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                  Jay County Indiana Biographies Surnames M, N, O

MANOR, CHARLES L

Charles L. MANOR, a well-known and substantial farmer and landowner of Richland township, was born in that township and has lived there all his life. Mr. MANOR was born on a pioneer farm in Richland township on September 12, 1860, and is a son of David and Jane (SHERRARD) MANOR, who were among the pioneers of that township. David MANOR was born in Berkeley county, Virginia, and remained in that state until in the days of his young manhood, when he came North and located in Ohio, where he became engaged working at the cooper's trade. For two years he remained in Ohio and then came over into Indiana and entered a tract of 160 acres in Richland township, this county, upon which he erected a log cabin and established his home. He cleared the place and in time had a good piece of property and was accounted one of the substantial and influential pioneers of the neighborhood. He and his wife spent the remainder of their lives on that farm. They were the parents of sixteen children, eleven of whom lived to maturity and eight of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Mary C., William, John, Rosa, Martha, Hannah and Emma. Reared on the farm on which he was born, Charles L. MANOR received his schooling in the primitive schools of that neighborhood. He remained at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-five years, a helpful factor in the labors of developing the home place, and then began farming on his own account on a sixty-five-acre tract in. that neighborhood which belonged to his wife, and as he developed that place added to his holdings until he became the owner of 110 acres, a part of which he since has sold and is now the owner of a well-kept farm of eighty acres, on which he continues to make his home. Mr. MANOR is a Republican, a member of the Fairview Methodist Episcopal church and is affiliated with the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Fairview, over the line in Randolph county. It was in 1885 that Charles L. MANOR was united in marriage to Victoria STARBUCK, a daughter of William E. and Mollie (McKINNEY) STARBUCK, of this county, and to this union were born four children, namely: Alpha, who married Arle GRAY, of Randolph county, and has five children, Cecil, Dorothy, Arthur, Gale and Crystal; Ray B., now living at Albany, Ind.[Delaware Co.], who married Oma BANTZ and has four children, Mary, Martha, Charles and Ruby E.; Millie, who married Russell ANDERSON, of Richland township, and has three children, Pauline, Nila and Violet; and Emma, who married Charles NORRIS, of Muncie [Delaware Co.]. Mrs. Victoria STARBUCK MANOR, mother of these children, died on June 2, 1918. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp. 331-332. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

MANOR, WILLIAM M

William W. MANOR, one of Jefferson township's well known farmers, living on rural mail route No. 2 out of Redkey, was born in Jay county and has lived here most of his life, the exception being some years during the years of his youth, when the family lived in the adjoining county of Randolph. Mr. MANOR was born at Powers Station and is a son of John E. and Maggie (McFARLAND) MANOR, both of whom were members of pioneer families in this section of Indiana. John E. MANOR, who is now making his home with his son, William, in Jefferson township, was born in Virginia and was but a child when he came to Indiana with his parents, Zeblan W. and Mary Ann (SHUMAKER) MANOR, who located in. Randolph county, where the father bought a farm. Some years later Zeblan W. MANOR disposed of his interests in that county and came with his family up into Jay county and bought a farm of 112 acres in Richland township, where he established his home and where he spent the remainder of his life. Five of his children are still living, John E. MANOR being the eldest of these. John. E. MANOR received his schooling in. Randolph county and for some time after his parents moved to Jay county he worked on the home farm in Richland township. He then became engaged in the saw-milling business at Powers Station and was thus engaged at that place until the big timber was pretty well worked out of that vicinity, after which he resumed farming, making his home on a rented farm in this county. Two years later he returned to Powers and two years afterward moved back to Randolph county and made his home on a farm belonging to his father in that county and there he remained until his retirement in 1915, since which time he has been making his home with his son. William, in this county. He has six children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Pearl, Jesse, Cleat, Gladys and Ollie. William W. MANOR was but a lad when his parents moved from Powers to the farm in Randolph county and in the schools of this latter county he completed his schooling. He remained with his father on the farm until his marriage in the fall of 1899, when he established his home on the farm of 487 acres in Jefferson and Greene townships, on which he is now living, and has since resided there, continuing to rent the land which he has farmed to advantage, his operations having been carried on in up-to-date fashion. In his political views Mr. MANOR is a Democrat. It was in September, 1899, that William W. MANOR was united in marriage to Ella LACEY, of this county, and to this union two children have been born, Agnes and Earl, the latter of whom is at home with his father on the farm.. Agnes MANOR married Dewey MAULLER, of Randolph county, and has one child, a daughter, Helen V. Mrs. Ella MANOR, who died on October 23, 1921, was a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county, a daughter of Fernando and Anna (WHALEY) MAULLER, further mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, and had lived in this county all her life. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.436-436. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MARKER, JAMES

James MARKER, one of Jay county's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, proprietor of an excellent farm on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, in Penn township, as well as a farm in the neighboring county of Blackford, is a native son of Jay county and has resided here all his life with the exception of about three years during which he was engaged in working in the oil fields of Blackford county. Mr. MARKER was born on a farm in Penn township on December 29, 1879, and is a son of Daniel and Mary ( HAVERFIELD ) MARKER, both of whom were born in Ohio but had come to Indiana with their respective parents in the days of their youth, the MARKER's settling in Wells county and the HAVERFIELD's in Blackford county. Daniel MARKER, who is now living retired on the old HAVERFIELD place in Blackford county, is a son of Daniel MARKER, Sr., who moved from Ohio with his family in pioneer days and established his home in Wells county, this state. Here the younger Daniel MARKER grew to manhood, well trained in the ways of the farm. After his marriage he bought an "eighty" in Penn township, Jay county, and there established his home. Some years later he sold that place and bought a "forty" in the same township. On this latter place he made his home until his retirement in 1907, and removal to the old HAVERFIELD place in Blackford county, where he is now living. To him and his wife were born four children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Earl, Elva and Pearl. Reared on the home farm in Penn township, James MARKER received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and remained at home helping in the labors oi developing the farm until during the height of the oil development work hereabout he went over into Blackford county and was for three years engaged in working in the oil fields there. He then returned to the home farm and was there for some time, or until he rented the place on which he is now living, having married meanwhile, and established his home on that place. After awhile he bought the place and has continued to make his home there, he and his family being very comfortably situated. In addition to the fifty and one-half acres Mr. MARKER owns here he also owns a tract of seventy-four and one-half acres in Blackford county and is farming both places. In addition to his general farming he gives considerable attention to the raising of live stock and is doing well. Mr. MARKER is a Democrat and is a member of the Montpelier lodge of the Improved Order of Red Men, in which lodge he has "gone through the chairs" and has represented the lodge in the Great Council of the order in Indiana. James MARKER married Mary Elizabeth AULT, a daughter of Henry and Rachel AULT, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Thelma Mae, who married Hugh ROMINE. The MARKER's have a pleasant home in Penn township and have ever taken an interested part in home in the community's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.215-216. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MARTIN, ALBERT

Albert MARTIN, a veteran of the Civil war and for many years one of the best known residents of Penn township, who died at his home on the old ALLEN farm on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, in that township, in the fall of 1902 and whose widow is still living there, was a "Buckeye" by birth but had been a resident of this county for nearly forty years prior to his death and had a wide acquaintance hereabout. Mr. MARTIN was born in Harrison county, Ohio, December 14, 1840, and was a son of John and Harriet MARTIN, both of whom also were born in Ohio, members of pioneer families in the "Buckeye" state. Reared in Harrison county, Ohio, Albert MARTIN was living there when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and went to the front as a soldier with the 126th regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served for nearly two years or until honorably discharged on account of physical disability. In 1866 he came over into Indiana and located in Penn township, this county, where he presently was married. After his marriage he established his home on the old Allen farm in Penn township and there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring on October 14, 1902. Since the death of her husband Mrs. MARTIN has continued to make her home on the farm, where she and her family are very comfortably situated. Mrs. MARTIN was born in this county ,Mary Emily ALLEN and is a daughter of William and Eunice ( BROWN ) ALLEN, the latter of whom was born in Logan county, Ohio. William ALLEN also was an Ohioan by birth, born in Belmont county, and was about sixteen years of age when he came to Indiana with his parents, Moses ALLEN and wife, in 1839, the family settling in Jay county. Moses ALLEN bought the farm on which his granddaughter, Mrs. MARTIN, is now living and established his home there, becoming one of the active and influential pioneers of that neighborhood. Counting Mrs. MARTIN's grandchildren resident on the farm, there thus have been five generations of the Allen's resident there. William ALLEN grew to manhood on that pioneer farm and after his marriage established his home there, becoming- the owner of the original quarter section of the place which had been entered from the Government by his father, and there he spent the remainder of his life, one of the useful and forceful members of that prosperous and progressive community. He and his wife had three children, Mrs. MARTIN and her two brothers, William Roscoe and Horton ALLEN. To Albert and Mary Emily (ALLEN) MARTIN were born six children. Harriet, Guy. Roscoe, Gertrude, Fleming and Mary, all of whom are living save Fleming, who died November 18, 1917. He married Ivy McCOMMISH, and at his death left his widow and three children, Edward, Albert and Lloyd. Harriet MARTIN married John MURPHY and has four children, Helen, Marian, Julia and Catherine MURPHY. Marian Murphy married Floyd ROBERTSON and has one child, a daughter, Roberta Jean ROBERTSON, thus bringing to Mrs. MARTIN the distinction of being a great-grandmother. Guy MARTIN married Estella BAILEY and has five children, Stacey, Allen, Richard, Bruce and William. Roscoe MARTIN married Media SAUNDERS and has five children, Violet, Wesley, Ivan, Freda and Victor. Gertrude MARTIN married William BETZ and has four children, Naomi, Thair, Wilmina and Mary Louise BETZ. Mary MARTIN married Victor WITTER and has two children, Emily and Margaret WITTER. Mrs. MARTIN is a birthright member of the Friends Meeting at Pennville. Her husband was formerly clerk of the Monthly Meeting and for years had been a teacher in the Sunday school. He was a Republican and ever gave a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. Mrs. MARTIN's grandfather, Moses ALLEN, was one of the active agents of the ''underground railroad" in the days before the war when runaway slaves were being assisted by the Quakers on their way to freedom in Canada. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.295-296. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MARTIN, FREDERICK

Frederick MARTIN, senior member of the firm of Martin & Botkin, dealers in clothing and men's furnishings at Portland, former treasurer of Jay county and former representative from this district in the Indiana General Assembly, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived in this county all his life. Mr. MARTIN was born in a log cabin on an uncleared farm in the Mt. Zion neighborhood in Noble township on September 29, 1853, and is a son of George and Caroline ( STOLZ ) MARTIN, Alsatians, the former of whom is still living, being now in his ninety-second year. George MARTIN was born in the French province of Alsace on February 12, 1830, and was sixteen years of age when he came to this country with his parents, Solomon MARTIN and wife, in 1846, the family coming on out into Indiana and settling on land in Noble township, this county, among the early settlers of that community. There George MARTIN grew to manhood. He married Caroline STOLZ, who also was born in Alsace and who had come to this county with her parents in the days of her girlhood, and after his marriage began farming on his own account, buying for $400 a forty-acre tract of woodland on which he built a log cabin and established his home. With an energy not so often exhibited in this generation this pioneer reserved the labor of clearing his place to the night hours, continuing for some time to work as a farm hand for others during the days, and in time he had the place cleared and a going farm started. As his sons, Frederick and Henry, came on in their turn they assisted in the labors of developing the place and helped gradually to add to the same by purchase of adjoining land until now the MARTIN's have a well improved farm of better than 200 acres. On this farm George MARTIN continued to make his home until 1865 when he moved to New Corydon, where he engaged in mercantile business and was thus occupied until his retirement in 1919, continuing, however, to make his home at New Corydon, where he is now living, one of the oldest and one of the best known men in Jay county. His aged wife died in 1917. They had been married sixty-five years and were the parents of seven children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Katherine, Louise (deceased), Sophia, Margaret, Elizabeth and Henry MARTIN, auditor of Jay county and further mention of whom is found elsewhere in this volume. Frederick MARTIN's common schooling was completed in the schools of New Corydon and this he supplemented by a course in bookkeeping in a business college and a course in a normal school, after which he became associated with his father in the store at New Corydon and remained there until his election in 1894, as the nominee of the Republican party, to the office of treasurer of Jay county and moved to Portland, though retaining his interest in the store at Corydon. He was re-elected in the following election and thus served for two terms in this important office, after which he became employed in the store of Cartwright & Headington at Portland, where he remained for sixteen years and during which time he was elected to represent this district in the House of' Representatives of the Indiana General Assembly, serving in the legislature during the years 1905-06. In 1916 Mr. MARTIN formed a partnership with John H. Botkin, who also for years had been a Cartwright & Headington employee, and the two became engaged in the clothing and men's furnishing business at Portland, doing business under the firm style of Martin & Botkin, and are still thus engaged. During the period of America's participation in the World war Mr. MARTIN served on the Jay county draft board. As indicated above, he is a Republican. He is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and is a member of the Lutheran church, in which for years he has been an office bearer, having served in about all the church offices, including that of the eldership, and for years also was superintendent of the Sunday school. Mr. MARTIN has been twice married. He first was united in marriage to Anna FENNIG, daughter of Philip FENNIG, and to that union two children were born, Clara and Herbert C. Following the death of the mother of these children Mr. MARTIN married Ruth AXE, daughter of Frederick AXE. Clara MARTIN married A. E. CHEW and has two children, Clarel and Robert. Herbert C. MARTIN married Louise GIFT and has two children, Alice Caroline and Herbert Meredith.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.221-222. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut. MARTIN, Fred Jay County, Indiana Portland Daily Sun, Centennial Edition September 21, 1936 Fred MARTIN of the firm of MARTIN & BOTKIN, has the distinction of being the oldest store clerk in Jay County. His father, one of the pioneers of the county, was engaged in the store business for many years at New Corydon at a time when that place was an important trading place. Mr. MARTIN says: "I was born on September 29, 1853 in a log cabin that my father built on what is now know as the BRUMM farm in Noble township. The cabin had a puncheon floor and a mud chimney. We lived there until I was eight years old when my father sold this farm of 40 acres to Mr. BRUMM and bought an 80 acre farm that is now known as the Money SMITH farm. We lived on this farm about four years when my father had the misfortune to lose a limb rendering him unable to farm. In 1865 he sold the farm for $2,500 cash and bought a half interest in the general store at New Corydon from my uncle Adam STOLZ. We moved to New Corydon in 1865 and took possession of the store. I was then a boy of 12 or 13 when I began to work in the store for George STOLZ & Co. I clerked in the store until 1875 when we bought uncle George STOLZ interest and the firm became George MARTIN & Son. I have been engaged in the merchandising business ever since with the exception of four years from 1894 to 1898 when the good people of Jay county elected me county treasurer. . . ."

MARTIN, HENRY

Henry MARTIN, auditor of Jay county and formerly and for many years a merchant at New Corydon, this county, is a native son of Jay county) a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived in this county all his life. Mr. MARTIN was born on a farm in Wabash township on February 15, 1870, and is a son of George and Caroline ( STOLZ ) MARTIN, both of whom were born in the French province of Alsace and who had come here with their respective parents in the days of their youth. Mrs. Caroline MARTIN died in 1916. She and her husband had been married more than sixty-five years. George MARTIN, a substantial landowner of this county, died at his home in New Corydon on October 9, 1921, in his ninety-second year. For many years he had been engaged in the mercantile business at New Corydon, but retired in 1919, as is set out elsewhere in this volume, together with further details regarding the MARTIN family and the coming of Solomon MARTIN, father of George MARTIN, with his family to Jay county in 1846 and the establishment of the family home in this county, these details being carried in a biographical sketch of Frederick MARTIN, elder brother of Henry MARTIN and a well known merchant of Portland, senior member of the firm of Martin & Botkin, and former treasurer of Jay county and former representative in the legislature from this district. Henry MARTIN was reared in Wabash township, receiving his early schooling in the schools of that township and supplementing the same by a course in Wittenberg College at Springfield, Ohio. Upon leaving college he became associated with his father and brother in the management of the store at New Corydon and was there engaged in business for better than twenty-five years, or until his election, as the nominee of the Republican party, to the office of county auditor in 1918, since which time he has made his home in Portland, having entered upon the duties of his public office on January 1, 1920. As indicated above Mr. MARTIN is a Republican and has long been recognized as one of the leaders of that party in this county. He and his wife are members of the English Lutheran church, in which he has for years served as an office bearer, having been a deacon, an elder, a Sunday school teacher for near thirty years and for twenty-five years superintendent of the Sunday school. On January 3, 1897, Henry MARTIN was united in marriage to Anna COOK, daughter of Frederick and Wilhelmina COOK, and to this union four children have been born, Emma Grace, Helen (deceased), Marjorie and George Frederick. Emma Grace MARTIN is a member of the class of 1922, Wittenberg College, and carried off junior honors in 1921. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.174-175. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MASON, SAMUEL

Samuel MASON, M. D., president of the Peoples State Bank of Pennville and owner of an excellent farm on the edge of that pleasant little city, former trustee of Penn township, formerly one of the best known practicing physicians in this part of the state, but now tor years retired from active practice, is a veteran of the Civil war, a native Hoosier, and has been a resident of this state all his life, a resident of Jay county for nearly fifty years, save for a period of about three years, during which he Was engaged in practice at Hartford City [Blackford Co.] Doctor MASON was born on a pioneer farm in Jackson township in the neighboring county of Wells, on February 14, 1845, and is a son of Thomas and Harriet (DIXON) MASON, who had come over into Indiana from Fairfield county, Ohio, following their marriage in 1840, and had settled on a tract of land which Thomas MASON had entered from the Government in Wells county, where they established their home and reared their family. There were thirteen children in this family, of whom but two survive, Doctor MASON having a brother, George Albert MASON, for many years an attorney and one of the leading citizens of Montpelier. Thomas MASON was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, in 1808, son of Dorsey MASON, a Pennsylvanian. and died in Fairfield county, Ohio, in 1883. His widow long survived him, and her last days were spent at Montpelier, Ind. She was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1818, and was eight years of age when &he; came to this country with her parents, Thomas DIXON and wife, the family locating at Newark, [Licking Co.] Ohio, where she grew to womanhood and married Thomas MASON, the remainder of her life being spent in Indiana. Thomas MASON was a practical man and a good farmer) and as he developed the original quarter section he had acquired from the Government he added to his land holdings until he became the owner of an excellent farm of 240 acres and was accounted one of the substantial citizens of that section of Wells county. Reared on the home farm, Samuel MASON received his early schooling in the neighborhood schools, the school house being a log cabin in a clearing in the woods, and In the spring of 1862, when seventeen years of age, came down into Jay county and entered Liber College, which then had acquired quite a reputation as an educational center in this county. In the summer of that year August 6, 1862 he enlisted his services as a soldier in behalf of the cause of the Union and went to the front as a member of Company K of the 75th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he rendered service until discharged six months later on account of physical disability. Upon his return he re-entered Liber College and there prepared himself to teach school, and for several years thereafter was engaged in teaching, this service being rendered in the neighboring counties of Blackford and Wells and in Missouri and Tennessee. In the meantime he was giving his attention to preparatory studies in medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. W. C. RANSOM, of Jadden, in Grant county, and presently entered the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, from which he was graduated in 1873. Upon receiving his diploma. Doctor MASON opened an office for the practice of his profession at Pennville. In 1879-80 he took a post-graduate course in the Ohio Medical College and upon his return moved his office to Hartford City, where he was engaged in practice for three years, at the end of which time he returned to Pennville, resumed his practice there and so continued until his retirement from active practice in 1899. In the meantime the Doctor had taken an active interest in the work of gas and oil development hereabout and had also bought a valuable farm on the edge of Pennville, the same lying adjacent to his pleasant home there, and since his retirement has given his attention to the interests thus acquired, the direction of operations on his 130 acre farm giving him agreeable occupation. In 1905 Doctor MASON was elected president of the Peoples State Bank of Pennville and has since had that interest also to look after, as well as other substantial interests in the community. For four years (1905-09) he served the public as trustee of Penn township. On June 24, 1874, the year following his graduation from medical school. Dr. Samuel MASON was united in marriage to Sarah A. BAILEY, who was born in Warren county, Ohio, daughter of Abram and Mary A. (JANNEY) BAILEY. but who had been a resident of this county since her childhood and had been a teacher in the schools of Portland and Pennville, and to this union were born four children, John B., Charles Rufus, Mary and Almeda, the two latter of whom are living. Charles R. MASON died in the summer of 1899, not long after his graduation from the Pennville high school, and John B. MASON died in 1913. John B. MASON, who was practicing law at Montpelier, married Margaret BRENNAMAN and left one child, a son, Charles W. Almeda MASON married Herbert E. BAYNE and has two children, Olive Rosamond and Marjorie. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.448-449. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MAY, FRANCIS H

Francis H. MAY, secretary and treasurer of the HART Glass Company and of the T. F. HART Paper Company and recognized as one of the most progressive young business men of Dunkirk, is a native of Illinois, but has been a resident of Dunkirk since the days of his boyhood. Mr. MAY was born at Galesburg, III., July 20, 1891, and is a son of Nicholas P. and Mary (HART) MAY, who became residents of Dunkirk about twenty years ago. Nicholas MAY was born at Pittsburgh, Pa., where he was reared and educated. He early became engaged in the general brokerage business, with particular reference to transactions in glass and before locating at Dunkirk had resided at Galesburg, at St. Louis and at Sandusky, Ohio, from which latter city he came to Indiana with his family and located at Dunkirk during the time of special activity in the glass industry in that city. Francis H. MAY's youth thus was attended by considerable moving about and his schooling was received in the several cities above mentioned, being completed in the high school at Dunkirk. Upon leaving school he became engaged in the insurance business at Dunkirk and was thus engaged for about four years, at the end of which time, in 1915, he became connected with the office staff of the HART Glass Company at Dunkirk. In 1918 he was elected secretary treasurer of that company and has since been serving in that important and responsible capacity. He also is secretary-treasurer of the T. F. HART Paper Company, manufacturers of paper board, with offices at Dunkirk and mills at Albany, and is regarded as one of the "live wires" in manufacturing and industrial circles hereabout. In MAY, 3916, Francis H. MAY was united in marriage to Agnes ELLENBERGER, who was born in Indiana, and to this union two children have been born, sons both, Francis and John. Mr. and Mrs. MAY are members of the Catholic church at Dunkirk and take a proper interest in parish affairs. They have a pleasant home at Dunkirk and are' interested participants in the community's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.371-372. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

McCOLLISTER, WILLIAM E

WILLIAM E. McCOLLISTER, one of the best known farmers and landowners of Penn township and proprietor of a fine place on rural mail route No. 4 out of Bryant, is a native son of Jay county and has resided here most of his life, though a part of his youth and the days of his young manhood were spent in the neighboring county of Wells. Mr. McCOLLISTER was born on a pioneer farm in Pike township, this county. May 16, 1858, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth (ARNUT) McCOLLISTER, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio, whose last days were spent in Wells county, Indiana. Henry McCOLLISTER was born in Greene county. Pennsylvania, and remained there until about fourteen years of age when his place of residence was changed to Ohio, where he grew to manhood and was married. After his marriage he became engaged in farming in Ohio and remained there until about 1856 when he came over into Indiana and settled on a farm in Pike township, this county. Some years later he moved up into Wells county, where he bought a farm and spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1907, and where his widow is still living. He owned forty acres in Wells county and 120 acres in Jay county. He and his wife were the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this sketch alone survives, the others having been James M., Rebecca Jane and Ella Maria. William E. McCOLLISTER was but a lad when his parents moved from this county up into Wells county, and in the schools of the latter county he completed his schooling. Reared on a farm, he has followed farming all his life, an assistant to his father until he was twenty-four years of age, after which he rented an "eighty" from his father and began farming on his own account. Later he bought a tract of thirty-five acres, a part of the place on which he is now living in Penn township, this county, and there established his home. Mr. McCOLLISTER is a good farmer, and as his affairs prospered he added to his holdings until now he is the owner of an excellent farm of 275 acres, which he has improved in admirable fashion, these improvements including four sets of buildings. He had to clear the greater part of this land and all improvements on the place have been made by himself. Mr. McCOLLISTER is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. In 1882 William E. McCOLLISTER was united in marriage to Sarah Jane STRALEY and to this union four children have been born, namely: James L., who married Archie MARTIN; Martha Mildred, who married Joseph BRYAN and has three children, Kenneth, Carroll and Melvin Woodrow; Wilbur Ray, who married Thesel HOLLOWAY and has three children, Kenneth, Dorothy and Wilbur Ray; and Esther E., who is at home with her parents. Mrs. McCOLLISTER was born in this county and is a daughter of George and Martha Ellen (PROUDY) STRALEY, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania, but had become a resident of Ohio in his boyhood. In the days of his young manhood he came over into Indiana and after his marriage established his home in Wayne township, this county, where he spent the remainder of his days, a well-known farmer and stock buyer. Mrs. McCOLLISTER has a sister, Rebecca. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.353-354. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

McCONOCHY, HOMER J

Homer J. McCONOCHY, secretary and treasurer of the Portland Oil Refining Company and proprietor of an admirably equipped garage in Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has long been regarded as one of the most active young business men of the county seat town. Mr. McCONOCHY was born on a farm in Jefferson township on March 18, 1885, and is a son of Daniel and Rebecca ( HUDSON ) McCONOCHY, the latter of whom is still living. Daniel McCONOCHY was born in the neighboring county of Randolph and was but a child when he came up into Jay county with his parents, the family locating in Jefferson township. There he grew to manhood and after his marriage settled on a forty-acre farm which lie had bought in that same township, where he remained until 1892 when he moved to the village of Blaine where his last days were spent, his death occurring there in December, 1916, he then being seventy-two years of age. To Daniel McCONOCHY and wife were born four children, the subject of this sketch having a brother, William G. McCONOCHY, who married Mamie McINTYRE and has three children, William, Wilma and Harold, and two sisters, Eva, who married A. B. HUFF, of Muncie, Ind.( Delaware County ) and has one child, Arthur B. HUFF, and Mamie, who married Ray PICKETT, of Dayton, Ohio (Montgomery Co.) Homer J. McCONOCHY was but a lad when his parents moved from the farm to the village of Blaine and he received his schooling there. He was helpful in the labors of his father's farm until after he bad attained his majority, when he became interested in the automobile industry and after his marriage in 1907 became definitely engaged in the auto business. In 1916 Mr. McCONOCHY opened his present place of business in North Meridian street, Portland, and. has ever since been there conducting one of the best equipped general garages in eastern Indiana. When the Portland Oil Refining Company was organized recently he took an active part in the work of organization and was elected secretary and treasurer of the company, which has erected and is operating an extensive refining plant in Portland. Mr. McCONOCHY is an active member of the local Chamber of Commerce, a Scottish Rite Mason and a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, a member oi the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and he and his wife are members of the Country Club and are Democrats. It was in 1907, as noted above, that Homer J. McCONOCHY was united in marriage to Nellie VANGOSEN. To that union two children have been born, Maxwell and Ermal. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.304-305. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

McCOY, JOHN W

JOHN W. McCOY, a retired baker of Portland, former member of the firm of Thomas, Huey & McCOY, and one of the best known men in the city, was born in Missouri but has been a resident of Portland practically all his life, his parents having been but temporary residents of Missouri at the time of his birth, their permanent home having been at Portland. It was on April 17, 1868, that Mr. McCOY was born and the place of his birth was Stockton, Mo. His parents were William and Catherine ( LEONARD ) McCOY, the former of whom was born in Jay county and was for years a lawyer, practicing at Portland. Catherine LEONARD was born in Ireland, but had been a resident of Portland since the days of her girlhood, her parents having come here with their family many years ago. William McCOY and Catherine LEONARD were married in Portland and were the parents of two children, of whom the subject of this sketch alone survives. Reared at Portland, John W. McCOY received his schooling there and as a young man became engaged as a clerk in the Eyman grocery store, where he remainder for about three years, at the end of which time he transferred his services to the Wilson grocery store and was there engaged as a clerk for a number of years. He then for several years was connected with the operation of a restaurant in Portland and while thus engaged was attracted to the, possibilities of the bakery business and presently became engaged in that line, a member of the firm of Thomas, Huey & McCoy, this connection continuing until his recent disposal of his interest in the business and retirement. On September 5, 1909, John W. McCOY was united in marriage to Jane TOUMEY and to this union three children have been born, John, Mary Catherine and Margaret Jane. Mr. and Mrs. McCOY are members of the Methodist church. Mr. McCOY is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodges of the Loyal Order of Moose and of the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland. Mrs. McCOY was born on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, daughter of Jeremiah and Margaret ( HEIS ) TOUMEY, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Germany, who have been residents of this country since the days of their childhood, having accompanied their respective parents to America many years ago. Jeremiah TOUMEY and wife are the parents of seven children, Mrs. McCOY having five brothers, Sylvester, William, Frederick, John and Leonard, and a sister, Mary. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.95 . Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

McDANIEL, OTTUS

Ottus McDANIEL, a former member of the Portland city council and proprietor in that city of one of the leading grocery stores in this part of Indiana, is a native son and has lived here all his life. He was born in Greene township on May 30, 1879 and is a son of Jones and Julia ( MANSON ) McDANIEL, both of whom were also born in this county, members of pioneer families here, and who were for years well known residents of Portland. Jones McDANIEL was a teamster and for seventeen years was the driver of the old hook and ladder truck of the Portland fire department. He and his wife had three children, all of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Mary and Lulu. Ottus McDANIEL received his schooling in the Portland public school and early became employed as the driver of the delivery wagon for the grocery firm of P .J. SMITH& Son. He continued to drive the wagon for about seven years and then was taken "inside" as a clerk in the store, a form of service he rendered for fifteen years -- thus making twenty-two years of continuous service for one firm -- at the end of which time, in 1911, he determined to go into business for himself, and with this end in view bought the Walter HOTSENPILLAR grocery store in the J. A. LONG building. For three years Mr. McDANIEL continued in business there and then he bought the W.A. HUMPHRIES grocery store at 318 North Meridian street, his present location, and has ever since been engaged in business there. Upon taking over this store Mr. McDANIEL, whose motto is "Store Quality." completely overhauled the place, improving and remodeling in up-to-date fashion and has long had one of the best stocked and most admirably equipped grocery stores and meat markets in the section of the state, the same occupying two full floors and including $5,000 worth of modern fixtures. Upon opening the place Mr. McDANIEL found three employees sufficient for his business. Now he has seven employees regularly and nine on Saturdays. In 1920 his volume of business amounted to $103,247.98. Mr McDANIEL is a Democrat and has long given his earnest attention to local civil affairs, having served for four years (1908-12) as a member of the Portland city council from his ward, the youngest councilman up to that time ever elected in Portland and the second Democratic councilman ever elected from his ward. He is member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Modern Woodman, the Kiwanis Club and the Chamber of Commerce and he and his wife are members of the West Walnut Street Christian Church. In February, 1910, Ottus McDANIEL was united in marriage to Anna E. BEARD, who was born in Salamonia, this county, the daughter of William and Martha ( WHITE ) BEARD, the former of who was a well known merchant at Salamonia, and who were the parents of twelve children, nine of whom are still living. To Mr. and Mrs. McDANIEL two children have been born, Bill Beard, who is now attending the Garfield school, and one who died in infancy. SOURCE: Vol. II, pp.288-289 History of Jay County, Indiana, ed. Milton T. Jay, M.D., Historical Publishing Co. Indpls. 1922.

McKINNEY, ANTHONY WAYNE

ANTHONY WAYNE McKINNEY, who died at his home in Dunkirk in the fall of 1918, was for many years one of the most potent factors in the development of the commercial interests of Jay county, particularly of the region surrounding the towns of Dunkirk and Redkey, and it is but fitting that in this formal history of the county in which he was born and in which his useful career had its fruition there should be carried some modest tribute to the good memory he left at his passing. His was a permanent and enduring work in this community and promises to be continued in successive generations, for the careful commercial plans he so wisely laid now are being carried out by his sons Jesse, Frank and Arthur in the operation of the McKINNEY department store at Dunkirk, which claims the title of "Indiana's greatest country store," an establishment containing upward of thirty departments and occupying 30,000 square feet of floor space. Anthony Wayne McKINNEY was born on a pioneer farm in Richland township, this county. May 2, 1847, and was a son of Joseph J. and Elizabeth McKINNEY, who reared their family of ten children on that quarter section homestead farm, the grant of which was secured by Joseph J. McKINNEY during the VanBuren administration is still held in the family. The McKINNEY's of this line got their start in America in Colonial times. Joseph J. McKINNEY's father, Anthony Wayne McKINNEY, was a soldier of the War of 1812, and the latter's father, Joseph J. McKINNEY, was a soldier of the Revolution. The persistence of names and admirable family practice here is noted. Anthony Wayne McKINNEY, grandfather of the subject of this memorial sketch, was the founder of the family in Indiana. He served as a soldier during the War of 1812 and when settlements were beginning to be effected over in this part of Indiana he came here and set up a water power grist mill on the Mississinewa river in the Fairview neighborhood in Randolph county and thus became one of the most useful pioneers of this section, his mill attracting custom among the then widely separated settlers for miles hereabout. One of his sons, Joseph J. McKINNEY, named for his Revolutionary grandsire, became one of the first settlers in Richland township, Jay county. Of Joseph J. McKINNEY, the Richland township pioneer, it has been written that "he and his good wife Elizabeth were pioneers in the truest sense of the word, for it fell to their lot, together with other early settlers of their day, to help clear the forests and to lay out and help build the roads, and otherwise lay the foundations for our present civilization." Joseph J. McKINNEY was a useful and influential pioneer citizen, for years served his community as township trustee and also served .two terms as representative from this district in the Indiana General Assembly. He lived to be seventy seven years of age. As noted above, he and his wife had ten children, all of whom grew to maturity, those besides the subject of this memorial sketch having been Mrs. Sarah TAYLOR, George W. (a soldier of the Union during the Civil war), Mrs. Nancy GOE, Mrs. Adaline MAITLEN, Mrs. Mary NIBARGER, Mrs. Elizabeth HALL, Mrs. Susan KNAPP, Mrs. Ella BROWN and Jesse McKINNEY. As most of these reared families of their own the McKINNEY connection hereabout in the present generation is a no inconsiderable one. Reared on the home farm in Richland township, Anthony W. McKINNEY completed his schooling at Liber College and when seventeen years of age began teaching school, continuing thus engaged during the winters for several years or until he went into business at Redkey as the proprietor of a sawmill, that having been in the days when "timber was king" hereabout. He married at the age of twenty-two and not long afterward added to his business enterprise a store at Dunkirk for the sale of hardware and agricultural implements, presently moving this stock to his home town of Redkey, where he established the first exclusive -hardware and implement store in the vicinity, and where for more than thirty years he continued successfully to serve his community as a distributor of household and farm commodities. He introduced and urged upon his farmer neighbors and friends the installation of improved farm machinery and add and started the first reaper and the first selfbinder in this section of the country, it having been written of him that "so eminently did he ply his trade in this particular line that Redkey became known far and near as a center of supply for all kinds of farming implements, supplies and repairs." With the development of the natural gas industry in this region Mr. McKINNEY took an active part in the promotion of the interests incident to that particular phase of industrial development and was one of the prime movers in the company which took charge of the work in Redkey, drilling wells and interesting outside capital in the utilization of the new fuel. During the later years of his life Mr. McKINNEY lived practically retired from mercantile activities and occupied himself with looking after his various property; interests, taking particular enjoyment and pride in the big department store which had been promoted by his sons at Dunkirk and which was the outgrowth of the business started by himself half a century before. He was a member of the board of directors of the Farmers State Bank of Redkey and was also a director of the City State Bank of Dunkirk. Though ever active in the general public affairs of his community Mr. McKINNEY was not an aspirant for political office and the only position of this sort he ever held was that of treasurer of the city of Redkey, in which capacity he served for a number of years. Mr. McKINNEY was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Dunkirk. His wife died in 1906 and his last years were spent at Dunkirk, where his sons had made their home, his death occurring there on September 5, 1918. It was in 1869 that Anthony W. McKINNEY was united in marriage to Martha Jane GOE, who was born in Greene county, Ohio, a member of one of the real pioneer families of that county, a county from which so many of the pioneers of Jay county came and to this union five sons were born, one of whom died in infancy; Harry, who died at the age of twenty-three years, and Jesse, Frank and Arthur, proprietors of the McKINNEY department store at Dunkirk, who are doing business under the firm name of the McKINNEY Brothers Company. Jesse McKINNEY, the eldest of these brothers, was born at Redkey on August 16, 1875. He completed his schooling by attendance at the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute and a term at Oberlin College and then entered the Byron W. King School of Oratory, from which latter institution he was graduated, entertaining at that time views concerning the possibilities of a public life. Mr. McKINNEY is a Democrat and has always taken an interested part in public affairs. He served for two years as town clerk at Redkey and in 1906 was elected to represent this county in the lower House of the Indiana General Assembly, serving in the regular session of 1907 and in the special session afterwards called by Governor Hanley for the consideration of the county local option bill. But the call of business always has been stronger than the lure of politics and from the days of his boyhood Mr. McKINNEY has been in business, he and his brothers having been valuable assistants to their father in the operation of the store at Redkey, which was continued until the time of the elder McKINNEY's retirement, after which the younger men started out "on the road," each with a distinctive line, and for two or three years were busy gaining some most valuable experience as traveling commercial salesmen. They then were ready for the enterprise which they had in mind and began "cashing in on a dream," as a nationally circulated house organ of a well known office-supply concern some time ago, in a most informative write-up of that enterprise in connection with a story of general office efficiency, referred to the McKINNEY brothers' enterprise. The brothers Jesse and Frank and Arthur pooled their interests and took over the old established business of their father, organizing at Dunkirk the Hardware Supply Company, with an initial capital of $15,000. As the little story of commercial enterprise here referred to says: For six years the new firm prospered, but in those six years the three brothers had experienced visions of a larger store, a store that would not confine itself to a limited line.. Dreaming of it, talking it over and figuring the possibilities of branching out only served to crystallize the idea in their minds. The day dawned when dreams came true and the Hardware Supply Company blossomed out as McKINNEY's Department Store. The old building (formerly used as a hotel ) had been remedied and repainted, display windows added, elevators installed, intercommunicating telephones put in and each of the thirty departments carefully stocked. To much more along this line is added, The business grew with each succeeding day. It was in 1915 that the department store had its beginning when the brothers bought the old Boston dry goods stock at Dunkirk and added dry goods to their stock in trade. Presently they added a furniture department, and then men's furnishings and women's ready -to-wear goods and millinery and finally a line of shoes, all these lines with their various auxiliaries making a very complete department store, occupying a building 60 by 130 feet, three stories in height. In February, 1910, Jesse McKINNEY was united in marriage to Mary H. GILPIN, who was born in Portland, a daughter of Levi L. and Nancy ( HAWKINS ) GILPIN, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Martha J., born on March 9, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. McKINNEY are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Dunkirk and Mr. McKINNEY is president of the board of trustees of the same, a member of the board for some years. He also for the past four years has been superintendent of the Sunday school. Frank McKINNEY, the second of the McKINNEY brothers, was born at Redkey on August 22, 1877, and the lines of his business life have run pretty closely parallel to those of his brother, above outlined. Upon leaving the high school at Redkey he entered his father's store and remained there until the establishment was moved to Dunkirk in 1909, since which time he has been a resident of the latter city, giving his attention to the affairs of the McKINNEY department store. On January 9, 1909, Frank McKINNEY was united in marriage to Charm WEAVER, who was born in Dunkirk on June 12, 1885, and whose schooling was completed at Glendale College, Cincinnati. Mrs. McKINNEY is a daughter of John and Jennie ( MAITLEN ) WEAVER, both members of old families in this community, and the former of whom formerly was proprietor of one of the oldest complete general stores in Dunkirk, later taken over by the Dunkirk Mercantile Company. Mr. and Mrs. Frank McKINNEY also are members of the Methodist church, and he is a member of the board of trustees of the church. Arthur L. McKINNEY, the youngest of the three brothers and who in addition to his mercantile interests has been for years interested in musical expression, the author of several songs of wide recognition, was born at Redkey on November 3, 1885. He completed his schooling under a special tutor and then took up in such leisure as he could command from the duties of the store the study of music, making a specialty of piano and slide trombone, taking an active part in both band and orchestral work. His study of musical composition has given him a facility in musical expression which has found its outlet in the writing of a number of pieces which have been well received in musical circles, particularly his "When the Wheat to Gold" and "I Told Her So Long Years Ago." On February 16, 1910, Arthur L. McKINNEY was united in marriage to Lena M. PETERSON, who was born in the neighboring county of Delaware, daughter of Newton and Luella ( McDANIELS ) PETERSON, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Duane P., born on April 4, 1914. Mrs. McKINNEY's schooling was completed at the university at Valparaiso, Ind., and prior to her marriage she had taught school at Albany, Ind. Mr. McKINNEY is a member of the United Commercial Travelers of America. He and his wife are members of the Methodist church at Dunkirk and he is one of the church stewards. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.40-44. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

McLAUGHLIN, JACOB B

Jacob B. McLAUGHLIN, formerly and for years a teacher in the schools of this county, but who is now and for some years past has been living on his well-kept farm in Madison township, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived in this county all his life. Mr. McLAUGHLIN was born on a farm in Noble township on June 13, 1850, and is a son of William and Rebecca ( GRAY ) McLAUGHLIN, the latter of whom was born in Gallia county, Ohio, September 17, 1803, a daughter of James and Hannah ( CLAYPOOL )GRAY. William McLAUGHLIN was born in Bath county, Virginia, March 23, 1803, and was a son of Hugh and Jane ( WILEY ) McLAUGHLIN, who later became residents of Meigs county, Ohio. In this latter county William McLAUGHLIN grew to manhood and was there married, September 17, 1833, to Rebecca GRAY. Six years later, in 1839, he came over into Indiana with his wife and the three children that meanwhile had been born to them and settled on an "eighty" he had entered from the Government in Madison township, this county, establishing his home there in a rude log cabin, and entered upon the serious task of making a farm out of the woodland tract. Ten years later, in 1849, he moved with his family to a farm in section 34 of Noble township and there established the home in which he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. He died on July 3, 1872, and his widow survived until in February, 1881. Of the nine children born to this pioneer pair the subject of this sketch was the last born. Three of these children are still 'living, Jacob B. McLAUGHLIN having two brothers, John McLAUGHLIN, of Portland, and George McLAUGHLIN, of Madison township. Reared on the home farm in Noble township, Jacob B. McLAUGHLIN supplemented the schooling received in the district school by attendance for five terms at Liber College, and in the fall of 1872 received his first license to teach school, Simeon K. Bell at that time having been county school "examiner." Mr. McLAUGHLIN's first term of school was taught during the winter of 1872-73, and he continued-as a teacher each winter thereafter until in 1883, meantime taking two terms of instruction during the summers in the old Portland Normal School and one term at the normal school at Valparaiso, Ind. During this time he also was carrying on his farm work. In 1883 he retired from the school room and was out for seven years, at the end of which time he resumed teaching and was for six years thereafter thus engaged. Upon, the death of his mother in 1881, Mr. McLAUGHLIN inherited a portion of the home acres and he bought a sufficient additional tract to give him possession there of seventy acres, which he farmed for a number of years. He then sold thirty acres of this tract and traded the remaining forty for a livery stable plant in Portland and also bought a dwelling house in Portland. In the follower year he traded the house in on eighty acres of the farm on which he is now living in Madison township, and not long afterward also sold the. livery stable, with a view to giving his whole attention to farming and moved to Madison township, where he since has reeded. To the original tract of eighty acres in this township Mr. McLAUGHLIN has added by purchase until now he owns an excellent farm of 130 acres which he has improved in up-to-date fashion, and on which he is living practically retired, renting the fields. This farm is located on rural mail route No. 3 out of Ft. Recovery (Ohio). Mr. McLAUGHLIN is a bachelor. He is a Democrat and has ever given his interested attention to local civic affairs, but has not been a seeker of public office. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.200-201. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MCLAUGHLIN, William H

WILLIAM H. McLAUGHLIN, trustee of Wayne township and one of the best known citizens of Portland, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived in this county all of his life. Mr. McLAUGHLIN was born on a farm in Madison township on May 8, 1864, and is a son of Hugh and Sarah A. ( LEHMER ) McLAUGHLIN, both of whom were members of pioneer families there. Hugh McLAUGHLIN was born in Ohio and was about ten years of age when his parents, John and Barbara McLAUGHLIN, came over into Indiana with their family and settled on a farm in Madison township, this county, where they established their home. John McLAUGHLIN, the pioneer, and his wife were the parents of eight children, of whom three are still living, Francis M., Anna and Rebecca. Hugh McLAUGHLIN grew to manhood on the old home farm in Madison township and after his marriage to Sarah A. LEHMER, McLAUGHLIN became engaged in farming on his own account and was long recognized as one of the substantial farmers of that community. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Barbara, and a brother, Wiley A. McLAUGHLIN. William H. McLAUGHLIN received his schooling in the district schools of this county and for three years after reaching manhood's estate farmed with his father. He then became engaged in black smithing and was thus engaged for nine years, at the end of which time he bought a general store at College Corner and was for thirteen years engaged in business at that place. Selling his store at College Corner, Mr. McLAUGHLIN resumed farming for one year and then became engaged at Portland in operating a shoe repair shop. In 1918 he was elected trustee of Wayne township and' is still serving the public in that capacity. Mr. McLAUGHLIN is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Congregational church. In 1894 William H. McLAUGHLIN was united in marriage to Anna M. WEBER, who also was born in this county, a daughter of Benjamin and Mary A. WEBER, and to this union eight children have been born, Harrison Emerson (deceased), Harriet R., Mary L., Lula, Walter L., Byron and Gerald. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.85-90. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MEEKER, FREDERICK EDWARD

Frederick Edward MEEKER, of Portland, one of the organizers and a member of the board of directors of the Home Finance Corporation of Indianapolis, formerly and for years connected with the affairs of the HAWKINS Mortgage Company of Portland and prior to that connection for some years engaged in the newspaper business at Portland, one of the best known young men in that city, was born in Portland and has been a resident of that city all his life. Mr. MEEKER was born on August 18, 1879, and is a son of Norton Augustus and Rachel Hannah ( HAWKINS ) MEEKER, the latter of whom was a daughter of Judge Nathan B. and Rebecca ( SHANKS ) HAWKINS, both members of pioneer families in this county and concerning whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere in this work m a comprehensive review of the HAWKINS family in Jay county. Norton Augustus MEEKER, an honored veteran of the Civil war and formerly and for years one of the leading merchants of Portland, was a native of Ohio, born in Delaware county, that state, July 7, 1844, a son of Robert and Jane ( McDONALD ) MEEKER, and was living there when the Civil war broke out, he then being under seventeen years of age. Tn the next year, on August 8, 1862, he then being just past eighteen, he enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and went to the front as a member of Company A, 96th regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which gallant command he served until honorably discharged on August 18, 1865, the war then being- over. During the battle of Arkansas Post, September II, 1862, he was severely wounded in the neck and in one arm and during his service was in several other hard fought engagements. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. MEEKER rejoined his parents, who meanwhile had moved to Jay county, locating in the immediate vicinity of Portland, where his father became engaged in farming and also for years operated the toll gate on East Main street. As a boy Mr. MEEKER had learned the rudiments of the drug business and after his marriage on October 4. 1866, at Portland, to Rachel Hannah HAWKINS returned to Ohio and opened a drug store at Spencerville [Allen Co.]in that state. A few years later he disposed of his interests there and returned to Portland, where for some time he was eng-aged as the local agent for the United States Express Company, but the urge to re-enter business on his own account proved stronger than his desire to continue connected with the corporation and he presently opened a drug store in Portland and was thus engaged in business in that city, first on North Meridian street and then on West Main street, the remainder of his life, his death occurring on May 24, 1890. His widow survived him for more than twenty-five years, her death occurring on April 17, 1918, she then being in her seventieth year. To Norton A. and Rachel H. (HAWKINS) MEEKER were born six children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Lenora J., wife of H. D. WALTZ, of Portland: Gertrude O., wife of Frank L. BRADEN, former proprietor and publisher of the Portland Commercial-Review and a former city clerk of Portland, now and for years past a resident of Indianapolis, head of the firm of F. L. BRADEN & Co., insurance adjusters; Caroline Adele, who died in 1894 at the age of twenty-two years; Charles M., who died in 1871 at the age of fourteen months, and Franklin Sheridan MEEKER, of Portland. Reared at Portland, where he was born, Frederick E. MEEKER received his schooling in the schools of that city and when seventeen years of age became engaged as a clerk in the book and jewelry store of R. H. DENNEY at Portland. Three years later he became engaged in newspaper work at Portland in association with his brother-in-law, Frank L. BRADEN, and was thus engaged for about six years, at the end of which time he accepted employment as time keeper for the construction force of the Muncie & Portland Traction Company, engaged in building the traction line from Muncie to Portland, and upon the completion of that work was appointed ticket agent for the company in the Portland office. He continued thus engaged for about eighteen months, at the end of which time he took up a new line and was for nearly three years thereafter engaged in the publication of city and county directories, after which he became engaged in the real estate business at Portland in association with C. W. McLAUGHLIN, and was thus engaged for about three years, at the end of which time he entered the office of N. B. HAWKINS and Company and was with that: concern when it became reorganized as The HAWKINS Mortgage Company. In this latter connection Mr. MEEKER's attention particularly was directed to the Welfare Loan Societies department of this company's extensive operations and he organized the second such society of the present long series of Welfare Loan Societies now operating under the direction of The HAWKINS Mortgage Company. Mr. MEEKER continued his connection with this company until in January, 1921. when he and T. J. TAYLOR, of Portland directed their energies toward the organization of the Home Finance Corporation of Indianapolis and in May following secured a charter for that concern, which is incorporated in accordance with the laws of the state of Indiana and under the supervision of the Indiana state securities commission. The Home Finance Corporation of Indianapolis, incorporated with a capital of $1,000,000, quickly established itself on a firm financial basis and is now recognized as one of the most promising concerns of this character in Indiana. The local branch office of the Home Finance Corporation is in the Sibery block in Portland, which was bought for that purpose. The greater part of the stock in this concern is held by substantial business men and farmers of Jay county and is officered as follows: President, O. E. PIERCE, of Portland; vice-president, Charles S. WATSON, of Indianapolis; secretary-treasurer, Frank L. BRADEN, of Indianapolis, who with E. Bert THURMAN, of Indianapolis, T. J. TAYLOR, of Portland, David ABRAMSON, of Portland, and Frederick E. MEEKER, of Portland, constitute the board of directors. Mr. MEEKER also is a member of the board of directors of the Portland Chamber of Commerce and has long- been recognized as one of the real "live wires" in the business life of that city. He is a Republican and has ever given his earnest attention to local civic affairs. Fraternally, he is affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent Order of Elks and with the local aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland, and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church and of the Country Club. On May 8, 1908, Frederick E. MEEKER was united in marriage to Grace E. WARE, who at that time had been for five years a member of the teaching staff of the schools of Jay county, and to this union one child has been born, a son, J. Gordon MEEKER, born on September 25, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. MEEKER have a very pleasant home on East High street, Portland, and have ever taken an interested and helpful part in the general social activities of the city. Mrs. MEEKER also is a member of one of the pioneer families of Jay county, the WARE's having been represented here since the days when what is now Jay county was a part of Randolph county. She was born in Pike township and is a daughter of Enoch F. and Rebecca Jane ( LYONS ) Ware, the latter of whom was born in that same township, daughter of Elijah and Mary ( BAILEY ) LYONS, the latter of whom was born in Fulton county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Peter and Margaret ( CLINE ) BAILEY. Elijah LYONS was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, September 24, 1824, a son of Thomas and Eve ( APPLE ) LYONS, who in 1837 moved to Perry county in that same state. In this latter county Elijah LYONS grew to manhood and in 1846 married Mary BAILEY. Four years later, in September) 1850, he came over into Indiana and settled on an uncleared farm in section 26 of Pike township, this county, where he and his wife reared their family and spent the remainder of their lives, useful and influential members of that community. Enoch F. WARE also was born in Pike township, May 31, 1848, a son of John E. and Susan ( FREEZLE ) WARE, the latter of whom was born in Washington county, Tennessee) but was reared in Wayne county, Indiana, where her parents, Martin and Mary FREEZLE, had settled when she was a child. John E. WARE was born in Amherst county, Virginia, April 4, 1816, a son of Andrew and Cynthia Ann WARE, who in 1834 moved with their family to Clark county, Ohio, and in the following year (1835) moved over into Indiana and settled on a quarter section of timber land in the Bluff Point neighborhood in what later came to be organized as Pike township, this county. John E. WARE was nineteen years of age when he came to this county with his parents and he at once "buckled down" to the task of clearing and developing the home place. In 1842 he married Susan FREEZLE and established his home on that place, coming later to be the owner of 380 acres of land, and there his last days were spent, his death occurring in the spring of 1868. His widow long survived him. They were the parents of nine children, of whom William WARE, the first born, died in the service of his country while serving as a soldier of the Union during the Civil war. The late Enoch F. WARE, the fourth in order of birth of these children, grew up on that homestead farm and on November 28, 1879, married Rebecca Jane LYONS. He established his home there and spent the rest of his life on that place, one of the leading men of The community and for two terms trustee of Pike township. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, six of whom are still living, Mrs. MEEKER having four sisters, Mrs. Everett BISHOP, of Seattle, Wash.; Mrs. Clarence HUTCHENS, of Portland; Lucile and Lena, who are unmarried and living on the old home place, and one brother. Lee WARE, who is farming the home place in Pike township. Mrs. MEEKER's schooling was completed at the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute. At the age of seventeen she became qualified as a teacher and for five years prior to her marriage was engaged as a teacher in the schools of this county. She has long taken an interested part in local cultural activities, one of the leaders in woman's club work at Portland, and is the district chairman of the Eighth district department of the Indiana state federation of clubs. She organized the first Parent-Teacher Association in Portland and is the present president of the local association. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.328-331. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MERRY, FRANK W

Frank W. MERRY, president of the Indiana Glass Company at Dunkirk, president of the First State Bank of Dunkirk and in other ways actively and prominently identified with the industrial and commercial interests of Dunkirk and of Jay county, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Indiana and of Dunkirk for the past twenty years and has thus long felt himself as much a part of the community in which he resides as though native and to the manner born. During the period of American participation in the World war Mr. MERRY served as a member of the selective draft board for Jay county and also served as a member of the war service committee for the associated glass industries of the United States, in both of these important capacities rendering invaluable service to the nation. He is a Republican and in the party convention which nominated Mr. Hughes for President at Chicago in 1916 was a delegate from this district, and was later elected to represent the Eighth district as an elector from Indiana in the electoral college which declared the election of the President. He is a member of the Congregational church at Dunkirk and of the Portland lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Mr. MERRY has been actively identified with the glass industry since he was twenty-one years of age and has for years been recognized as one of the dominant figures in that industry in this country. He was born at Bowling Green, Ohio, June 18, 1874, and was graduated from the high school in that city in 1893. He then entered Oberlin College and after a òcourse of two years there entered the employ of the Ohio Flint Glass Company, coming to Dunkirk in July, 1895, as bookkeeper and paymaster of the company's plant at that place. In 1899 this plant was destroyed by fire and was not rebuilt, the company transferring the business here created to a new plant at Lancaster, Ohio, and Mr. MERRY removed with the staff to Lancaster, continuing his connection with the company's affairs there until the Lancaster plant was merged in the fall of that same year with the other plants of the National Glass Company, a combination of twenty-one glass plants, with offices .at Pittsburgh, Pa., when he was transferred to the general offices of the company at Pittsburgh, where he was made assistant treasurer of the company. In 1902 he was elected treasurer of the company and òon January 3, 1903, returned to Dunkirk to take charge of the No. I plant of the National Glass Company. In the following year (1904) Mr. MERRY helped promote the organization of the Indiana Glass Company, which leased the local plant of the National Glass Company at Dunkirk, and he was elected president of the company, a position he ever since has held. The plant was purchased in 1909. Upon the organization of this company J. E. MERRY was elected vicepresident, H. H. PHILLIPS, secretary and treasurer, and H. J. BATSCH, factory manager. This organization continued effective until in 1915, when C. W. SMALLEY was elected to succeed J. E. MERRY as vice president, and in 1916 Charles L. GAUNT was elected to succeed H. H. PHILLIPS as secretary-treasurer. Elsewhere in this work there are set out details regarding the operation of the extensive plant of the Indiana Glass Company, which since the plant was taken over by the present organization has doubled its output. It is now doing an annual business in excess of $1,250,000 and its local payroll aggregates more than $500,000 a year. The company long ago demonstrated that it is panic proof and its plant is kept in continuous operation day and night, employing a force of right around 550 persons, a most important contribution to the industrial life of Dunkirk and of Jay county. The plant has a capacity of over three carloads of glass a day, the output being confined to table ware, vases and lamps, the table ware being pressed and the vases and lamps blown. Prior to 1906 the company was able to use natural gas effectively, but with the diminution of the supply of this wonderful natural fuel was forced to manufacture its own gas and has a capacious plant for that purpose. While Mr. MERRY gives his chief attention to the affairs of the Indiana Glass Company, the very nature of his position as executive head of this important industry requires an extension of his activities, and he has other interests which, all together, make him a very busy man. As noted above, he is president of the First State Bank of Dunkirk, and he also takes an active and intelligent interest in local civic affairs. He has long been regarded as one of the leaders of the Republican party in the Eighth district and has rendered valuable service to his party, his interest in party affairs having been demonstrated ever since he first became a resident of this county when little more than a boy, back in the summer of 1895, in the days when the natural gas boom hereabout was just about at its height. From the hour of his introduction to this community, Mr. MERRY has cherished a hearty interest in all that pertains to the common welfare hereabout, and that interest has found an outlet in many a useful channel, so that he long has been recognized as one of the typically representative men of Jay county. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.110-111. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

METZ, VERNON E

VERNON E. METZ, who is widely known throughout the counties of Jay, Adams, Randolph and Wayne as a salesman of made to measure clothing for men, with headquarters at Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. METZ was born on a farm in Wayne township on March 22, 1889, and is a son of Thomas J. and Margaret ( BICKLE ) METZ, both members of old families here, the former born in Wayne township and the latter in Pike township. Thomas J. METZ is a landowner in Pike township, where he has farmed for years, and he and his wife have had six children, four of whom are living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Hazel, Glicie and Juanita. Reared on the home farm, Vernon E. METZ received his schooling in the district school in the neighborhood of his boyhood home and after leaving school continued farming. He married before he was twenty years of age and for four or five years thereafter was variously occupied until he was made manager of the grain elevator at Blaine, a position he continued to occupy for eighteen months, at the end of which time he became engaged in his present line, selling men's clothing by sample and on made-to-measure lines, his territory covering the four counties above enumerated, and has done well. For about nine months during the time of America's participation in the World war Mr. METZ was occupied in the more essential occupation of fireman on the Pennsylvania railroad, but upon the return of normal conditions resumed his clothing business, making his headquarters at Portland, where he has established an excellent business. Mr. METZ is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodges of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Improved Order of Redmen at Portland. On September 26, 1908, Vernon E. METZ was united in marriage to Nellie E. DUNMOYER, who was born in Pike township, this county, daughter of William H. and Rosa E. ( BROWN ) DUNMOYER, and to this union two children have been born, Millard and Noel. Mrs. METZ's schooling was completed in the Portland high school. Her father, William H. BROWN, is the owner of a farm of 115 acres in Greene township, this county, and he and his wife have had six children, four of whom are living, Mrs. METZ having three sisters, Elsie, Bernice and Dolores. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.79. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

METZNER, WESLEY T

WESLEY T. METZNER, a well known and substantial retired building contractor of Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life, an important factor in the county's general development, for his building operations have been carried on in all parts of the county. He was born on a farm in Noble township on November 9, 1855, son of John and Catherine ( YOUNG ) METZNER, the former a native of Germany, born in the kingdom of Saxony, October 2, 1805, a son of Jasper and Hannah ( REISENBERG ) METZNER; and the latter a native of France, born on July 18, 1819, daughter of Nicholas and Salome (YOUNG) YOUNG, who were among the early settlers in Jay county and whose last days were spent here. John METZNER was twenty-three years of age when he came to this country in 1838 and on November 4, 1839, at Newark, Ohio, he married Catherine Young, who had come to this country two years prior to that date. For twelve years after his marriage John METZNER worked at his trade, that of a wagon maker, at Louisville, Ohio, and then, in 1851, come over into Indiana and located on a farm of eighty acres in section 7 of Noble township, this county, where he and his wife established their home and spent their last days, well known and influential residents of that community. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom four are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, William F. METZNER, and two sisters, Catherine E., wife of George STOLZ, of Portland, and Mary A., wife of Harvey A. HUEY. Reared on the home farm in Noble township, Wesley T. METZNER received his schooling in the old METZNER schoolhouse) so named because it occupied a site at the cross-roads on a corner of his father's farm. From the days of his boyhood he was a valued assistant to his father in the labors of the farm and for several years after his school days were over continued farming, at the same time being more or less engaged working at the carpenter's trade and thus acquired an early skill as a builder. He married at the age of thirty and then bought a forty-acre farm in Wayne township, establishing his home there. It was then that Mr. METZNER entered upon his career as a building contractor, a line which he followed with success until his retirement in 1920, for many years having been regarded as one of the county's leading contractors., his operations covering a wide territory hereabout. Years ago Mr. METZNER left his farm home in Wayne township and moved to Portland, where he since has made his residence. He sold the place in Wayne township and is now the owner of a well developed farm of something more than 102 acres in Pike township. Mr. METZNER is a Republican and for some years during the time of his residence in Wayne township (1894-99) served as assessor of that township. He is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Portland and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. It was on November 15, 1885, that Wesley T. METZNER was united in marriage to Mary Emma ROSER, who also was born in this county, and to this union were born four children: Ethel C., Jay E., Mabel E. and Mary V., the last named of whom died on May 13, 1920. Ethel C. METZNER married John McDANIEL, of Portland, and has three children, John, Max M. and Lee A. Jay E. METZNER, who is unmarried, is now living at Muncie, Ind., where he is employed as a bookkeeper in the offices of Ball Bros. During the World war he served as clerk of the draft board of Delaware county. Mrs. METZNER was born in Noble township, a daughter of Evan and Catherine ( SPRECHER ) ROSER, natives of Pennsylvania, who had located in this county about the year 1860. Evan ROSER was a substantial farmer of Noble township and he and his wife spent their last days there. They were the parents of five children, of whom but two are now living, Mrs. METZNER and her brother, Edwin ROSER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.99-100. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MILLER, ALBE D

Albe D. MILLER, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Jay county, proprietor of an excellent farm in Wayne township, where he resides, rural mail route No. 6 out of Portland, is a native son of this county and has resided here all his life. Mr. MILLER was born on a farm in Wayne township on December 3, 1854, and is a son of Daniel and Mary A. ( WHIPPLE ) MILLER, the latter of whom came to this county from Rhode Island with her brother when twenty-six years of age and was shortly afterward married here. Daniel MILLER was born in Maryland and was thirteen years of age when he came to this county with his parents, the family driving through in a covered wagon and settling on an eighty-acre farm which his father had entered from the Government in Wayne township. Here Daniel MILLER grew to manhood and after his marriage established his home on a farm in that same township and there he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of six children, four of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Amy and Ada, and a brother, Sumner B. MILLER. Reared on the home farm in Wayne township, Albe D. MILLER completed his schooling by attendance for three terms at old Liber College and remained at home, helpful in the labors of the farm, until his marriage when he bought an "eighty" in Wayne township, a part of the place on which he is now living, and has resided there ever since. Upon taking possession of this place Mr. MILLER entered upon a plan of improvement which in time gave him an admirable place and in 1906 he bought an adjoining tract of 120 acres, thus giving him a farm of 200 acres, which he still is successfully farming, carrying on his operations in up-to-date fashion. In addition to his general farming, Mr. MILLER has long given considerable attention to dairying. He is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Christian church at Salamonia. Albe D. MILLER has been twice married. In 1885 he was united in marriage to Mary SPENCE, who was born in the neighboring county of Randolph and who died in 1888 leaving one child a daughter, Vera, born on April 13, 1886, who married Harry BERGER, a farmer of Pike township, and has three children, Glenn F., Evelyn and Ralph. On February 22, 1899, Mr. MILLER married Sophia PFIEFFER, who was born in Green Bay, Wis., but who was reared and educated at Madison, Wis., and who came to Jay county in 1898. Mrs. MILLER is a daughter of Anton and Dorothy ( GARDNER ) PFIEFFER, Europeans, born in the kingdom of Bavaria, who were married there and shortly afterward came to America. Anton PFIEFFER enlisted as a soldier in behalf of the Union cause during the time of the Civil war and at the battle of Gettysburg received a wound which ultimately caused his death. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, one son, Fred, who died at the age of sixty-one years, and six daughters, all of whom are living, Mrs. MILLER having five sisters, Mary, Minnie, Caroline, Emma and Amelia. The MILLER's have a pleasant and hospitable home and have ever done their part in general community service. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.235-236. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

MILLIGAN, WILLIAM F

WILLIAM F. MILLIGAN, head of the firm of MILLIGAN & Company, real estate and loans, at Portland, secretary of the Jay County Farm Loan Company, president of the MILLIGAN Finance Company of Ft. Wayne, and for years regarded as one of the active and influential business men of this county, is a native of Ohio, born in Darke county on April 17, 1865, and is a son of John and Rominia (CARTER ) MILLIGAN, the latter of whom was born at Cincinnati. John MILLIGAN was born in Pennsylvania and grew to manhood in that state. He moved to Ohio and thence to Indiana, where he married Rominia CARTER. He later established his home on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, and there became a substantial farmer and landowner. He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, four of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Martha, wife of George DENNEY, of Mercer county, Ohio, and Ellen, wife of Ernest LOWRY, of New Madison, Ohio, and a brother, J. Wesley MILLIGAN. Reared on the home farm in Darke county, William F. MILLIGAN received his early schooling in the schools of that county and supplemented this by a course of eighteen months in the Normal School at Portland, after which he was employed as a bookkeeper in his home county for four years, at the end of which time he went to Chicago and was there for two years engaged as a shipping clerk in a wholesale concern. He then moved to Selma, Ind., where for two years he was in the retail meat business. Disposing of his interests at Selma he then became a resident of Portland, where for about four years he was engaged as a collector for the mercantile firm of Cartwright & Headington, acquiring thus a form of experience which presently prompted him, to go into the collection business on his own account. With this end in view he formed a partnership and for two years conducted a collection agency, with offices at Portland and Muncie. In 1906 Mr. MILLIGAN disposed of his interest in that concern and became engaged at Portland in the real estate and loan business, which business he since has maintained, his business being incorporated under the firm name of MILLIGAN & Company, he being the head of the concern, and has been quite successful. Mr. MILLIGAN also is secretary of the Jay County Farm Loan Association and in other ways has been active in the business concerns of the. community in which he resides. He is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. MILLIGAN has been twice married. In 1904 he was united in marriage to Elizabeth PEDEN, who was born in Randolph county, this state, daughter of Thomas and Martha PEDEN, and to this union were born two children, Arab, who married Bernard HIATT, of Portland, and Luella, who is now (1921) a student in the Portland high school. Following the death of the mother of these daughters Mr. MILLIGAN married Mrs. Dora E. ( WOODS ) CABLE, who was a friend of his youth in his old home neighborhood in Darke county, Ohio, where she also was born, a member of one of the old families of that section of the state. Mr. and Mrs. MILLIGAN have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the general social activities of their home town. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.86-87. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MILLIGAN, WILSON H

Wilson H. MILLIGAN, one of Bearcreek township's well known and substantial farmers and landowners and proprietor of a fine farm on rural mail route No. 9 out of Portland, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and has lived, in this county all his life, the farm which he owns in Bearcreek township being part of the original tract entered there by his grandfather, Wilson MILLIGAN, one of the pioneers of that township, about the time of the formal organization of this county. Mr. MILLIGAN was born on that farm, as was his father, and has done well his part in carrying on in his generation the work of development started there by his grandfather and continued by his father. He was born on November II, 1873, and is a son of Samuel Homer and Harriet A. ( TOWLE ) MILLIGAN, the latter of whom also was a member of one of Jay county's pioneer families, the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth ( MONTGOMERY ) TOWLE, of Liber. The late Samuel Homer MILLIGAN, a veteran of the Civil war, was born on September 22, 1846, and was a son of Wilson and Mary ( BLAINE ) MILLIGAN, the latter of whom was a daughter of James and Elizabeth ( DOUGLASS ) BLAINE, of Circleville, Ohio, Wilson MILLIGAN, who became one of Jay county's best known pioneers, was born in Highland county, Ohio, August 27, 1812, and was a son of James and Mary ( SILLICK ) MILLIGAN, the former of whom was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, the son of George MILLIGAN, a native of Ireland, who had located in Pennsylvania in Colonial days. James MILLIGAN married in Pennsylvania and four years later, in 1801, moved over into the Territory of Ohio, that having been two years before Ohio was admitted to statehood, and settled in Highland county, presently becoming one of the incorporators of the village of Greenfield in that county, and there he and his wife reared their family of eight children and spent the remainder of their days. Wilson MILLIGAN grew up in the Greenfield neighborhood in Highland county and in the summer of 1833, he then being twenty-one years of age, was married. In 1837 he became attracted to the new lands then being opened to settlement over in this part of Indiana and entered from the Government a tract of 240 acres in Bearcreek township, this county, where he put up a log cabin in the forest wilderness and established his home, and there he resided for more than fifty years, becoming the owner of an excellent farm of 320 acres. Wilson MILLIGAN was twice married. By his first wife, Mary BLAINE, he had six children, William :Blaine, James Newton, Mary Elizabeth, Hannah Jane, Sarah Amanda and Samuel Homer. The mother of these children died on January 4, 1866, and on August 4, 1867, Wilson MILLIGAN married Jane A. MONTGOMERY, daughter of Reuben and Mary ( PEARSOL ) MONTGOMERY, and one of the early school teachers of this county. Wilson MILLIGAN was one of the most active forces in promoting schools and better social conditions in his neighborhood, in pioneer days, served for some years as trustee of Bearcreek township and was an earnest worker in the United Brethren church. His youngest son, Samuel Homer MILLIGAN, father of the subject of this sketch, was born on the pioneer home farm in Bearcreek township and there grew to manhood. He completed his schooling at Liber College and when seventeen years of age enlisted (May 28, 1864) for service as a soldier of the Union and went to the front as a member of Company E, 139th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry (one hundred days service), and served until he received his honorable discharge. Upon his return from the army he resumed his studies at Liber College and on December 24, 1868, was married to Harriet A. TOWLE, of Liber. In 1870, in company with his brothers, he became engaged in the saw-milling business and was thus engaged for three years, at the end of which time he disposed of his interest in the mill and resumed farming, locating on the old home place, where he spent the remainder of his days, his death occurring there on February 15, 1889. To him and his wife were born nine children, all of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Nina and Mary, and six brothers, Orland B., Edward T., John B., Roydon R., Carlton M. and Scott MILLIGAN. Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, Wilson H. MILLIGAN received his schooling in the Antiville school and from the days of his boyhood has devoted his attention to farming. He was but seventeen years of age when his father died and he remained at home helping to farm the place in his mother's behalf until his marriage at the age of twenty-five when he came into possession of twenty-five acres of the place and there established his home. Since then, from time to time, Mr. MILLIGAN has acquired other interests in the old home place until now he is the owner of 120 acres and has an admirably equipped farm plant. In addition to his general farming he has long given considerable attention to the raising of live stock, with particular reference to hogs, and is doing well. It was on March 18, 1899, that Wilson H. MILLIGAN was united in marriage to Ida MICHAEL, who was born in Darke county, Ohio, but was reared in Bearcreek township, this county, daughter of William and Elizabeth ( PHILLIPPI ) MICHAEL, and to this union three children have been born, Homer, Milo and Ralph, the latter of whom is still in school, in attendance at the Antiville school. Mr. MILLIGAN is a Republican, as were his grandfather and his father, and he and his wife are members of the Pleasant Ridge Methodist Episcopal church. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.130-131. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MILLS, HANSON F

HANSON F. MILLS, clerk of the Jay Circuit Court and formerly and for years a well known member of Jay county's excellent teaching corps, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. MILLS was born on a farm in Jefferson township on April 22, 1887, and is a son of Ardon and Ella ( BRUBAKER ) MILLS, both of whom also were born in Jay county, members of pioneer families here, and who were the parents of eleven children, nine of whom are still living. Ardon MILLS is a substantial farmer in Jefferson township and for years has been widely known hereabout as a live stock buyer. Reared on the home farm in Jefferson township, Hanson F. MILLS supplemented the schooling received in the local schools of that neighborhood by attendance at the normal school at Marion and the Tri-State College at Angola. At the age of eighteen years he began teaching school and was thus engaged for twelve years, or until his election in the fall of 1918 to the office of clerk of the Jay Circuit Court, which important offilcial position he now occupies. Mr. MILLS is a Republican and from the days of his youth has taken an active and earnest interest in local civic affairs, long having been regarded as one of the leaders in the junior ranks of that party in this county. He is a member of the Portland lodge of the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. MILLS married Cleo Ada HARTLEY, daughter of Enoch and Anna HARTLEY, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Margaret Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. MILLS have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.52. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MITCHELL, JOSEPH H

Joseph H. MITCHELL, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Madison township, is a member of one of Jay county's old families and has lived in this county all his life. Mr. MITCHELL was born on a farm in Madison township on September 2, 1873, and is a son of Amos and Martha J. ( KNOWLTON ) MITCHELL, both members of pioneer families in that neighborhood. Amos MITCHELL, who is still living in Madison township, is the owner of 100 acres of land there, land that was entered from the Government by his father, John MITCHELL, one of the early settlers of that township. To Amos MITCHELL and wife were born eight children, six of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having three sisters, Sarah, Malinda and Eva, and two brothers, William and Wesley MITCHELL. Reared on the home farm in Madison township, Joseph H.. MITCHELL received his schooling in the Chapel, school district No. 2, and remained at home assisting in the labors of the farm until his marriage at the age of twenty-two, when he rented a farm and began farming on his own account. Two years later he bought from his father-in-law forty acres of the farm on which he is now living in Madison township and has since resided there, he and his family having a very pleasant home on rural mail route No. 3 out of Ft. Recovery, Ohio (Mercer Co.) Since taking possession of this place Mr. MITCHELL has enlarged his holding until now he has 133 acres and has improved the farm by the erection of a set of new and lip-to-date buildings, his house being equipped with bath, hot and cold water, electric lights and furnace, and he has one of the best equipped farm plants in the neighborhood. The farm is all cleared save about twenty acres left for a woodlot. Mr. MITCHELL is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church at Salamonia. It was on February 26, 1896, that Joseph H. MITCHELL was united in marriage to Emma E. WAGNER, who was born on the place on which she is now living, and to this union have been born six children, Rufus, Lura, Freda, Forrest, Harry and Emma L., two of whom, Rufus and Lura, are married. Rufus MITCHELL, who is now a motor mechanic living at Chillicothe, Ohio, (Ross County) is a veteran of the World war. He enlisted for service at Ft. Wayne and after four months of training in this country was sent to France as a motor mechanic, there rendering eight months of overseas service. He married Olga. JUNOD and has one child, a son, Harold. Lura MITCHELL married John CULL, a farmer of Noble township, this county, and has one child, a son, Robert CULL. Mrs, MITCHELL was reared in Madison township and received her schooling in the Center school. She is a daughter of Lorenz and Mary ( LOCKER ) WAGNER, the former of whom was born in France and came to this country after the Franco Prussian war, presently locating in Jay county, where he became the owner of an excellent farm in Madison township. He and his wife had two daughters, Mrs. MITCHELL having a sister, Bertha. Both Lorenz WAGNER and his wife had been previously married and the latter, by her marriage to Edward BARTLING, was the mother of seven children, all of whom save one, Anna, are living, these being Henry, Sarah, Elizabeth, Edward, Louise and Sophia BARTLING. By his first marriage to Emily SHUE. Lorenz Wagner was the father of five children, three of whom, Emily, Anna and Fred, are living, the deceased being Charles and one who died in infancy.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.306-307. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MONTGOMERY, I A

I. A. MONTGOMERY, proprietor of a general store at Bryant and one of the best known men in that section of Jay county, is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life. Mr. MONTGOMERY was born in the village of Westchester on October 12, 1877, and is a son of George G. and Sarah ( GRIFFITH ) MONTGOMERY, both members of pioneer families in this county, the latter born in Washington, Pa., but a resident of Jay county since the days of her girlhood, her parents having come to Indiana and settled in Noble township, this county, in pioneer days. George G. MONTGOMERY was born in Wabash township, this county, a member of one of the real pioneer families there. He completed his schooling in old Liber College and for some time in the days of his young manhood was engaged in farming. In 1877, he became engaged in the mercantile business at Westchester in partnership with his brother-in-law, Isaac GRIFFITH, and was thus engaged until in the early '90s when he sold his interest in the store and returned to farming, a vocation he followed until 1899, when he again became engaged in the mercantile business, in association with his son, I. A. MONTGOMERY, opening the store at Bryant which is now owned and conducted by the latter. This mutually agreeable partnership continued for eighteen years, or until the retirement of the elder MONTGOMERY in 1917, when I. A. MONTGOMERY bought his father's interest in the store and has since been carrying on the business alone. George G. MONTGOMERY died on September 7, 1919. To him and his wife were born seven children, five of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Laura and Edna, and two brothers, William and Fred MONTGOMERY. I. A. MONTGOMERY received his early schooling in the schools of Westchester and supplemented this by attendance for two years at the normal school at Marion, Ind. Upon attaining his majority he formed the association with his father in the mercantile business at Bryant and continued doing business at that place under that partnership until, as noted above, he bought his father's interest in the store in 1917, and has since then been carrying on the business alone. Mr. MONTGOMERY has an admirably equipped store and carries a full line of goods, his trade covering a wide territory in the upper part of Jay county and throughout the lower part of Adams county. He is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political affairs, but has not been a seeker after office, his expanding commercial interests being sufficient to engross his attention. On September 17, 1902, I. A. MONTGOMERY was united in marriage to Mary MILES, of Bryant, and to this union two children have been born, a son and a daughter, Ivan, who was graduated from the Bryant high school with the class of 1921, and Myra who is a member of the class of 1923. Mrs. MONTGOMERY was born at Laura, Ohio, but has been a resident of Jay county since her childhood, she having been but three years of age when she came to this county with her parents, Dr. J. T. and Susan ( COATE ) MILES, who located at Bryant, where she received her schooling and grew to womanhood. The MONTGOMERY's have a pleasant home at Bryant and have ever taken a proper interest in the general social activities of the community. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.139-140. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MONTGOMERY, WILLIAM H

William H. MONTGOMERY, one of Jay county's best known and most substantial farmers and landowners and proprietor of an excellent farm in Bearcreek township, where he makes his home, rural mail route No. 11 out of Portland, was born in that same township, a member of one of the real pioneer families of this county, and has resided there all his life. Mr. MONTGOMERY was born on December 22, 1875, and is a son of George G. and Sarah (GRIFFITH) MONTGOMERY, both members of old families in Jay county and further and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, George G. MONTGOMERY having been formerly and for years a merchant, first at Westchester and then at Bryant, at which latter place he is now living retired, the store which he established there now being conducted by his son, I. A. MONTGOMERY. It was while his father was engaged in farming in Bearcreek township that William H. MONTGOMERY was born. He was about two years of age when his father became engaged in the mercantile business at Westchester and in that village he spent his youth, receiving his early schooling in the Westchester schools. This be supplemented by a three years course in the old Portland Normal School and a term in the Marion Normal School and was engaged for one term as a teacher in the schools of this county, teaching in the Haffner school in Bearcreek township. After his marriage at the age of twenty-two years, Mr. MONTGOMERY rented the home farm of 240 acres in Bearcreek township and there established his home. Three years later he bought the farm and has since resided there, in the meantime increasing his acreage by purchases from time to time of additional land until now he owns 662 acres in Bearcreek township and has one of the best improved farms in the county, his farm plant being up-to-date in all essential details. Mr. MONTGOMERY is a Republican and has ever taken a good citizen's interest in local political affairs, but has not been a seeker after public office. It was on November 4, 1898, that William H. MONTGOMERY was united in marriage to Wilma ROSEBOROUGH and to this union four children have been born, Mabel, George, John and Frederick W., all of whom are at home. Mrs. MONTGOMERY, who is a daughter of John and Clara R. (McCOLLUCH) ROSEBOROUGH, was born and reared in Fulton county, Ohio. John ROSEBOROUGH was formerly and for years engaged in the practice of law at Elmira, Ohio. He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, three of whom are living, Mrs. MONTGOMERY having two sisters, Cora and Alice. Mrs. MONTGOMERY is a member of the Westchester United Brethren church SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.383-384. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MORAN, JAMES J

James J. MORAN, senior member of the law firm of MORAN & GILLESPIE at Portland, former judge of the Indiana State Court of Appeals, former judge of the Jay Circuit Court and a member of the bar of this court for nearly twenty-five years, with residence at Portland, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Judge MORAN was born on a farm in Adams county, Indiana, in 1873, and is a son of Thomas and Anna MORAN, natives of Ireland, who were married in Ireland and shortly afterward came to America and proceeded on out into Indiana, locating in Adams county, where they established their home on a farm, and there spent the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of nine children; of whom seven are still living. Reared on the home farm in Adams county. Judge MORAN received his early schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and supplemented this by a course in Ohio Northern University at Ada, Ohio, after which he began teaching school and was for four years thus occupied, meantime taking advantage of the summer courses in the normal school at Portland and preparing himself for the study of law, he having early decided upon the law as his profession. Thus prepared he entered the Indiana Law School at Indianapolis, and in 1896 was graduated from that institution. In the spring of the following year he returned to Portland and in association with Jacob F. DENNEY began practice. Two years later this association was discontinued and Judge MORAN then formed an association with Cornelius CORWIN, an arrangement which was continued for four years, at the end of which time Judge MORAN became a partner of Judge SMITH. This association was maintained for six years, or until Judge MORAN was elected to the bench of the Jay Circuit Court in the fall of 1910. Upon the completion of his four years on the Circuit Court bench, Judge MORAN was appointed by Governor Ralston to the bench of the Indiana Appellate Court. He served in that important judicial capacity until January 1, 1917, and upon completion of this service returned to Portland and resumed his practice, forming then a partnership with Frank GILLESPIE, and has since been practicing under the firm name of MORAN & GILLESPIE. Judge MORAN is a Democrat and is a member of the Portland Kiwanis Club and of the local lodges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal Order of Moose, and is a member of the Catholic church. Judge MORAN married Elizabeth SOMMERS and he and his wife have a very pleasant home at Portland. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.334-335. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MORAN, MARK M

Mark M. MORAN, M. D., former president of the Jay County Medical Society and one of the best known physicians in this county, with offices at Portland for the past twelve or thirteen years, where he has been engaged in practice with the exception of the time spent in service in the Medical Corps of the United States Army during the time of America's participation in the World war, was born in Indiana and has lived in this state all his life. Doctor MORAN was born on a farm in the neighboring county of Adams on April 30, 1882, and is the last born of the nine children born to Thomas and Anna MORAN. Of these children, seven are still living, those besides the Doctor being Judge James J. MORAN, of Portland; John, Patrick, Bridget, Margaret and Anna. Thomas MORAN and his wife were natives of Ireland who came to this country immediately following their marriage, and after a brief residence in Preble county, Ohio, came over into Indiana and established their home on a farm in Adams county, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Doctor MORAN was reared on that home farm. He supplemented his local schooling by attendance at the Tri-State Normal School at Angola, Ind., the Marion (Ind.) Normal College and Valparaiso (Ind.) University, meantime teaching school for four winters, his studies all the while being- directed with a view to the eventual study of medicine, and thus prepared presently entered the Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery, a department of Valparaiso University at Chicago. After three years of study there he entered the Eclectic Medical College at Cincinnati, and after two years further study there was graduated in 1908. Upon receiving his diploma, Doctor MORAN located at Fort Wayne, Ind., and was engaged in practice there for six months, at the end of which time he moved to Portland and opened an office there and has since been practicing in that city. On June 24, 1918, Doctor MORAN enlisted his services in behalf of the Medical Corps of the United States Army for service in the World war, and was sent to the officers training camp at Camp Greenleaf. Seven weeks later he was transferred to Camp Gordon at Atlanta, Ga., and after eight weeks of intensive training there was attached to the staff of General Hospital 6, at Ft. McPherson (Atlanta), as registrar of the hospital and instructor in operating room technique and anaesthetics. There he remained until mustered out on January 7, 1919, with the rank of first lieutenant, the war then being over. Upon the completion of his military service. Doctor MORAN returned to Portland and resumed his practice, and has for the past two years been connected with the United States public health service, his field being Jay county. The Doctor also served for four years as county health commissioner. He is a member of the Jay County Medical Society, of the Indiana State Medical Association and the American Medical Association, and has served as president of the county society. He is a member of the local post of the American Legion and of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Catholic church. Doctor MORAN married Alta Mary WARD, daughter of J. C. WARD, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Mary Ann. Doctor and Mrs. MORAN have a pleasant home at Portland and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the city. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.136-137. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MORRISON, JOHN A

JOHN A. MORRISON, manager of the Portland Electric Company at Portland, is a native of the old Keystone state, born in York county, Pennsylvania, May 23, 1878, and is a son of William B.. and Catherine E. ( PABST ) MORRISON, both of whom also were born in Pennsylvania. William B. MORRISON was a farmer and merchant and he and his wife were the parents of three children, two of whom are still living, John A. MORRISON having a brother, William G. MORRISON. John A. MORRISON received his schooling in Fulton county, Illinois, to which county his parents had moved from Pennsylvania when he was a child, and upon completing the high school course entered Northwestern University, where he took the course in pharmacy. Upon leaving the pharmacy school Mr. MORRISON took service with the Des Moines Drug Company at Des Moines, Iowa, and in time was made assistant general manager of the concern. He remained with this company for twenty years, or until 1916 when he became attracted to the possibilities of electrical distribution and supplies and became engaged at Des Moines in the electrical business, continuing there until 1919 in which year he transferred his connection to the Portland Electric Company and has since resided in Portland, where he is carrying on the agency for the Lally farm and rural electric light and power plants, this local agency controlling sales for this popular equipment within a radius covering ten counties hereabout. On June 24, 1901, John A. MORRISON was united in marriage to Cora Mae ALLISON, who was born at Hastings, Neb., daughter of Joseph S. and Martha (Huston) Allison, and to this union two children have been born, Ruth Elizabeth, who is a member of the class of 1923, Portland high school, and John R. Mr. and Mrs. MORRISON are members of the Baptist church. In his political views Mr. MORRISON is independent. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.66. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

MURRAY, DONN PIATT

Donn Piatt MURRAY, M. D., for many years one of the best known physicians in this section of Indiana, a practitioner at Dunkirk for more than a quarter of a century, a member of the board of directors of the First State Bank of Dunkirk, president of the local school board and in other ways long associated with the general movements having to do with the development of that city, is a native Hoosier, a fact of which he never has ceased to be proud, and has lived in Indiana all his life, a resident of Jay county since his graduation from medical college in 1894. Doctor MURRAY was born in the village of Selma, in the neighboring county of Delaware, September 13, 1870, and is a son of William H. and Margaret J. ( ORR ) MURRAY, the latter of whom was born in that same county. The late William H. MURRAY, an honored veteran of the Civil war and former auditor of Delaware county, was born in Henry county, this state, a son of C. B. MURRAY and wife, the former of whom was a Pennsylvanian who became one of the pioneers of Henry county, but whose last days were spent at Hagerstown, in Wayne county, where he died at the age of eighty-two years. William H. MURRAY was reared in Henry county and was living there when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and went to the front as a member of the 19th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which was attached to the celebrated Iron Brigade and with which gallant command he won a commission as first lieutenant. During this service he was twice wounded, once in the battle of the Wilderness and at the battle of Stone Mountain was severely wounded. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. MURRAY returned home and after his marriage established his home at Selma, where he became engaged in the mercantile business. He ever took an active part in local political affairs, long one of the leaders of the Republican party in Delaware county, and for one term served the people of that county as county auditor. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, all of whom are living, Doctor MURRAY having three sisters, Lulu M., Margaret M. and Edna K., and three brothers, James O., Arthur L. and Robert F. MURRAY. Doctor MURRAY's name was given him in honor of Donn PIATT, the noted newspaper correspondent, who was a much admired friend of his father and in acknowledgment of the compliment Mr. PIATT presented the youngster with a silver loving cup and as the boy grew older maintained for some years a personal correspondence with him. The Doctor was graduated from the Muncie high school with the class of 1890 and during the following winter taught school at Smithfield. He then entered the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis and in 1894 was graduated from that institution. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor MURRAY became associated with Doctor FERTICH in the practice of his profession at Dunkirk and has ever since been a resident of that city. For three years this association with Doctor FERTICH continued and then Doctor MURRAY opened an office of his own and has since been engaged in practice alone, one of the best known physicians in all this territory roundabout. The Doctor is a member of the Jay County Medical Society, and has repeatedly been an office bearer in that society, and is also a member of the Indiana State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, ever taking an active interest in the deliberations of these bodies. He is a Republican, a Freemason, affiliated with the local Masonic lodge at Dunkirk, and is a member of the Congregational church at Dunkirk. The Doctor has long taken an interested part in the general commercial and industrial development of his home town and is a member of the board of directors of the First State Bank of Dunkirk. On November 22, 1898, at Dunkirk, Dr. Donn Piatt MURRAY was united in marriage to Lulu BEST, of that city, and to this union three children have been born, one of whom died in infancy, the others being Sarah Margaret, born on July 20, 1907, and John William MURRAY, March 1, 1914. Mrs. MURRAY was born at Fayette City, Pa., but has been a resident of Dunkirk since the days of her girlhood, her parents, John and Sarah BEST, having moved to that city years ago. Doctor and Mrs. MURRAY have a very pleasant home at Dunkirk and have ever taken an interested part in the general social and cultural activities of the city as well as of the community at large. Mrs. MURRAY is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.241-242. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

MYERS, SOL

Sol MYERS, a well known retired farmer and landowner and former building contractor, of Wayne township, this county, living on rural mail route No. II out of Portland, is a Buckeye by birth, but has been a resident of Jay county for the past thirty-seven years. Mr. Myers was born on a farm in Harrison county, Ohio, September 13, 1845, and is a son of Adam and Catherine ( BINGER ) MYERS, both of whom also were born in that state. Adam MYERS was a well-to-do farmer and he and his wife were the parents of twelve children, two of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, William MYERS, living in Hancock county, Ohio. Sol MYERS was reared on the home farm in Ohio and received his schooling in the neighboring district schools. As a young man he for several years worked as a farm hand and then took up carpentering and at the age of twenty-five years began on his own account as a building contractor, many years ago taking up his residence in this county. In 1885 he bought the farm of ninety-nine acres which he still owns in Wayne township and made substantial improvements on the same, erecting all new buildings and otherwise putting the place in its present up-to-date shape. Mr. MYERS bought this farm in behalf of his sons, who have looked after its operation and it is at present being farmed by his elder son, George W. MYERS. Upon coming to Jay county Mr. MYERS continued active as a building contractor and so continued until his retirement in 1916, during that time having built many of the houses and barns throughout the central part of the county. Mr. MYERS is a Democrat and the members of his family entertain the same political views. In December, 1867, Sol MYERS was united in marriage to Harriet ANDERSON, who was born and reared in Hancock county, Ohio, a daughter of Elijah and Elizabeth ( CAMPBELL ) ANDERSON, and to this union have been born five children, four of whom are living, namely: George W., Martha E., Henry W. and Delia. George W. MYERS, who, as noted above, is farming his father's place in Wayne township, married Gertrude PETERS and has had four children, of whom two, Paul Leroy and Harold, are .living and two, Francis H. and Ruby, are deceased. Martha E. MYERS married T. H. ALEXANDER, a farmer of Wayne township, and has had four children, Charles, Donn and Mary Helen living, and Elmer, deceased. Henry W. MYERS, who also is farming in Wayne township, married Ella COOPER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.277-278. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

NAHRWOLD, CHARLES C

Charles C. NAHRWOLD, proprietor of what is recognized as the leading plumbing and heating establishment in Portland, as well as one of the best equipped plants of this kind in this part of the state, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life with the exception of a brief period during the days of his "journeyman" experience when he was in the West. Mr. NAHRWOLD was born at Ft. Wayne, Ind., April 23, 1880, and is a son of Christ and Sophia ( HEUER ) NAHRWOLD. He was reared at Ft. Wayne and supplemented the schooling received in the schools of that city by a business course m a night school, after which he became' apprenticed to a Ft. Wayne plumber and became thoroughly conversant with the details of that trade, a trade lie ever since has followed and in which he has been quite successful. For a time after getting his trade Mr. NAHRWOLD worked as a "journeyman" plumber, in various towns in Indiana, chiefly in Ft. Wayne, Hartford City and Portland, and in 1909 went West, following his trade there for five or six months, at the end of which time lie returned to Indiana and was for several months thereafter employed at Ft. Wayne. He then returned to Portland, which city had attracted his attention during the time of his previous employment there, and went to work in the plant of Yount & Ewry, where he remained for about eighteen months, or until January I, 1911, when he started in business for himself, opening a plumbing shop at Portland. In 1913 he bought the electrical supplies store of Charles BAILEY and added this line to his plumbing establishment, continuing to carry electrical supplies for about five years, at the end of which time he discontinued that line and has since devoted his attention wholly to plumbing and heating, carrying an ample stock of supplies and accessories in that line. He handles the "Arcola" hot water heating system and has done much to promote the introduction of that convenient system of heating in this community. Mr. NAHRWOLD is a Republican and is a charter member of the Portland Kiwanis Club and a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In 1917 Charles C. NAHRWOLD was united in marriage to Faye HOBBS, who was born in Delaware county, this state, daughter of J. William and Ellen ( COULSON ) HOBBS, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Charles William. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.296-297. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

NEELY, HENRY M

Henry M. NEELY, one of Richland township's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, proprietor of an admirable place on rural mail route No.1 out of Redkey, former township trustee and formerly and for years one of the best known oil men hereabout, has been a resident of Jay county for the past twenty years and has done well here. Mr. NEELY was born in Des Moines county, Iowa, May 2, 1857, and is a son of Jesse and Mary (SIGWORTH) NEELY, both of whom were born in the state of Pennsylvania. Jesse NEELY became attracted to the West in the days of his young manhood and was for some time during the '50s a resident of Iowa, but after awhile returned to Pennsylvania and made his home in the district in which the first oil development was brought about in this country. He assisted in drilling the first productive oil well ever brought in this country and thereafter devoted himself to the development of the Pennsylvania oil fields and became a conspicuous figure in that development. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, five of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Agnes, Hester, Rose and Lemon. Henry M. NEELY was but a child when his parents returned to Pennsylvania from Iowa and he received his schooling in the schools of Clarion county, in the former state. When seventeen years of age he began working in the oil fields with his father and when nineteen he had an oil rig of his own and began his career as a driller. For fifteen years he was thus engaged, working in various fields as new developments opened up and in 1894 was made superintendent of the local branch of the plant of the Logansport Gas Company at Walton, Ind.[Cass Co] Two years later he was transferred to Kokomo [Howard Co.]and was for four years thereafter in charge of the gas plant there. He then was made superintendent of the gas field of the Ohio and Indiana Gas Company at Redkey and since then has been a resident of this county, his attention of recent years being given to farming and stock raising. It was in 1898, not long after coming to this county, that Mr. NEELY bought a tract of thirty-five acres in Richland township. A couple of years later he bought an "eighty" lying across the road from the former tract and on this latter piece erected a new house and an up-to-date set of farm buildings and has since made his home there. Since taking possession of this place Mr. NEELY has done much in the way of improvement and has a well improved farm and an excellent farm plant, the latter including two tractors, a heavy one for general purpose work and a lighter one for cultivating and light work about his farm. He has demonstrated to his own satisfaction that the tractor is a wonderful factor in promoting efficiency of farm labor and has done away with all his horses with the exception of one team of favorites. Mr. NEELY has for years given considerable attention to the raising of live stock and feeds out about 150 head of hogs a year and a car load of cattle. He has a milking machine to facilitate the dairying operations on the place. He has twenty-two head of Guernsey cattle. He has added to his land holding until now he is the owner of 275 acres in Jay county and 100 acres in the neighboring county of Randolph. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Redkey and he is a member of the board of trustees of the same. He is a Democrat and has served as trustee of Richland township. Mr. NEELY is a Scottish Rite (32d degree) Mason, affiliated with the blue lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons at Redkey and with the consistory of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite at Indianapolis, and is likewise a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with the temple of that order at Indianapolis. In 1878 Henry M. NEELY was united in marriage to Victoria LOGUE, who was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, daughter of John and Jane (BARR) LOGUE, and to that union six children have been born, Burdette, Lena, Lemon, Elmer, Jesse and Mary Jane, all of whom are living. Lena NEELY married Fred THOMAS, a farmer of Randolph county, and has two children, Harry and George. Lemon NEELY married May WALTERS and is farming in Richland township. Elmer NEELY, also engaged in farming in Richland township, married Ethel SAUNDERS and has one child, a daughter, Victoria. Jesse NEELY who married Sarepta BARLEY, is now engaged in the hardware and farm implement business at Redkey, doing business under the firm name of H. M. NEELY & Son. Mary Jane NEELY married Paul MAUZY and is living at Muncie, Ind.[Delaware Co.], where her husband is engaged as purchasing agent for the Hoosier Clutch Company. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.366-368. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

NEIL, FORREST W

Forrest W. NEIL, one of Greene township's progressive farmers and owner of a well improved farm on rural mail route No. 2 out of Portland, is a Missourian by birth, an Ohioan by rearing but a Hoosier by choice and adoption, having been a resident of Indiana and of Jay county since the days of his young manhood. Mr. NEIL was born on a farm in Missouri on August 28, 1874, and is a son of James J. and Clara F. ( WILSON ) NEIL, who more than twenty years ago became residents of this county. James T. NEIL, who is now living retired at Pennville) was born in the State of Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood, later going to Missouri where he married and continued to make his home until about 1886 when he disposed of his interests there and moved to Ohio. He bought a farm in this latter state and made his home there until 1899, when he disposed of his interests there and moved over into Indiana and bought a farm of forty acres in this county, establishing his home on the same in December of that year. He continued to make his home there until his retirement from the farm and removal to Pennville, where he is now living. To him and his wife seven children have been born, all of whom are living, those besides the subject of this sketch the first born being Maud, Lawson, Seber, Pearl, Roxie and Lena. Forrest W. NEIL was twelve years of age when the family left Missouri to make their home in Ohio and in the schools of the latter state he completed his schooling. He came with his parents to Jay county in 1899, and here began farming on his own account, renting a place in Penn township. Two or three years later he married and established his home on that place, continuing there until 1908, when he bought the eighty-acre farm on which he is now living in Greene township and has since made his home on this latter place, where he and his family are very comfortably situated. Since taking possession of this place Mr. NEIL has erected an entirely new set of buildings and has made numerous other improvements, now having a well equipped farm plant. In addition to his general farming he has given consider able attention to the raising of live stock and is doing well. He is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. It was on September 10, 1902, that Forrest W. NEIL was united in marriage to Edith E. MOORE, who was born in this county, and to this union seven children have been born, all of whom are living save one, Elma June, who died in infancy, the others being H. Lloyd, Frances, Helen, Wilma, Virginia and Betty 1. Mrs. NEIL is a daughter of the late John and Frances P. ( WIGHT ) MOORE, the latter of whom of "Mayflower" descent was born in Crawford county, Ohio, in 1840, a daughter of Warren W. and Harriet ( WHITE ) WIGHT, and was a teacher in the schools of Galion, Ohio, at the time of her marriage to Mr. MOORE. She died at her home in this county on December 13, 1896. The late John MOORE, in his generation one of the best known men in Jay county, was born in Morrow county, Ohio) in 1833, and was the fifth in order of birth of the eight children born to William and Jane ( BISHOP ) MOORE, the former of whom was born in Ireland and the latter in Pennsylvania. John MOORE and Frances WIGHT were married in 1862, and they continued to make their home in Ohio until 1868, when they came to Indiana and settled on an eighty-acre farm in Penn township, this county. Mr. MOORE was a practical sawyer and erected a sawmill at Pennville which he operated for some years. His affairs prospered and he eventually became the owner of a fine farm of 300 acres in Penn township, on which in 1890, he erected one of the best brick houses in that part of the county. His death occurred there in 1907. In the days when the task of draining this region was being worked out he long served as a ditch commissioner and in that capacity rendered a real service to the county. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, all save one of whom grew to maturity, Mrs. NEIL having had five brothers, Clarence, Albert, William, John B. and Ray L. MOORE, and two sisters, Jennie and Mary E. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.178-179. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

NELSON, WILLIAM M

William M. NELSON, the well-known candy maker of Portland, was born in that city and has lived there all his life. Mr. NELSON was born on September 25, 1863, and is a son of Jonathan and Mary Jeannette ( BELL ) NELSON, formerly and for years well-known residents of Portland. Jonathan NELSON was born in Jackson county, Ohio, a son of Moses and Polly ( CHILDERS ) NELSON, who became pioneers of Jay county. Moses NELSON was a Virginian by birth, who had settled in Jackson county, Ohio, where he was married and where he made his home until in the '30s of the past century, when he came over here into Indiana with his family and settled in Wayne township, this county, where he had entered from the Government a tract of eighty acres of land and where he established his home and spent the remainder of his life, one of the influential pioneers of that section of the county. Jonathan NELSON was but a boy when he came to this county with his parents and he was reared on that pioneer farm in Wayne township, receiving his schooling in the neighborhood schools. He remained there until after his marriage, when he made his home at Portland, where he became the engineer in the first steam flour mill operated in that city and was thus occupied for years. He later became engaged as a teamster in Portland and in that city spent his last days, his death occurring in March, 1896. His widow survived him for more than fifteen years, her death occurring in 1912. They were the parents of five children, all of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having three brothers, James A., Frank Edward and Charles D. NELSON, and a sister, Cora I. Reared at Portland, where he was born, William M. NELSON received his schooling in the schools of that city and early became engaged as a painter, a vocation he followed until his marriage at the age of twenty-six, when he became engaged in his present line, that of candy making, and has since been thus engaged, his products having a wide sale hereabout. It was in 1889 that William M. NELSON was united in marriage to Sarah E. LOY, who also was born in this county, and to this union have been born four children, Rita D., Morris W., Anita B. and Dorris E., the two latter of whom are unmarried and at home with their parents. Rita D. NELSON married Homer I. SHEFFER, of this county, and has four children, Violet Pauline, Lawrence Everett, Bonita Ursel and Fahien Allen. Morris W. NELSON married Nellie Glee SHAW, also of this county, and is now living in Colorado. Mrs. Sarah E. NELSON was born in Pike township, this county, and is a daughter of Adam and Sarah ( BICKEL* ) LOY, the latter of whom died in 1883. Adam LOY was born in this county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and during the Civil war enlisted as a soldier of the Union and died at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., October 6, 1864, while in service, a sergeant of Company E, 89th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, He left his widow with three children, two of whom are still living, Mrs. NELSON having a brother, Plina LOY. Their sister, Mary C. died on May 5, 1872. * This name should be JONES. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.499-500. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

NICHOLS, CLARENCE N

CLARENCE N. NICHOLS, president of the city school board, junior member of the firm of REINHARD & NICHOLS, clothing merchants at Portland and one of the best known young business men of that city, has been a resident of Portland since he was four years of age. He was born in the neighboring county of Randolph on April 24, 1888, and is the son and only child of William A. and Laura Belle ( ULSH ) NICHOLS. William A. NICHOLS also was born in Randolph county and there became engaged in the railway service, remaining there until 1892 when he was appointed local agent of the G. R. & I. Railroad Company at Portland and moved to that city, which has since been his home. As noted above, Clarence N. NICHOLS was but four years of age when he came .to this county with his parents in 1892 and he grew up at Portland. During his course in high school he specialized in commercial forms and for a year after leaving school was employed as a stenographer in the office of the Portland Drain Tile Company. He then decided to become engaged in business on his own account and in association with W. G. REINHARD became engaged in the clothing and men's furnishing business at Portland, under the firm style of REINHARD & NICHOLS, and has ever since been thus engaged, the firm doing business at 110 North Meridian street. Mr. NICHOLS is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of which he is the secretary, and the Fraternal Order of Eagles; is affiliated with the local chapter of Phi Delta Kappa and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. NICHOLS is a Republican and has long given his studious attention to local civic affairs. For some time he has been a member of the city school board and in August, 1921, was elected president of that body. For years he has been one of the leading spirits in the Greek letter fraternity Phi Delta Kappa and for the past five or six years has been the secretary-treasurer of the national organization of that body. In 1910 Clarence N. NICHOLS was united in marriage to Hilda M. TUDOR, of Portland, and to this union two children have been born, a son and a daughter, William A. and Elizabeth A. NICHOLS . SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.85. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

NIXON, J E

J. E. NIXON, M. D., of Portland, one of the best known physicians in this part of Indiana, is a native son of Jay county, a representative in the fourth generation of NIXON's who have created their impress upon the life of this county, and has lived here all his life save for a period of several years during which he was practicing his profession at Ridgeville, over the line in the neighboring county of Randolph. Doctor NIXON was born at Portland on April 12, 1875, during the time his father, the late Joseph P. NIXON, was serving the public as treasurer of Jay county. The NIXON's are numbered among the real pioneer families of Jay county. Doctor NIXON's grandfather, John NIXON, having come here with his family from Columbiana county, Ohio, in 1836, the year of the formal organization of Jay county, and settled on a tract of land which he had entered from the Government in Jefferson township. There he established his home and spent the remainder of his life, one of the useful and influential pioneers of that section. John NIXON was a skilled cabinet maker and much of the household furniture that entered into the pioneer homes of that neighborhood was made by him, as well as the coffins in which his pioneer neighbors were laid to their last rest. He was joined here in 1837 by his father, William NIXON, who came over from Columbiana county (Ohio) and here spent his last days. William NIXON was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, and was a son of George NIXON, who was born in Ireland, of English stock, and who was but a child when he came to this country with his parents, George NIXON and wife, in the year 1758. Joseph P. NIXON was three years of age when he came with his parents to this county in 1836 and he grew to manhood on that pioneer farm in Jefferson township, becoming in turn a farmer on his own account and the owner of a fine place of 280 acres, on which he labored with success. For several terms he served as trustee of Jefferson township and in 1874 was elected treasurer of lay county. During the period of this incumbency he made his home at Portland and upon the completion of his term of service returned to his farm, where he remained until 1905, when he moved to Portland, where his last days were spent, his death occurring there in 1920. The NIXON corn planter which he designed and brought to perfection was one of his valuable contributions to the cause of bettering farm conditions. Joseph P. NIXON married Emaline HITE, who also was a member of one of the real pioneer families of this county, daughter of William HITE, who had come here from Ohio and had established in Jefferson township one of the first flour mills in Jay county. Mrs. NIXON preceded her husband to the grave about four years, her death having occurred in 1916. To Joseph P. and Emaline ( HITE ) NIXON were born eight children, six of whom are still living, those besides Doctor NIXON being James G., Millard, Anna, Elmer and Ida. Reared on the home farm in Jefferson township. Doctor NIXON received his early schooling in the schools of that district and supplemented this by a course in the old Portland Normal School and in the normal school at Marion, Ind. He early became qualified to teach school and for five years was employed as a- teacher in the schools of this county. Meanwhile he had been giving his thoughtful attention to preparatory studies in medicine and presently entered the Medical College of Indiana at Indianapolis, from which institution he was graduated in 1904. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor NIXON opened an office for the practice of his profession at Ridgeville, Ind., and was there thus engaged for six years, at the end of which time, in 1910, he located at Portland, where he since has been engaged in practice. Doctor NIXON is a member of the Jay County Medical Society, in which organization he has been an office bearer, and is also affiliated with the Indiana State Medical Association and the American Medical Association. He is a Democrat, a York Rite Mason and an elder in the Presbyterian church. In 1905, Dr. J. E. NIXON was united in marriage to Mabel HIESTED, daughter of Daniel G. and Martha ( ABEL ) HIESTED, and to this union have been born three children, Wallace H., Martha and Grace. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.58-59. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

NUCKOLS, WILLIAM S

William S. NUCKOLS, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Knox township, is a "Buckeye" by birth but has been a resident of Indiana and of Jay county since he was six years of age. Mr. NUCKOLS was born on a farm in Ross county, Ohio, September 29, 1852, and is the son of Lemuel and Mary K. (WILKERSON) NUCKOLS, whose last days were spent in Jay county. Lemuel NUCKOLS was a Virginian by birth and remained in the Old Dominion until he was thirteen years of age, when he went to Ohio and after his marriage settled clown in Ross county, where he was the owner of a farm of seventy-two acres. In 1865 he disposed of his interests there and putting his essential household belongings Into a wagon drove through with his family to Indiana and settled on a quarter section of land he had bought in the woods of Knox township, this county. That quarter section was wholly unimproved when he settled there and he put up a house and proceeded to clear the place, in good time bringing it under cultivation, and there he spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife were the parents of four children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Jesse, Elizabeth and James L. Having been but a child when he came to Jay county with his parents in 1865. William S. NUCKOLS received his schooling in the schools of Knox township and from the days of his boyhood was a helpful factor in the labors of developing the home place. After his marriage he established his home on that place and has continued to reside there, now the owner of the entire farm, a place upon which he has made many substantial improvements. Mr. NUCKOLS is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. William S. NUCKOLS has been twice married and by his first wife, who was Lydia WRIGHT, is the father of four children, namely: George, who married Ima ZEIGLER and has seven children; Allie, who married Luther ZEIGLER , a cousin of her brother George's wife, and has two sons; Francis, who married Sarah MAITLEN and has seven children, and Oscar, who married Amy RIDGEWAY and has three children. Following the death of the mother of these children Mr. NUCKOLS married Anna CURRENT, a daughter of James K. P. CURRENT and a member of one of the old families of Jay county. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.380. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

O'BRIEN, THOMAS

Thomas O'BRIEN, one of Pike township's best known farmers and the proprietor of an excellent farm on the line between Jay and Randolph counties, the same being situated on rural mail route No. 4 out of Ridgeville, was born in that township, on the place on which he is now living, and has resided there all his life. Mr. O'BRIEN was born on September 9, 1873, and is a son of Michael and Anna (SINNETT) O'BRIEN, who were substantial farming people of that community. Michael O'BRIEN was a native of Ireland, born in County Wexford, and was reared there. As a young man he came to America and for some time thereafter was engaged in railroad work in New York. He then made his way South and was engaged in flour milling at Chattanooga, Tenn., when the Civil war broke out. His lack of sympathy with the Southern cause prompted him to dispose of his interests in Tennessee and to come North. He located at Hamilton, [Butler Co.] Ohio, and there became again engaged in railroad work, making his home there until 1867, when he came up into Indiana and bought a tract of sixty acres of land in Pike township, this county, and here established his home. His affairs prospered and he gradually increased his holdings until he became the owner of a good farm of 180 acres, and on that place he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring on June 8, 1902. His widow survived until December 7, 1919. Michael O'BRIEN and his wife were the parents of four children, two of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Owen O'BRIEN. Reared on the home farm in Pike township, Thomas O'BRIEN received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and from the days of his boyhood has been devoted to the affairs of the farm, 140 acres of which he now owns and on which he and his family are quite comfortably situated. Mr. O'BRIEN has a well equipped farm plant and is carrying on his operations in up-to-date fashion. On January 2, 1915, Thomas O'BRIEN was united in marriage to Cora WHITENACK, who was born in Randolph county, Indiana, a daughter of David and Martha (WARE) WHITENACK, and to this union three children have been born, William, Walter and Arthur. Mr. and Mrs. O'BRIEN are members of the Catholic church at Portland and are Democrats. He is a member of the local council of the Knights of Columbus at Union City. Mrs. O'BRIEN's father, David WHITENACK, died on December 8, 1894, and his widow is still living. She was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, and was there married, when eighteen years of age, to Patrick CUMMINS, with whom she straightway afterward came to the United States. Patrick CUMMINS died here, leaving three children, William, James and Richard, and his widow married David WHITENACK. To this latter union eight children were born, Mrs. O'BRIEN having six sisters, Stella, Dorothy, Delia, Ada, Hazel and Loretta, and a brother, Walter WHITENACK.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.397-398. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

OHMART, J ERNEST

J. Ernest OHMART, junior member of the firm of Holmes & OHMART, abstracts, real estate and loans, at Portland, and former cashier of the Farmers State Bank of that city, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Mr. OHMART was born on a farm in the vicinity of North Manchester, in Wabash county, August 12, 1881, and is a son of Loren and Alice (SHOWALTER ) OHMART, the latter of whom died on December 13, 1911. Loren OHMART was born in Wabash county, a son of Levi OHMART and wife, pioneers of that county, and grew up as a farmer, a vocation he followed until his retirement and removal to North Manchester, where he is now living. He and his wife had five children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Roland, Inez, Rosa and Ralph. Reared on the farm, J. Ernest OHMART completed his schooling in the high school at Laketon, Ind. and for about five years thereafter continued working on the farm. He then was appointed postmaster of Laketown, a village just southwest of North Manchester, and occupied that position for nine years and seven months, at the end of which period of service he became connected with the bank at Laotto, a village up on the line between Noble and Lagrange counties, serving as cashier of that institution for about eight months, at the end of which time he accepted the position of cashier of the Farmers State Bank at Portland and moved to the latter city. For about five years Mr. OHMART remained with this bank, acquiring there an experience with and knowledge of conditions hereabout, particularly with respect to farm loans and real estate values, that prompted him to go into business on his own account, and in June, 1920, he opened an office at Portland for a general real estate, loans and abstract business. In the following August he effected a partnership with John W. HOLMES, the veteran real estate man and abstractor, of Portland, and this partnership continues, a quite mutually agreeable arrangement. In 1902 J. Ernest OHMART was united in marriage to Emma E. GOEHIER, who also was born in Wabash county, a daughter of Philip and Elizabeth GOEHIER, and to this union three children have been born, Geraldine, wife of Dr. William P. SMITH, of Portland; GOEHIER and Zoe. Mrs. OHMART's father, Philip GOEHIER, is a retired farmer living in North Manchester. Mr. and Mrs. OHMART are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are Republicans. Mr. OHMART is a member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce and of the Rotary Club and is also affiliated with the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Modern Woodmen. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.258-259. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ORR, JAMES G

JAMES G. ORR, president of the Portland Chamber of Commerce, who is engaged in the wholesale fruit and produce business at Portland, one of the best known and most progressive business men of that city, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. He was born at Selma, in Delaware county, this state, August 3, 1880, son of Joseph N. and Nannie C. ( SIMMONS ) ORR, who are still living there. Joseph N. ORR was born in Delaware county, a member of one of the pioneer families of that section of the state, and early became engaged in business at Selma, proprietor of a general store, which business he still maintains. He and his wife have three children, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Nellie and Bertha. Reared at Selma, James G. ORR received his early schooling in the excellent schools of that village and supplemented the same by the course in the high school at Muncie and two years of attendance at Indiana University. Reared to a commercial life, he became engaged in business with the W. H. Moreland Shoe Company at Muncie, where for five years he was proprietor of a shoe store. He then sold that store and returned to Selma, where he became engaged in the grocery business, continuing thus engaged until in 1913, when he disposed of his interests there and moved to Portland, where he has since been quite successfully engaged in the wholesale fruit and produce business on West Race street. Ever since he became a resident of Portland Mr. ORR has given his thoughtful attention to the general commercial activities of the city and is now president of the Portland Chamber of Commerce, to the affairs of which active and influential organization he has long been earnestly devoted. He is a Republican, a Knights Templar and Cryptic Mason, a past exalted ruler of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, a member of the United Commercial Travelers, and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. ORR is one of the charter members of the Portland council, Royal and Select Masters (Masonic), and is now. serving as steward of the council. In 1905, James G. ORR was united in marriage to Helen TOMLINSON, of Henderson, Ky., and to this union one child has been born, a son, James N. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.39-40. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.


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