantime making his home at Redkey, where he had established his place of residence after his marriage twenty years or more ago. In January, 1921, Mr. HAMMITT bought the old established restaurant of Markle & Son at Redkey and has since been engaged in the restaurant business at that place. Since taking charge of this establishment Mr. HAMMITT has made numerous improvements in the place and has added much to up-to-date the appearance of the same. Mr. HAMMITT is a Republican and a Freemason. On June 27, 1900, Bert HAMMITT was united in marriage to Laura MARANDY, who was born in Jefferson township, this county, Mr. & Mrs. HAMMITT have a pleasant home at Redkey and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.209-210. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HAMMITT, JOHN G

John G. HAMMITT, one of the well known and substantial farmers of Jackson township, proprietor of a well improved farm of 120 acres in the Poling neighborhood, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and has lived here all his life, with the exception of a few years spent in the neighboring county of Adams. Mr. HAMMITT was born on a farm in Jackson township on October 10, 1874, and is a son of James M. and Mary (MARTIN) HAMMITT, both of whom were members of pioneer families here. James M. HAMMITT, a veteran of the Civil war, was born in the vicinity of Sandusky, Ohio, and came to Indiana with his parents, Martin and Mary A. (OVERMIER) HAMMITT, the latter of whom was a daughter of John G. and Catherine E. (HUFFMAN) OVERMIER, in 1840, the family locating on a quarter-section farm in Jackson township, this county, among the real pioneers of that section of the county. Martin HAMMITT was a son of Joseph and Mary (BRIANT) HAMMITT and was but an infant when his father, a soldier of the War of 1812, died while in service during that war. He grew up in Ohio and was there married, remaining there until he moved with his family to this county, where be spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, Oliver H. P., George W., Samuel, Sarah Ann, John, James M. and Benjamin. Five of these sons served as soldiers of the Union during the Civil war. Originally a Whig, Martin HAMMITT espoused the cause of the Republican party upon its organization and his sons also were Republicans. He served for some years as trustee of Jackson township and also was a trustee of the Christian church. As noted above James M. HAMMITT was but a child when he came to Jay county with his parents and he grew up on the pioneer farm in Jackson township. When the Civil war came on he enlisted his services in behalf of the Union cause and went to the front as a member of the 11th Indiana Cavalry. He was captured by the enemy at the battle of Nashville and sent to Andersonville prison pen, where he was kept until the end of the war. Upon his return home he resumed his work on the farm and in time became the owner of the home farm, where he is still residing. To him and his wife were born four children, of whom three are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Frank and Fay HAMMITT. Reared on the home farm in Jackson township, John G. HAMMITT received his early schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and supplemented this by a course in the old Normal School at Portland and in the Normal School at Vincennes, after which he became engaged in teaching school and was for six years thus engaged, farming during the summers and teaching during the winters. He then rented a farm up over the line in Adams county, where he remained for six years, at the end of which time he returned to this county and bought the farm of 120 acres on which he is now living in Jackson township, and has since resided there, he and his family being very comfortably situated. On September 19, 1898, John G. HAMMITT was united in marriage to Bertha WATSON, who was born in the neighboring county of Adams, and to this union three children have been born, Hugh and Frank, both of whom are at home on the farm and Phoebe, deceased. The HAMMITT's are Republicans and are members of the Sardinia Christian church. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.389-390. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HARDY, JOHN S

John S. HARDY, one of Jay county's well known and progressive young farmers and landowners, proprietor of an excellent farm in Wayne township, and another farm in Jackson township, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and has lived here all his life. Mr. HARDY was born in the city of Portland on October 22, 1897, and is a son of Oscar and Dora B. ( JOHNSON ) HARDY, the former of whom was born in Jackson township, son of John HARDY, a veteran of the Civil war and in his day the heaviest taxpayer in Jackson township, who was born in Pike township, this county, in 1839, a son of Curtis HARDY, who was born in Preble county, Ohio, son of the Rev. John HARDY, and who settled in Jay county in 1837, the year following the formal organization of this county, the HARDY's thus having been represented here almost from the time of the beginning of social and civic order in this region. Reared at Portland, John S. HARDY was graduated from the high school there in 1915 and then entered the agricultural college of Purdue University at Lafayette and was in attendance there when the Purdue University S.A.T.C. was established for service in connection with this country's activities during the World war. He was enrolled in the S.A.T.C. and was thus connected until in December, 1919, when he returned home and entered upon the farming operations upon which he since has been so successfully engaged. In February, 1919, he had bought the farm of 125 acres on which he is living in Wayne township and upon establishing his home there, he having married the year before, began a systematic course of improvement on the place which has given him one of the most up-to-date and best equipped farm plants in the county, including a dwelling house which fills all the modern requirements of a comfortable home, and he and his family are very comfortably situated. In addition to this farm, Mr. HARDY has a farm of 209 acres in Jackson township, a part of the old HARDY home acres, and is farming both places, carrying on his operations in accordance with the best approved theories of modern agriculture, his three years and more of training at Purdue standing him well in stead in these operations. He also gives proper attention to the raising of live stock, with particular reference to pure bred Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs, and in this latter phase of his operations is doing well, becoming recognized as one of the most alert young stockmen in the county. It was on July 6, 1918, while he was a student at Purdue, that John S. HARDY was united in marriage to Bernice BIMEL, who also was born in Portland, daughter of Fred and Margaret ( KELSO ) BIMEL, of whom further and mention is made elsewhere in this work, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Dora Margaret, born on May 1, 1919. Mrs. HARDY completed her schooling at Pennhall College and in Maryland College. She and Mr. HARDY are members of the Presbyterian church at Portland. They have a very pleasant home on rural mail route No. 10 out of Portland and take an interested part in the general social activities of the community.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.287-288. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HARDY, JOHN

John HARDY, who died at his home in Jackson township in 1890, was an honored veteran of the Civil war as well as one of the most substantial citizens of Jay county, a large landowner and otherwise interested in the material development oi the community, and at his passing left a good memory. Mr. HARDY was born in Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families of the county, and all his life was spent here, so that he was a participant in the development of this region from the days of the early settlement. He was born on a farm in Pike township on September 29, 1839, and was a son of Curtis and Rachel (DOOLEY) HARDY, both of whom were born in Preble county, Ohio, members of pioneer families in that section of the Buckeye state, and who came over into Jay county following their marriage in 1837, the year following the erection of Jay county as a separate civic unit in the group of Indiana counties, and located on a farm in Pike township, where they built up a comfortable establishment and spent the remainder of their lives. Curtis HARDY and his wife were the parents of nine children, all of whom are now deceased, but there arc numerous descendants of this pioneer pair living in this county in the present generation. John HARDY grew to manhood on the pioneer farm in Pike township and completed his schooling m the famous old Liber College. He early became interested in farming and stock raising- and was thus engaged in this county when the Civil war broke out. On July 26, 1862, he enlisted for service In the Union army and went to the front as a member of Company F of the 75th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which gallant command he served until mustered out on June 8, 1865, the war then being over. During this period of service Mr. HARDY took part in no fewer than fourteen battles and was twice seriously wounded, once at the battle of Chattanooga, when he was shot through the breast and shoulder, and again at the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, where his skull was fractured above the left eye by the impact of a minnie hall. Upon the completion of his term of service in the army Mr. HARDY returned to Jay county and resumed his agricultural operations, in which lie became quite successful, the owner of 992 acres of farm and grazing lands in Bearcreek and Jackson townships. He spent the later years of his life on his Jackson township farm, his death occurring there on February 2, 1890. In his political views Mr. HARDY was an ardent Republican. He was a member of the Newlight church in Jackson township and took a proper part in community good works. On October 8, 1867, John HARDY was united in marriage to Sarah T. GRIFFIN, daughter of Sumner and Lavina (COOK) GRIFFIN, who had come to this county in 1837, and to this union were born seven children. Rose B., Frederick S., Curtis W., Verona V., Alda I., John W. and Cady O., the last three of whom are deceased. Rose B. HARDY makes her home at 604 East Main street, Portland. Frederick S. HARDY, a retired farmer of this county, also living at Portland, married Catherine LOTT and has three children, Cedric, Walter and Carroll. Curtis W. HARDY, who is now living at Rocky Ford, Col., married Mabel GILPIN and has one child, a daughter, Sarah M. Verona V. HARDY (deceased) married Charles A. SMITH, a Jay county farmer, and had two children, Leta and Velmo. Cady O. HARDY, who died on November 26, 1903, married Dora B. JOHNSON, a daughter of John L. and Melvina (RUSH) JOHNSON, and had two children, sons both, John S. and Foster J., the former of whom married Bernice B. BIMEL, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred BIMEL, and has one child, a daughter, Dora M. The mother of these sons survived her husband for nearly eight years, her death occurring on November II, 1911. John S. and Foster J. HARDY are successfully engaged in farming in this county, making their homes at Portland. The late Cady O. HARDY completed his schooling in Indiana University and in the Eastman National Business College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and upon his return from college became engaged here in the real estate business and in directing the affairs of the HARDY estate. He was a member of the Christian church and was a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Knights of Pythias. Foster J. HARDY was graduated from the Portland high school in 1918 and is now devoting his attention to his farm of 200 acres and to the estate of his aunt, Rosa HARDY. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.357-358. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

HARPER, CHARLES E

Charles E. HARPER, one of Knox township's well known farmers, was born on a farm in Fayette county, Ohio, October 10, 1870, and is a son of John A. and Lucinda ( ROWE ) HARPER, who were the parents of five children, four of whom are living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Phoebe Ellen, William P. and Carrie A. John A. HARPER was a Virginian who had located in Ohio in the days of his young manhood and had settled on a farm in Fayette county after his marriage. He died there in the late '70s and his widow after awhile married again and in 1882 with her husband and children came to Indiana, the family locating in Richland township, this county. Charles E. HARPER was twelve years of age when he came to this county with his mother and stepfather and he completed his schooling in the schools of Richland township. As a young man he went to Illinois and was there for twelve years, engaged in farming, later going to Laporte county, Indiana, where for twelve years he was engaged in farming. He then came back to Jay county and bought the quarter of a section of land on which he is now living in Knox township, established his home there and has since resided on that place. Mr. HARPER is a Democrat and is a member of the Knights of Pythias, affiliated with lodge No. 551 at LaCrosse, Ind. It was while living in Illinois that Charles E. HARPER was united in marriage to Mary O. BRUDER, who was born at Gibson City, that state, and. to this union seven children have been born, Lawrence, Alma, Zeila, Bernice, Mabel, Charles and Richard, all of whom are at home. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.271-272. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HARRIS, CLARENCE C

Clarence C. HARRIS, proprietor of a well kept farm of 159 acres in Penn township, where he has a comfortable home on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here practically all his life. Mr. HARRIS was born on the farm on which he is now living on October 24, 1866, and is a son of Benjamin and Sarah J. ( McDORMAN ) HARRIS, who had come to this county with their respective parents in the days of their youth and were married here. Benjamin HARRIS was a farmer all his life and was retarded as one of the substantial citizens of the community in which he lived. In addition to his general farming he for years was engaged in stock buying and thus had a wide acquaintance hereabout. He and his wife were the parents of four children, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Nettie Ann, and two brothers, Albert W. and Arthur A. HARRIS. Reared on the home farm, Clarence C. HARRIS received his schooling in the Balbec school and from the days of his boyhood has been a farmer. He remained at home until about nineteen years of age when he went to Kansas and was there engaged in farm work for about three years, at the end of which time he returned home and bought a tract of twenty-four acres and began farming on his own account. Shortly afterward he was married and established his home on the old home place, where he ever since has resided. As his affairs prospered Mr. HARRIS added to his land holding's until now he has an excellent farm of 159 acres, the greater part of which is under cultivation. In addition to his general farming he has given considerable attention to the raising- of live stock, particularly hogs, and has done well, it having been his policy to feed the grain he raises on the place. Mr. HARRIS is a Democrat. His wife is a member of the United Brethren church. It was on October 10, 1889, that Clarence C. HARRIS was united in marriage to Jennie GREEN and to this union two sons have been born. Otto LaFawn and Basil Firm, both of whom are unmarried. Otto LaFawn HARRIS served as a soldier during the time of America's participation in the World war and was mustered out as a sergeant. Mrs. HARRIS was born at Cumminsville, Ohio, and is a daughter of William and Jennie ( HART ) GREEN, the former of whom was born in New Hampshire and the latter in Covington, Ky. who were the parents of two children, Mrs. HARRIS having had one sister, who died in infancy. Her father died when she was about six years of age and her mother presently married again and the family located at Redkey. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.311-312. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HART, CONRAD

Conrad HART, one of the old settlers of Santa Clara County, is a native of Pennsylvania, born in Berks County, February 22, 1825, his parents being John and Anna (Coppas) Hart, both of whom were Pennsylvanians. When Conrad was in his fifth year his parents removed to Pickaway County, Ohio, and there he was reared and learned the tailors trade, seven miles east of Circleville. In 1843 the family removed to Jay County, Indiana and there the parents lived until their death. One year after there removal there, however, Conrad went back to Ohio, where he worked at this trade for three years, then removed to Logansport, Indiana, where he acquired property and pursued his trade. In 1852 he started by team for California, crossed the Wabash at Attica, then through Bloomington, Illinois, crossing the Mississippi at Fort Madison and the Missouri at St. Joseph. Accompanying him were two other wagons with their occupants, also from Logansport. They took the route by Sublette's cut-off and arrived at Grizzly Flats, California, July 11, after a trip of 72 days. After about a month he started on his travels going in succession to Sacramento, Nichols, Foster's Bar on the Yuba river, Napa Valley, thence to Portland, Oregon (that place then being a mere hamlet) from there up the Willamette River as far as Eugene City, and on the first of September he started for San Jose. On his arrival, he went to work on the very tract of land where he now resides, and seven years later had accumulated enough money to buy and pay for it. This tract consists of forty-six and one-half acres, hardly three-fourths of a mile from the city limits of San Jose. When he came here it was wild land without even a fence, but now it is one of the most productive place in the county. From thirty acres he cut about 100 tons of hay. He has nearly twelve acres in fruit planted in 1885 and all showing splendid progress. There are about 900 French prunes, 200 apricots and 300 yellow egg plums. These trees are said by competent judges to be as fine as any in the state. Mr Hart raises about fifty tons of beets on five acres and ten tons of carrots. From some of his old apple trees he has picked twenty-two boxes per tree and from a single Winter Nelis pear tree, twelve to fifteen boxes. The present residence was built in 1860. Mr. Hart was married in that year to Mrs. Margaret A. Funk, a native of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Hart died in December 1879 and left one child. Mr. Hart is politically a staunch Republican. Pen Pictures from the Garden of the World, Santa Clara California, ed. H. S. Foote, Lewis Pub. Co., Chicago, 1888, p.352 (found complete text of book on Heritage Quest)

HARTLEY, CHARLES F

Charles F. HARTLEY, one of Jackson township's well known and progressive farmers and landowners, was born in that township and has resided there the greater part of his life, the exception being a period during the '80s and '90s when he resided in Michigan. Mr. HARTLEY is a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county, the HARTLEY's having been represented here since, the year 1845. He was born on January 12, 1862, and is a son of Enoch B. and Lydia H. ( SHANKS ) HARTLEY, the latter of whom was a sister of Gen. John P. C. SHANKS, the story of whose interesting career is told elsewhere in this work, together with further details concerning the SHANKS family, which was one of the first families in this section. The late Enoch B. HARTLEY, a veteran of the Civil war, was born in Warren county, Ohio, and was seventeen years of age when he came with his parents, Samuel and Deborah ( BORDEN ) HARTLEY, of whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere in this volume, to Jay county in 1845, the family locating in Jackson township. In 1855 Enoch B. HARTLEY, who was the eldest of the eight children born to his parents, married Lydia H. SHANKS, daughter of Michael and Martha B. ( CLEAVER ) SHANKS, and established his home at Pennville, then Camden. He presently moved from here to Minnesota, but about a year later returned to Jay county and located on a forty-acre farm in Jackson township, where he was living when the Civil war broke out. In February, 1865, he enlisted his services as a soldier of the Union and was commissioned first lieutenant of Company G of the 153d regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served in the Army of the Cumberland until mustered out in the following September, the war then being over. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. HARTLEY returned home and resumed farming and black smithing, vocations he followed the remainder of his life, increasing his holdings until he was the owner of an excellent farm of 240 acres. He died on December 29, 1901. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, eight of whom are living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Ida, Mary, William, Alice, Louisa C., Martha Lulu. Ernest and Arthur, the two last named of whom served as soldiers during the time of the Spanish-American war. Reared on the home farm in Jackson township, Charles F. HARTLEY received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and remained at home until 1887 when he went to Michigan and took up farming in that state, where he presently married and established his home on an eighty-acre farm he had bought there. For seventeen years Mr. HARTLEY remained in Michigan and then, following the death of his father, he returned to Jay county and established his home on an "eighty" of the old home place, which he inherited and where he is now living, he and his family being very comfortably situated. It was in February, 1894, that Charles F. HARTLEY was united in marriage to Anna WOODWARD, who was born at Grand Rapids, Mich., and to this union seven children have been born, five of whom are living, Ruth, Esther, Agnes, Harold and Enoch, those deceased having been Mildred and Lawrence. Agnes HARTLEY married Howard HAFFNER, of this county, and has one child, a daughter, Mildred Maryanna. The HARTLEY's have a pleasant home and have ever taken an interested part in the social activities of the community in which they live. Mr. HARTLEY is a member of West Grove grange, No. 117, Patrons of Husbandry, and takes an active interest in grange affairs. In his political views he is "independent." SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.500-501. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HARTMAN, ROLAND C

Roland C. HARTMAN, a well known farmer and landowner of Knox township and a member of one of the pioneer families of that section of Jay county, was born in that township and has lived there all his life. Mr. HARTMAN was born on June 14, 1875, and is a son of John T. and Martha ( SEIFMAN ) HARTMAN, the former of whom was born in that same township, a son of Levi S. and Jemima ( SCHRACK ) HARTMAN, who were among the early settlers of that section. Levi S. HARTMAN came here in pioneer days and established his home in Knox township, where he was living when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and went to the front, leaving the management of the farm in the hands of his son George, who then was but twelve years of age. He died while in service and his son, John T. HARTMAN, thus early was charged with the responsibility of carrying on operations on the home place. After his marriage John T. HARTMAN continued to make his home there and died of heart disease at the age of twenty-seven years. He and his wife had six children, four of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Leota, Mamie and Leon. Reared on the home farm in Knox township, Roland C. HARTMAN received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and from the days of his boyhood has been a farmer. He was married when he was twenty-one years of age and then began farming on his own account, establishing his home on a twenty-acre tract he had bought in the neighborhood of the old home, and there he has continued to reside, having meanwhile increased his land holdings to eighty acres. Mr. HARTMAN and his family reside in a log house, one of the few interesting old relics of the days of the pioneers which still are serviceable for occupancy in this county, and they have made it very comfortable. It was on January 18, 1896, that Roland C. HARTMAN was united in marriage to Eva RIDGEWAY, who also was born in this county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and to this union have been born four children, Elsie, born on July 3, 1902; Ralph, June 17, 1904; Dorothy, April 24, 1906, and Carl, September 3, 1908, all of whom are at home with their parents. Mr. and Mrs. HARTMAN are members of the Oak Grove Methodist Episcopal church and are Republicans. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.239-240. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HAWKINS, JOHN JAY

THE HAWKINS FAMILY was here when the first beginnings of a social order were being worked out in this region, in the days before Jay county had a separate civic identity, when what now comprises the twelve townships of this county were included within the confines of Randolph county, the country now comprised within the borders of Jay county then having been little better than a "howling" wilderness of swamps and timber fastnesses, the Indians still treading their trails hereabout and wild animals everywhere lurking in the deep forests. From the beginning the HAWKINSes have been among the dominant factors in the social and economic development of this region, and in the fifth generation are still carrying on the work laid out here by the pioneer of this family. John Jay HAWKINS, the founder of the family in Jay county, was perhaps the most forceful individual figure hereabout in the days before the county was organized and his influence was largely helpful in stimulating further settlement here. He died an untimely death, due to the hazard of the wilderness, and was the first white person buried in the territory which afterward became organized as Jay county. One of his sons, Benjamin W. HAWKINS, was the county agent appointed to locate and "lay out" the county seat town when the county was organized in 1836. Another son, Nathan Byrd HAWKINS, was the delegate from this district to the Indiana state constitutional convention in 1850 and first judge of the common pleas court in this judicial district. Prior to that and even from the days of his boyhood he had been an active force in the development of the commercial interests of the county, and has been referred to as "the first business man in the county," as will be noted by reference to the Montgomery History of Jay County (Part I of this work), where it is set out that he "started to show land to strangers" following the settlement of the family here in 1829. As a lawyer. Judge HAWKINS looked after the financial affairs and property of nonresidents and in course of time, in the absence of better banking facilities, he was asked to care for the money and securities of local resident for safe keeping. He had the first iron safe in the community and kept considerable money on hand at all times, thus virtually the pioneer banker of Jay county. One of his sons, the late Nathan B. HAWKINS, former state senator from this district, assisted in establishing the second bank in the county and was active in its affairs for thirty-five years. Senator HAWKINS first used the name of N. B. HAWKINS & Company in business, this later being changed to that of the HAWKINS Mortgage Company, with headquarters still at Portland, now one of the best known financial concerns in the Middle West, which under the direction of Morton S. HAWKINS, president of the company and son of Senator HAWKINS, is carrying on the work begun by "The House of HAWKINS" here in 1829. But even prior to that, in the days of John Jay HAWKINS, a lieutenant in the War of 1812, and in the days of his father, Samuel HAWKINS, the Indian fighter, who was colonel in command of the expedition which went to the relief of General Harrison at Ft. Wayne and was wounded in the shoulder during that memorable campaign, and who afterward became one of the pioneers of this region, settling near the present site of Eaton, Ohio, the name of HAWKINS was known from Cincinnati to Ft. Wayne, back in Territorial days, and has thus been inseparably identified with business affairs throughout eastern Indiana for more than a century. The story of the days of the settlement of the HAWKINS family here in 1829 is so well told in the prior narrative (Montgomery's History of Jay County Part I of this work) that it need not here be retold, the attention of the reader being respectfully invited to a perusal of that narrative in this connection, but a brief review of that narrative for purposes of continuity is but proper. It is narrated that the founders of the HAWKINS family in America were four brothers, John, Samuel, Benjamin and James HAWKINS, who emigrated from England to the American colonies in the fore part of the eighteenth century and settled in the Shenandoah Valley in the Virginia Colony, these brothers being said to have been descendants of Sir John HAWKINS, an English navigator, born at Plymouth about 1520, who, according to Chambers's Encyclopedia, has the "infamous distinction" of being the first Englishman that trafficked in slaves and who established the slave trade between Africa and the American colonies. His "commercial" career ended in 1568, after which he is found more honorably employed. He was appointed treasurer of the British navy in 1573, knighted for his services against the Spanish Armada in 1588, and for the rest of his life was engaged in making havoc of the Spanish West Indian trade. In 1595, along with his kinsman, Drake, he commanded an expedition directed against the Spanish settlements in that part of the world, but died, November 21, in the same year. He founded a hospital at Chatham for the relief of disabled and sick sailors. Samuel HAWKINS, one of the sons of the Samuel HAWKINS, the colonist mentioned above, was born and reared in the Shenandoah Valley and there spent his last days. During the Revolutionary war he served as a soldier in the patriot army. One of his sons, Samuel III, grew up in the Shenandoah Valley and when the tide of emigration began to flow west after the Revolution became one of the first settlers in Bourbon county, Kentucky.! Following Wayne's successful expedition and treaty opening new territory to settlement in what later came to be organized as the state of Ohio he moved with his family from Kentucky and became a pioneer of the region surrounding what is now Eaton, in Preble county, Ohio, an older chronicle stating that he is thought to have been the first white settler to cross the Miami river. One of this old Indian fighting pioneer's sons, John Jay HAWKINS, the founder of the family in Jay county, was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, September 25, 1789, and was named in honor of John Jay who in that same year was appointed by Washington the first chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States and in whose honor also Jay county was given its name, the only county in the United States thus named. John Jay HAWKINS was but a lad when he moved with his parents from Kentucky to Ohio and he grew up amid pioneer conditions in what later came to be organized as Preble county, his schooling thus having been so much neglected that he did not acquire the ability to read and write until after his marriage to Nancy SELLERS, who taught him these accomplishments. She also was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, and was a daughter of Nathan SELLERS, a Revolutionary soldier who had emigrated to that section but who became a pioneer of Ohio in 1809. Daring the war of 1812 John Jay HAWKINS served as a lieutenant in the army and later served as sheriff of Preble county. He became a man of affairs in that county and remained there until early in 1829 when he moved with his family into what then was a wilderness over in this part of Indiana, having previously selected a site for his new home on the banks of the Little Salamonie, south of where Portland seven years later was laid out when the county came to be organized. It was on March 8, 1829, that he and his wife and their six children arrived at this site after the toilsome trip along the inadequate trails of the period. During that summer the family lived in what the pioneers called a "half-faced camp," but before fall had a stout log cabin erected and were snugly ensconce before the hard winter came. All hands pitched in and presently a clearing was effected and the making of a farm was under way. Game was plentiful and there was no lack of meat, while the sale of furs to the traders kept up the supply of such money as was needed. It was while hanging for dressing the carcass of a deer that John Jay HAWKINS came to his untimely end, the carcass falling upon him and inflicting such injuries that he died from their effect on March 15, 1832, a little more than three years after his arrival here, and he was the first white person buried here. His widow survived until 1868. They were the parents of six children, four sons, Samuel, Nathan B., Benjamin W. (who became agent for Jay county at the time of its organization, as is set out elsewhere) and Joseph C., and two daughters, Avaline, who married James SIMMONS, and Caroline, who married B. W. CLARK, whose descendants in the present generation form a numerous connection. Nathan Byrd HAWKINS, the second son of this pioneer family, was born in Preble county, Ohio, October 24, 1812, and was thus sixteen years of age when he came over here into the Salamonie country with his parents in 1829. He took an active part in the work of clearing and developing the home place and also found time, as has been noted, to "show land to strangers," thus becoming the first real estate agent and business man of the pioneer community. After awhile, in order to gratify his inclination for a business career, he went to Richmond and become a clerk in Elijah Coffin's store, later becoming engaged m business on his own account at Milton. In the meantime he had attracted the attention of John S. Newman, one of Indiana's leading lawyers*of the period, who advised him to take up the study of law. In 1839 he returned to Jay county and began the practice of law at Portland, which had been created the county seat three years before. Three years later, in 1842, he was elected to represent this dis~id in the state Legislature and in 1850 was elected delegate to the State constitutional convention from the district comprised of the counties of Randolph, Jay and Blackford. Upon the creation of the court of common pleas in 1852 he was elected judge of that court, this judicial district comprising the counties of Blackford and Jay, and was serving in that judicial .capacity at the time of his death on October 18, 1853. As has been noted in the introduction to this review Judge Nathan B. HAWKINS took an active part in the general business affairs of the community and as a private banker afforded to the pioneers their first banking facilities. Judge HAWKINS married Rebecca SHANKS, who was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, February 26, 1818, and who had become a resident of this county when her parents, John and Mary SHANKS, settled here in pioneer days. Of the children born to Judge HAWKINS and wife, six grew to maturity, namely: John Jay, whose last days were spent in Washington, where for years he was engaged in 'the Government service; lane C., who married David VanCleve BAKER, in his day one of the leading lawyers of this part of Indiana; Helen H., who married Isaac A. GRIFFITH, in his day one of the leading merchants of this county; Rachel A., who married Norton A. MEEKER, a former merchant of Portland; Sarah G., who married Benjamin F. FULTON, also a Portland merchant, of whom further mention is made elsewhere, and Nathan B., Jr. Judge HAWKINS was a charter member and first worshipful master of Jay lodge, No. 87, F. and A. M., and his was the first Masonic funeral held in this county. The second Nathan Byrd HAWKINS was born in Portland on January 1, 1853, and was less than-one year old when his father died. He completed his schooling in old Liber College and in the Indianapolis high school and when nineteen years of age became engaged in the lumber business at Portland, but presently disposed of that business and in 1875 assisted in the organization of the Citizens Bank at that place, of which concern he was made assistant cashier and with which he continued actively connected the remainder of his life, thus early becoming one of the leaders in the commercial life of Portland and of this county, a promoter of the best interests of this region until his death. During the days of the natural gas "boom" here he was president of the Portland Gas, Oil and Mining Company, and did much toward the development of the industries dependent upon natural gas hereabout. In 1906 he was elected state senator from this district and served in .the Senate during the sessions of 1907 and 1909. His death occurred on February 20, 1911. Senator Nathan B. HAWKINS married Genevra I. JAQUA, daughter of James B. JAQUA, banker and lawyer, of Portland, and of whom further mention is made elsewhere, and to this union were born three children, Estella, Morton S. and Zillah Pearl. As noted above, Senator HAWKINS was the first to use the firm name of N. B. HAWKINS and Company, which was later Changed to the HAWKINS Mortgage Company, now one of the leading financial concerns in the Middle West and whose business is carried on under the general direction of the Senator's son, Morton S. HAWKINS, president of the company, who continues to make his home in Portland, direct descendant in the fourth generation of John Jay HAWKINS, the founder of the family in Indiana, and third in descent from Judge Nathan B. HAWKINS, "the first business man in Jay county." Morton S. HAWKINS was born in Portland on February 12, 1881, and attended school there up to the eighth year when he was sent to the Jesuit Fathers school at old Albuquerque, N. M. After a season's attendance there he entered the West Texas Military Academy at San Antonio, where he was in attendance for two years, at the end of which time he returned to Indiana and entered the Law School of Indianapolis University at Indianapolis, from which he was graduated in 1903 with the degree of L.L.B. For twelve years Mr. HAWKINS continued his residence in Indianapolis, practicing his profession first in association with Pierre Gray and then for a time in association with Arthur W. Brady, general counsel for the Union Traction Company. He then formed an association for practice with Merrill Moores, present member of Congress from the Seventh Indiana district, and was for seven years thus associated, or until his return to Portland. While living at Indianapolis Mr. HAWKINS promoted the organization of the Beech Grove Traction Company and was otherwise active in the general affairs of the city. It was in 1912, following the death of his father and the reorganization of the latter's extensive business interests, that Mr. HAWKINS returned to Portland to take direction of the affairs of N. B. HAWKINS & Company, of which he had been elected president. In 1919 this company was reorganized as the HAWKINS Mortgage Company, capital stock $1,500,000, and Morton S. HAWKINS has continued to serve as president of the company. In 1913, the year after he entered upon the general direction of the affairs of this financial concern, Mr. HAWKINS spent nearly a year in Europe, investigating in England, Belgium, France and Germany the methods of handling small loans on personal property. About that same time the Russel Sage Foundation started an agitation in the United States to reform the small loan business and outlaw the "loan shark". Through this movement laws were passed in many states fixing a reasonable monthly rate of interest and l~envise regulating such business and subjecting it to state examination. After this form of business thus had been placed on an equitable basis the HAWKINS institution called in a staff of experts and perfected plans for the establishment of welfare loan institutions in every city of over 20,000 population in the country. This work is now well under way, the HAWKINS Mortgage Company's mutual system of Welfare Loan Societies now having no fewer than twenty nine branches, operating in eleven states. In addition to his activities as the head of this growing institution Mr. HAWKINS has, since his return to Portland in 1912, organized and promoted no fewer than ten state banks and trust companies in the states of Indiana and Ohio. He also maintains a close interest in various local industrial and commercial enterprises and was actively instrumental in the establishment of the Portland Republican, a daily newspaper started in 1913, and is a member of the board of directors of the company which publishes the newspaper. Mr. HAWKINS is a Scottish Rite (32) Mason, affiliated with the local lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons at P'ortland and with the consistory at Fort Wayne, and is also a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with Murat temple at Indianapolis. On February II, 1922, at Atlanta, Morton Sevier HAWKINS was united in marriage to Fannie Lamar MANLEY, of that city, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. MANLEY and a member of the well known Lamar, Doughty and Manley families of Georgia. The marriage, it was announced, was the culmination of a romantic meeting of Miss Manley and Mr. HAWKINS in London during the preceding summer, the former having made the European trip during that summer with her grandmother, Mrs. Charles L. GATELEY.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.33-38 Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HAYNES, SUMMER W

SUMMER W. HAYNES, for more than forty years a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, with law offices at Portland, the nominee of the Prohibition party in 1908 for the office of Governor of the state of Indiana and in 1916 for United States senator, for many years actively and prominently identified with the county board of children's guardians, the present attorney for that board, and in other ways helpful in the promotion of good works in district and state, was born at Portland and has lived there all his life, long having been recognized as one of the most helpful personal factors in the common life of this community. Mr. HAYNES was born on August 15, 1855, and is the fourth in order of birth of the eight children born to Judge Jacob March HAYNES and Hilinda S. ( HAINES ) HAYNES, as is set out elsewhere in this volume, together with a comprehensive narrative relating to the late Judge HAYNES, of excellent memory in this community, and details concerning the HAYNES family in America. Reared at Portland, Sumner W. HAYNES received his early schooling in the schools of that city, schools to the promotion of whose interests his father gave so unselfishly of his time and his services, and then entered Earlham College, where he remained three years. In the meantime he had been giving his attention to the study of law under his father's able preceptorship and thus equipped for further study entered the law school of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and in 1880 was graduated from that institution. He was admitted to the bar upon his return from law school and in 1881 became engaged in practice at Portland in association with his father. Judge HAYNES. Two years later, in 1883, Mr. HAYNES entered into a partnership with W. E. Cox and this mutually agreeable association was maintained for eight years, or until its dissolution, after which Mr. HAYNES formed a partnership in practice with George W. Hall. This association also was continued for eight years, or until its dissolution, since which time Mr. HAYNES has practiced alone, one of the oldest members of the bar in continuous practice in this county, he and Judge John M. Smith being now recognized as the ranking members of the bar now in active practice. Though reared a Republican, his father having been one of the leaders of that party hereabout, Mr. HAYNES early became an enthusiastic supporter of the principles of the Prohibition 'party and has for years been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in Indiana, his time and his means and his services having been given in unstinted measure to the promotion of the Prohibition cause since he first became a campaigner in that behalf back in 1886, when the organization which eventually brought about national prohibition of the liquor traffic was just getting a good start in this state. Long a leader of that party in this county and district, Mr. HAYNES was made the nominee of the party in the state for Governor in 1908, and in 1916 was further complimented by his associates in that organization by being nominated for the United States Senate. In the national convention of the party in 1916 he placed before the convention the name of Ex-Governor Hanly of Indiana, who was the party's nominee for President in that year. Mr. HAYNES took a very positive stand against the principle involved in local option, as applied to the liquor traffic; considering the traffic in the nature of a crime, instead as simply a matter of expediency, he insisted that it was no part of the policy of the State to submit a question criminal in its nature and tendencies to a vote of any community. He also opposed the original Hobson amendment" to the United States constitution, for the reason that it only prohibited the manufacture for sale, leaving the right and power, under the constitution, for any individual or organization to manufacture for his or its own use. Mr. HAYNES' helpful and sympathetic interest in behalf of child welfare work has long made him one of the leaders in that behalf in Indiana and in 1908-10 he rendered effective service as superintendent of the Indiana State Children's Home Society, his organizing ability brought to bear in that behalf having done much toward the better systematization of the work of that society. During this period of two years of service Mr. HAYNES practically gave up his law practice in order to devote his undivided attention to the work to which he had given his heart, and he never has ceased to take an active and influential interest in the work, an interest which took active form in 1891 when he began his labors in connection with the beneficent work of finding homes for orphaned and homeless children in this state, and he is even now the attorney for the county board of children's guardians. For thirty-five years Mr. HAYNES has been a member of the session of the Presbyterian church at Portland and in 1892 was the commissioner from this presbytery to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian church, held that year at Portland, Ore. For ten years or more he taught a class in the Sunday school of this church and for twenty-three years has served as superintendent of the Sunday school. On August 24, 1881, the year in which he was admitted to the bar, Sumner W. HAYNES was united in marriage to America E. HAYS, daughter of Courtney and Ann ( CLAYPOOL ) HAYS, of Portland, and to this union were born two daughters, May Beatrice and Mabel Edna, both of whom now are deceased. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.72-74. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HAYNES, WALTER M

Walter M. HAYNES, president of the Peoples Bank of Portland, the oldest bank in that city and the first state bank organized in Indiana, has been connected with that bank since the days of his young manhood a period of nearly fifty years, and has been president of the same since the death of his father, the late Judge Jacob M. HAYNES, who was one of the organizers of the bank and president of the same until his death in 1903. Mr. HAYNES was born in Portland and has been a resident of that city all his life, one of the strong, influential factors in the development of the city's commercial interests, having thus been a participant in all movements having to do with the substantial growth of that city since it began to emerge from its pioneer state. The story of the establishment of the Peoples Bank of Portland, as well as the story of the coming to Portland in 1844 of Mr. HAYNES father, together with details relating to the HAYNES family in America and further facts concerning the family in Portland, is told elsewhere in this volume, and to those several narratives the attention of the reader is respectfully directed in this connection. Suffice it here to say that Walter M. HAYNES was born on September 15, 1853. and that he is the first in order of birth of the eight children born to the late Judge Jacob March HAYNES and Hilinda S. (HAINES) HAYNES, and is the successor to the former in the direction of the affairs of the Peoples Bank of Portland, one of the oldest and best known bankers in eastern Indiana. Reared at Portland, Walter M. HAYNES received his early schooling In the public schools of that city. Early evincing a taste for commercial pursuits, he supplemented this schooling by a course in the Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and upon his return to Portland became employed as a bookkeeper in the old Kirschbaum mercantile establishment in that city. A year later he was taken into the office of the Peoples Bank, which was organized in 1873 and of which his father was president, and for two years served that institution as a teller. He then was advanced to the position of assistant cashier and five years later was elected cashier of the bank, a position he continued to occupy until the death of his father in 1903, in which year he was elected by the directors of the bank to succeed Ills father as president of the bank, a position he now occupies, and during which incumbency he has done much to advance the interests of the bank in all proper directions. In addition to his banking interests, Mr. HAYNES is a member of the board of directors of the HAYNES Milling Company of Portland, a director of the Sedan Body Company of Union City, Ind., and a member of the board of directors of the HAYNES Automobile Company of Kokomo, of which his brother, Elwood HAYNES, whose practical application of the principle of automotive power to vehicular traffic revolutionized road traffic throughout the world, is the president. Mr. HAYNES also is a member of the board of trustees of the Green Park Cemetery Association of Portland, and for forty years has been one of the directing forces behind the Jay County Fair Association, one of the most successful organizations of this character in Indiana. He is a Republican, as was his father, and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. In 1877 Walter M. HAYNES was united in marriage to Elizabeth MOORE, of Marion, Ohio, [Marion Co.] who died on March 29, 1910, and to that union one child was born, a daughter, Florence, who married Adelma E. STARBUCK and has two children, Walter and Elizabeth. Mr. HAYNES is a member of the Presbyterian church at Portland and a member of the board of trustees of the same. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.337-338. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HEARN, P M

P. M. HEARN, former recorder of Jay county and a prominent real estate dealer at Portland, is a native son of this county, a member of one of the counties pioneer families, and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Wayne township, August 6, 1851, son of William and Jane E. ( WHEAT) HEARN, the latter of whom was born in the state of New York and had come to this county with her parents in 1836, the WHEAT's having been among the early settlers of Jay county. William HEARN was born in the state of Maryland and was but a lad when he came to Indiana with his parents in 1839, the family settling in this county. Here he grew to manhood on a farm and after his marriage established his home on a farm of seventy-two acres in Wayne township, a part of the old Indian reserve, and developed an excellent piece of property. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom five are still living, P.M. HEARN having three brothers, Charles, William and Robert HEARN, and a sister, Rowena. Reared on the home farm in Wayne township, P. M. HEARN received his schooling in the local district school and at Liber College and was for seven years thereafter engaged as a teacher in the schools of Jay county, farming during the summers and teaching during the winters. In 1878 he was elected recorder of Jay county and in 1882 was re-elected, thus serving two terms of four years each. Upon his retirement from the recorder's office in 1886 Mr. HEARN became engaged in the real estate business at Portland, to which city he had moved upon entering upon his duties as recorder, and has ever since been thus engaged, one of the most successful operators in that line in the county. Mr. HEARN is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Church of Christ. Mr. HEARN has been twice married. On December 25, 1879, he was united in marriage to Ida E. CADWALLADER, who was .born in Ohio and who had come to Jay county with her parents, Isaac CADWALLADER and wife, in the days of her youth, and to that union five children were born, namely: Lacey, who is married and living at Indianapolis, where he is engaged in the real estate business; Omar, a minister of the Church of Christ, now pastor of a church at Las Vegas, N. M., who is married and has two children, Guy and Mary L.; Lorena, who married the Rev. Charles RODEMAN, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and has four children, James M., Belinda J., Julius and Mary Frances; Ruth Hortense, who married Leroy PAXTON, a miner at Oatman, Ariz., and has had two children, both of whom are deceased, and James T. unmarried, who is now clerk in the bank of the Hawkins Mortgage Company at Centralia, III. During the period of American participation in the World war James T. HEARN served for eighteen months in the United States navy. The mother of these children died on February 23, 1908, and on March 18, 1909, Mr. HEARN married Mrs. Almaretta ( ADNEY ) TIMMONS, who was born in Noble township, this county, daughter of Daniel and Phoebe ( AUKENBAUGH ) ADNEY. Mr. and Mrs. HEARN have a very pleasant home at Portland and take a proper part in the city's general social activities.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.60-61. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HENISCEY, CHRISTIAN

Christian HENISCEY, who for years was one of the best known farmers and landowners of Jefferson township, who died at his home in that township in the summer of 1889, was of European birth, but had been a resident of this country and of Jay county since the days of his infancy and thus ever accounted himself as stanch an American as though native here. Mr. HENISCEY was born in Germany on October 30, 1836, and was but an infant in arms, about one year of age, when his parents, Martin and Rebecca HENISCEY, came to this country and proceeding on out into Indiana settled on a farm in Jefferson township, this county, and here established their home. Martin HENISCEY was the owner of a farm of eighty acres in that township and there he and his wife spent the remainder of their days, useful pioneers of that neighborhood. It was on this pioneer farm that Christian HENISCEY grew to manhood. He received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and became a practical farmer on his father's farm. After his marriage he bought a tract of forty acres in that township, the place on which his widow now is living, and sometime afterward added to this by the purchase of an adjoining tract of twenty acres, so that he came to be the owner of sixty acres, and here he lived until his death on June 21, 1889, and his widow continues to make her home there, this home being on rural mail route No. 5 out of Portland. It was on November 2, 1862, that Christian HENISCEY was united in marriage to Susan WIKEL, who was born in Ohio, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth WIKEL, and to this union were born nine children, six of whom, Daniel, John, Solomon, Ezra, Elizabeth and Jacob, are living. Another son, Elijah HENISCEY, who died on June 9, 1912, left a widow, who was Ida MAYBAR, and two children, Walter L. and Edna. Daniel HENISCEY is unmarried and continues to make his home on the home place, looking after the operations of the farm. John HENISCEY married Alice MORRICLE and has four children, Inez, Lyman, Ina and lrvin. Solomon HENISCEY married Cora BRUNER and has two children, Laura and Nora. Ezra HENISCEY married Rena HESTON and has four children. Fay, Ethel, Edgar and Frederick. Elizabeth HENISCEY married Roy TUMILSON and has seven children, Edna, Ruth, Clarence, Florence, Nellie and Harold TUMILSON. Jacob HENISCEY married Clara SPITZER and has eight children, Guy, Russell, Susie, Alice, Helen, Fred, Daphne and James. Christian HENISCEY was a member of the German Baptist church, as is his widow, and their children were reared in that faith. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.226-227. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HIATT, ALFRED M

Alfred M. HIATT, postmaster at Pennville and one of the best known residents of that section of Jay county, is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Greene township on May 13, 1870, and is a son of Jasper and Mary E. ( SPAHR ) HIATT, both are members of pioneer families in this county. Jasper HIATT was born at Fountain City, Ind., and was but a child when his parents came to Jay county with their family. His wife was born in Greene county, Ohio, and she also was but a child when her parents came over here, among the first of the numerous families from that county who settled in this county in pioneer days. Jasper HIATT's father was the neighborhood blacksmith in Greene township in the early days here and was one of the best known men of that time in that section of the county. Jasper HIATT completed his schooling at Liber College and was teaching school in his home township when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted as a soldier of the Union and served in the army for about two years. Upon his return he became engaged in farming in Greene township and remained there until the fall of 1872, when he bought a farm of eighty acres just south of Pennville, in Penn township, and there made his home until in 1914, when lie sold his farm and moved to Pennville, where he spent the remainder of his days, his death occurring there on March 2, 1917. He and his wife were the parents of six children, the subject of this sketch having five sisters, Emma, Luella, Lillie, Ethel and Pearl. Reared on the home farm just south of Pennville, Alfred M. HIATT received his early schooling in the Pennville schools and supplemented this by attendance at the normal school at Valparaiso, Ind., and the normal at Fortville. For four years he was engaged in teaching during the winters and then he began to make a specialty of hog raising and also in season operated a threshing rig, a vocation he carried on for fourteen years, at the end of which time he became engaged in railway construction work and was thus engaged for three years, or until he was appointed postmaster of Pennville, his commission being dated February 15, 1915, since which time his time has been devoted to the duties of this office. Mr. HIATT is a Democrat and has ever taken an interested part in local political affairs. He is a Freemason, is past worthy patron of the local chapter of the Order of Eastern Star, and is also a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Alfred M. HIATT married Anna M. SPENCER and to this union two children have been born, Hazel, who married Luther ODA and has one child, a daughter, Barbara Leah ODA, and William, who married Iva ENSLEY and has one daughter, Jane. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.189-190. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HIATT, EDGAR R

Edgar R. HIATT, M. D., a practicing physician at Pennville, one of the best known young physicians in Jay county, who attained the rank of captain in the American army during the World war, rendering service in France and in the Army of Occupation, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived in this county all his life. Doctor HIATT was born on a farm in Greene township on December 10, 1887, and is a son of William P. and Mary Elizabeth ( BANTA ) HIATT, both of whom were members of pioneer families in that township, the latter a daughter of Joseph L. and Jane ( GARD ) BANTA, who had come over here from Ohio. William P. HIATT was born in Greene township and is a son of William and Martha ( JACKSON ) HIATT, who came up here from Randolph county in 1841 and who were the parents of four sons and two daughters, the family early becoming one of the most influential in that part of the county. Reared on the home farm in Greene township, Doctor HIATT received his early schooling in the neighborhood schools and then entered the high school at Pennville, from which he was graduated in 1906. For five years thereafter he taught school in this county, meanwhile continuing his studies and presently entered Indiana University, from which he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1914. Thus equipped by preparatory study he entered the medical college of Indiana University and in 1916 was graduated from that institution. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor HIATT returned home and became associated with Doctor Schwartz in the practice of his profession at Portland. In August, 1917, he enlisted his services in behalf of the army and was sent to Ft. Benjamin Harrison, where he presently was given a commission as first lieutenant and was transferred to Ft. Sill (Okla.), where he spent two months in a school of gas defense and was then commissioned as an instructor in gas defense and was sent to various camps giving instructions along this line, serving in this capacity for eight months or until June 1, 1918, when he was attached to the 359th regiment (infantry) of the 90th division and two weeks later was sent overseas, continuing his service with that "outfit" until he received his discharge on June 5, 1919, with the rank of captain. During this service Doctor HIATT was severely wounded, October 4, 1918, while on the front line sector of the battle raging around St. Mihiel, and was compelled to remain in a hospital until in January, when he rejoined his command, which meanwhile had been sent into Germany with the Army of Occupation, and he remained there at Urzig until the command was ordered home to be mustered out, in the following summer. Upon receiving his discharge from the army Doctor HIATT returned home and presently opened an office for the practice of his profession at Pennville, where he since has been located. The Doctor is a Republican. He is a member of the Greek letter fraternities Delta Upsilon and Phi Chi, the latter the medical fraternity; is a Freemason and a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and is a member of the local post of the American Legion at Portland. On October 24, 1916, Dr. Edgar R. HIATT was united in marriage to Mary E. WRIGHT, daughter of Malvern O. and Lydia ( STANSBURY ) WRIGHT, and to this union two children have been born, Elizabeth Ann and William Edgar. Mrs. HIATT also is a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county. Her father, Malvern O. WRIGHT, was born here in 1859, a son of Elijah C. and Elizabeth ( COFFIN ) WRIGHT, the latter a daughter of Nathaniel and Lydia ( BUNKER ) COFFIN. Elijah C. WRIGHT, the pioneer, came to Jay county from Wayne county in 1843. He was born in Wayne county in 1817 and was a son of David and Hepzabeth ( COFFIN ) WRIGHT, who were among the Carolina Quakers colonists who had come out into Indiana in territorial days and settled in Wayne county. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.200-201. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HICKMAN, LEMON O

Lemon O. HICKMAN, one of Richland township's well known farmers, living on rural mail route No. I out of Redkey, was born in that township and has lived there all his life. He was born on June 22, 1880, and is a son of Joseph P. and Emaline ( BOOTS ) HICKMAN, both of whom were born in Greene county, Ohio, but who came to Jay county with their respective parents in the days of their childhood and were thus reared here. Joseph P. HICKMAN became a substantial farmer of this county and the owner of about 200 acres of land in Richland township.. To him and his wife were born five children, three of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Elba M. and Luella. Reared on the home farm in Richland township. Lemon O. HICKMAN received his early schooling in the old Booth school and supplemented this by two years of attendance on the high school at Redkey. He remained on the farm, a valued assistant to his father, until his marriage at the age of twenty years, when he began farming on his own account, renting the home place from his father, and is still living there, now renting 120 acres. In addition to his general farming Mr. HICKMAN raises about sixty head of hogs a year. His place is well kept and his operations are carried on in up-to-date fashion. Mr. HICKMAN and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Redkey. On September 29, 1900, Lemon O. HICKMAN was united in marriage to Bessie BRUBAKER , who was born in Fulton county, Indiana, a daughter of Solomon F. and Samantha ( TERRILL ) BRUBAKER. When she was eleven years of age she moved to Gas City, Ind., with her parents and five years later came with them to Jay county, where she has since resided. To Lemon O. and Bessie ( BRUBAKER) HICKMAN two children have been born, sons both, Kenneth W. and Bermond E., the latter of whom is still in school. Kenneth W. HICKMAN has completed his schooling and is now serving in the United States army, attached to the 11th Company, Coast Artillery. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.175-176. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

HILL, JOHN W

John W. HILL, an honored veteran of the Civil war, former postmaster at Redkey and formerly and for years engaged in the mercantile business there, now living retired in that city, well past eighty years of age and one of the best known octogenarians in Jay county, is a Hoosier by birth and has lived in Indiana all his life, a resident of Redkey for thirty years. Mr. HILL was born on a farm in the neighboring county of Randolph on May 2, 1839, and is a son of Hiram and Martha ( MANN ) HILL, pioneers of that county. Hiram HILL was born in North Carolina and was but a child when he accompanied his parents to Indiana, the family settling in Randolph county, among the early settlers of that county. He grew up as a farmer and after his marriage established his home on a quarter section of land which he had bought. This holding he presently increased to 320 acres and he was accounted one of the substantial farmers of his neighborhood. Hiram HILL died in 1871. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, of whom four are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Abner and George HILL, and a sister, Angle. Reared on the home farm in Randolph county, John W. HILL was living there when the Civil war broke out. In 1862, he then being twenty-three years of age, Mr. HILL enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and was attached to the Sixty-ninth regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served until mustered out after the close of the war, among the engagements he participated in with that regiment having been those at Richmond, Ky., Arkansas Post, Vicksburg and Youngs Point, Ala. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. HILL returned home and not long afterward was married. For two or three years thereafter he continued farming and then, in 1868, became engaged in the mercantile business at Arba, a village on the southern edge of Randolph county. Two years later, in 1870, he moved his stock of goods up to Spartansburg, in the same county, and there continued in business until 1892, when, attracted by the gas "boom" then at its height hereabout, he disposed of his business at Spartansburg and moved to Redkey, where he opened a general store, quickly becoming recognized as one of the leading merchants of that city. In 1903, Mr. HILL was appointed postmaster at Redkey and for four years he served in that capacity. Upon the completion of his term of service in the post-office he retired from business and has since been living retired, continuing to make his home at Redkey, where he and his wife are very comfortably situated. It was in 1865, that John W. HILL was united in marriage to Julia DAVIS, who was born at Jonesboro, in Grant county, this state, daughter of William and Rebecca ( SMALL ) DAVIS, and to this union have been born seven children, Ross, Pearl, Clarence, Cora, Frederick, Howard and Nellie, all of whom are living and all married. Mr. and Mrs. HILL are members of the Christian church and are Republicans. Mr. HILL is a Scottish Rite (32nd degree) Mason and an Odd Fellow and has for many years taken an earnest interest in the affairs of these orders. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.177-178. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HINES, JOHN S

John S. HINES, proprietor of the Princess Theater at Portland and who formerly and for many years was engaged in the undertaking business there and later and for some years engaged in drilling for oil in this county, was born in Jay county and has lived here all his life, long having been one of the best known men in the county. Mr. HINES was born on October 22, 1867, sixth in order of birth of the twelve children born to George and Catherine (ZONE) HINES, and was reared on a farm in Pike township, in the district schools of which township he received his schooling. He early was attracted to the undertaking business and upon leaving the local schools he went to New York City, where he took a complete course in the Bernard School of Embalming. Upon receiving his dioloma as a certified embalmer Mr. HINES returned home and became engaged in the undertaking business at Portland, a calling he followed for twenty years, or until 1905, when he sold his undertaking establishment and went into the oil business as a producer. He secured about 1,000 acres of leases in Pike township and for about ten years was engaged in developing the same, bringing in numerous productive wells, the greatest of which was a fifty-barrel well, disposing of his product through the Ohio pipe lines. In December, 1917, Mr. HINES bought the Princess Theater at Portland and has since been directing the same, giving special attention to high-class motion pictures, and has made this one of the most popular theaters devoted to film productions in this section of the state. Mr. HINES is a Republican, is a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. On June 15, 1897, John S. HINES was united in marriage to Ida GEIGER, who was born in Greene township, this county, daughter of Joseph and Nettie (LEDBETTER) GEIGER, both of whom were born in Licking county, Ohio, and who were the parents of three children, of whom Mrs. HINES is the second in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. HINES have three children, Ralph, Ruth and Harold, the latter of whom is a member of the class of 1922, Portland high school. Ruth HINES was graduated from the Portland high school with the class of 1921. Ralph HINES, also a graduate of the Portland high school, enlisted for service in the United States army on May 20, 1919, and after a season of preliminary camp training was attached to Company C, 31st Infantry, and in July was sent with this command to Siberia for guard duty on the Transiberian railway, where he remained until April 1, 1920, when the command was transferred to the Philippine Islands for headquarters duty. There he was made a corporal and is still serving, having enlisted for three years of foreign service. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.343-344. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HOGAN, WILLIAM E

REV. WILLIAM E. HOGAN, D. D., pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at Portland and one of the best known clergymen in that city, is a native Hoosier and has lived in Indiana all his life. He was born at Oakland City, Ind., February 28, 1882, and is a son of the Rev. George W. and Lucy E. ( HOPPER ) HOGAN, the latter of whom was born in Kentucky. The Rev. George W. HOGAN was a Virginian by birth and was reared in Virginia, where he received his schooling. When a young man he entered the ministry and was active in that profession until his death. During the early days of his ministry he came to Indiana and was for a time located at Salem, later moving to Oakland City, where he established his permanent home. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, six of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch having been John W., Amanda B., Junius, Aaron, Montrea L. and Owen E. (deceased). Reared at Oakland City, William E. HOGAN received his schooling in the excellent schools of that city and early gave his attention to study for the gospel ministry, in due time being ordained to the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church. His first charge was at Merom, where he remained for two years and then was sent to Newburg, where he served as pastor of the church at that place for a year; thence to Washington, Ind.; thence to Valentine, in Lagrange county; thence to Inwood, from there to Syracuse and thence to Knightstown, from which latter city he was sent by the Conference to Portland in 1920 and has since been pastor of the Methodist church at that place. Mr. HOGAN is a Freemason and has long given his thoughtful attention to Masonic affairs. In 1904 the Rev. William E. HOGAN was united in marriage to Lily M. WILLIAMS, who was born at Mt. Carmel, Illinois., and to this union three children have been born, Esther Marie, Hugh C. and Harlan F., the first named of whom, born on June 22, 1905, died on October 2, 1919, she then being in her fifteenth year. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.77-78. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

HOLLY, CHARLES H

Charles H. HOLLY, assessor of Greene township, a former member of the advisory board of that township, formerly and for years a teacher in the schools of this county, now living on his well kept farm in Greene township, was born in that township and has lived there the greater part of his life, the exception being a few years during which he made his home in Kentucky, where he for some time owned a farm. Mr. HOLLY was born on November 18, 1860, and is a son of Elnathan and Magdalene ( KINSEY ) HOLLY, the latter of whom was born at Dayton, Ohio. Elnathan HOLLY was born in Mahoning county, Ohio, a son of Henry Wadsworth HOLLY, a farmer and a native of Connecticut, and was early trained to the vocation of black smithing. As a young man he came to Indiana and was for some time engaged in farming- and black smithing in Wells county, but later came down into Jay county and bought a farm of forty acres in Greene township, where he established his home and where he spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom two are living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Emerson HOLLY. Charles H. HOLLY grew up on the farm, completed his schooling in the old normal school at Portland and began teaching school, a vocation he followed for twelve years, continuing to farm during the summers. In 1894 he went to Kentucky, where he bought a hundred acre farm and where he remained until 1899, when he returned to Jay county. Two years later he returned to Kentucky, where he remained a couple of years, at the end of which time he came back to Jay county and has since resided on his farm of fifty-eight acres in Greene township, though for some time past he has not been actively engaged in farming. Mr. HOLLY is a Democrat and has for years taken an active interest in local political affairs. He served for some time as a member of the township advisory board and is now assessor for the township. He and his wife are members of the Christian church and for thirty-five years he has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is a past noble grand of that order. Charles H. HOLLY has been thrice married. On March 1, 1893, he was united in marriage to Minnie PEEK, a daughter of Robert PEEK. She died in 1898 and he later married Eva ROSS, a daughter of David ROSS, who died in 1907, after which he married Mary M. RAMSEY, a daughter of Isaac RAMSEY. Mr. and Mrs. HOLLY have a pleasant home in Greene township and take an interested part in the general social activities of the community in which they live, their home being on rural mail route No.1 out of Portland. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.171-172. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HOLMES, CHESTER

Chester HOLMES, trustee of Greene township and a well known and substantial farmer, stockman and landowner of that township, was born in Greene township, a member of one of the pioneer families there, and has resided there nearly all his life, the exception being a short period during the years of his young manhood which he spent in the West. Mr. HOLMES was born on May 2, 1883, and is a son of Frank and Mary ( BOUSMAN ) HOLMES, the latter of whom was born in the neighboring county of Randolph, in this state. Frank HOLMES was born in Darke county, Ohio, and was but a lad when his parents, James and Catherine HOLMES, came with their family over into Indiana and settled on a pioneer farm in Wayne township, this county, among the early settlers of that section, the first of the present considerable HOLMES connection in this county to locate here. James HOLMES was a Virginian by birth, born in historic old Rockbridge county, that state, and was a wagon maker by trade, a vocation he followed for some time after he came to this county, maintaining a wag-on shop on his farm in Wayne township, and was thus of much service to his pioneer neighbors in the early days when the neighborhood wagon shop was an essential feature of the industrial life of the community. Frank HOLMES grew to manhood on that farm and after his marriage established his home on a farm of forty-five acres he owned in Greene township and there spent his last days, his death occurring in 1899. His widow survived until 1904. They were the parents of four children, the subject of this sketch having had three sisters. Cora E., Gertrude and Sallie R. (deceased). Chester HOLMES was sixteen years of age when his father died. He completed his schooling in the neighborhood schools and remained with his widowed mother until her death, after which he took a prospecting trip through the West, but at the end of a year returned to this county and resumed his place on the farm, where he has since resided, having established his home there after his marriage. In addition to his general farming Mr. HOLMES gives considerable attention to the raising of live stock, particularly the breeding of pure bred Poland China hogs, and feeds out about 100 head of hogs a year. He is a Democrat and has been serving as township trustee since 1918. He is a member of the local lodge of the Loyal Order of Moose at Portland. On February 29, 1912, Chester HOLMES was united in marriage to Bertha BOUGHMAN, daughter of William and Elizabeth ( FRITZINGER ) BOUGHMAN. Mr. and Mrs. HOLMES have a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 7 out of Portland and take an interested part in the general social activities of the community in which they live. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.282-283. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HOLMES, JOHN W

John W. HOLMES, who for the past thirty years has been engaged in the real estate and loan business at Portland, one of the best known factors in that line in this part of the state, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Mr. HOLMES was born on a farm in the neighboring county of Adams on November 8, 1862, and is a son of Andrew W. and Mary E. ( RAY ) HOLMES, who retired from the farm and became residents of Portland about twenty years ago. Andrew W. HOLMES is a Virginian by birth, but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of his childhood, having come to this state with his parents, John and Martha HOLMES, in 1844, the family settling in Adams county, where he grew to manhood and after his marriage established his home on a farm, becoming the owner of a farm of 212 acres, on which he resided until his retirement in 1901 and removal to Portland. To Andrew W. HOLMES and wife were born seven children, all of whom save one, Ella, are living, those besides the subject of the sketch being as follows: Levi M., living in Pittsburgh, Pa. who married Amanda MERRILL and has four children, Arthur W., Clarence M., Eva Beatrice and Dorothy; Etta M., who married the Rev. James H. WILLIAMS, now of Rising Sun, Ohio, and has four children, Mac, Lea, Russell and Dallas WILLIAMS; Josephus P., now living at Midland, Mich., who married Ethel SONDAY and has nine children; F. Roy, now living at Ann Arbor, Mich., who married Cora WATERS and has two children, Harold and Thelma; and Heber L., now living at Alma, Mich., who married Zeila BARTLING and has five children, Margaret, Fern, Mary, Geraldine and Kenneth. Reared on the home farm in Adams county, John W. HOLMES received his early schooling in the schools of his home district and supplemented the same by attendance at the normal school at Lebanon, Ohio, and the Eastern Indiana Normal School at Portland. For four years he was engaged in teaching school in his home county and then he served a term as principal of the schools at Dunkirk. For three years thereafter he was engaged in teaching in Delaware county and then served a year as a teacher in the normal school at Covington, Ind., and a year in the Portland city schools. By this time Mr. HOLMES had come to the conclusion that he had better get settled down in business. He had been giving some attention to the real estate business during vacation periods and in 1892 located at Portland, where he opened an office for real estate and loan transactions and has ever since been thus engaged in that city, for years having been recognized as one of the leaders in that line hereabout. In 1898 John W. HOLMES was united in marriage to Eva E. PLACE, who was born in the neighboring county of Wells, daughter of Alien T. and Jane ( WHITEMAN ) PLACE, and to this union three sons have been born, Howard PLACE, who is now a student at DePauw University; John Paul, who is a senior in the Portland high school, and Herbert Allen, who is following his brothers along the paths of learning and has entered high school. Mr. and Mrs. HOLMES are Republicans and are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, the congregation of which Mr. HOLMES has been serving as treasurer for the past fifteen years. Fraternally, he is affiliated with the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Portland. During the period of America's participation in the World war Mr. HOLMES rendered faithful service as fuel administrator for Jay county, serving in this important capacity from November 2, 1917, until his honorable discharge on February 28, 1919, and in other ways contributed of his energies to the promotion of the various local war activities that so deeply engrossed the attention of the people during that stressful period. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.201-202. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HOLMES, LEANDER G

Leander G. HOLMES, formerly and for years engaged in the grain business at Portland, one of the best known men in the county, and who died at Battle Creek, Mich., in the summer of 1920, was a native Hoosier and had been a resident of this state all his life. Mr. HOLMES was born on a farm in the neighboring county of Wells on October 20, 1855, and was a son of Lemuel and Sarah ( MYERS ) HOLMES, who came to this county with their family about the year 1873 and located at Portland, Lemuel HOLMES establishing there the marble worrks now operated by his son, Charles HOLMES. Leander G. HOLMES was about eighteen years of age when his parents moved to Portland, and he there became engaged with his father in the operations of the marble works, and continued thus engaged for some years, or until he entered the grain business, which afterward occupied his attention. Mr. HOLMES became a successful grain dealer and erected the elevator now operated by the Equity Exchange. He also erected an elevator at Bryant and continued his operations along that line until in 1916, when lie sold his grain interests and retired. Meanwhile he had acquired possession of a 120-acre farm south of Portland, to the operation of which he gave his attention, and was also the owner of a couple of business buildings on North Meridian street, Portland. Mr. HOLMES died on August 25, 1920, and is buried in Green Park cemetery at Portland. He was a Republican and was a member of the Methodist church, as is his widow. On May 7, 1879, Leander G. HOLMES was united in marriage to Clara J. CREAGER, of Portland, and to that union were born four children, Sarah Edith, Walter C., Vadia M. and Russell, the last named of whom died in infancy. Sarah E. HOLMES married J. J. GRIFFITH, a civil engineer, now living at Indianapolis. Walter C. HOLMES, who is now engaged in the grain business at Indianapolis, married Gladys COPELAND, and has two children. Harriet J. and Anne. Vadia M. HOLMES married Donald HALL, secretary and treasurer of the Drop Forge Company at Portland, and has two children, Helen H. and Lee G. Mrs. HOLMES was born in Darke county, Ohio, daughter of Lewis and Sarah ( GOODALL ) CREAGER, and was about sixteen years of age when her parents moved from Ohio to Portland, where she completed her schooling in the high school. Her father was born in Maryland and her mother was born at Leeds, England.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.232-233. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HOLSAPPLE, ORIEN E

Orien E. HOLSAPPLE, proprietor of the bottling works at Portland and well known manufacturer of "soft" drinks, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life, a resident of Portland since the days of his infancy. Mr. HOLSAPPLE was born in the historic and pleasant village of Salamonia on December 28, 1892, and is a son of John W. and Etta E. ( ISENHART ) HOLSAPPLE, who are now living at Portland. John W. HOLSAPPLE was born on a farm over in the adjacent county of Darke, in Ohio, and was but a child when he came to Jay county with his parents, Noah and Susanna HOLSAPPLE, who settled on a farm in the immediate vicinity of Salamonia, where he grew to manhood. He became a cooper by trade and in 1893 moved with his family to Portland, where he was long employed by a local concern, and where he is now engaged in connection with the operation of his son's bottling works. As noted above, Orien E. HOLSAPPLE was but a year old when his parents moved to Portland and he was reared in that city. He supplemented the schooling received at the high school by a course in alocal business college and then became engaged as a bookkeeper in the credit department of the W. H. Hood Company, local wholesale grocers. Mr. HOLSAPPLE remained with this establishment until 1915, when he bought a one-third interest in the bottling works of Harris & Son, manufacturers of soft drinks at Portland, and became actively identified with that business. In 1917 he purchased the remaining interest in this concern and sold one-fourth to his uncle, James lsenhart, of Portland, and has since then devoted himself to the 'enlargement of the plant's capacity and the extension of the business. It is a matter worthy of note that since taking over this business Mr. HOLSAPPLE has increased the production to five times its former aggregate, his trade covering not only Jay county but some of the towns in adjacent counties. On April 23, 1917, Orien E. HOLSAPPLE was united in marriage to lrma SWHIER, who also was born in this county, a daughter of Plummer and Ellen SWHIER. Mr. and Mrs. HOLSAPPLE are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Portland and are Democrats. Mr. HOLSAPPLE is a member of the local Chamber of Commerce, of the Kiwanis Club and of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal Order of Moose, in the affairs of all of which organizations he takes a proper interest. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.107-108. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HOOD, JOHN A

John A. HOOD, general manager of the W. H. HOOD Company, wholesale grocers, at Portland, and for years one of the most active and influential factors in the general commercial life of that city, was born at Portland and has lived there all his life. Mr. HOOD was born on May 23, 1875, and is a son of William H. and Aurelia B, ( PUMPHREY ) HOOD, the latter of whom was born at Connersville, Ind. [Fayette Co.], a daughter of Nicholas and Laura PUMPHREY. William H. HOOD, a retired wholesale merchant at Portland, president of the W. H. HOOD Company, wholesale grocers, and for many years recognized as one of the leading figures in the commercial development of that city, an honored veteran of the Civil war and long active in good works hereabout, has been a resident of Portland for nearly fifty years and has thus been a witness to and a participant in the amazing development which has marked this community during the past half century. Mr. HOOD is a native of Ohio, born in Montgomery county, that state, March 9, 1843, and is a son of John and Susanna (OLINGER) HOOD, both of whom also were born in Ohio, members of pioneer families in the Dayton neighborhood. John HOOD was a substantial farmer and he and his wife had two children, of whom William H. HOOD alone survives. William H. HOOD was reared on the home farm in Montgomery county, Ohio, and was living there when the Civil war broke out. In June, 1862, he enlisted his services in. behalf of the cause of the Union and went to the front as a member of Company B, 110th regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served until honorably discharged in 1865, the war then being over. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. HOOD returned home and the next year was married. He then opened a general store in Darke county, Ohio, and was there engaged in business until 1874, in which year he disposed of his interests there and came over into Indiana, locating at Portland, where he opened a retail grocery store. This business quickly expanded and it was not long until Mr. HOOD was beginning to serve the retail trade throughout this region as a wholesaler of groceries. Twenty-five years after establishing- himself in business in Portland, Mr. HOOD incorporated the establishment as the W. H. HOOD Company. He was elected president of that concern, a position he still occupies, and continued in active direction of the concern's affairs until his retirement in 1918, since which time the wholesale house has been operated under the management of his son, John A. HOOD. On June 12, 1866, William H. HOOD was united in marriage to Aurelia R. PUMPHREY, and to this union were born eight children, of whom two, Theodore C. and Clarence R., are deceased, the others being as follows: John A., the immediate subject of this biographical review; Anna L., widow of the late Charles S. BISHOP, a traveling salesman, of Richmond, Ind. [Wayne Co.], who has four children, Donald, Ruth, Irene, and Anna; Emma S., widow of the late C. J. HENLEY, of Portland, who has one child, a daughter, Dorothy; Ida M., wife of James LIMLE, a shoe salesman, of Portland; Clara J., who married Dr. R. J. ANDERSON, of Indianapolis, [Marion Co.] and has two children, Jane and Vincent W., and Esther, who married Harry M. JACOBS, a bookkeeper in the offices of the Twist Drill Company at Cleveland, and has two children, Ida Belle and Margaret. The HOOD's are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. William H. HOOD has for years been an ardent Prohibitionist and rejoices at the success of the principles for which he has so long contended. John. A. HOOD, manager of the W. H. HOOD Company, and the only surviving son of William H. and Aurelia ( PUMPHREY ) HOOD, was born. not long after his parents became residents of Portland, and he "grew up" to the grocery business in that city, an active assistant to his father in the store from the days of his childhood. After his graduation from the Portland high school he took a supplementary course in the commercial department of Miami College at Dayton, as a means further to equip him for the career upon which he had determined, and from that time on became a valuable factor in the development of the business, which in 1901 was incorporated as the W. H. HOOD Company, and of which John A. HOOD has been the active manager since the practical retirement of his father some years ago. Mr. HOOD is one of the active and influential members of the Portland Chamber of Commerce, is president of the local Kiwanis club and is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias, He is a Republican, as is his father, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 1897 John A. HOOD was united in marriage to Mary HUEY, daughter of John and Ruth ( HEADINGTON ) HUEY and a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Robert HOOD, who is preparing, to follow along commercial lines in the footsteps of his father and his grandfather. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.384-385. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HOUGH, JASPER

Jasper HOUGH, one of Bearcreek township's well known farmers and landowners, now living retired at his pleasant farm home in that township, on rural mail route No. I out of Bryant, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. HOUGH was born on a farm in Bearcreek township on May 16, 1854, and is a son of Dennis and Sophia ( HOTT ) HOUGH, the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania. Dennis HOUGH was born in Ohio, but early became a resident of Jay county where for some years in the days of his young manhood he taught school in addition to his work as a farmer. He was the owner of a forty-acre farm in Bearcreek township and he and his wife were the parents of six children, but two of whom are now living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Wilson N. HOUGH. Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, Jasper HOUGH received his schooling in the old Block school house in that township and when sixteen years of age began working "on his own" as a farm hand. When twenty-one years of age he rented the home farm and began to operate the same, establishing his home there after his marriage at the age of twenty-five, and remained there until 1896 when he bought the place on which he is now living in that same township. Mr. HOUGH has a well improved farm of forty acres, all the buildings on the place having been erected since he took possession and he and his family are very comfortably situated. For some time Mr. HOUGH has been living retired from the active labors of the farm, the place being worked at present on the shares by his son, Garno HOUGH. Mr. HOUGH is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Christian Union church in Bearcreek township, Jasper HOUGH has been thrice married. On June 13, 1878, he was united in marriage to Ella LEONARD, who also was born in this county, daughter of Dr. Francis LEONARD, and to this union were born six children. Earl D., Raymond W., Eleanor E., Clarence W., Nannie L. and Audra I., all of whom are living and all save Clarence married. The mother of these children died on December 6, 1891, and on February II, 1893, Mr. HOUGH married Mrs. Malinda ( DERBIN ) GOFF, widow of Martin GOFF. She died in February, 1898, and on September 30, 1899, he married Mrs. Rosa ( SHIRK ) GRAVATT, widow of George GRAVATT, who also was born in this county, and to this union two children have been born, Garno M. and Leila R., both of whom are at home with their parents. Mrs. HOUGH was born in Jackson township and is a daughter of John and Catherine ( FREEDMAN ) SHIRK, both of whom were born in Germany but who came to this country with their respective parents in the days of their childhood, the former at the age of nine years and the latter at the age of seven years. John SHIRK was a farmer and stonemason and the owner of an eighty-acre farm in Jackson township. He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, four of whom are living, Mrs. HOUGH having three brothers, Mathias, Frank and Dennis SHIRK. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.161-162. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HOUSER, WILLIAM

William HOUSER, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Bearcreek township and proprietor of an excellent farm on rural mail route No. 1 out of Portland, where he makes his home, now living practically retired from the general labors of the farm, has been a resident of Jay county since the middle '70s and has developed a good piece of property at the place on which he settled upon coming over here from Ohio. Mr. HOUSER was born in the vicinity of Ft. Recovery, over in the neighboring county of Mercer, in Ohio, October 14, 1848, and is the posthumous son and only child of William and Rachel (DOWNS) HOUSER, both of whom also were born in Ohio. William HOUSER was a blacksmith and had acquired a bit of land in the Ft. Recovery neighborhood. His widow married again and continued to make her home in Recovery township, in Mercer county, and it was there that her son by her first marriage, the subject of this sketch, grew to manhood. The junior William HOUSER remained with his mother and stepfather until after his marriage at the age of twenty-five, when he began farming for himself on a tract of eighty acres he had inherited from his father in the neighborhood of Ft. Recovery. Three years later he sold that place and came over into Jay county, April 4, 1876, and bought a tract of 120 acres in the woods in Bearcreek township, where he established his home and has since resided. The greater part of this tract was uncleared when. Mr. HOUSER took possession, but he presently got the place under cultivation and as his affairs prospered added to his holdings by the purchase of an adjacent tract of 110 acres, thus having 233 acres, on which as the years passed he developed an admirable farm plant. Of late years Mr. HOUSER has given over the tilling of his fields to tenants and is "taking things easy," though continuing to keep a pretty close supervisory eye on the direction of things on his farm, and still feeds out some live stock. Mr. HOUSER is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church at Bryant. It was on October 19, 1873, while living in Mercer county, that William HOUSER was united in marriage to Mary MENCHOFFER, of Washington township, that county, and to this union have been born six children, five of whom, Rachel C., George, Caroline, Gomer and Alice, are living. Rachel C. HOUSER married Ed KROUS, a farmer of Bearcreek township and has five children, Herman, Alta, Albert, George and Alice. George HOUSER, who is farming in this county, married Clara SPADE and has two children, Mahlon and Mary. Gomer HOUSER, who is a well known stock buyer of this county, married Maude COX, who died on February 9, 1916, leaving three children, Johanna J., Burdette and William W. Mrs. Mary HOUSER was born in Germany and was but a child of two years when she came with her parents, John and Catherine MENCHOFFER, to America, the family proceeding on out to Ohio and settling in Mercer county. John MENCHOFFER became a substantial farmer and landowner in Washington township, that county, the proprietor of an excellent farm of 440 acres. He and his wife had seven children, five of whom are still living, Mrs. HOUSER having three sisters, Margaret, Caroline and Catherine, and a brother, George MENCHOFFER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.444-445. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

HUEY, SANGOR K

Sangor K. HUEY, one of Bearcreek township's progressive young farmers, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the old and well known families of the county, and has lived here all his life. Mr. HUEY was born on a farm in Bearcreek township on January 18, 1898, and is a son of Troy and Bertha G. (HOLMES ) HUEY who are now living in the neighboring county of Adams. Troy HUEY also was born in Bearcreek township, May 6, 1873, and was reared there, a son of Jonas and Susanna ( BISHOP ) HUEY, the latter of whom also was born in Bearcreek township, a member of one of the old families in this county. Jonas HUEY was born in Pennsylvania and came to Jay county with his parents when eight years of age. Mrs. Bertha G. HUEY was born in the neighboring county of Randolph, March 22, 1877, and came to Jay county about 1883, with her parents, Francis and Mary ( BAUSMAN ) HOLMES, the former of whom was born in Darke county, Ohio, and had become a resident of Randolph county in the days of his young manhood. Troy HUEY grew up on a farm and has been a farmer all his life. He continued to make his home in this county until 1901, when he moved up into Adams county, where he is now living, the owner of a farm of eighty-four acres in Jefferson township of that county. To him and his wife were born eleven children, all of whom are living save Elmer, who died at the age of two months, the others (besides the subject of this sketch) being Kenneth, Imo F., Dora D., Freeman, Donald, Herle, Dale, Wilbur and Raymond. Reared on the farm, Sangor K. HUEY completed his schooling in the New Corydon high school and remained at home until after his marriage at the age of twenty-one, when he moved to Portland and there remained for thirteen months, at the end of which time he moved onto the farm on which he is now living in Bearcreek township, this farm of eighty acres belonging to his wife, and here established his home. The farm is well improved and is equipped with an excellent farm plant, the same including an electric lighting installation. In addition to his general farming Mr. HUEY is giving proper attention to the raising of live stock and is doing well in his operations. It was on August 23, 1919, that Sangor K. HUEY was united in marriage to Mrs. Goldie V. ( DAUGHERTY ) GOSS and to this union one child has been born, a son, Joseph Cline HUEY, born on March 18, 1920. Mrs. HUEY was born in the neighboring county of Adams, where she was reared and where she received her schooling, a daughter of William S. and Mary J. ( SIBERY ) DAUGHERTY, the latter of whom was born in Jay county on April 20, 1858, a member of one of the pioneer families here. William S. DAUGHERTY was born in Adams county on November 14, 1854, and became a well-to-do citizen of that county. He and his wife were the parents of eleven children, nine of whom are still living, those besides Mrs. HUEY being Louella G., Lydia J., Viola, Dean, Dulcie, Aubie, Allen and Irene. On April 7, 1917, Goldie V. DAUGHERTY was married to Henry W. GOSS, who was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, April 7. 1858, and who died two days after his marriage. Mr. and Mrs. HUEY have a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 2 out of Bryant and take an interested part in the general social activities of the community in which they live. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.124-125. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HUFFMAN, SAMUEL F

Samuel F. HUFFMAN, a well known retired farmer and substantial landowner, now living at Dunkirk, where he has made his home for more than a decade, was born on a farm in Niles township in the neighboring county of Delaware on February 27, 1851, and thus grew up quite familiar with pioneer conditions in this section. Mr. HUFFMAN is a son of George and Nancy (COX ) HUFFMAN, Ohioans, who were pioneers of this part of Indiana. George HUFFMAN was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, and when a young man entered a tract of eighty acres in Delaware county, Indiana, anc proceeded to clear the same. After his marriage his father gave him an adjacent tract of 160 acres which he had entered from the Government and on this place George HUFFMAN established his home presently supplanting the log house which he had first erected by a more pretentious and permanent house, and was living there when the Civil war broke out. In 1864 he enlisted his services in behalf of the Union cause and was attached to Company A of the 22d regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which command he rendered garrison duty at Indianapolis until the close of the war. Upon the completion of his military service he returned to the farm and continued there his work of development, in time creating an excellent piece of property, and continued to live on the farm until his retirement in 1890 and removal to Jay county, where his last days were spent. In 1898 he was seriously injured in a railway accident and died from the effect of these injuries on December 18 of that year. Samuel F. HUFFMAN was reared on the home farm in Niles township, Delaware county, and received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood. He was thirteen years of age when his father went into the army and thus early he acquired a sense of responsibility in connection with the labors of developing the farm and during the days of his youth was a capable aid to his father in this work. He married when twenty years of age and his father gave him eighty acres of the home place. On this tract he established his home and continued to reside there until his retirement from the farm in 1908 and removal to Dunkirk, where he since has resided. In the meantime he had enlarged his land holdings and he and his son now own 200 acres in Delaware and Blackford counties. It was in 1908 that Mr. HUFFMAN's wife suffered a stroke of partial paralysis, this illness necessitating retirement from the farm. She died at Dunkirk on November 22, 1918. Mrs. HUFFMAN was born Evaline V. BARLEY in Delaware county, and was a daughter of John and Lavina A. ( HAINES ) BARLEY, pioneers of that county. She married Samuel F. HUFFMAN on August 24, 1871, and to that union were born four children, Lloyd, who is living on the home place in Delaware county, George W. and John (deceased), and one who died in infancy. Mr. HUFFMAN is a member of the First Baptist church at Dunkirk and is a member of the Miligrove lodge of the Improved Order of Red Men. Lloyd HUFFMAN, only surviving son of Samuel F. and Evaline V. ( BARLEY ) HUFFMAN, was reared on the home farm in Niles township, Delaware county, and is still living there, having a well improved farm plant. In 1892 he married Nora E. WISE, who also was born in Delaware county, and to this union two children have been born, sons both, Harold and Samuel. In 1917 Harold HUFFMAN married Susan RACER, of Delaware county, and to this union two children have been born, Mary E. and John Lloyd. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.115-116. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HUNT, ROBERT M

Robert M. HUNT, one of the well known farmers of Jackson township, acquired a residence in this county when he was a mere infant and although some years of his life have been spent in the West and in Michigan, he always has regarded Jay county as his home. Mr. HUNT was born on a farm in Preble county, Ohio, February 19, 1867, and is a son of Warner L. and Margaret ( McGILL ) HUNT, who became residents of Jay county in the latter '60s and here spent the remainder of their lives. Warner L. HUNT was born in Wayne county, Indiana, where his parents had settled upon coming from North Carolina to Indiana in pioneer days. He was reared on the home farm in that county and after his marriage lived for awhile over in Preble county, Ohio, but in 1868, he then being twenty-seven years of age, came back into Indiana and settled on a farm of eighty acres which he had bought in Jackson township, this county, and as he developed that farm bought adjacent land until he was the owner of a well kept farm of 108 acres, and on that place spent his last days, one of the useful and influential residents of that community. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, of whom five are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Walter A., Elmer C., Jesse L. and Manford C. HUNT. As noted above, Robert M. HUNT was one year old when his parents settled in this county and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Jackson township, receiving his schooling in the local schools. When nineteen years of age he took a trip West and prospected around quite a bit in the states of Missouri, Kansas and Iowa and then joined one of his elder brothers, who had settled in Michigan, and in this latter state remained for nine years, or until in 1917 when he returned to his old home in Jay county and has since resided here, farming a forty-acre tract in which he has an interest in Jackson township, and is doing well. Mr. HUNT is a Republican and is a member of the local aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.279-280. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

HUTCHENS, WILLIAM H

William H. HUTCHENS, a well known retired merchant, formerly and for years engaged in the grocery business at Portland, where he is still living, is a member of one of the real pioneer families of Jay county, his grandfather, Joel HUTCHENS, who came over here with his family from Ohio, having been one of the first settlers in Noble township, where he cleared an "eighty" and became one of the substantial and influential pioneers of that community. Joel HUTCHENS and his wife were the parents of nine children, two of whom, Sarah and Susan, are still living. One of the sons of this family, Dr. Henry C. HUTCHENS, an honored veteran of the Civil war, who died at his home in Portland in the summer of 1903, was the father of William H. HUTCHENS. Doctor HUTCHENS was born in Ohio and was but a lad when he came to this county with his parents. He was reared on the farm in Noble township and early turned his attention to the study of medicine, completing his studies in that connection under the preceptorship of an old physician at Ft. Recovery. When the Civil war broke out he enlisted his services in behalf of the Union cause and went to the front as a corporal of Company E, Eighty-fourth regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving with that gallant command until the close of the war and thus participated in numerous of the important engagements of the war. Upon the completion of his military service Doctor HUTCHENS returned to this county and became engaged in the practice of his profession. About 1883 he located at Portland, where he continued actively engaged in practice the remainder of his life, his death occurring there in July, 1903. Doctor HUTCHENS married Sarah A. CUNNINGHAM, a member of one of the old families of Jay county, and he and his wife were the parents of nine children, of whom six are living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Mahalia. Huldah, Anna C., Orenda and John E., the deceased members of this family having been Jacob, Mary and George HUTCHENS. William H. HUTCHENS, son of Dr. Henry C. and Sarah A. ( CUNNINGHAM ) HUTCHENS, was born in Madison township, this county, and was but an infant when his father went away to war. He received his schooling in the schools of Madison and Noble townships and as a young man became engaged in association with his uncle in the business of "huckstering" throughout this section of the state, avocation he followed for about three years, or until his marriage, when he became engaged in farming. For five years he made his home on a farm and then, in 1889, he opened a grocery, and general store at Brice, at the same time receiving the commission as postmaster at that place. A year later, with a view to seeking a wider field for his operations, Mr. HUTCHENS disposed of his interests at Brice and moved to Portland, where he bought a grocery store and was there for a year engaged in the grocery business, at the end of that time taking employment with the wholesale grocery house of the Hood Company at Portland, with which concern he remained until 1907, when he again engaged in the grocery business on his own account and continued thus engaged, proprietor of one of the most popular groceries m Portland, until his retirement from business in 1920. Mr. HUTCHENS is a Democrat and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political matters. It was in 1880 that William H. HUTCHENS was united in marriage to America C. WOTEN, who also was born in this county, daughter of John and Mary WOTEN, of Noble township, and to this union two children have been born, namely: Grace E., who married C. L. CHITTUM, of Jackson, Mich., and has three children, Harold, William J. and Herbert C., and Clarence, who married Inez WARE, who also was born in this county, and continues to make his home in Portland. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.106-107. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.


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