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Jay County Indiana Biographies Surnames I, J, K & L


IRELAND, JACOB

Jacob IRELAND, a well-known and substantial farmer and land owner of Jay county, a veteran of the Civil war, now living practically retired at his home in Jackson, township, is a native "Buckeye," but has been a resident of this county for many years. Mr. IRELAND was born in Allen county, Ohio, August 27, 1839, and is a son of Charles and Catherine (SHOBE) IRELAND, whose last days were spent in that county. Charles IRELAND was born in Maryland, where he remained until in the days of his young manhood, when he came West and entered from the Government a tract of eighty acres of land in Allen county, Ohio, later increasing this to 120 acres, established his home there and there spent the remainder of his life, one of the useful pioneers of that section. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, five of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having four sisters, Christina, Elizabeth, Lucinda and Eliza. Reared on the home farm in Ohio, Jacob IRELAND was living there when the Civil war broke out. In 1861 he enlisted his services as a soldier of the Union and went to the front as a member of Company B of the 81st regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for more than three years. Mr. IRELAND served in the Western army and participated in the battle of Shiloh and was with Sheridan on the march to the sea and during the siege of Atlanta. Upon the completion of his military service he returned home and resumed farming, but presently married and went to Kansas and hornesteaded a quarter section of land, on which he made his home for six years, at the end of which time he returned to Ohio. Two years later he came over into Indiana and traded his Kansas homestead tract for an eighty-acre farm in Jackson township, this county. On this latter place he made his home for twenty-five years and then sold the place and bought the sixty acre farm in this same township on which he is now living-, retired, in his eighty-third year. He and his wife are members of the Sugar Grove Methodist Episcopal church and are Republicans. It was in 1865, not long after leaving the army, that Jacob IRELAND was united in marriage to Martha DeCAMP, who also was born in Ohio, daughter of John and Lydia (WILLIAMS) DeCAMP, and to this union five children have been born, Edgar, Albertus, William, Charles and John, all of whom live in Jay county. Edgar IRELAND married Margaret MEREDITH and has eight children, Frederick, Dewey, Lewis, Jacob, Walter, Arthur, Mary and Clara. Mary IRELAND married Floyd SWEENEY and has three children. William IRELAND married Alice CHITTUM and has eight children, Milo, Frank, Ray, Flossie, Nellie, Lena, Lucille and Reva. Milo IRELAND married Muriel LEWIS and has three children, Bernice, Naomi and Ladema. Frank IRELAND married Zorpha PENSINGER and has two children, Willard and Catherine. Flossie IRELAND married Harry HAFFNER and has two children, Dorothy and Floyd. Nellie IRELAND married Leslie PENSINGER and has one child, Maxine, and Lena IRELAND married Ernest SHEWALTER and has one child, Wilma. Charles IRELAND married Alma MALLARD, who died, leaving one child, a daughter, Addie, after which he married Ora MYERS. To this latter union one child was born, a son, Gerald. Addie IRELAND married Grant HARPER and has two children, Margaret and Wilma. John IRELAND married Lavina ULM and has two children, Millard and Harold. It thus will be noted that Mr. and Mrs. IRELAND have twenty grandchildren and fifteen great-grandchildren.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.333-334. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

IRELAND, William M

William M. IRELAND, one of Jackson township's well known and progressive farmers and landowners, is a native of Kansas but has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his boyhood. Mr. IRELAND was born on a homestead farm on the plains of Kansas on April 15, 1870, and is a son of Jacob and Martha (D'CAMP) IRELAND, both of whom were born in Ohio. Jacob IRELAND, an honored veteran of the Civil war, now living retired on his farm in Jackson township, this county, and of whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere in this work, was married shortly after his return from the army and then went to Kansas and homesteaded a farm, where he remained until the late '70s when be came back to Ohio and from there on over into Indiana and traded his Kansas homestead place for a farm in Jackson township, this county, and has ever since been a resident of this county, now living retired in his eighty-third year. To him and his wife were born five sons, the subject of this sketch having four brothers, Edgar, Albert, Charles and John IRELAND, all of whom reside in this county. William M. IRELAND was nine years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents and he was reared on a farm here in Jackson township, receiving his schooling in the neighborhood schools. He married at the age of twenty-two and began farming on his own account, renting a part of his father's farm, but a year or two later moved over into Bearcreek township and rented a farm of 160 acres there. A year later he moved, back into Jackson township and rented a farm of 120 acres there and established his home. Eight years later he bought an "eighty" of this place and has continued to reside there, in the meantime having made numerous substantial improvements on the place and now has an admirable farm plant. Mr. and Mrs. IRELAND are members of the Sugar Grove Methodist Episcopal church and are Republicans. It was on October 10, 1892, that William M. IRELAND was united in marriage to Alice CHITTUM, who was born in this county, daughter of Joseph and Mahalia (BENNETT) CHITTUM, and to this union eight children have been born, Flossie, Milo, Nellie, Frank, Lena, Ray, Lucille and Reva, the last three of whom are at home with their parents. Flossie IRELAND married Harry HAFFNER, of this county, and has two children, Dorothy and Floyd. Milo IRELAND married Muriel LEWIS and has three children, Bernice, Naomi and Ladema. Nellie IRELAND married Leslie PENSINGER and has two children, a daughter, Maxine, and a son, Don. Frank IRELAND married Zorpha PENSINGER, a sister of Leslie PENSINGER, and has two children, Willard and Catherine, and Lena IRELAND married Ernest SHEWALTER, also of this county, and has one child, a daughter, Wilma. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.378-379. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

JACK, MARION

MARION JACK, former representative from Jay county in the lower house of the Indiana General Assembly, former deputy treasurer of Jay county and in other ways actively identified with public affairs, a substantial landowner of Wayne township, now living retired in Portland, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Mr. JACK was born on a farm in the near vicinity of Ridgeville, in the neighboring county of Randolph, March 25, 1851, and is a son of Robert M. and Asenath ( ODLE ) JACK, who later became residents of Jay county, but whose last days were spent at Ridgeville. Robert M. JACK was born in Warren county, Ohio, and was twelve years of age when his parents, Robert L. and Sarah Elizabeth ( FERRIS ) JACK, left Ohio and came over to take up some of the newer lands in Indiana. Robert L. JACK entered a tract of 400 acres in the vicinity of Ridgeville in Randolph county. On this place he established his home, cleared the tract and became one of the substantial and influential pioneers of that neighborhood. On that pioneer farm Robert M. JACK grew to manhood and when twenty-one years of age was given a 100 acre farm by his father, on which place he established his home after his marriage and continued to live there for about ten years, at the end of which time, in the middle '50s, he contracted a severe case of "Kansas fever" and with his family moved to the Sunflower state, which had just about that time been organized as a separate territory, though it was not admitted as a state until 1861, but after a year's experience amid the turbulence which then marked that territory was content to return to Indiana and settle down on his father-in-law's farm near Deerfield. Two years later he came up into Jay county and bought a farm of 130 acres in the neighborhood of Collett, settling there on March 1, 1861. He cleared that place and remained there until 1874, when he sold his farm and moved to Ridgeville. He later went to Oregon, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring there in 1894, he then being seventy-five years of age. Robert M. JACK and wife were the parents of seven children, all of whom are living save two, Harry, who died on December 26, 1907, and Elizabeth, who died on September 3, 1911, those besides the subject of this sketch being Edna, Cora Alice, Elmer R. and Rebecca Jane. Reared on the farm, Marion lack completed his schooling in Ridgeville College and early began teaching school, a vocation he followed during the winters for a period of thirty-eight years, his summers being occupied on his father's farm in Pike township, where he made his home after his marriage in 1874, his father retiring from the farm in that year. In the meantime Mr. JACK was giving his thoughtful attention to local civic affairs and was coming to be recognized as one of the leaders in the Republican party in this county. In 1900 he was elected to represent this county in the state Legislature and in 1902 was his party's nominee for the office of county recorder, but was defeated along with the rest of the ticket in that year. In 1903 he bought a place in Wayne township and moved from his Pike township farm, accepting the position of deputy to the county treasurer, and served in that position until 1907. Upon leaving the court house Mr. JACK gave his full attention to the affairs of his Wayne township farm and remained there until his retirement from the farm in 1914 and removal to Portland, where he has since resided and where he and his wife are very comfortably situated. They are members of the United Brethren church at Portland. It was on March 8, 1874, that Marion JACK was united in marriage to Elma RHODES, of New Mt. Pleasant, and to this union five sons were born, Oren Leroy, who died on December 12, 1888; Forest A., Harry, Merle R. and Ivan R. Forest A. JACK has been twice married. To his union with Letta AYRES, one child was born, a daughter, Dona. His wife and daughter both died and he married his deceased wife's sister, Margaret AYRES. Harry JACK, who is living in Wayne township, married Thetis FRAZEE, also of this county, and has two children, Gerald and Marion. Merle R. JACK, who is now living in Canton, Ohio, married Pearl WATERS, also of this county, and has three children, Elma, Iona R. and Ralph. Ivan R. JACK married Mabel GEORGE, of this county, and has three children, Ivan Robert, Maxine L. and Dorothy M., it thus being noted that Mr. and Mrs. JACK have eight grandchildren, in all of whom they take much delight. Mrs. JACK is a member of one of the real pioneer families of Jay county, her parents, John and Susanna RHODES, having settled in Jefferson township in 1837. Both were born in Columbiana county, Ohio, the former in 1815 and the latter in 1819. Upon coming to this county John RHODES entered a "forty" in Jefferson township and there established his home. Besides farming, he also was a carpenter and did much of the early building thereabouts. He also was active in public affairs and for years served as justice of the peace in and for his home township. He and his wife had eight children, of whom four are still living, those besides Mrs. JACK being Mrs. Elizabeth J. KIDDER, Mrs. Lydia C. FINCH and John A. RHODES. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.76-77. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

JAQUA, ALONZO L

ALONZO L. JAQUA, a veteran real estate dealer at Portland and for years recognized as one of the leaders in that line in this county, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Portland since he was three years of age and has thus been a witness to and a participant in the amazing development that has marked that city during the past half century and more. Mr. JAQUA was born on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, March 6, 1850, son of James B. and Eliza J. ( AVERY ) JAQUA, the latter of whom was born at Nashville, Tenn., but had been a resident of Ohio since the days of her childhood, her parents having moved up from Tennessee to get away from slavery conditions in that state. James B. JAQUA was a member of one of the real pioneer families of Ohio, his grandfather, Gamaliel JAQUA, a native of Connecticut and a soldier of the war of the Revolution, having settled in Preble county about the time Ohio was admitted to statehood and there spent his last days. James B. JAQUA was a farmer in Darke county, a landowner and a practicing attorney. In 1853 he disposed of his interests in Ohio and moved with his family to Portland, where he established himself in the practice of law and where he spent the remainder of his life, for many years having been regarded as one of the leaders of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, as is set out elsewhere in this work. His wife died on November 24, 1871, and he survived her nearly thirty-five years, his death occurring at Portland on May 13, 1906. They were the parents of nine children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Alice (deceased), Carrie E. (deceased), Genevra I., who married Nathan B. HAWKINS, Judson A., Minnie Z., Carl W., Pearl R. (deceased) and Frank B. Reared at Portland, to which place, as noted above, he had moved with his parents when but three years of age, Alonzo L. JAQUA received his schooling in the schools of that city, completing the same at the old Liber College. When twenty-five years of age he became engaged at Portland in the manufacture of brick and was thus engaged for several years, at the end of which time he became engaged in the retail lumber business, his lumber yards occupying the site at present occupied by the Jay County Lumber Company. After four years he retired from the lumber business, but several years later again became engaged in that line and was for four years again thus occupied. In 1885 Mr. JAQUA sold his lumber yard and became engaged in the real estate business, which line he ever since has followed and in which he has been quite successful, long having been regarded as one of the leading realty dealers in this part of the state, his offices in South Meridian street having been the scene of many an important realty transfer. On September 5, 1893, Alonzo L. JAQUA was united in marriage to Louelle OSWALD, who was born at Ft. Recovery, Ohio, but who was reared in Portland, where she completed her schooling in the old normal school, her parents having moved to Portland from Ohio when she was a child. Mrs. JAQUA is a daughter of Louis and Jane ( CURTIS ) OSWALD the former of whom was for years a merchant at Portland. Louis OSWALD and wife were the parents of six children, three of whom are still living, Mrs. JAQUA and her sisters, Magdalena and Sarah, Her brother, Louis G. OSWALD, formerly well known in Portland, died at San Antonio, Tex., at the age of thirty-nine years. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.74-75. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

JAY, MILTON

Milton T. JAY, M. D., of Portland, editor in chief of this History of Jay County, for years one of the best known physicians in eastern Indiana, a specialist in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, former president of the Delaware District Medical Society, formerly and for years secretary of the Jay County Medical Society, former president of the Indiana State Board of Optometry, formerly and for years secretary of the Jay county board of health, a former member of the school hoard for the city of Portland, a member of the draft board for Jay county during the time of America's participation in the World war and in other ways for years an active and influential factor in local civic and social affairs, is a native son of Jay county, a fact of which he never has ceased to be proud, and has been a resident of this county all his life save for the period spent away in college. Doctor JAY was born one mile east of the village of Bryant, in Bearcreek township, this county, October 25, 1867 and is a son of Dr. James C. and Ann ( CONKLIN ) JAY, both natives of Ohio. the latter born in the vicinity of Tippecanoe City, in Miami county, that state, in 1827. The late Dr. James C. JAY, an honored veteran of the Civil war and in his generation one of the best known physicians in this region, was born in the vicinity of Laurel, in Darke county, Ohio, in 1824 and his professional education was received at the Eclectic Medical College at Cincinnati. He married in Ohio and not long afterward, in 1854, he then being thirty years of age, came over into Jay county and established himself in practice in the Bloomfield neighborhood in Bearcreek township, later moving to a point one mile east of Bryant, where his last days were spent, and was living there when the Civil war broke out. In 1863 he enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and was appointed a hospital steward, but shortly afterward was commissioned assistant surgeon of the 119th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which afterward was mounted and became known as the 7th Indiana Cavalry, Col. John P. C. SHANKS commanding, and with this gallant command served until the close of the war. Upon the completion of his military service Doctor JAY returned to his home in this county and resumed his practice in the Bryant neighborhood, where he died, as is noted in the chronicles of the time, from disease contracted in the army, April 9. 1881, leaving his widow and five children. His widow followed him to the grave within less than a month, her death occurring on May 2, 1881. When the veterans of the Civil war living in the vicinity of Bryant presently (in 1887) came to organize a post of the Grand Army of the Republic in that village they named it James C. JAY Post, No. 448, in honor of their comrade's memory, for they had loved him well. Milton T. JAY was but thirteen years of age when he and his four sisters were left doubly orphaned and by force of circumstances he thereafter was compelled to rely pretty largely upon his own resources for a livelihood. He, however, maintained his attendance in the local schools, and during his youth was variously employed, working in factories, on the farm, or clerking in stores, and presently entered upon an apprenticeship to a wagon maker and for a year after completing this apprenticeship worked at the trade of wagon making. Meanwhile he had been pursuing studies with a view eventually to following in his father's footsteps as a physician and preliminary to a medical course was in good time enabled to enter DePauw University, where for two years he pursued the scientific course preparatory to entrance on his final medical studies and in September, 1888, was matriculated at the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati. In that same month he was married and thus had a valued helpmate during the time of his college course. On March 6, 1890, Doctor JAY was graduated from the Ohio Medical College and on the day following, March 7, 1890, opened an office for the practice of his profession at Portland, he having made arrangements in advance for this step. For two years the Doctor continued engaged in general practice and then took up the special practice upon which he since has been engaged, this having particular reference to the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. In the spring of 1901 he took a post-graduate course in the Post-Graduate Medical School in New York city. Doctor Jay's service as an optornetrist has given him a much wider than local reputation along that line and from April, 1909, to May,. 1913, he served as a member of the Indiana state board of optometry, during this period of service serving twice as president of the board and one term as secretary. He became a member of the Jay County Medical Society in March, 1890, and for ten years served as secretary of that society. He also is a member of the Delaware District Medical Society, of which he was president in 1920, and is likewise affiliated with the Indiana State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. Doctor Jay is a Republican and has long been retarded as one of the leaders of that party in this district. For four years (1894-98) he rendered public service as secretary of the Jay county board of health and from June 20, 1906, to April, 1909, served as a member of the Portland city school board. During the time of America's participation in the World war Doctor Jay rendered conspicuous local service. In July, 1917, he was appointed a member of the local draft board for Jay county and until March 15, 1918, served as president of that board and thereafter until the work of the board was closed on April 1, 1919, served as member and chief clerk of the board, as is set out more fully in the report of the activities of this board in the World war history section of this work in Volume I. The Doctor has long given his special attention to matters involving local historical research, for years one of the most active members of the Jay County Historical Society, and it was a matter of much local congratulation when it was announced in the spring of 1921 that he had undertaken the critical and not wholly untrying duty of acting as editor in chief of this History of Jay County, a service for which it is believed future generations in this community will hold him in pleasant remembrance. In this connection and in deference to the Doctor's innate modesty, it is but proper to say that this brief review of his life was not written by him, but is the work of a friend who knows how ardently the Doctor is interested in questions pertaining to the history of this section of Indiana and particularly of Jay county and how deeply he is concerned in all movements having to do with the compilation and preservation of local historical data. The Doctor is a member of the Indiana State Historical Society and his contributions in that behalf in the archives of the Indiana state historical commission are regarded as valuable. It was on September 5, 1888, that Dr. Milton T. JAY was united in marriage to Mary E. HARRIS, who was born in the vicinity of Lynn, in the neighboring county of Randolph, a daughter of Jesse C. and Sarah E. ( BOWEN ) HARRIS, and. whose acquaintance with the Doctor was begun while she was a student in the old Eastern Indiana Normal School at Portland, and to this union one child has been born, a son, James C. JAY, now a law student in the legal department of Butler College at Indianapolis. James C. JAY, who bears the name of his honored grandfather, was born at Portland on August 29, 1899, and following his graduation from the Portland high school took a course in the International Business College at Ft. Wayne, from which he also was graduated. In the meantime he had been giving his serious attention to the study of law and thus equipped by preparatory study entered the law school at Indianapolis and in the following year was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court. In 1915 James C. Jay served as a page in the House of Representatives of the Indiana General Assembly and has since taken an interest in practical politics that has caused him to be recognized as one of the junior leaders of the Republican party in this county and he is now serving as committeeman for that party for the Eighth precinct of Wayne township. When under the sponsorship of the Mississinewa chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution at Portland in 1920 a compilation, under the general editorial direction of Dr. Milton T. JAY, of the history of the various war activities in Jay county was undertaken, the task of typing the manuscript of this huge compilation was performed by James C. JAY. One copy of this work (substantially bound) is in the archives of the Indiana Historical Commission at Indianapolis, a second copy is on file in the law library of the Jay Circuit Court at Portland and a reproduction of this invaluable service to the people of Jay county is carried in Volume I of this present work. Portraits of Doctor Jay and of his son are carried in Vol. I, facing page 269, the beginning of Part III of that volume. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.324-327. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

JAY, ORLISTUS

Orlistus JAY, the well known grain, hay and coal merchant, formerly and for many years operator of a string of grain elevators and mills, one of the most prominent factors in the grain business in this section of the state, is a "Buckeye" by birth, but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of his young manhood, his active career having been spent in Redkey, where he started in business and where he is now living. Mr. JAY was born in Miami county, Ohio, and is a son of the Rev. Thomas and Sarah ( YOUNT ) JAY, the former of whom was for many years an influential minister of the Friends church, as well as a substantial landowner, a descendant of William JAY, who was a brother of John JAY, the illustrious American statesman who was the first chief justice of the United States Supreme Court. The Rev. Thomas JAY and his wife were the parents of ten children, four of whom, Oliver, Mary, Anna and Clara, are deceased, the survivors, besides the subject of this sketch being Elizabeth, Webster, Ellen, Belle and Emma. Under the roof of his parents and in the public schools of his native county, Orlistus JAY was prepared for college and then was sent to Earlham College, the sterling old Quaker school at Richmond, Ind. In the meantime Mr. JAY had been giving his thoughtful attention to the development of the grain business and upon leaving college he came up into JAY county and started in business at Redkey, presently erecting there the first modern grain elevator built in that city. As his business expanded, and under the methods he applied to the business it did rapidly expand, he branched out into other fields, created a stock company for the more systematic direction of the business and erected grain elevators at Elwood, Portland, Ft. Recovery, Blaine and Mulberry, in the latter place also erecting a flour mill, and so continued actively and successfully engaged in the grain business, head of the JAY Grain Company, until his retirement from that company. Since disposing of his interest in the JAY Grain Company, Mr. JAY has continued to make his home at Redkey, where lie and his wife are very comfortably situated, and where he is now operating his grain elevator, coal yard and hay barn. It was in April, 1885, that Orlistus JAY was united in marriage to Emma BAKER, who was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, daughter of David and Janie ( READ ) BAKER, the former of whom, an officer of the Union army during the Civil war, was engaged in the dry goods business at Phillipsburg, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. JAY have one child, a daughter, Nilah. who was born at Redkey and whose schooling was completed at DePauw University. On June 19, 1910, Nilah JAY was united in marriage to Charles WHITEHAIR, and to this union three children have been born, Jay, Janie and Paul. Mr. WHITEHAIR is a traveling secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association and was for two years that association's representative in India. Mr. and Mrs. JAY are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Redkey and have for years taken an earnest and active interest in the affairs of the church. Mrs. JAY long served as secretary of the Missionary Society of the church and Mr. JAY was a member of the board of trustees of the church at the time the handsome new church edifice was erected. He is a Republican and has ever taken an interested part in local civic affairs, having served as a member of the school board at the time the present commodious school building was erected in 1893. For many years Mr. JAY was one of the leaders in the prohibition movement and in common with all who thus served as pioneers in that movement rejoices at the constitutional inhibition placed by the people upon the liquor traffic.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of JAY County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.233-234. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

JEFFRIES, JAMES B

James B. JEFFRIES, a well known farmer and landowner of Bearcreek township and proprietor of a well improved farm on rural mail route No. 1 out of Bryant, where he makes his home, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of this county for years. Mr. JEFFRIES was born on a farm in Fairview county, Ohio, July 20, 1859, and is a son of Jerome and Lydia ( EMICK ) JEFFRIES, the latter of whom was born in Virginia. Jerome JEFFRIES also was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, a member of one of the old families there, and for some time after his marriage made his home there, later moving to Licking county, where he became the owner of a farm of ninety-five acres and where he died on August 5, 1921. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Alice, Mary, William, Carrie, George, Charles, Alvin, Calvin and Ida. Reared on the farm, James B. JEFFRIES received his schooling in the schools of Fairfield and Licking counties. As a young man he took a notion to do some prospecting in the West and for two years spent his time in Kansas, but then returned to Ohio and began farming for himself, he then' being twenty-four years of age. For four years he rented land and then bought a "forty" in Mercer county, Ohio, where he established his home after his marriage at the age of thirty. For fourteen years Mr. JEFFRIES carried on his farming operations on that place and then he sold it and moved over into Indiana, buying here the eighty-acre farm on which he is now living in Bearcreek township, this county. Since taking possession of this place Mr. JEFFRIES has made numerous substantial improvements, including the erection of a silo and has a well equipped farm plant, he and his family being very comfortably situated. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical church of Bearcreek township. It was on February 14, 1889, while living in Ohio, that James B. JEFFRIES was united in marriage to Clara ROW, who was born in Knox county, that state, but was reared in Licking county, a daughter of Aaron and Sarah ( BURNER ) ROW, both of whom were born in the latter county, and to this union have been born two children, Grace and William, both of whom are married and living in Bearcreek township. Grace JEFFRIES married William WHEELER, a Bearcreek township farmer, and has four children, Mary, Mabel, Homer and Grover WHEELER. William JEFFRIES, who also is farming in Bearcreek township, married Amelia ROBARD and has one child, Cloida W. JEFFRIES. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.162-163. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

JELLISON, CHARLES

Charles JELLISON, a former member of the advisory board for Jefferson township and proprietor of a farm on rural mail route No. 2 out of Ridgeville, was born on a farm in Pike township, this county, on April 10, 1867, and is a son of Ephraim and Mary E. ( HESTER ) JELLISON, who had come up into this county from Randolph county. Ephraim JELLISON was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and was two years of age when his parents left that state with their family in 1839, and came to Indiana, locating in Randolph county. In this county Ephraim JELLISON grew to manhood and became a farmer. For some time after his marriage he rented a farm in Randolph county and then came up into lay county, settling in Pike township, where he lived until 1889, when he bought a tract of eighty acres in Jefferson township and on this latter place made his home until his retirement from the farm and removal to Ridgeville, where his last days were spent. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, of whom seven are still living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Mary E. and Eva, and four brothers, James, John A., Louis and Joseph JELLISON. Reared on the home farm in this county, Charles JELLISON received his schooling in the neighborhood schools. Upon his father's retirement from the farm he bought the home acres in Jefferson township and has since been farming the same, having established his home there after his marriage in the fall of 1899. Mr. JELLISON has a well improved farm of eighty acres and he and his family are very comfortably situated. They are members of the Christian church at Powers. Mr. JELLISON is a Democrat and served for some time as a member of the advisory board for Jefferson township. It was on October 4, 1899, that Charles JELLISON was united in marriage to Rana HESTON, who also was born in Jay county, a daughter of John and Margaret HESTON, and to this union two children have been born, Mary M., and Paul. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.179-180. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

JONES, GILFORD H

Gilford H. JONES, well known undertaker and veteran merchant at Redkey, dealer in furniture and carpets in addition to carrying on his undertaking establishment, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Mr. JONES was born at Francesville, in Pulaski county, on February 27, 1865, and is a son of William R. and Sarah ( STOUT ) JONES, both of whom were born and reared in the vicinity of Dupont, in Jefferson county, this state, and were married at Madison. William R. JONES, who formerly and for years was engaged in business at Redkey, under the firm name of W. R. JONES & Sons, and who is now living retired at Francesville, established his home on an eighty-acre farm in the immediate vicinity of Medaryville, in Pulaski county, after his marriage and for four years resided there. He in the meantime had been acquiring somewhat extensive land interests in the vicinity of the neighboring village of Francesville and presently moved to the latter place, where in 1877 he established a hardware store, which he continued to operate until 1900 when he moved the stock to Redkey and consolidated it with the stock of a furniture store at the latter place, for which he had traded a 120-acre farm, at the same time taking his sons, Gilf. H., Charles C. and John C., into partnership in the business, the firm operating under the name of W. R. JONES & Sons, and also carrying on an undertaking business. In 1891 this store was destroyed by fire and a new building was erected on the site, the same now occupied by the JONES brothers. On March 1, 1921, the long existing partnership was dissolved, Charles C. JONES taking over the hardware line and Gilford H. JONES taking the undertaking department and the furniture and allied lines. William R. JONES is now living at Francesville, in the immediate neighborhood of which place he owns a 360-acre farm. His wife died on March 11, 1914. They were the parents of three sons, the two mentioned above and John C. JONES, who died on November 17, 1917. Reared at Francesville, Gilford H. JONES received his early schooling in the schools of that village and supplemented the same by a course in a business college at Lafayette in the winter of 1884-85. Thus better equipped for the mercantile career upon which he had determined, he became associated with his father and brothers in business and on July 2, 1886, located at Redkey. In the following fall he married and established his home at Redkey and has ever since been a resident of that place, now one of the oldest merchants continuously engaged in business in that city. As noted above, Mr. JONES is now giving his whole attention to the furniture and undertaking end of the business with which he has so long been connected and has associated with him his son, Howard W. JONES, who gives his special attention to the undertaking department, representing the third generation of this family in business in Redkey, this establishment being one of the commercial "landmarks" in that city. This establishment now occupies two floors, 40x80 feet, and a balcony for furniture, besides one floor, 20x80 feet, which is given over to the display of carpets and the undertaking department. When in the summer of 1886 Mr. JONES became established in business at Redkey the store occupied a room 18x60 feet in dimensions. He has now been engaged in this line of business longer than any other individual in Jay county. It was on November 17, 1886, that Gilford H. JONES was united in marriage to Stella A. REISH, who was born at Francesville, daughter of Solomon and Nancy REISH, who were among the early residents of that place, and to this union six children have been born, four of whom, Howard W., Nina M., Marguerite and Helen, are living, Ralph having died at the age of nine years and five months and Bernice D., at the age of two years. Nina M. JONES married Floyd D. BURCHARD, a merchant of Rensselaer, Ind. and has one child, a daughter, Winifred. Howard W. JONES, who, as noted above, is now assisting his father in the business at Redkey, married Tyrah STEED. During the time this country was taking part in the World war he was a student at Chicago University and was attached to the S.A.T.C. of that institution. Gilford H. JONES and his family are Republicans. Mr. JONES is a 32d degree Mason and Knight Templar, affiliated with the blue lodge at Redkey, the commandery at Muncie and the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite at Indianapolis. He also is affiliated with the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Redkey.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.148-150. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

JONES, HIRAM H

Hiram H. JONES, M. D., a veteran of the World war, former coroner of Jay county and one of the best known physicians and surgeons in this county, with offices at Salamonia, where he has been engaged in practice ever since he entered upon his professional work, with the exception of the period spent in the service of the army during the time of America's participation in the World war, is a native son of Jay county and is a member of one of the real pioneer families of this county. Doctor JONES was born on a farm in Penn township on September 15, 1885, and is a son of Hiram G. and Rebecca ( SULLIVAN ) JONES, both of whom were born in that same township, the latter a daughter of James A. and Rachel ( McBRIDE ) SULLIVAN, pioneers of that township. James A. SULLIVAN was a native of North Carolina. He died at his home in this county in 1874. His wife was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and died in 1891. Hiram G. JONES, who died at his home in this county in 1915, was born in Penn township on June 30, 1842, and was the last born of the ten children born to John D. and Lydia ( VORE ) JONES, pioneers of this county and further and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Both John D. JONES and his wife were Pennsylvanians, the former born in York county in 1793, and the latter, in Bedford county in 1797. She died in February, 1870, and he survived for nearly six years, his death occurring in January, 1876. They were married in Pennsylvania and not long afterward moved to Ohio and settled in Clinton county, later coming over into Indiana and locating at Richmond, where they remained until they came to Jay county about the time this county was formally organized in 1836. John D. JONES entered from the Government a quarter section of timber land in Penn township, the patent for which bears date of August 1, 1837, and on this place established his home. He also entered other lands in this county and early became recognized as one of the influential pioneers of that neighborhood. The title to that original quarter section of the old JONES farm still remains in the family, now held by Francis L. CROWE, who married Alida JONES, a sister of Doctor JONES and a granddaughter of the pioneer. Hiram G. JONES grew to manhood on that pioneer farm, the place where he was born, and after his marriage established his home there, presently buying from the other heirs 100 acres of the original tract. It was on December 19, 1866, that he was united in marriage to Rebecca SULLIVAN, who was born in Penn township in 1845. To that union were born eight children, all of whom are living save two, Minnie L., who was teaching school at the age of seventeen years at the time of her death in 1885, and Mrs. Lydia V. EMMONS, who also was a teacher in the schools of this county for some years before her marriage to E. E. EMMONS, who then was a teacher in the Pennville schools. The other members of this family besides Doctor JONES are Edna J., Mrs. CROWE (mentioned above), Warren W., Chella M. and Dewie H. Reared on the home farm in Penn township, Doctor JONES received his elementary schooling in the old JONES school house (district No. 7) and then entered the Pennville high school, from which he was graduated in 1903. The next year he took a post-graduate course in the Portland high school and received a diploma from that school in 1904. During the two following winters he taught school in Penn township and then entered Indiana University at Bloomington, his studies there being directed with a view to furthering his study of medicine, he early having devoted himself to the medical profession. His studies at the university were carried on during the years 1906-8, after which he resumed teaching for a period and was thus engaged for four years, teaching one term in Jackson township, one term in Penn township and two terms in Madison township. In 1912, he entered the Medical College of Indiana University at Indianapolis and in 1915, was graduated from that institution. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor JONES returned to Jay county and on December 1, 1915, opened an office for the practice of his profession at Salamonia, where he has since been located with the exception of the time spent in army service. On June 18, 1918, Dr. Hiram H. JONES received a commission as a first lieutenant in the Medical Corps of the United States army; on July 7 was sent to Camp Beauregard, where he remained until September I, when he was transferred to Camp. Hancock and attached to Base Hospital 98 as a surgeon. From that camp this unit presently was transferred to Camp Merrit for intensive training for overseas service and on November 12, the Doctor with this detail sailed for France, landing at Brest on November 22. A week later he went to Paris with Base Hospital 98 and three weeks later was assigned to the station at Lourdes. A month later this unit was sent to Limoges to relieve Base Hospital 32 and from that station Doctor JONES was sent on special detail to Bordeaux. Two weeks later he rejoined his detail at Limoges and there remained until May 12, 1919, when he was sent back to Bourdeaux as medical officer of the 32nd Engineers. With this command the Doctor remained until May 27, when he sailed for the United States, arriving here on Tune 9. From Newport News he was detailed to Camp Taylor and there received his discharge on June 17, 1919. Upon completing his military service Doctor JONES returned to Salamonia and resumed his practice. The Doctor has taken an earnest interest in the promotion of soldier welfare movements, was a helpful factor in the organization of the David Whipple Post, No. 279, of the American Legion and is the present (1921) commander of that post. He is a Republican and in 1916, was elected coroner of Jay county and in. 1918 was re-elected to that office, thus serving two terms. The Doctor is a member of the local and state medical societies and of the American Medical Association and is a Freemason, a member of Pennville Lodge No. 212, Free and Accepted Masons. He also is affiliated with the local lodge of the Junior Order of the United American Mechanics at Boundary. On November 17, 1915, not long after his graduation from medical college. Dr. Hiram H, JONES was united in marriage to Zillah P. HAWKINS, of Portland, a daughter of the Hon. Nathan B. and Genevra ( JAQUA ) HAWKINS, concerning whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere in this volume under the head of "The Hawkins Family," and to this union one child has been born, a son, Howard H., born on May 31, 1919. Mrs. JONES was graduated from the Portland high school with the class of 1904. She and the Doctor have a pleasant home at Salamonia and take an interested part in the general social activities of that delightful neighborhood.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.212-214. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

KAVANAUGH, WILLIAM H

William H. KAVANAUGH, proprietor of a public garage and general taxicab business at Portland, where he has made his home since 1914, was formerly and for years engaged in the newspaper business, but with the development of the automobile industry departed from that line and entered the rapidly developing field in which he since has been engaged and is doing well. Mr. KAVANAUGH was born in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, October 25, 1870, and is a son of Thomas and Jennie ( HENSON ) KAVANAUGH. He supplemented the schooling received in the schools of that city by a course in a business college there and also took a preliminary course in the study of law, but did not complete his studies along that line, instead becoming interested in newspaper work and as a young man became engaged in the circulation department of the Dayton (Ohio) News. He presently was promoted to the position of manager of that department and remained at Dayton until 1898, when he went to Cincinnati and was there further engaged in newspaper work for two years, at the end of which time he accepted a proposition to take charge of the state circulation force of one of the Indianapolis newspapers. For three years he was thus engaged and then he branched out on his own account and for eleven years thereafter was engaged throughout Indiana and Ohio in installing systems for the increase of circulation in the offices of county seat newspapers in those states. During this time Mr. KAVANAUGH had formed the pleasant acquaintance of the city of Portland and when he presently made up his mind to "settle down" and acquire a permanent residence his inclination turned him in this direction. He had been noting with interest the rapidly developing field opened up by the general use of automobiles and upon taking up his residence in Portland opened there a public garage, to which he presently added a line of taxicabs, and he has since been quite successfully engaged there in that line, his place of business on North Meridian street being one of the best known public garages in this section of Indiana. On June 21, 1900, William H. KAVANAUGH was united in marriage to Catherine FLORA, who was born in Dayton, Ohio, but was reared at Bluffton, Ind., to which place her parents, John and Laura ( CHRISTMAN ) FLORA, had moved when she was a child. Mr. KAVANAUGH is a Republican and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having become affiliated with that order at Marion, Ind. Mrs. KAVANAUGH is a member of the Daughters of Rebekah, to which order she became attached at Winfield, Kans. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.166. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

KEENE, R E

R. E. KEENE, manager of the plant of the Jay County Lumber Company and one of the best known lumber men in this county, has been a resident of Portland since 1911, in which year he was made manager of the lumber company's plant with which he ever since has been connected. Mr. KEENE was born at Spencer, in Owen county, this state, April 17, 1878, son of Henry C. and Cynthia A. ( LUKENBILL ) KEENE, both of whom were born in that same county, members of pioneer families there. Henry C. KEENE was a well-to do farmer and he and his wife were the parents of six children, all of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Emmet S. and Elbert, and three sisters, Sophronia, Millie and Jessie. Robert E. KEENE received his schooling in the schools at Spencer and as a young man went to Elwood, Ind. where he became engaged in the lumber yard of the Winters Lumber Company. He worked there about a year, acquiring a good deal of valuable fundamental knowledge of the lumber business, and then went to Windfall, where for four years he was connected with the plant of the Windfall Lumber Company. Thus broadened by further experience in the lumber business Mr. KEENE accepted a proposition to return to Elwood and take the management of the yards of the Winters Lumber Company. For twelve years Mr. KEENE remained at Elwood thus engaged and then, in 1911, accepted the position of manager of the yards and mill of the Jay County Lumber Company at Portland and has since resided at Portland looking after the company's affairs there. This company handles all sorts of building material and also does a lumber milling business. On November 22, 1910, Robert E. KEENE was united in marriage to Margaret P. McCURDY, daughter of Ninion and Letitia McCURDY, and to this union two children have been born, James W. and Margaret. Mr. KEENE is a Republican. He is a member of the Portland Country Club and is a member of the Masonic lodge at Windfall and of the Elks lodge at Elwood. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.67-68. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

KIDDER, JOHN J

John J. KIDDER, M. D., one of Jay county's well known physicians and surgeons, with offices at Salamonia, where he has made his home ever since entering upon the practice of his profession a quarter of a century ago, is a native son of this county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and has resided here all his life. Doctor KIDDER was born on a farm in Pike township on December 21, 1870, and is a son of William and Julia ( COLLINS ) KIDDER, both of whom were born in Warren county, Ohio, but had been residents of Jay county since the days of their childhood, having come over here with their respective parents in pioneer days. William KIDDER was a son of John and Sarah ( BURRESS ) KIDDER, who became residents of this county in 1837, the year following the formal organization of Jay county. John KIDDER and his wife were natives of New Hampshire, the former born in 1789. When sixteen years of age he moved with his parents to Maine. At the age of twenty-six he married and moved to New York, but a year or two later came West and settled in Warren county, Ohio, where he remained for about twenty years, or until 1837, when he came over into Indiana and entered from the Government a tract of 200 acres in Jay county, 120 acres of this land lying in Pike township, where he established his home. There he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, his death occurring on May 14, 1858, and hers, October 4, 1875. Of the eleven children born to this pioneer couple eight grew to maturity and the KIDDER connection in the present generation is a considerable one. William KIDDER was but a child when he came here with his parents from Ohio in 1837 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Pike township. For several years during the days of his young manhood he was engaged in teaching school in the schools of this county, but after his marriage established his home on a farm of eighty acres which he had acquired in Pike township and thereafter devoted himself to farming. He and his wife were the parents of three children, one of whom died in infancy, the others being Joseph KIDDER, of Portland, and Doctor KIDDER, the immediate subject of this biographical review. Doctor KIDDER grew to manhood on the home farm in Pike township, receiving his elementary schooling in the Antioch school (district No. 5), and for two terms taught school in the old Zoar school and in district No. 2 in that township. Under the preceptorship of his uncle, John G. ROSS, of Portland, he early began to turn his attention to the study of medicine and during the years 1893-96 was a student in the Ohio Eclectic Medical College at Cincinnati. In August, 1896, Doctor KIDDER opened an office for the practice of his profession at Salamonia. A month later he married and established his home in that pleasant village-e and has since resided there, thus having followed the practice of his profession at that place for more than twenty-five years. The Doctor is a member of the Jay County Medical Society and of the Indiana State Medical Society and has ever kept abreast of the advance in medical science. He is a past noble grand of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (Jay County Lodge No. 803) at Salamonia and is also a member of Camp 13538, Modern Woodmen, at that place. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Salamonia. It was on September 5, 1896, that Dr. John J. KIDDER was united in marriage to Cora CUPP, of this county, and to this union two children have been born) Orva T., who is now (1922) in his third year in Indiana University and is entered for the class of 1925 of the medical college of the university, and Thelma, who is a member of the midyear class of 1924, Portland high school. Mrs. KIDDER was born in Pike township and is a daughter of Valentine H. and Ellen ( FREEMAN ) CUPP both natives of Ohio, the latter born in Fairfield county and the former in Perry county. Not long after their marriage in Fairfield county, Ohio, Valentine CUPP and his wife came over into Indiana and established their home on a farm in Pike township this county. Valentine CUPP had a well improved farm of 100 acres and was accounted one of the substantial citizens of that township. To him and his wife were born two daughters, Mrs. KIDDER having a sister, Elizabeth. Doctor and Mrs. KIDDER have a pleasant home at Salamonia and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community of which they long have been an influential part. During the time of America's participation in the World war Doctor KIDDER was a member of the Volunteer Medical Corps of the United States army, subject to call at any time, and he also took an active part in the promotion of the Liberty Loan "drives" in Madison township. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.170-171. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LANDERS, ARTHUR

Arthur LANDERS, one of the well-known and substantial farmers and landowners of Knox township, was born in a log cabin on a farm in the south part of that township on October 6, 1873, and has lived in the township all his life. Mr. LANDERS is a son of Isaac and Levina (MEEKS) LANDERS. to whom two daughters also were born, Sarah Jane and Anna. Isaac LANDERS, who is now living retired in Knox township, was born in Highland county, Ohio and was eleven years of age when he came to Indiana with his parents, William and Sarah LANDERS, who settled on an eighty-acre farm in Richland township, this county, in 1855, among the early settlers of that section of the county. William LANDERS, the pioneer, cleared that farm and there spent the remainder of his life. Isaac LANDERS grew to manhood on that farm and in turn became a farmer on his own account, gradually increasing his land holdings as his affairs prospered until he became the owner of 545 acres. He is now living retired in Knox township in his seventy-eighth year. Arthur LANDERS received his schooling in the Beech Grove school and remained at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-two years, when his father gave him an "eighty" in Knox township. On that place he established his home and has since resided. Mr. LANDERS has done well in his farming operations and now has a well-improved farm of 262 acres, on which he is engaged in general farming and stock raising. He is a. Democrat and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. Arthur LANDERS married Effie DEEDS, who also was born in this county, first born of the six children born to John A. and Martha (BROOKS) DEEDS, and to this union have been born four children, Opal, Audrey, Floyd A. and Farrell, the last named of whom died at the age of seven years. Opal LANDERS married Harry FINCH, of this county, and has one child, a daughter, Effie Ellen. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.370-371. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LANGENHORST, FRANK B

Frank B. LANGENHORST, former trustee of Wabash township and a well known building contractor and landowner residing in that township, on rural mail route No. 2 out of Celina, Ohio, is a native of the Buckeye state, born on a farm over in the neighboring county of Mercer (in Ohio), but has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his early childhood. Mr. LANGENHORST was born on June 17, 1863, and is a son of Frank and Elizabeth (TOHEL ) LANGENHORST, both natives of Germany, the latter of whom, born in Oldenburg, came to America in 1858 in company with a younger brother, the two locating at Dayton, Ohio, where not long afterward she was married. Frank LANGENHORST was -born in the vicinity of the city of Berlin and there grew to manhood. In 1852 he came to the United States, making the voyage in an old sail boat which was two days less than six weeks in making the passage. His destination was Cincinnati, where some of his old country friends were then living, and after reaching that city he became engaged in day labor, but not long afterward became engaged in river traffic, making his headquarters at New Orleans, and was for three years thus engaged, working on the steam packets plying the waters of the Mississippi and the Ohio. At the end of this period he returned to Cincinnati and not long- afterward went up to Dayton, where he presently was married to Elizabeth TOHEL. Having decided by this time to take up the life of an agriculturist he bought a tract of forty acres in Mercer county, Ohio, and there established his home, but presently became attracted to what was regarded as a better opportunity over on this side of the line and moved over into Jay county, where he bought a tract of fifty acres in Wabash township, the place on which his son Frank is now living, and there settled down to the farming operations which occupied him the remainder of his life. He also was the owner of an adjoining tract of fifty acres in Mercer county and created a good piece of property. Frank LANGENHORST died on February 26, 1892, and his widow survived him for more than eleven years, her death occurring on July 26, 1903. They were the parents of three children, two of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, John LANGENHORST, a carpenter, living over the line in Coldwater, Ohio. The one daughter of this family, Mary, died in 1875 at the age of fourteen years and two days. Frank B. LANGENHORST was but a child when his parents moved over into Jay county and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Wabash township, receiving his schooling in the old Staphon school (district No. 1). As a young man he learned the carpenter trade and presently became a building contractor, a vocation he ever since has followed, giving his particular attention to that line, though maintaining his interest in the operation of the farm, and for years has been widely known hereabout as a builder, much of the carpenter work in that neighborhood having been done under his direction. Mr. LANGENHORST married when twenty-one years of age and continued to make his home on the home place in Wabash township, fifty acres of which he eventually came to own by inheritance. To that he has added by purchase until now he is the owner of an excellent farm of 155 acres, twenty-five access of which lies in the adjoining county of Mercer, and he thus is a taxpayer in two states. Since 1916 his eldest son, Adam LANGENHORST, has been directing the affairs of the farm, which under Mr. LANGENHORST's direction has been well improved, new and modern buildings giving it the appearance of having one of the best farm plants in the neighborhood. Mr. LANGENHORST is a Democrat and for four years and one month (1900-05) served the' public as trustee of Wabash township. He and his family are members of Holy Trinity Catholic church in Wabash township and he is a member of St. Bonifas court No. 1741, Catholic Order of Foresters, at New Corydon, to the affairs of which he has long given his active attention. It was on September 15, 1884, that Frank B. LANGENHORST was united m marriage to Frances BUETEL, who was born in this county, and to this union have been born six children, Adam, Joseph, Eva, Gladys, Ambrose and Frederick, all of whom are unmarried and at home with their parents. The LANGENHORST's have a very pleasant home and have ever taken an interested part in the community's general social activities and good works. Mrs. LANGENHORST was born in Wabash township on November 13, 1862, and is a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth ( REIMAN ) BUETEL, the latter of whom was born in the vicinity of New Reigel, Ohio. Adam BUETEL was born in the Kingdom of Bavaria and there grew to manhood, becoming a skilled shoemaker. In 1854 he came to the United States and located at New Reigel, Ohio, where he established himself as a shoemaker and where he married. He continued to make his home there until the spring of 1859, when he came to Jay county and settled on a farm in Wabash township, where he spent the remainder of his life, becoming the owner of an excellent farm of 100 acres. He and his wife had twelve children, four of whom are still living, Mrs. LANGENHORST having three brothers, Joseph, John and Henry BUETEL. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.242-244. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LARE, CHARLES
 
LEE, RICHARD O

Richard O. LEE, former trustee of Jackson township and one of the best known farmers of that part of Jay county, a former teacher in the schools of this county, has been a resident, of Jay county since the days of his early childhood. Mr. LEE was born on a farm in Allen county, Ohio, August 29, 1884, and is a son of Martin M. and Elizabeth ( COURT ) LEE, who later became residents of Jay county. Martin M. LEE was a Virginian by birth, born in that section of the Old Dominion now included in West Virginia, and was but a boy when he accompanied his parents over into Ohio, the family settling in Alien county, where he grew to manhood, was married and engaged in farming until 1886 when he came with his family to Indiana and settled on a fifty-acre farm he had bought in Jackson township, this county, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1892. He and his wife were the parents of six children, five of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having three sisters, Mabel, Abbie and Grace, and a brother, George LEE. One daughter, Effie, is deceased. Richard O. LEE was two years of age when he came with his parents to this county in 1886 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Jackson township. He was but eight years of age when his father died and he thus early began to assume mature responsibilities. Upon completing the course in the Polington high school Mr. LEE began teaching school and was for two years thus engaged, one winter at the Oakland school and one at the Center school. He then became engaged as a pumper in the oil field and for eight years followed that vocation, or until his marriage in 1910, when he bought the farm of forty acres on which he is now living in Jackson township and has since been actively engaged in farming. Mr. LEE is a Democrat and has for years given his thoughtful attention to local political affairs, long regarded as one of the leaders of his party in that part of the county. In 1914 he was elected trustee of Jackson township and served a four-year term in that important office. He is a member of the local aerie of Eagles at Portland. On November 25, 1910, Richard O. LEE was united in marriage to Lottie COX, who was born in Jackson township, this county, a daughter of William and Amanda ( MERRILL) COX, and to this union four children have been born, one of whom, Orville, is deceased, the others being William, Marion and Lawrence. The LEE's have a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 2 out of Portland and take a proper and interested part in the general social activities of the community in which they reside. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.254-255. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LEMASTERS, LUMAN W

Luman W. LEMASTERS, an honored veteran of the Civil war and one of the best known farmers and landowners of Jay county, proprietor of "Lockout Hill Farm" in Madison township, where he makes his home, this farm being on rural mail route No. 6 out of Portland, is a "Buckeye" by birth, but has been a resident of this county practically all the time since he was twelve years of age, a period of about seventy, years, and has thus been a witness to and a participant in the amazing development that has taken place in this community since what might properly be regarded as pioneer days, for there was still much of the primeval wild here when he first came to this county. Mr. LEMASTERS was born on a farm in Shelby county, Ohio, October 19, 1842, and is a son of Luman W. and Nancy ( YOUNG ) LEMASTERS, Virginians, who became residents of Ohio in their childhood days and were there married. The elder Luman W. LEMASTERS was born in that section of the Old Dominion that came to be organized as West Virginia during Civil war times. He was reared as a farmer and also became a local preacher of the Methodist Episcopal church. After his marriage he made his home on an eighty-acre farm which he owned in Shelby county, Ohio, and there remained until 1854, in which year he moved with his family over into Indiana and located on a quarter section of land he bought in Madison township, this county, the west eighty of which is now owned by his son Luman, the subject of this sketch. On that place the elder Luman W. LEMASTERS and his wife spent the remainder of their days, their influence for good in that community continuing a pleasant memory in the neighborhood. He died on April 15, 1888, and his widow survived until August 26, 1904. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having three sisters, Phebe J., Mary P. and Martha J., and two brothers, Jacob and John LEMASTERS. As noted above, the junior Luman W. LEMASTERS was twelve years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents in 1854. He grew to manhood on the home farm in Madison township, completing his schooling in the neighborhood schools and by two years of attendance at the old Farmers Academy at College Corner, and was living on the farm when the Civil war broke out. On July 21, 1861, he enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and went to the front as a member of Company C of the 39th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which presently was reorganized as the 8th Cavalry, and with that gallant command was serving when on July 3, 1863, while on a charge against the enemy at Deckers Forge, two and one-half miles south of Winchester, Tenn., he was shot through the left breast, receiving a wound which terminated his further usefulness as a soldier, putting him on the invalid list. In March, 1864, Mr. LEMASTERS received his discharge and in the following fall was married and began farming for himself as a renter of land in this county. Three years later he moved over into Darke county, Ohio, and was there engaged in farming for nine years, at the end of which time he returned to Jay county and took charge of the home farm in Madison township. In 1904 he bought the west eighty of that quarter section and is still living there, practically retired since 1907, renting his fields. Mr. LEMASTERS is a Republican, is a member of Henry McLaughlin Post, No. 516, Grand Army of the Republic, at Salamonia, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of that village. It was on October 2, 1864, that Luman W. LEMASTERS was united in marriage to Mary K. CHEW, who has thus been his helpmate for more than fifty-seven years. Mrs. LEMASTERS was born in Camden county. New Jersey, February 13, 1847, and is a daughter of Dr. Ezekiel and Caroline B. ( WOOLSTON ) CHEW, both of whom were born in that same state. In 1855 Dr. Ezekiel CHEW moved with his family from New Jersey to Farmersville, Ohio. Two years later he moved to Ft. Jefferson, in Darke county (Ohio) and after a sometime residence there came to Indiana. He made several changes of residence after coming to this state, but finally located in St. Joseph county, where his last days were spent, his death occurring there in August, 1888. His wife died on February 27, 1879. They were the parents of ten children, of whom seven are living, Mrs. LEMASTERS having one sister, Sarah F., and five brothers, Nathaniel D., Cooper, Charles, Virgil and Donald CHEW. To Luman W. and Mary K. ( CHEW ) LEMASTERS have been born ten children, Beulah S., Luman C., William C., Elsie, Bertha, Ord O., Edith, Maude, Arthur and Vernon, all of whom are living. Beulah S. LEMASTERS married L. L. ROCKWELL, who is engaged in the garage business at Ft. Recovery, Ohio, and has four children, Claude, a Noble township farmer, who married Opal LOY, and has two children, Catherine M. and Duetta ROCKWELL; Opal, who married Daniel GRILE, who is operating a garage at Geneva, Ind., and has two children, Lester and John Lynn GRILE; Edith, wife of Cecil BICKEL, a Madison township farmer, who has one child, and Anna. Luman C. LEMASTERS, a farmer of Madison township, married Belle WEHRLEY and has twelve children, Clarence, a Madison township farmer, who married May BICKEL and has three children, Kenneth, Mary I. and Luman; Chesley, now living at Richmond, Ind., who married Clara BURKEY and has two children, Donald and Doris; Bertha, who married Russell HERCULES, of Richmond, Ind., and has two children, Mervil and Isabella; Floyd, a Noble township farmer, who married Opal GAGLE and has one child, Remonda; Gerald, who is in the garage business at Pennville and who married Mabel KANTNER and has one child, Maxine: Stanley, who is at home; Dorothy, wife of Charles HUNT, of Richmond, Ind.; John, a teacher in the schools of this county, making his home in Madison township, and who married Dorothy DELAUTER and has one child, Geraldine, and Freda, Ord, Mary O. and Elvin C., who are at home. William C. LEMASTERS, who is now living at Victor, Col., where he is the proprietor of a moving picture theater, married Leila LEWIS and has four children, Gladys, who married Lloyd G. MOSER, of Mt. Rosa, Col., and has two children, Carrie and Bobby; Leila, who married Earl SLINKARD and is living in California, and Ralph and William, at home. Elsie LEMASTERS married M. J. ADKINSON, a farmer of Madison township. Bertha LEMASTERS married John YAEGER, who is now principal of schools at Brazil, Ind., and has six children, Clarence, Mary, Helen, John V., George W. and Luther L. YAEGER. Dr. Ord O. LEMASTERS, now a practicing physician at Sidney, Ohio, married Emma GARMENHOUSER. He and his wife have an adopted daughter, Isabella. Edith LEMASTERS married Henry MINEHOLTZ, who is now engaged in the mercantile business at Alamosa, Col., and has four children, Wilhelmina, Lucile, Helen E. and Marjorie M. Maude LEMASTERS married Dr. S. W. PHILLIPS, a veterinary surgeon, now living at David City, Neb., and has two children, Donald and Louise. Arthur LEMASTERS married Maude McLAUGHLIN and is now engaged in the garage business at Geneva, Ind. Dr. Vernon LEMASTERS, a veteran of the World war and a practicing physician, now living at Sidney, Ohio, married Helene GARMENHOUSER and has one child, a son, Robert. Doctor LEMASTERS was commissioned a first lieutenant in the Medical Corps of the United States army during the war and served for eighteen months overseas. Mr. and Mrs. LEMASTERS were among the most active promoters of the movement which led to the organization of the Methodist Episcopal church at Salamonia in 1876 and thus for more than forty-five years have been prominently identified with that congregation. Mr. LEMASTERS served as a member of the board of trustees of this congregation until 1920 and for more than forty years was class leader, while for many years Mrs. LEMASTERS was one of the leading teachers in the Sunday school.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.195-197. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LITTLER, FRANK A

Frank A. LITTLER, assistant cashier of the First State Bank of Dunkirk and for years one of the best known figures in commercial circles in that city, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Indiana and of Dunkirk for the past thirty-five years and thus has long counted himself as much a resident of Jay county as though "native and to the .manner born." Mr. LITTLER was born on a farm in Liberty township, Seneca county, Ohio, April 20, 1861, and is a son of Nathan and Mary ( ENGLER ) LITTLER, the former of whom was born in Virginia and the latter in Maryland, who had come to Ohio with their respective parents in the days of their youth and had grown up in Seneca county, where they were married and where they spent their last days. Nathan LITTLER, who died in 1884, was a well-to-do farmer, the owner of a well kept place of 205 acres, and was a substantial citizen of the community in which he lived. He and his wife were the parents of five children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Austin C. and Chester J. LITTLER. Reared on the home farm in Seneca county, Frank A. LITTLER completed his schooling by a three-years course in the normal school at Ada and was for about five years thereafter engaged in teaching school in his home county, where he remained until the spring of 1886, when he came over into Indiana and bought a drug store at Dunkirk, which he continued to operate for about eleven years, at the end of which time he sold the store and became a bookkeeper in the general store of J. W. WEAVER at Dunkirk, remaining there for six years, or until 1903, when he entered the First State Bank of Dunkirk as a clerk. Mr. LITTLER here found his forte and he was gradually advanced in the business of the bank until he was made assistant cashier, the position he now has held for several years. On December 24, 1885, Frank A. LITTLER was united in marriage to Mary B. DUNLAP, who was born at Versailles, Ohio, daughter of the Rev. William and Anna DUNLAP, the former a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal church, and to this union have been born six children, five of whom are living, namely: Warren F., a teller in the First State Bank of Dunkirk, who married Marie ROOK and has four children, Harriet M., Frank P., Heber L. and Marian; Lorraine, who is a teacher in the public schools at Dunkirk; Frank G., production manager in the manufacturing plant of Ball Bros. at Muncie, who married Marjorie JONES, who died in December, 1919, leaving one child, a daughter, Pauline M.; Ernest D., a farmer of Jay county, who married Lillian M. STEWART, and Chester A., unmarried, who is at home. Mrs. LITTLER also had been a school .teacher before her marriage. She was graduated from the high school at Bettsville, Ohio, and took supplementary courses in the university at Delaware and in the normal school at Ada, after which for two years or more she was engaged in teaching. Mr. and Mrs. LITTLER are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are Republicans. Mr. LITTLER is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Dunkirk. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.143-144. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LOCKER, BERT

Bert LOCKER, a well known blacksmith and welder at Portland, where he has been in business for years, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Madison township on September 9, 1878, and is a son of Jacob D. and Leara ( FREEMYER ) LOCKER, both of whom were born in that same township, members of pioneer families, and who are still living there. Jacob D. LOCKER is the 'proprietor of a well kept farm of forty acres and is one of the well known men in his community. To him and his wife have been born eleven children, all of whom are living save two, Oliver and Ethel, the others besides the subject of this sketch being Jesse, Andrew, Vernie, Leo, Blanche, Minnie, Elsa and Vera. Reared on the home farm, Bert LOCKER received his schooling in the old Center school in Madison township and in the schools of Portland and as a young man left the farm and began working in the Bimel factory at Portland, continuing there for about six months, at the end of which time he began to learn the blacksmith trade under Lewis COOK and perfected himself in the details of that craft. After about eight years of service for others in this line Mr. LOCKER decided to begin operations on his own behalf and bought the Doctor CULBERT blacksmith shop on East Main street and started in business for himself. He remained at that location for about seven years and then bought the shop he has since been operating at 121 East North street, where he has one of the best equipped blacksmith and welding shops in this part of the state. His machinery is electrically equipped and he has his own generator for the acetylene welding done in his place. Mr. LOCKER is a Democrat and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. On November 17, 1900, Bert LOCKER was united in marriage to Anna GOWDY, who was born in Iowa, daughter of Aldon and Eliza (KREAMER ) GOWDY, and to this union two children have been born, Gladys, born on December 25, 1901, and John, June 14,1904. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.101-102. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LONG, HERBERT

HERBERT LONG, a well known sporting goods merchant at Portland, who formerly was engaged in the drug business in that city, is a native Hoosier and has been a resident of Portland with the exception of some years spent in prospecting and homesteading in the West ever since he was a child, his parents having moved to that city when he was eight years of age. He was born in Kosciusko county, this state, December 5, 1867, son of John A. LONG and wife, and was the last born of the three children born to that parentage. In 1876 John A. LONG located at Portland with his family and it was in that city that Herbert LONG received his schooling. As a young man he thought to follow the advice of Horace Greeley and go West to grow up with the country. With this end in view he entered a claim to a quarter of a section of land in Kansas and remained with his claim LONG enough to prove up on it. He then sold that tract to advantage and went on down into Texas, where he prospected around for several years or until Oklahoma was opened to settlement, when .he went up into the new state and entered a claim to a quarter of a section. On this he also proved up and presently was able to sell it to advantage. By this time he was beginning to have serious thoughts of the old home back in Indiana and he returned to Portland and became engaged there in the drug business. Finding this business not as congenial to his tastes as he thought it would be he sold his drug store after having operated it for about a year and opened the sporting goods store and cigar stand which he has since been quite successfully operating, and has one of the leading establishments of this sort in this section of Indiana. Mr. LONG is a Democrat and is a member of the local aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland. On November 8, 1908, Herbert LONG was united in marriage to Minerva J. ROWE, who was born in the neighboring county of Blackford, where she was reared. Mr. and Mrs. LONG have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.95-96. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LONG, JOSEPH A

Joseph A. LONG, president of the J.A. LONG Company, of Portland, and long recognized as the most extensive dealer in poultry, butter and eggs in the United States, has exemplified in his career what amazing developments may arise from one's "day of small things" and has thus furnished the world an object lesson in the combined value of applied energy and enterprise that might profitably be heeded in many quarters today. When Mr. LONG started in the produce business his sole possessions of a material character were a blind horse, bought "on time," and a rickety wagon, with a barely sufficient fund of small change to carry him over his first "huckstering" trip over the highways out of Portland. That was in the spring of 1883, less than forty years ago. Today the J. A. LONG Company stands pre-eminent in its class, with buying stations and packing houses covering the country, and the largest creamery east of the Mississippi river, the. aggregate of the produce handled annually through these agencies being sufficient almost to stagger the imagination. It is gratifying to note that Mr. LONG is a native Hoosier, a fact of which he never has ceased to be proud, and he certainly has done well his part in helping to put Hoosierdom "on the map." He was born in the town of Warsaw, county seat of Kosciusko county, Indiana, November 23, 1865, and is a son of John and Hannah ( STAUFFER ) LONG, the latter of whom died at that place in 1869, leaving three children, the subject of this biographical review and his brother Herbert and sister Ida. John LONG, who died at Portland in 1919, married, secondly, Matilda STRAUSS, and to that union were born three children, two of whom, Clarence and Jessie, are living. John LONG was born in Pennsylvania and grew to manhood in that state, becoming a blacksmith, a vocation he followed all his active life. He was married in Pennsylvania and not long afterward came to Indiana and located at Warsaw, where he remained until 1874, when he moved with his family to Converse, this state. Three years later he moved to Portland, and in this latter city spent the remainder of his life. By a comparison of dates here set out it will be noted that Joseph A. LONG was about twelve years of age when he moved with his father to Portland. He was graduated from the high school there in 1882, at seventeen years of age, and the next year, in the spring of 1883, started his highly successful career as a produce dealer, starting out, as has been stated, with a blind horse and a small wagon to "huck-ster" throughout Jay county. Personality counts. Many a young man has started out huckstering. Many have done well at it and have gone on until they have created a well-developed business. Joseph A. LONG went on until he has long been recognized as the leader of his line in the United States, and it was the friendly manner in which his initial labors throughout this region were received by the people, this friendliness being based upon the pleasant manner of the young man's "approach," that formed the basis of this success. It was not long until he was able to add to his road equipment, and in due time he had five large wagons working the territory hereabout. In 1896, thirteen years after engaging in the produce business, Mr. LONG established his first branch buying station, this being located at Celina. The business continued to grow, other buying stations were established, packing houses were erected, the great creamery at Union City was established, clearing houses were created in Cleveland, Buffalo and New York City, the business continued to expand, and in 1911 it was incorporated as the J. A. LONG Company, with Joseph A. LONG, the founder and promoter of the same, as president of the company, which now has no fewer than 259 buying stations, twenty-two packing houses, two of which are given over to meat packing, the great creamery at Union City with its capacity of 1,000,000 pounds of butter a month, and the countless ramifications which a concern of this magnitude must include. That the home office of this great concern is in Jay county is a point worthy of special note in this history of the county. In addition to his duties as president of the J. A. LONG Company, Mr. LONG has numerous other interests which reveal his enterprise. He is the vice-president of the First National Bank of Portland, president of the Lehigh Clay Products Company of Lehigh, Iowa, and is connected also with the Portland Drain and Tile Company, the Portland Silo Company, the Knocker Shirt Company, the Portland Body Works and the Portland Egg Case Company. In his political views he is "independent." Fraternally he is affiliated with the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias, and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. In 1887 Joseph A. LONG was united in marriage to Mary TIPTON, daughter of David TIPTON, and to this union one child was born, a daughter, Mabel, who married Allen P. RICE, manager of the J. A. LONG Company's creamery at Union City, and has one child, a daughter. Hazel. Mr. and Mrs. LONG have a very pleasant home at Portland and have ever taken an interested part in the city's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.144-145. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LUDY, WILLIAM H

William H. LUDY, telegraph operator for the G. R. & 1. Railway Company at Portland, Ind., was born at Winchester, Ind., September 16, 1868, the son of John W. and Olive ( ROOSA ) LUDY, both of whom were born in that same county, members of old families in that section of the state. John W. LUDY was reared in Randolph county and early became inclined to the mechanical trades, becoming both a cabinet maker and a machinist. He later became a farmer and still later became engaged in the real estate business at Winchester, which latter business he maintained until his death in 1905. William H. LUDY received his schooling at Winchester and early learned telegraphy, his first employment in that line being secured, in the office of the Big Four Railroad Company at Winchester. For about two years Mr. LUDY served as operator there and then he became engaged in the contracting business, a line which he followed at Winchester for about a year, at the end of which time he became employed in a furniture factory, where he remained two years. He then became engaged with his father in farming, but after three years of farming, returned to the telegraph key and went to work as operator for the G. R. & 1. at Winchester. In 1907 Mr. LUDY was transferred from the Winchester office of this company to the office of Portland and has since been engaged as operator at the local station. Mr. LUDY is a Freemason and he and his family are members of the Friends church. On January 20, 1891, William H. LUDY was united in marriage to Flora L. STANLEY, who also was born at Winchester, and to this union have been born six children, John, Roger, Charles S., Mildred, Martha and Mary, the last two of whom are twins. Roger LUDY married Lucile FIGEL, who was born in this county. During the period of America's participation in the World war he went out with the first line of selective service men from Jay county and was sent to Camp Taylor, where he presently was made a corporal. Charles LUDY enlisted for service in the aviation corps and was sent to the field at San Antonio, Tex. He was mustered out as a sergeant. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.102-103. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LUZADDER, GEORGE

George LUZADDER, who died at his home in Richland township more than twenty years ago and whose widow is still living there, very comfortably situated at her pleasant farm home on rural mail route No.1 out of Redkey, was for years one of the substantial and influential farmers of that section of Jay county and at his passing left a good memory. Mr. LUZADDER was a Virginian, born in Taylor county in what since Civil war days has been West .Virginia on March 24, 1839, and was a son of John and Sarah (BOLEY) LUZADDER, both of whom also were born in that section of Virginia. Of the seven children born to John LUZADDER and wife, two William and Nancy are still living. The others, besides the subject of this memorial sketch, were Aaron, Elizabeth, John and Moses. Reared on a farm, George LUZADDER remained in Virginia until he was twenty years of age, when in 1859 he came to Indiana and became engaged in farm labor in Henry county. Two years later he married there and then began farming on his own account, presently coming to Jay county, where in 1866 he bought his first tract of land, a "forty" in Richland township, and there established his home. In that same year he bought an adjoining "forty" and twelve years later bought an adjacent tract of twenty-five acres, this giving him a farm of 105 acres, which he improved in excellent fashion and brought up to a high state of cultivation. As his affairs prospered Mr. LUZADDER added to his land holdings until he became the owner of 375 acres in Richland and Jefferson townships and was accounted one of the substantial farmers of that section. Mr. LUZADDER was a Democrat and ever gave a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs, but was not a seeker after public office. He died at his home in Richland township on March 7, 1898, and his widow is still making her home there, renting her farm. It was on December 19, 1861, in Henry county, this state, that George LUZADDER was united in marriage to Nancy J. LAKE, who was born in that county, a member of one of the pioneer families there, and had received her schooling in one of the typical log school houses of the time and place. Mrs. LUZADDER's parents, William and Mary (CURRENT) LAKE, were Virginians, born in that section of the Old Dominion now included in West Virginia, and came to Indiana some time after their marriage, driving through with a covered wagon and settling on a tract of forty acres which William LAKE had "entered" in Henry county. When they came to Indiana they had one child. Four others were born in Henry county. Of these children two are still living, Mrs. LUZADDER having a brother, Julius C. LAKE. Those deceased were James E., Jeremiah and Sylvanus. To George and Nancy J. (LAKE) LUZADDER seven children were born, namely: Nettie, Savannah (deceased), John W., Rebecca (deceased), Rosa, Miriam and Minnie (deceased). Nettie LUZADDER married Jerry JENKINS, a farmer of Jefferson township, this county, and has two children. Garnet and LAKE. Savannah LUZADDER, who died on April 4, 1919, married John STEWART, of Richland township, and had five children, two of whom Lina and Ivy are living, the others having been Carl and Sarah and one who died in infancy. Rebecca LUZADDER, who died in March, 1910, was the wife of Charles SMITH, of Jefferson township. Rosa LUZADDER married George RETTER, a farmer, now living in Wayne county, this state. Miriam LUZADDER married Oscar SMITH, a farmer of Jefferson township, and has had two children, Trevah and Vina, the last named of whom is now deceased. Minnie LUZADDER, who died on December 10, 1899, was the wife of Park BURDEN, of Jefferson township. John W. LUZADDER is unmarried and continues to make his home on the farm. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.394-395. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LYONS, THOMAS H

Thomas H. LYONS, one of Pike township's best known and most substantial agriculturists and landowners, proprietor of an excellent farm on rural route No. 4 out of Ridgeville, is a native of the old Buckeye state, whence so many of the older residents of Jay county came, but has been a resident of this county since he was four years of age and has thus been a witness to and a participant in the amazing development that has marked this region during the past seventy years. Mr. LYONS was born in Perry county, Ohio, November II, 1846, and is a son of Elijah and Mary (BAILEY) LYONS, the latter of whom was born in Fulton county, Pennsylvania, January 12, 1820, a daughter of Peter and Margaret (CLINE) BAILEY. Elijah LYONS was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, September 24. 1824, son of Thomas and Eve (APPLE) LYONS, who moved in 1837 from that county to Perry county, same state, where the father died in August of the following year. His widow survived him many years, her death occurring in 1879 in Jay county. Two of their sons, Thomas and Samuel, were soldiers of the Union during the Civil war, the latter holding the rank of captain. Elijah LYONS was fourteen years of age when his father died and he remained with his mother on the home farm until his marriage to Mary BAILEY, January 8, 1846, after which he began farming on his own account in Perry county, where he remained until he came over into Jay county with his family in the fall of 1850 and settled on an unimproved tract in section 26 of Pike township, establishing his home there in a rude log cabin, which was occupied by the family until he was able to erect a substantial and commodious brick residence in 1867. His first land holding there was a tract of something more than a quarter section, but as his affairs prospered he added to this until he became one of the large landowners of that part of the county. Elijah LYONS was a man of force and influence in the community, one of the leaders in the local ranks of the Democratic party, and served for some time as trustee of Pike township and later as a member of the board of county commissioners from his district. On that farm he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. She died on October 4, 1885, and he survived until in January, 1908. They were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the first born, the others being William, who died in infancy, John B., Mrs. Sarah A. JELLISON, Stephen S., Mrs. Rebecca Jane WARE, Mary Lavina and Mrs. Susanna DICKES. As noted above, Thomas H. LYONS was four years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents in the fall of 1850 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Pike township. He received his early schooling in the Lesh school, supplementing this by a course in Liber College, and as the eldest soh was from the days of his boyhood a helpful factor in the labors of developing the home farm. When twenty-six years of age, Mr. LYONS bought an "eighty" of the home place, a part of the farm where he is now living, and has continued to make his home there, he and his family being very comfortably situated. As his farming operations developed he bought additional land and now is the owner of a fine farm of 280 acres and one of the best equipped farm plants in the neighborhood. Mr. LYONS is a Democrat, as was his father, and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs, but has not been a seeker after public office. On May 15, 1.873, Thomas H. LYONS was united in marriage to Adeline FRICKEL, a daughter of Conrad and Mary FRICKEL, who were among the earlier of the German emigrants who had come over here from Ohio, and to this union have been born five children, all of whom are living save one son, Jesse , the first born, the others being Pearl, Homer. Gay and. Elijah. The two daughters are unmarried and are at home with their parents. Homer LYONS married Alice BROSIUS and has two children, Dale and Rex. Elijah LYONS, who was named in honor of his paternal grandfather, married Minnie MILLER and has three children, Max, Madonna and Robert Elijah. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.421-422. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

LYTLE, JOHN S

John S. LYTLE, M.D., one of Jay county's veteran physicians and a resident of Dunkirk for the past twenty-five years, is a native of Scotland but has resided in this country since the days of his young manhood. Doctor LYTLE was born in the city of Glasgow, the place where his father also was born, December 9, 1859, and is a son of John and Jean ( StCLAIR ) LYTLE. He early devoted himself to the medical profession and when twenty-one years of age was graduated from a medical college at Edinburgh. In 1882, almost immediately following his graduation, Doctor LYTLE came to America and located at Philadelphia, where he opened an office for the practice of his profession. Eighteen months later he moved to Pittsburgh and there became settled in practice, remaining in that city for nine years, at the end of which time he moved to Cannonsburg, Pa., where he was in practice for three years. In the meantime, hearing good word of the rapid development being made over here in this section of Indiana during the time of the natural gas "boom," Doctor LYTLE investigated conditions hereabout and 'determined to settle in Indiana. In accordance with this resolution he left Cannonsburg and located at Dunkirk, where he ever since has been engaged in practice, one of the best known physicians in this section of Indiana. In 1889 Dr. John S. LYTLE was united in marriage to Delia STONE, who was born in Ohio, and to this union three children have been born, but one of whom, Susan E., is living, the others having died in infancy. On June 7, 1921, Susan E. LYTLE married Milton IRVIN, of Mexico, Ind. Doctor and Mrs. LYTLE are members of the Episcopal church, and are Republicans. The Doctor is a Freemason and is also a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Dunkirk. ISOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.233. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

 

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