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Jay County Indiana Biographies Surnames P - R


PADDOCK, C A

C. A. PADDOCK, M. D., former mayor of Portland and a practicing physician in that city for the past twenty years and more, an active member of the Jay County Medical Society and present secretary of the same, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Doctor PADDOCK was born in the vicinity of Winchester in the neighboring county of Randolph on March 7, 1874, and is the son and only child of Benjamin and Elizabeth ( COX ) PADDOCK, the latter of whom was born in that same county, a member of one of the pioneer families there. Benjamin PADDOCK was born in Union county, this state, and there grew to manhood and became a plowmaker. After his marriage, however, he settled on a farm in Randolph county and there spent the remainder of his life, a substantial citizen and land owner. He and his wife were members of the Friends church and their son was reared in that faith. Doctor PADDOCK received his early schooling in Randolph county and supplemented this by a course at Ridgeville College, after which he entered the medical college at Indianapolis, and in 1901 was graduated from that institution. Upon receiving his diploma, Doctor PADDOCK opened an office for the practice of his profession at Portland and has been engaged in practice there ever since. The Doctor is a member of the Indiana State Medical Society and of the Jay County Medical Society, has filled all the offices in the latter society at one time and another and is now secretary of the same. He is a Democrat and has for years taken an active and earnest interest in civic affairs. For eight years he served as mayor of Portland, and in 1920 was nominated by the Democratic party of the Eighth district to represent this district in Congress, but the "fortunes of war" were against him in the resultant race. The Doctor has ever kept fully abreast of developments in his profession and for two years occupied the chair of anatomy in the Indianapolis Medical College. He is a member of the Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity, is affiliated with the local lodges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and he and his wife are members of the Friends church. They have a pleasant home and take an interested part in the city's general social activities. Doctor PADDOCK married Pearl M. EDWARDS, daughter of Hamilton and Asenath ( SMITH ) EDWARDS, and to this union have been born two children, Lawrence V. and Opal A. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.234. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PARKS, WILLIAM M

William M. PARKS, proprietor of the popular Ford garage at Portland and one of the best known young automobile men in this part of Indiana, was born at Richmond, this state, October 2, 1892, and is a son of Leonidas L. and Jennie ( RANDOLPH ) PARKS, both of whom were born in Preble county, Ohio. Leonidas L. PARKS has for years been a teacher in the public schools of Richmond. He and his wife have seven children. Reared at Richmond, William M. PARKS supplemented the schooling received in the public schools of that city by a course in Mrs. Hiser's Business College there and thus equipped for clerical work entered the office of the Gaar-Scott Company in that city, where he remained for about two years, at the end of which time he was transferred to that company's offices at Laporte, Ind., in connection with the operations of the M. Rumeley Company, heavy farm machinery. Mr. PARKS remained with these people about three years and then went to Toledo as secretary to the treasurer of the Willys-Overland Company. Not long afterward, however, his services were secured by the Ford Company as division head of the purchasing department of that company and he went to Detroit, where he remained with the Ford organization for five years. By that time he had determined to enter business for himself and in casting about for a location decided on Portland. On August 1, 1920, in association with his brother, Ernest PARKS, he bought the Ford garage at Portland, together with the local agency for the Ford cars and tractors, and has since been engaged in business there, proprietor of what is regarded as one of the most completely equipped garages in this section of the state. Twelve persons are employed in the place and business is carried on in snappy style. Mr. PARKS is a Republican. He is a member of the local Kiwanis Club at Portland and he and his wife are attendants at the Methodist Episcopal church. On June 19, 1915, William M. PARKS was united in marriage to Ruby HUNTER, who was born and reared at Indianapolis, daughter of Albert A. and Ada ( SCHAFFER ) HUNTER, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Rubynelle) born on March l, 1916. Mr. and Mrs. PARKS have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the general social activities of the city. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.66-67. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PAUL, SYDNEY

Sydney PAUL, manager of the plant of the Portland Body Works, manufacturers of automobile bodies, at Portland, is an. Englishman by birth but an American by adoption and choice and has never had occasion to regret the decision which prompted him to come to this country not long after he had attained his majority. Mr. PAUL had been thoroughly trained in the details of his craft in his home country and the additional experience gained by practical service in some of the big body building plants of this country after his arrival here has given him a facility in that form of industrial operation that has long caused him to be regarded as one of the leaders in his line. He has been a resident of Portland since 1915 and has from the very beginning of his residence there been recognized as one of the important factors in the industrial life of the town. Mr. PAUL was born at Petersborough, in Northamptonshire, England, April 22, 1886, son of Stephen and Harriet (AYTHORPE) PAUL, and completed his schooling at St. Peters College in that city. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed under the English system, for a period of five years with the firm of Brainsby & Sons, coach and auto body builders, at Petersborough, and upon completing his apprenticeship went to Coventry, the automobile center of England, and there became employed in the enclosed body building department of the Daimler Motor Car Corporation. So thoroughly had the young man learned the technicalities of his craft that his skill was at once recognized by his employers and within a month he was put in charge of the landaulette department of that corporation's great plant. For more than three years Mr. PAUL remained with this concern and then he went to Southport, where for a time he was employed as superintendent of the enclosed body building department in the plant of the Vulcan Motor Car Corporation. As a means of widening his knowledge of his craft he then rendered service in various other plants in England until he was twenty-three years of age, when he determined to come to America and enter the automobile industrial field here. On November 24, 1909, he sailed on the American Line steamer "Freisland," which on account of rough seas was thirteen days in making the passage, the unwonted delay causing the vessel to be reported lost in maritime offices. Mr. PAUL landed at Philadelphia and straightway proceeded to Kalamazoo, Mich., where the position of superintendent of the auto body department of the plant of the Michigan Buggy Company was awaiting him. The conditions there did not prove satisfactory and he only remained a month, going thence on January 1, 1910, to Muncie;, Ind., [Delaware Co.] where he became employed as mechanical engineer and designer in the plant of the Glasscock Bros. Manufacturing Company, builders of auto bodies. In the following August, Mr. PAUL went to New York to meet the English girl to whom his troth had been plighted before he left his native land, and he was married there. Returning to Muncie with his bride, he established his home in that city and there remained connected with the Glasscock Bros. plant until November 1, 1915, when he moved to Portland to take the position of mechanical engineer and assistant manager in the office of the Portland Body Works. On January 1, 1921, he was promoted to the position of manager of the plant and has since served in that important capacity. When operating at capacity the Portland Body Works employs about 300 men and is regarded as one of the city's leading industrial concerns. The company's products are in wide demand and have been used in the manufacture of a long line of typically representative cars. While the' company's chief contract is for bodies used in the manufacture of the Aubum car, other contracts have included bodies for such cars as the Elgin, the Haynes, the Apperson, the Brisco, the Argo, the Jackson, the National and the Pilot, Mr. PAUL's technical skill as a designer and engineer thus having found expression in an interesting variety of forms. Mr. PAUL is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church and of the Country Club. He also is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary Club and the Elks Club at Portland and in the affairs of these several organizations takes an interested part. It was on August 26, 1910, at the Hotel Earle in New York City, the Rev. B. M. Nyce, pastor of the Presbyterian church at Muncie, officiating, that Sydney PAUL was united in marriage to Edith RICE, who had come from England to meet him there. Mrs. PAUL was born at Southport, England, daughter of George Henry and Elizabeth (GOWEN) RICE, and was reared there. To Sydney and Edith (RICE) PAUL have been born three children, two daughters and a son, Edna RICE PAUL, Evelyn AYTHORPE PAUL and Sydney Reginald PAUL. The PAUL's have a very pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the general social activities of the city. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.344-345. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PAVEY, JENIUS

Jenius PAVEY, a farmer and landowner of Jefferson township, was born on a farm in Fayette county, Ohio, March 4, 1861, and is a son of Isaac and Margaret E. PAVEY, who were the parents of twelve children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Alice, and a brother, Darius PAVEY. Isaac PAVEY was born in Fayette county and was the owner of a good farm. Jenius PAVEY grew to manhood on the farm on which he was born and after his marriage remained on the home farm until 1889, when he came over into Indiana and bought the farm of eighty acres in Jefferson township, this county, where he is now living. He is a Republican. It was on August 27, 1885, while living in Ohio, that Jenius PAVEY was united in marriage to Jane BONECUTTER , who also was born in that state, and to this union two children have been born, Edith and William E., the latter of whom is still at home. Edith PAVEY married Gilbert REED, now living at Muncie, Ind., and has two children, Paul and Mary Jane REED. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.194. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PAXSON, ALBERT

Albert PAXSON, head of the firm of PAXSON & Son, proprietors of the sawmill at Pennville, and for years one of the active factors in the promotion of the best interests of that town and surrounding country, has been a resident of Jay county all his life. He was born on a farm in the Balbec neighborhood in Penn township on November 24, 1859, and is a son of Philip I. and Anna J. ( PEACOCK ) PAXSON , who were members of pioneer families in this part of the state. Philip I. PAXSON was a son of Joseph PAXSON and wife, who had come over here from Columbiana county, Ohio, in the early days of the settlement of this county and had become substantial residents of Penn township, the PAXSON's thus having been represented here from the days of the beginning of orderly social development here. Philip I. PAXSON became a farmer and landowner in Penn township and here he and his wife spent their last days, as is set out elsewhere in this work. They were the parents of seven children) five of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having four brothers, John J., W. E., J. E. and O. P. PAXSON. Reared on the home farm in Penn township, Albert PAXSON received his schooling in the Balbec school and early become engaged in farming, and also worked in the broom factory at Balbec for about five years. His first venture "on his own" was on a tract of ten acres which he bought and which he presently sold. to advantage and then bought a tract of fifty-five acres, which he proceeded to cultivate. During the days of oil and gas development he also was quite extensively engaged in the oil fields. About the year 1900 Mr. PAXSON bought the sawmill at Balbec and operated that for about four years, at the end of which time he closed out his interest there and moved to Pennville, where he bought the sawmill and has since been engaged in business there, now having as a partner in the business his son, Harry E. PAXSON. The PAXSON's have an up-to-date plant. In addition to their general custom and market milling and lumbering, they also do a quite extensive business in the buying, selling and shipping of timber and their plant is quite interestingly reminiscent of the old days when "timber was king" hereabout. Mr. PAXSON is a Republican and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In 1882 Albert PAXSON was united in marriage to Mabel BROWN, daughter of Isaac and Sarah J. ( BRENNAN ) BROWN, and to this union three children have been born, namely: Crystal, who married Lem DOWNING and has five children, Claude L., Chella Mabel, Frank Albert, Carl Elbride and Ralph B. DOWNING; Harry E., who married Virginia RUTH and is engaged with his father in the lumber milling business at Pennville, and Chella, wife of Jesse LANNING, who died on February 22, 1913. The PAXSON's have a pleasant home at Pennville and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community. Mr. PAXSON was one of the active members of the Home Union and also a member of the Pennville Improvement Association. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.286-287. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PAXSON, JOSEPH ELWOOD

Joseph Elwood PAXSON, a well known retired farmer and building contractor and landowner of Penn township, a resident of Pennville and for many years one of the leading factors in the development of that section of the county, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families of this county, and has lived here all his life. Mr. PAXSON was born on a farm in Penn township on September 14) 1847, and is a son of Philip I. and Anna J. ( PEACOCK ) PAXSON, the latter of whom was born in the neighboring county of Randolph, a member of one of the families included among the early settlers of that county. Philip I. PAXSON was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and was a son of Joseph PAXSON and wife, who were among the quite numerous emigrants from that county who came over here into Indiana in the '30s and settled in Jay county when the lands here were being taken up and developed, the PAXSON's settling on a tract of land which Joseph PAXSON had entered from the Government in Penn township. Philip I. PAXSON was but a lad when he came over here from Ohio with his parents and he grew up here. After his marriage he established his home on a farm in Penn township and became the owner of a well improved farm of eighty acres. He and his wife spent their last days in this county and were among the influential residents of the Pennville neighborhood. They were the parents of seven children, of whom five are now living, the subject of this sketch and his four brothers, Oliver P., John J., Albert and William Elmer PAXSON. Reared on the home farm in Penn township, Joseph Elwood PAXSON received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and early began farming. He married at the age of twenty-three years and after his marriage continued farming for about three years, at the end of which time he began to devote his whole time to carpentering, at which from boyhood he had worked off and on, and it was not long until he had established a reputation as a building contractor which secured to him all the work he could do throughout that section, he thus becoming one of the best known builders in Jay county. He also owns a good farm of seventy-four acres in Penn township. Mr. PAXSON continued active in this vocation until his retirement in the spring of 1921. He continues to make his home in Pennville, where he has resided for many years and where he and his family are very comfortably situated. Mr. PAXSON is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church. It was on April I, 1871, that Joseph E. PAXSON was united m marriage to Mary L. PARRETT, who was born in Wabash county, this state, daughter of Amos and Mary ( SHELLEY ) PARRETT, the latter of whom was born in Montgomery county, Ohio. Amos PARRETT was born in Preble county, Ohio, and he and his wife were married in Wabash county, Indiana, to which county their respective parents had moved from Ohio. He grew up as a shoemaker, but later became engaged in mercantile business and after awhile moved into Huntington county, where his last days were spent. He and his wife had six children, those besides Mrs. PAXSON being Martha, Joseph, Lydia, Clemmie and John. To Joseph E. and Mary L. ( PARRETT ) PAXSON have been born seven children, namely: Iva, who married Thomas J. HARRELL and has two children, Mary and Avis; Bert, who married Iva BUNKER and has three children, Thelma, Floyd and Merle; Clemmie, who is at home with her parents; Opal, who married Walter WILLIAMS and has two children, Vada and Helen; Leslie, who married Orpha WALDO and has three children, Mary BURDETT, Waldo and Carl; Esta, who is at home with her parents, and Phyllis, who married Forest HULLINGER and has two children, Joseph and Rosamond. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.322-323. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PAXSON, WALTER W

Walter W. PAXSON, one of the best known farmers of Jay county, former overseer of the Indiana State Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry, and formerly and for years engaged in the horticultural nursery business in this county, proprietor of an excellent farm on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, in Penn township, was born on the farm on which he is now living, the third of the PAXSON's in direct descent in ownership of that farm, and has lived there all his life. Mr. PAXSON was born on March 5, 1866, and is a son of George and Lydia ( MENDENHALL ) PAXSON, both of whom were born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and who were but children when they came to this county with their respective parents, the two families having been among the considerable number of families from Columbiana county who found homes here in pioneer days. George PAXSON was but eight years of age when he came here in 1848 with his parents, Benjamin E. and Sarah ( MITCHEL ) PAXSON, both of whom were born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. Benjamin E. PAXSON bought an "eighty" in Penn township, the place on which his grandson, the subject of this sketch, now resides and there established his home. His son George grew up on that place and after his marriage to Lydia MENDENHALL established his home on the place, on which he presently established a "nursery" for the cultivation of garden and orchard plants and became widely known hereabout as a distributor of such products, one of the first persons in this section of the state thus to engage in this business on anything like a proper commercial scale, the PAXSON nursery products attaining a wide reputation throughout this area of distribution. George PAXSON and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom four are living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, William O. PAXSON, and two sisters, Sarah and Mattie. Reared on the home farm in Penn township, Walter W. PAXSON received his schooling in the school in district No. 5 of that township and early became associated with his father in the development of the nursery business on the home farm. After his marriage he was for some years engaged in the nursery business on his own account and since abandoning that line has devoted his whole attention to the cultivation of his farm, a well kept place of fifty-seven acres, a part of the old PAXSON farm, and has done well in his operations. For years Mr. PAXSON has given his do attention to the affairs of the Patrons of Husbandry, one of the most active members of the local grange, and was for four years overseer of the state grange. He is an ardent Prohibitionist and long has been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in this part of Indiana. For more than thirty years he has been a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and is a past chancellor commander of the lodge. He and his wife are members of the United Brethren church, and he has for years been an office bearer in the church, for the past twenty years a member of the board of trustees and for twenty years superintendent of the Sunday school. Walter W. PAXSON has been twice married. In 1893 he was united in marriage to Mattie OGAN, a daughter of Adam and Amy OGAN, and who died leaving two daughters. Hazel and Fay, both of whom also now are deceased. Mr. PAXSON's second wife, Laura JAMES, is a daughter of John and Margaret ( LAIRD ) JAMES. To this union one child has been born, a son, Lloyd Herman PAXSON. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.327-328. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PAYTON, W. W.

W. W. PAYTON, merchant, Dunkirk, is a native of Indiana, born in Delaware Township, Delaware County, September 16, 1840, a son of Rev. John H. and Temperance ( DRAGEO ) PAYTON. The father was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, and when a boy removed with his parents to Washington County, Ohio, and from there to Fayette County, Indiana. In the early days of Delaware County he entered land in Liberty Township, that county, about half of which he cleared from the heavy timber. In 1842 he removed to Liberty township, and while living there was ordained [p. 319] a preacher in the Methodist church. In 1849 he went to Bluffton to take his first charge, and one year later was appointed to the church at Monmouth. From there he went to Auburn, Allen Circuit, thence to Leesburg, where he spent two years, and subsequently had charge of churches at North Manchester, Columbia City, eighteen months, Bluffton, one year, Winchester, one year, Albany, one year. From Albany he went to Selma, where he remained until 1865, after which he spent four years and a half in Woodhull, Henry County, Illinois, going thence to Champaign County, where he resided until his death, December 14,1883, his widow being still a resident of Champaign County. W. W. PAYTON, the subject of this sketch, made his home with his parents, attending the schools of the various places where his father's pastoral duties called him. He enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, July 2, 1861, and was assigned to company K, Nineteenth Indiana Infantry. He [sic] regiment rendezvoused at Indianapolis, going thence to Washington City, where it joined the Army of the Potomac, First Corps, General McDOWELL. He participated in the battles of Gainesville, Manasses Junction, South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. His regiment wintered at Belle Plain. He was in the first day's fight at Gettysburg, where his corps lost its commander, General REYNOLDS, and where our subject was wounded and taken prisoner, but left in hospital. On the third day of the battle he was recaptured and sent to Philadelphia, where he remained in hospital three and a half months. He was then transferred to the hospital at Indianapolis where he was furloughed, and in December, 1863, rejoined his regiment near Rappahannock Station, Virginia, going thence to Culpepper Court House where he re-enlisted. He was promoted Sergeant of Company K, March 1, 1864, and April 21 following He was made Commissary Sergeant of the Nineteenth Indiana Regiment. He went with his regiment to Petersburg, where he was discharged October 19, 1864, on the consolidation of the Nineteenth, Seventh, Fourteenth and Twentieth Indiana Regiments. After his discharge he returned to his home, teaching school that winter, and the following spring he removed to Henry County, Illinois, where he was engaged in farming four years. He then went to Champaign County, Illinois, and three and a half years later came to Indiana, where he has since divided his time between farming and mercantile pursuits. He established his business at Dunkirk, December 13, 1881, and by his reasonable prices, and strict attention to the wants of his customers ha has built up a good trade. Mr. PAYTON was married November 5, 1863, to Miss Adaline BOWEN, a native of Blackford County, Indiana, and a daughter of William and Rebecca BOWEN. She died December 17, 1886. Their only child, Charles W., who was born July 23, 1871, died March 2, 1872. On the 16th dayof August, 1887, Mr. PAYTON was married to Miss Lizzie BROTHERTON, a nativeof Randolph County Indiana, but then a resident of Dunkirk, Jay County, Indiana, a daughter of James T. and Lucy A. BROTHERTON. Mr. PAYTON is a charter member of Benjamin SHIELDS Post, No. 289, G. A. R., which he has served as Adjutant and Quartermaster. He is a member of Dunkirk Lodge, No.275, A. F. & A. M., and also belongs to Dunkirk Lodge, No. 306, I. O. O. F. SOURCE: p.318 "Biographical and Historical Record of Jay County, Indiana," Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1887. Reprinted by Mayhill Publications of Knightstown, Indiana, 1974. This is the reprinted Jay County section out of the original combined 1887 History of Jay and Blackford counties. Submitted to GenWeb by: Betty Creath)

PENCE, JAMES R

James R. PENCE, a well known agriculturist of Penn township, living on a well improved farm on rural mail route No. 2 out of Pennville, has lived on that place for more than fifty years. Mr. PENCE was born on a farm in Henry county, this state, October 2, 1859, and is a son of Levi and Susanna ( McMULLEN ) PENCE, the latter of whom was born in Wayne county, Indiana, a member of one of the old families of that county. Levi PENCE was born in Warren county. Tennessee, and was but a boy when he came to Indiana with his parents, the family settling in Delaware county, where he grew to manhood and became a school teacher. After his marriage he began farming in Henry county and remained there until 1865 when he came to Jay county and bought an uncleared tract of eighty acres in Penn township, a part of the farm on which the subject of this sketch is now living. Levi PENCE cleared and drained that place and improved it in good shape, one of the first men in the county to discern and utilize the possibilities of thorough tile draining and he did much to promote the system of under draining throughout that section. For some time after coming here he also was engaged in teaching school during the winters and was helpful in other ways in helping to bring about proper social and economic conditions in the community. He increased his original land holdings until he became the owner of 120 acres and was accounted one of the substantial citizens of the community in which he lived. His wife died on July 6, 1911, and he survived until November 26, 1915. They were the parents of four children, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Effie I. and Alma M., and a brother, Dexter PENCE. As will be noted by a comparison of above dates, James R. PENCE was about six years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents. He grew to manhood on the home farm, receiving his schooling in the local schools and under the thoughtful home training of his parents, and from the days of his boyhood has devoted himself to the farm, which he is now managing in behalf of the family. The PENCE farm, now a tract of 146 acres, is well improved and profitably cultivated. Mr. PENCE has kept abreast of modern progress in agricultural methods and his operations have been carried on in up-to-date fashion. In addition to his general farming operations he has given considerable attention to the raising of live stock and has done well. In his political views Mr. PENCE is Independent. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.301-302. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PETERS, HARRY D

Harry D. PETERS, a well known dairyman and farmer living just north of Portland in Wayne township, this county, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Jay county since he was ten years of age. Mr. PETERS was born on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, January 13, 1872, and is a son of the Rev. Newton and Rachel ( LIGHT ) PETERS, both of whom were born in that same county and the latter of whom is still living. The Rev. Newton PETERS, who died at his home in this county on August 26) 1916) was reared on a farm and followed farming all his life, becoming a substantial landowner in this county as well as a successful dealer in real estate. He was for years pastor of the Baptist church in the vicinity of Lightsville, over in Darke county and had a wide acquaintance throughout this section. It was in 1882 that he came to Jay county, he and J. K. RIFFLE in that year having bought a tract of 240 acres in Wayne township, this transaction being historically looked upon as the beginning of the notable real estate "boom" which was inaugurated in Jay county about that time, and during that "boom" he bought and sold a number of good farms in this county, making his home on the west "eighty" of the 240 acre tract in Wayne township, where he spent his last days. He and his wife were the parents of four children, all of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Mrs. Gertrude MYERS, and two brothers, Jesse L. and George PETERS. As will be noted by a comparison of dates above, Harry D. PETERS was ten years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents in 1882. He completed his schooling in the district school in the neighborhood of his home in Wayne township and by attendance for two terms at the old Portland Normal School, which at that time was under the direction of Professor Reese, and remained at home, helpful in the labors of the farm, until his marriage at the age of twenty-two, when he established his home on the eighty acre farm on which he is now living, one mile north and one-half mile west of Portland. Upon taking- possession there Mr. PETERS began to make a specialty of his dairying operations and for four years operated his own milk wagon, finding a ready market in Portland, but since then has been selling his milk to a concern which looks after the delivery. Mr. PETERS has a herd of fifteen pure bred Holstein dairy cows and raises his own cattle, his herd being- subject twice a year to the test for tuberculosis and his cows are thus on the credited list as being absolutely free from this scourge. In addition to his dairying Mr. PETERS carries on his farming- operations in accordance with modern methods and has an excellent farm plant, his buildings being new and up to date and everything on the place "shipshape." Mr. PETERS is a Democrat, is an active member of Portland Grange No. 2190, Patrons of Husbandry, and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church at Portland. It was on April 4, 1894, that Harry D. PETERS was united in marriage to Mary E. RUNKEL, who was born in Madison township, this county, daughter of Stephen and Catherine ( HEIL ) RUNKEL, and to this union two children have been born, Ollie Naomi, who is a member of the class of 1922, Portland high school, and Clarence Everett PETERS, member of the class of 1923. The PETERS family is very pleasantly situated on rural mail route No. 2 out of Portland and its members take an interested part in the general social activities of the community.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.308-309. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PETERS, JESSE L

Jesse L. PETERS, manager of the Equity Exchange elevator at Portland, councilman-at-large for that city and for years one of the best known grain men in this part of the state, is a native of the Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of his childhood. He was born in Darke county, Ohio, December 13, 1877, and is a son of Newton and Rachel ( LIGHT ) PETERS, both of whom were born in that same county, who came over into Indiana and located at Portland in the early '80s. The Rev. Newton PETERS was a farmer and a minister of the gospel. He and his wife had four children, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Gertrude L., wife of George W. MYERS, of Portland, and two brothers, George M. PETERS and Harry D. PETERS, of Wayne township. Jesse L. PETERS grew to manhood at Portland, completing his schooling in the old normal school there and in the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute, and was for some years engaged as a teacher, principal of the General Shanks school at Portland. In 1908 he purchased the elevator and general store at Collett and was there engaged in business for eight years, or until 1916, when, on the organization of the Portland Equity Exchange, he was made manager of the same. Not long afterward he resigned this position and became engaged in the mercantile business at Alexandria, Ind., and later at Burlington, Ind., continuing thus engaged until 1921, when he returned to Portland to resume the management of the Equity Exchange elevator and has since occupied that position. The Equity Exchange started in a small way but it was not long until it had so firmly established itself in the confidence of the farmers hereabout that it has grown to be the most extensive grain elevator in Jay county, its operations providing an outlet for a wide market. Mr. PETERS is a Democrat and for some time served as a member of the local board of health at Portland. In 1921 he was elected councilman-at-large and is now serving in this latter capacity. In 1902 Jesse L. PETERS was united in marriage to Myrtle E. CROUCH, who was born in Mercer county, Ohio, but who had been a resident of Portland since the days of her girlhood, and to this union have been born two children, Madonna and Ivy R.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.101. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PETTYJOHN, WASHINGTON T

Washington T. PETTYJOHN, one of Jay County's leading agriculturists, residing on section 36, Jefferson Township, is a native of Indiana, born in Rush County, January 3, 1827, a son of Nide and Elizabeth ( THARP ) PETTYJOHN, his father born in Surrey County, North Carolina, and his mother a native of Preble County, Ohio. They were married in Rush County, Indiana, about the year 1824, and reared a family of seven children to maturity -- William, living in Republic County, Kansas; Washington T., the subject of this sketch; Mrs. Lydia Ellen HAYES, living in California; Mrs. Susan Ann BENNETT, of Colorado Springs, Colorado; Mrs. Rebecca Jane RIGGIN, of Andrew County, Missouri; Christopher C., residing in Washington Territory, and Solomon who died in California, aged thirty years. In 1836 the parents removed with their family from Rush County to Shelby County, Indiana, and in 1840 removed to Andrew County, Missouri. In March 1879, the parents left Andrew County with their son William, for Republic County, Kansas, where the father died January 1, 1883, aged about eighty-six years. The mother died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. RIGGIN, in Savannah, Andrew County, Missouri, October 4, 1886, in her seventy-ninth year. Washington T. PETTYJOHN, whose name heads this sketch, reached manhood in Andrew County, Missouri, remaining with his parents until reaching his twenty-second year. He then spent a few years in Randolph County, Indiana, where he was married October 26, 1854, to Miss Eleanor WARD, a daughter of Job and Amy ( GRAVES ) WARD. They have had born to them seven children --Mrs. Elizabeth BOYER of Cloud County, Kansas; Lot, now living with his parents, married Miss Minnie HENIZER, who died leaving two children named Ora and Charles; Dan, living at Silverton, San Juan County, Colorado; Jay, of Cloud County, Kansas; Mrs. Grace ARTMAN, of Jay County; Ely, of Aurora, Nebraska and Asa, at home. Mr. and Mrs. PETTYJOHN established their home in Jefferson Township, in March 1855, on the property they now own and occupy, their first house being a rude log cabin. Mr. PETTYJOHN first purchased 125 acres for $2,000 cash, about thirty acres of his land having been opened. He continued the work of improving his property until 1864, when he rented his land for two years, and moved his family to Ridgeville and enlisted as a recruit in Company A, Fortieth Indiana Infantry in November of the same year. He joined his regiment at Columbia, Tennessee, and with it participated in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, and received his discharge in June, 1865. He returned to his farm two years after leaving it, and has since added to it until it contains 250 acres, his farm being well improved and very productive. His residence is one of the best in Jefferson Township, and his farm buildings are correspondingly good. Politically Mr. PETTYJOHN is a Republican. He has served three years as county commissioner, with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his constituents. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Ridgeville Lodge, No. 116. The parents of Mrs. PETTYJOHN were both natives of North Carolina, but reared and married in Ohio. They were among the earliest settlers of Randolph County, Indiana, settling in what was afterward WARD Township, in April 1819, where they improved a large farm on which they resided until their death. The mother died April 27, 1864, aged sixty-seven years. The father survived until November 7, 1874, dying in his eighty-fourth year. Of their fourteen children eight are still living --Thomas, of Winchester, Randolph County; Mrs. Margery McKEW, of Ridgeville, Randolph County; Mrs. PETTYJOHN; Mrs. Edith MOFFITT, of Hancock County, Ohio; Mrs. Harriet THOMPSON, of Whitley County, Indiana; Joel, of Randolph County, Indiana; Mrs. Lydia WAY, living at Winchester, Indiana, and Job, of Ridgeville, Indiana. William died in early manhood; Sarah died in childhood; Sarah died aged two years; Mrs. Mary SUMPTION died in Randolph County; David died in the same county, and Mrs. Berzilla SUMPTION died in Madison, Nebraska, the last three leaving families.

PHILLIPS, GEORGE W

George W. PHILLIPS, who died at his home in Redkey in 1919 and who had for years been there engaged in the live stock business, his extensive breeding stables having been important factors in the promotion of better strains of live stock hereabout, left a good memory at his death and it is but proper that there should be carried in this formal history of the county of which he was a native some fitting tribute to that memory. Mr. PHILLIPS was born on the place at Redkey which he afterward brought to such a high state of development, December 9, 1862, and was a son of Asa F. and Mary T. ( GAUNT ) PHILLIPS, who were among the early and influential residents of that community. Asa F. PHILLIPS was a good farmer and g-ave considerable attention to live stock, hence from the days of his boyhood George W. PHILLIPS was trained to the ways of live stock development. He received his schooling in the schools of Redkey and after leaving school remained with his father on the farm. He married before he was twenty years of age and for a couple of years thereafter continued his residence on the home farm, in the meantime giving his particular attention to the live stock end of the farming operations, and in 1884 established at Redkey the breeding stables which for years thereafter exerted so pronounced an influence upon the promotion of better strains of horseflesh hereabout. Mr. PHILLIPS made a specialty of Belgians and Percherons, the draft horse ever having been his hobby, and he imported his breeding stock, making trips to Europe for this purpose and bringing back with him all the way from twenty to 160 pure bred horses at a time, his last trip in this connection having been made just before the war broke out in Europe in 1914, the further export of horses from the other side at that time being forbidden. For years Mr. PHILLIPS operated in this connection in association with the firm of Keiser Bros., who had their main stables at Keota, Iowa, and in 1906 he formed a further association with the Keisers in the sale and development of Texas lands, their first transaction in this line having been the purchase of sixty-eight sections of land in Texas. Mr. PHILLIPS continued this association until 1911, when he dissolved partnership with the Keisers and thereafter gave his whole attention to his horse business at Redkey and so continued until 1914 when he recognized that the gradual trend away from horses had made the cattle industry a more attractive one and he took up the development of Shorthorn cattle and the big type Poland China hogs, still utilizing his Redkey barns, and continued thus quite successfully engaged until his death on January 4, 1919. His body was laid to rest in the cemetery at Winchester, Ind. During the height of his activity as a horseman Mr. PHILLIPS became widely known as a breeder of fast horses and had a number of race horses that attracted much attention, the most notable of these having been "Fay Richmond," 2:01-1/4, the holder of more track records in the United States and Canada than any horse living or dead and who equaled the world's record of 2:03:-1 /4 on a half-mile track. Mr. PHILLIPS at one time was the owner of 200 acres of land in this county and for a number of years he also served as vice president of the Bank of Redkey. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Redkey and was a Republican. He was an active Freemason, affiliated with the blue lodge at Redkey and with the chapter, council and commandery at Dunkirk and was also affiliated with the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Redkey. It was OH April 15, 1882, that George W. PHILLIPS Was united in marriage, at Winchester, Ind., to Mary J. ARNEY, who was born and reared in that city, daughter of William and Nancy ( PAGE ) ARNEY, the former of whom was a Winchester merchant, and to this union was born one child, a son. Fay L., who was born in Redkey on April 24, 1896, and who is now carrying on the live stock business that had been developed by his father. Fay L. PHILLIPS was graduated from the high school at Redkey in 1916. He had had a previous course in a boys school in France (Remalard College at Oran), a private institution for the instruction of American and English youth in the French language, he having been taken abroad by his father on one of the latter's business trips to Europe for the purpose of getting a year of such training. He is now engaged in farming on his well equipped place of 120 acres and is also devoting considerable attention to the breeding of fast horses.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.250-251. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PHINNEY, ROBERT S

Robert S. PHINNEY, station agent for the Lake Erie & Western Railroad Company at Redkey and one of the best known young men in that city, is a Minnesotan by birth, but has been a resident of Indiana for ten or twelve years, nearly all of which time has been spent in the service of the railway company. Mr. PHINNEY was born in Rock county, Minnesota, September 8, 1888, and is a son of Fred P. and Mary E. ( SIFERT ) PHINNEY, who are now residing in Kansas. Fred P. PHINNEY was born in Lodi, Wis. and moved to Minnesota with his parents when he was but a lad. He early became connected with railroad work and presently was appointed agent for the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company at one of that company's stations in South Dakota. He later served as agent for the Butte, Anaconda & Pacific at Anaconda, Mont., and still later for the New York Central lines, continuing in the railroad service until 1910, when he settled on a farm of 120 acres which he had bought in the vicinity of Ridgeville, in this state, where he remained for six years, or until 1916, when he disposed of his interests there and moved. to a farm in the vicinity of Garden City, Kas., where he is now living. To him and his wife seven children were born. Of these, four are living, the subject of this sketch, having three sisters, Grace, Ethel and Laura. The deceased were Fannie and Vera and a son who died in infancy. When Robert S. PHINNEY was but a lad his father was stationed in the railway service at Bradley, Ill., and it was there his common schooling was completed. This he supplemented by a course in a business college and then took up railroad work, having become qualified both as a telegraph operator 'and as a clerk. His first assignment was as operator and agent at the New York Central's station at Bradley, III. He later served for some time as operator and clerk at Kankakee, Ill., and when his father moved to the farm in the Ridgeville neighborhood in 1910 he accompanied him and was for eighteen months engaged in helping out on the farm, continuing thus engaged until his acceptance in 1912 of a position with the Lake Erie & Western road. In 1915 he was appointed agent for that road at Redkey and has since occupied this position. Mr. PHINNEY is affiliated with the local lodges of the Free and Accepted Masons and the Knights of Pythias at Redkey. On September 30, 1911, Robert S. PHINNEY was united in marriage to Opal E. ROSS, who was born in Pike township, this county, a daughter of Frank and Ella ROSS, and to this union four children have been born, Walter, Myron, Ella and Fred. Mr. and Mrs. PHINNEY have a pleasant home at Redkey and take an interested part in the general social activities of the community.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.118-119. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PIERCE, JAMES O

JAMES O. PIERCE, former secretary-treasurer of the Bimel Manufacturing Company, of Portland, who died at his home in that city in 1920 and who prior to establishing his connection with the industrial interests of the community had for some years served as a teacher in the schools of this county, left a good memory at his passing and it is but fitting that there here should be carried some modest tribute to that memory. Mr. PIERCE was a native of Ohio, born on December 16, 1858, and was a son of Orange and Caroline ( SELBY ) PIERCE. He was reared at Zanesville, Ohio, and upon completing the course in the high school there supplemented the same by a course in the Zanesville Commercial College. He then came to Indiana and entered Ridgeville College, making his home at Ridgeville with his grandfather, the Rev. Asa PIERCE. Upon completing the course in Ridgeville College Mr. PIERCE became engaged as an instructor in the college and was thus engaged for several years, at the end of which time he accepted the position of superintendent of schools at Redkey and thus became a resident of Jay. county. For four years he served as superintendent at Redkey and then he transferred his services to the schools at Portland and thereafter made his home in Portland. For two years Mr. PIERCE taught in the Portland schools and then entered the office of the Bimel Manufacturing Company as bookkeeper. He presently was promoted to the position of secretary treasurer of the company and continued engaged with that concern for about twenty-five years, or until his retirement from business in 1913. After his retirement Mr. PIERCE continued to make his home in Portland, where he had become very comfortably situated, and there he died on December 4, 1920, he then being in the sixty-second year of his age. In April, 1880, James O. PIERCE was united in marriage to Sue BOWERSOX, who was born in Darke county, Ohio, in 1858, daughter of John H. and Diana ( HARTER ) BOWERSOX, who later became residents of Indiana, and to that union were born four children, namely: Inez, who married G. T. VAIL, a banker, of Michigan City, Ind., and has one child, a daughter, Barbara; J. 0. PIERCE, now a farmer in this county, who married Bessie FLESHER and has one child, a daughter, Marian; Earl, who is living at home with his mother, and Mabel, who married L. W. HULL, a lawyer of Oshkosh, Wis., and has one child, a daughter, Nancy. Mr. PIERCE was a member of the Methodist church, as is his widow, and was for more than twenty years superintendent of the Sunday school. He was a Republican and was a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Portland. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.44-45. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PLACE, ALLEN T

Allen T. PLACE, a veteran of the Civil war, who died at his home in Pennville on January 21, 1921, had been for years engaged in business at that PLACE, for the last ten years of his life engaged in the insurance business, and there were few men in this county who had a wider acquaintance than he. Mr. PLACE was a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families of Knox township, and practically all his life was spent here. He was born on a pioneer farm in Knox township on November 4, 1845, and was a son of William and Esther ( THAYER ) PLACE, both of whom were born in Rhode Island, but who became residents of Ohio where they were married. Not long after their marriage they came over into Indiana and settled on a tract of land which William PLACE had entered from the Government in Knox township, this county, established their home there and there spent the remainder of their lives, useful and influential pioneers of that section. William PLACE and his wife were the parents of eight children. Allen T. PLACE grew to manhood on the home farm in Knox township, completing his schooling in old Liber College. At the age of eighteen years he enlisted for service in the Union army and went to the front as a member of Company G of the 138th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served for five months, or until the end of the war, when he received his honorable discharge and returned home, resuming his PLACE on the farm. He was married in the spring of 1868 and for three years thereafter continued farming on the home PLACE. He then moved to the village of Keystone, up in the adjacent county of Wells and bought a general store there, continuing in business there for seven years, at the 'end of which time he disposed of his interests at that PLACE and returned to Jay county, locating at Pennville, where he bought a grocery store and meat market. The rest of Mr. PLACE's life was spent in business at Pennville, the last ten years of this time being given over to the direction of the considerable fire insurance business he had developed there and throughout this and adjacent counties. It was on March 29, 1868, that Allen T. PLACE was united in marriage to Jane WHITEMAN, who survives him and who continues to make her home at Pennville, where she is very comfortably situated. Mrs. PLACE was born in this county, and is a member of one of the real pioneer families of the county, her parents, the Rev. George C. and Mary ( SPAHR ) WHITEMAN, having been among the early and most influential factors in bringing about proper social conditions hereabout in the days of the settlement of this region. The Rev. George C. WHITEMAN, who was born in Ohio and who was a clergyman of the Methodist church, was here at the time Jay county was organized as a separate civic entity, and was widely known among the settlers throughout this section of Indiana. He entered a tract of land in Greene township, this county, about the time the county was organized and on this place he established his home. His wife was of the pioneer SPAHR family in Greene county, in Ohio, several representatives of which became pioneers of Jay county. The Rev. George C. WHITEMAN took an earnest part in general civic affairs and for thirteen years (1839-52) served as judge of the probate court. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, of whom three are living, Mrs. PLACE having a brother, James WHITEMAN, and a sister, Mary E. To Alien T. and Jane ( WHITEMAN ) PLACE were born six children, namely: Nellie, who married Wilbur H. CHANDLER and has one son, Earl CHANDLER, who is a graduate of DePauw University; Eva, who married John W. HOLMES, of Portland, and has three children, Howard, Paul and Herbert; Lottie, who married the Rev. W. A. GRIEST and has four children, Helen M., Leah E., Robert Allen and Elizabeth J.; Dr. W. D. PLACE, who married Mary SINCLAIR and has three children, Walter Edwin, Robert Allen and Ila Pauline; Olive, who spent one year as a teaching missionary in Japan and is now a teacher in the Portland public schools, and Pauline, who for five years or more was stationed at Nagasaki, Japan, as a missionary of the Methodist Episcopal church and is now attending Boston University. Mrs. PLACE is a member of the Methodist church, as was her husband, and is a Republican, as also was he. He was a member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic and of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.202-204. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PREMER, SAMUEL F

Samuel F. PREMER, a former member of the board of county commissioners for Jay county, formerly assessor in Greene township and now one of the best known and most substantial farmers and landowners in Noble township, where he resides, he and his family having a very pleasant home on rural mail route No. 9 out of Portland, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and has resided in this county all his life. Mr. PREMER was born on a farm in Wayne township on April 4, 1864, and is a son of William and Albina ( GILBERT ) PREMER, the latter of whom was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, but had been a resident of this county since the days of her childhood, her parents having come over here from Ohio in pioneer days. William PREMER also was born in Ohio, in the vicinity of the city of Wooster, in Wayne county, and was but one year old when his parents, Hiram and Elizabeth ( PREMER ) PREMER, came over here into Indiana and settled on a quarter section of land in section 9 of Noble township, this county, which his father had entered from the Government. Hiram PREMER was born in Wayne county, Ohio, in 1817, and was a son of Samuel and Mary PREMER, the former of whom was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1796, and was but three years of age when his parents moved to the Ohio frontier and settled in what later came to be organized as Butler county, whence in 1812 they moved to Wayne county. There Samuel PREMER in turn established his home and remained until he came to Indiana and settled in Jay county. His wife was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania. in 1796, and in 1811 moved with her parents to Wayne county, Ohio, the family being compelled during the first few months of their residence there to live in a block house on account of Indian troubles. She died in Jay county in 1861 and is buried in the PREMER cemetery. Hiram PREMER, one of the seven children born to this pioneer couple and grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was married in Wayne county, Ohio, and some years later came over into Indiana with his father and settled in Jay county, as noted above, becoming one of the earliest settlers in Noble township. Indeed, it is related that there were but two other settlers in that township when the PREMER's settled there. He had three children, Sarah, Isaac and William, when he came to this county and seven others were born after he took up his residence here. Of these ten children six are still living namely: Samuel and Solomon PREMER, of Haigler, Neb.; Mrs. Abigail HOUDESHELL, of Hartford City, Ind.; James PREMER, of Ft. Recovery, Ohio; John PREMER, of Hartford City, Ind., and Henry PREMER, of Marion, Ind. William PREMER, third in order of birth of Hiram PREMER's children, was but a babe in arms when his parents came to Jay county and he spent the remainder of his life here, living to be more than seventy-eight years of age. His life was a busy one, his activities extending pretty much over the county as a timberman, carrying on this line, along with sawmilling, in addition to his extensive farming operations, and at one time was the owner of three good farms. His wife ( Albina GILBERT ) was eighty-three years of age at the time of her death. They had eight children, three of whom died in infancy, the others (besides the subject of this sketch) being Mrs. Ida TEETERS, of Portland; Henry A. PREMER, of Tulsa, Okla.; William A. PREMER, of Bluffton, Ind., and Hiram E. PREMER, of Bluffton. In passing, it may be said that a part of the land entered in this county by the pioneer Samuel PREMER remained in the family until 1910, when Isaac PREMER, an uncle of Samuel F. PREMER, sold his farm in Noble township. Samuel F. PREMER was about seventeen years of age when his parents moved from Wayne township to Greene township and settled on a farm where the village of Blaine now is located. He completed his elementary schooling in the school in that neighborhood and supplemented this by a coarse in the old Portland Normal School, after which he taught school for one term, but this profession did not appeal very strongly to him and he thereafter for five years gave his full attention to the affairs of his father's sawmill. He then was made the local buyer at Blaine for the Jay Grain Company and was thus engaged for thirteen years, at the end of which time he rented a farm in Greene township and entered upon his present vocation as a farmer. Mr. PREMER continued to make his residence in Greene township until 1918 when he bought the place on which he is now living, a well kept farm of 100 acres in Noble township, and has since resided there, he and his family being very comfortably situated. Mr. PREMER is a Republican and has for years been reorganized as one of the leaders of that party in Jay county. He served one term (1901-4) as a member of the board' of county commissioners and for five years rendered service as township assessor in Greene township. He is a member of the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen at Portland and he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church at Bellefontaine. On March 10, 1888, Samuel F. PREMER was united in marriage to Florence A. WRIGHT, who was born and reared in Greene township, and to this union four children have been born, all of whom are living save Ellery, the first born, born on February 13, 1889, who died on May 8, 1906, and is buried in Green Park cemetery at Portland, the other children of this family being Harold A., Perry C. and Inez E., the latter of whom married Robert PHELAN, a Noble township farmer, and has one child, a daughter, Florence M., born on July 26, 1920. Harold A. PREMER married Hazel A. SPAHR and is farming in Greene township. Perry C. PREMER, a veteran of the World war, now employed in the body works manufacturing plant at Union City, Ind., married Gussie M. THORNBURG and has one child, a son, Frederick F., born on December 26, 1919. Perry C. PREMER enlisted for service in the World war in November, 1917, and served overseas as a corporal in Battery F of the 60th Artillery Corps. He sailed for overseas duty with his command in April, 1918, and remained abroad until in January, 1919, during this period of service having been a participant in the historic battles at St. Mihiel and in the Argonne Forest. He received his discharge on February 28, 1919. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.228-230. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PRILLAMAN, JOHN R

John R. PRILLAMAN, a well-known and substantial farmer and landowner of Bearcreek township, now living practically retired from the active labors of the farm at his pleasant place on rural mail route No. 9 out of Portland, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has resided in this county all his life. Mr. PRILLAMAN was born on a farm in the immediate vicinity of where he is now living, along the line between Bearcreek and Wayne townships, a part of the tract that was entered from the Government by his grandfather, and has thus been a witness to and a participant in the development of that section from the days of his childhood, seventy years ago. The date of his birth was March 24, 1850, and he is a son of Jacob and Henrietta (GRIMES) PRILLAMAN, the latter of whom was born in Fredericks county, Maryland, a daughter of John GRIMES and wife, who had come to Indiana with their family in 1839 and settled in Jay county. Jacob PRILLAMAN was born in Miami county, Ohio, in 1820, and was eighteen years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents, William PRILLAMAN and wife, in 1838, the family settling on a tract of new land aggregating 640 acres eighty of which was in Wayne township, the remainder in Bearcreek township, which William PRILLAMAN, the pioneer, had entered from the Government the year before. Jacob PRILLAMAN took an active part in the development of this timberland farm, and after his marriage to Henrietta GRIMES in 1844 continued to make his home there, receiving a tract of 160 acres from his father. He developed a good farm and spent the remainder of his life there, his death occurring in March, 1879. His wife had preceded him to the grave more than six years, her death having occurred in August, 1872. They were the parents of six children, of whom but two are now living, the subject of this sketch and his sister, Mrs. Mary KIRKPATRICK. John R. PRILLAMAN was reared on the home farm along the line between Wayne and Bearcreek townships, and his early schooling was received in the Hanlin school house, a hewed-log building in the former township. This course was supplemented by a term of instruction in 1869 in Ridgeville College. He remained at home assisting his father in the development of the farm, and after his marriage, at the age of twenty-one, began to farm on his own account, his father giving him a tract of forty acres of uncleared land, a part of the place on which he is now living. There he built a house and entered upon the job of clearing the land and making a farm. As his affairs prospered he built new buildings and increased his land holdings until now he is the owner of an excellent farm plant and a fraction more than 134 acres, 113 acres of which lie in Bearcreek township and the remainder over the line in Wayne township. For some years past Mr. PRILLAMAN has been renting his fields and taking things somewhat easier than during the earlier and busier years of his life. He is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Belmore Methodist Protestant church. On October 4, 1871, John R. PRILLAMAN was united in marriage to Emma R. SHERMAN, of this county, and to this union three children have been born, namely: Carrie F., born on November 7, 1872: Estella, April 26, 1876, and Fred H., June 29, 1879. Carrie F. PRILLAMAN married John LEONHARD, of Wabash township, this county, and died on May 23, 1906, leaving three children, Fred H., Fern F. and Erma M. LEONHARD. Fred H. LEONHARD, now living at Minneapolis, [Minnesota] is married and has one child, a daughter, Mary Jane. Fern E. LEONHARD married William SUTTON, of Yorktown. Ind., [Delaware Co.] now a civil engineer living at Yakima, Wash., and has one child, a daughter, Margaret A. Estella PRILLAMAN married Charles F. HARTMAN, a salesman, now living at Wilmington, Ohio, and has four children, Charles E., Jr., John Dale, Paul and Frederick. Fred H. PRILLAMAN, now a hardware merchant at Upland, Ind., married Mary LOGAN and has three children, John M., James and Carl. On October 4, 1921, Mr. and Mrs. PRILLAMAN celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, the occasion being made one of much felicitation on the part of their friends, more than 100 of whom were guests of the family on that day. Mrs. Emma R. PRILLAMAN was born in Licking county, Ohio, October 30, 1849, and was sixteen years of age when she came to Jay county with her parents, Lorenzo and Sophia P. (MOULTON) SHERMAN, the family settling in Wayne township, where she was living at the time of her marriage. She began teaching school upon her arrival here, at the age of sixteen, and was for some years thereafter thus engaged in this county, teaching four terms in Bearcreek township, four in Wayne and one in Noble. Both Lorenzo SHERMAN and his wife were born in the state of Vermont, the former on July 28, 1810, and the latter, February 27, 1823. The MOULTON moved to Licking county, Ohio, when. Sophia was eleven years of age. Lorenzo SHERMAN was twenty-nine years of age when he became a resident of Licking county. He and Sophia MOULTON were married there in 1840 and they continued to reside in that county until 1865, when they came to Jay county and settled in Wayne township, where Lorenzo SHERMAN bought a farm of 280 acres. On this latter place he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of nine children, five of whom are still living, Mrs. PRILLAMAN having two sisters, Anna L. and Celesta, and two brothers, Charles S. and Leroy H. SHERMAN. The deceased children of this family were Warren S., Reuben, Sarah and Sophia L. Both Warren S. SHERMAN and Reuben SHERMAN served as soldiers of the Union, during the Civil war, the latter enlisting at the age of nineteen years. He was taken prisoner by the enemy and died in Andersonville prison. Warren S. SHERMAN also was a prisoner at Andersonville, but survived the horrors of that dreadful pen. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.364-366. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PUMPHREY, WARREN A

Warren A. PUMPHREY. D.C. a popular chiropractic physician at Portland and whose wife also is a doctor of chiropractic, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state nearly all his life, a resident of Portland since the summer of 19.16. Doctor PUMPHREY was born on a farm in the immediate vicinity of Windfall, in Tipton county, this state, January 10, 1879, and is a son of Marion and Nancy Virginia PUMPHREY, both of whom also were born in Tipton county, members of pioneer families there, and the former of whom was a lifelong farmer. Doctor PUMPHREY grew up on the home farm and completed his early schooling in the high school at Windfall. In 1901, he then being twenty-one years of age, he took service with the Pennsylvania Railway Company and served as a railway conductor on that company's road until December 6, 1908. He then went West and was given a position as engine foreman in the Santa Fe yards located at Pueblo, Col., continuing thus engaged until 1910, when he returned to Indiana and was thereafter employed in the service of the Union Traction Company, running out of Tipton, until 1914, when he entered the Palmer School of Chiropractic at Davenport, Iowa, and on May 1, 1916, was graduated from that institution. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor PUMPHREY returned to Indiana and opened an. office for the practice of his profession at Portland, where he since has been located and where he has done well. In 1900 Doctor PUMPHREY was united in marriage to Pearl FOULKE, daughter of Ira and Minerva FOULKE, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Garnet Chloe. Mrs. PUMPHREY also is a doctor of chiropractic and she and her husband thus carry on their practice in a most effective partnership, an arrangement which has many advantages both for themselves and for their patients. The Doctors PUMPHREY have a pleasant home in Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities. Dr. W. A. PUMPHREY has from the days of his boyhood been devoted to music and has a talent along that line that has long- been recognized by his friends. He is the president of the organization which has in hand the affairs of the "crack" Portland community band and is also the leader of the orchestra of the First Church of Christ at Portland. The Doctor is noted for the painstaking efficiency of his methods and it is no secret among his friends that during his days of "railroading" he was regarded by his superiors as one of the best railway conductors in the employ of the Pennsylvania lines and the Union Traction Company. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.272-273. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PYLE, ABE S

Abe S. PYLE, one of Knox township's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived here all his life. Mr. PYLE was born on a farm in Greene township, this county, June 20, 1865, and is a son of Abel K. and Nancy J. ( HENRY ) PYLE, who were among the early settlers of that township. Abel K. PYLE, a Pennsylvanian by birth, came to Indiana in the days of his young manhood and located in Jay county. He presently bought a tract of fifty-three acres of land in Greene township and after his marriage established his home on that place. There he resided for twenty years, at the end of which time he moved to Jefferson town-j ship, where he bought a small tract of land and where he spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, of whom five are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Robert arid George PYLE, and two sisters, Emma and Rebecca. Reared on the home farm in Greene township, Abe S. PYLE received his meager schooling in the neighborhood schools and from the days of his boyhood was helpful in the labors of the home farm. He did not marry until thirty-five years of age and after his marriage he farmed as a farm hand one year. He then rented land until 1909, when he bought the farm of seventy-five acres on which he is now living in Knox townships and has since resided there. Since taking possession of this place Mr. PYLE has made numerous substantial improvements on the same and now has an excellent farm plant. In addition to his general farming operations he gives considerable attention to the raising of live stock and is doing well. He is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. It was in 1900 that Abe S. PYLE was united in marriage to Anna EVANS, who also was born in this county, daughter of John and Francine ( RATHBURN ) EVANS, and to this union six children have been born, George, Ola, Ethel, Howard, Henry and Lee (deceased). The PYLE's have a pleasant home and take an interested part in the general social activities of the community in which they live. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.231-232. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

PYLE, ARTHUR E

Arthur E. PYLE, a well known carpenter and chicken fancier at Redkey, was born in that city and has lived there all his life. He was born on April 13, 1880, and is a son of William R. and Sarah E. ( GLAZE ) PYLE, who are still living there. William R. PYLE has been a contracting carpenter at Redkey for many years and is one of the best known men in that vicinity. He and his wife have three children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Oscar and Ardilla. Reared at Redkey, Arthur E. PYLE took three years of high school and then began to work in the local glass factory. He spent twelve years thus engaged and became an expert workman, both in the finishing and blowing departments. When the glass industry there was abandoned he began, in 1905, working in association with his father in the building trade and has so continued, although since 1910 he has been giving much of his attention to the chicken business. Mr. PYLE started raising chickens in a small way merely as a "side line," but the business developed in his hands and in 1919 he started in to raise fancy chicks on a real commercial basis. His hatchery has grown under the demands made upon it until it now has a capacity of 4,200 eggs. He is now raising nothing but White Leghorns and makes a specialty of the market for day-old chicks and ten-weeks-old pullets, his hatchery during the past (1921) season having turned out around 8,000 chicks, a business which has attracted a good deal of attention hereabout. Mr. PYLE is a Republican and is a member C the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Redkey. On November 26, 1903, Arthur E. PYLE was united in marriage to Florence M. MILLER, of Dunkirk, and to this union two children have been born, Ruth M., who died at the age of nine years and four months, and Gene. Mrs. PYLE was born at Bellefontaine, Ohio, but was reared at Dunkirk, to which place her parents moved when she was a child. She is a daughter of Edward and Florence M. ( STEWART ) MILLER, who are living at Dunkirk, where Mr. MILLER has for years been engaged in the jewelry business. Mr. and Mrs. MILLER have four children, those besides Mrs. PYLE being Leslie, Freeman and Bertha. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.191-192. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

RALSTON, AUGUSTUS

Dr. Augustus RALSTON, of Wabash Township, came to New Corydon, this county, in April, 1880. He was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, September 1, 1845, where he remained until he was sixteen years of age. In 1861, when a mere boy, he enlisted in Company D, Thirty-third Ohio Infantry, for three years. After serving two years he was transferred to the marine service, and was on the B.G.Adams gunboat that ran up and down the Mississippi River and its tributaries. He was discharged in December, 1864, after having been engaged in twenty-two battles and skirmishes, including the siege of Vicksburg. He then commenced the study of medicine. He graduated at the business college at Delaware, Ohio, and then went to  Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated at the medical college in 1881. Dr. RALSTON was a son of James and Mary Ann ( GRUBB ) RALSTON, the father a native of Adams County, Ohio, and died in Greenup County, Kentucky, when his son was quite small, leaving six children. The mother was born in Lawrence County,Ohio, and she also died young, leaving four children, the Doctor being the youngest of the family. He was married December 3, 1883, to Rosetta M. ADAMS, who was born in Jay County, March 27, 1860, and has lived in the county ever since. Her parents were David W. and Harriet ( JOHNSON ) ADAMS, the father born in Columbiana County, Ohio, October 28, 1837, and the mother in Montgomery County, same State, April 6, 1844; both are living in WabashTownship on a farm. Doctor and Mrs. RALSTON have two children -- William, born August 1, 1884, and Augustus, born October 19, 1885. Mr. RALSTON's grandfather, Robert RALSTON, was of Scotch-Irish descent; he came to this country and died in Adams County, Ohio, where he probably settled when he first came to America. His grandmother, Isabella RALSTON, also died in Adams County. The Doctor first commenced his practice in Geneva, Adams County, remaining there one year, then removed to this county where he has a large and successful practice.

RALSTON, CALVIN

Calvin RALSTON, a well known young retail meat dealer at Redkey, was born in that city and has lived there all his life. Mr. RALSTON was born on May 6, 1895, and is a son of Charles L. and Sarah ( LYNCH ) RALSTON, who are still living in Redkey. Charles L. RALSTON was born on a farm in the vicinity of Rockford, Ohio, to which place his father, John D. RALSTON, had gone when he came to this country from Scotland. Reared on that farm, Charles L. RALSTON started out as a shoe cobbler, but presently took up the butcher's trade and became engaged in business along that line. In 1894 he came to Indiana and located at Redkey, where he became employed in the meat shop of Henry DANIELS, some years later opening a shop of his own, the place now operated by his son Calvin. To Charles L. RALSTON and wife were born eight children, those besides the subject of this sketch being David, Lydia, Daisy, Abbie (deceased), James, Mina and Mary (deceased). From the days of his boyhood Calvin RALSTON was a valued assistant to his father in the operation of the meat shop and for some time has been carrying on the business on his own account. He has a well kept and up-to-date place of business and is doing well. In April, 1917, Calvin RALSTON was united in marriage to Ethel LIFE, who was born in the neighboring county of Randolph, a daughter of William and Sarah LIFE, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Phama M. Mr. and Mrs. RALSTON are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are Democrats. Mr. RALSTON is a member of the local lodges of the Free and Accepted Masons and of the Knights of Pythias at Redkey and takes an interested part in the activities of these bodies. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.127-128. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

RANKIN, CHARLES H

Charles H. RANKIN, who died at his home in Penn township in the spring of 1904 and whose widow is still living there, very comfortably situated in a peasant home on rural mail route No. 4 out of Bryant, was a "Buckeye" by birth but had been a resident of Indiana since the days of his early childhood and of Jay county since the days of his young manhood, he having settled in Penn township after his marriage. Mr. RANKIN was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, December 4, 1852, and was a son of William and Rachel RANKIN, the latter of whom was born at Heathersfield, in that same county, and the former a native of Pennsylvania. When Charles H. RANKIN was two years of age his parents came from Ohio over into Indiana and located in Wells county, where he received his schooling and grew to manhood. As a young man he was engaged in saw milling. but after his marriage bought an eighty-acre farm in Penn township, this county, and made his home here, continuing to reside on that place until he bought the ''eighty" on which his family now are living in that same township, and there he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in March, 1904. In addition to his general farming Mr. RANKIN had long given considerable attention to the raising of live stock and had done well in his operations. He was a Democrat and ever gave a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. Charles H. RANKIN was married in this county to Rebecca GRAY, who was born in this county, a daughter of Thomas and Amy (MENDENHALL) GRAY, members of pioneer families here, and to this union four children were born, Nellie, Delia, William and Garnet, the two latter of whom are unmarried and at home with their mother. Delia RANKIN is living at Dayton, Ohio [Montgomery Co.]. Nellie RANKIN married Allie ELLIOTT and has two children, sons both, John and Hugh. Since the death of her husband Mrs. RANKIN has continued to maintain the farm and is doing well. She has been a resident of Jay county all her life. Her father, Thomas GRAY, was born in Ohio and came to Jay county with his parents when but a boy. He grew to manhood here, reared on a farm, but early became engaged as a carpenter and most of his life was devoted to the building trades, he having been the builder of many of the houses in the northern part of the county. He and his wife were the parents of five children, those besides Mrs. RANKIN being Jennie, Joseph, Leona and Miles SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.351-352. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

RARICK, JOHN A

John A. RARICK, a well-known and substantial farmer and dairyman of Wayne township and owner of a well kept farm on rural mail route No. 6 out of Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived in this county and in the adjacent county of Randolph all his life. Mr. RARICK was born on a farm in Pike township on December 4, 1875, and is a son of Philip and Isabella ( KINNEAR ) RARICK, the former of whom was born in Darke county, Ohio, and the latter in Randolph county, this state. Philip RARICK was the owner of a quarter of a section of land in Pike township and he and his wife were the parents of five children, all of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having four sisters, Elsie, Rosa, Clara and Cora. John A. RARICK received his early schooling in Jay county and completed the same in the schools of Randolph county, to which county he moved when he was thirteen years of age. He grew up acquainted with the ways of the farm and in turn became, a farmer on his own account. When thirty-three years of age. a couple of years after his marriage. Mr. RARICK came back to Jay county and bought an ''eighty" in Noble township. He established his home on that place and remained there for about six years, at the end of which time he sold that farm and bought the eighty-acre tract on which he is now living in Wayne township, just a convenient drive out of Portland. In 1914 Mr. RARICK added to his genera] farming operations a quite extensive dairy plant and has since then given his special attention to dairying, producing about forty gallons of milk daily for the Portland market. He has improved his place in Wayne township in up-to-date fashion, his house being equipped with bath, furnace, electric light and an air-pressure waterworks system and his dairy barn being "the last word" in adequate and modern equipment along that line, the general farm plant being regarded as one of the best in that neighborhood. On April II, 1906, John A. RARICK was united in marriage to Josie HANLIN, of Wayne township, and to this union three children have been born, namely: Hazel P., born on February 26, 1907; Mabel M., November 3, 1909, and John O., June 2, 1912, all of whom are attending school at Portland. Mr. and Mrs. RARICK are members of the Friends church at Portland and are Republicans. Mr. RARICK is a member of Omega Lodge No. 281, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Portland. Mrs. RARICK is a member of one of the old families of Jay county. She was born m Wayne township and is a daughter of Anderson J. and Sophia ( SHERMAN ) HANLIN, who were the parents of five children, all of whom are living, Mrs. RARICK having four brothers, Orland, Charles, Earl and Willis HANLIN. Anderson J. HANLIN was a farmer and landowner of this county, owner of an eighty-acre farm in Wayne township, and in the later years of his life was widely known hereabout as a dealer in live stock. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.310-311. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

RATHFON, HERSCHEL E

Herschel E. RATHFON, secretary of the Caar Canning Company of Redkey and one of the best known and most progressive young business men of that city, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Mr. RATHFON was born in Wayne county on August 21, 1885, and is a son of John D. and Luella (BALDWIN) RATHFON, both of whom also were born in Indiana. John D. RATHFON, who prior to his death at Redkey in 1916 had been for years engaged in the mercantile business in that city, in his earlier life had been a school teacher and had a wide acquaintance throughout this part of the state. He and his wife were the parents of three children, one of whom, Everett R. RATHFON, died in 1906, the other besides the subject of this sketch being the latter's sister, Effie. Herschel E. RATHFON's early years were spent in Wayne and Henry counties, where his father had been engaged in teaching and in operating a general store, and he was quite a lad when his parents moved to Redkey, where his father became engaged in the mercantile business, proprietor there of a general store. He was graduated from the Redkey high school in 1904 and upon leaving school became associated with his father in business and was so associated until the latter's death in 1916. For two years thereafter he maintained the business and then, in 1918, sold the store in order to give his undivided attention to the affairs of the Caar Canning Company, with which concern he had become associated at the time of its organization in 1917, when he was elected secretary of the company. The plant of the Caar Canning Company, one of the best equipped plants of its kind in Indiana, was erected "from the ground up" and Is, therefore, thoroughly up to date in its equipment, and its affairs are managed along the same progressive lines. Tomatoes form the chief product of this plant, which has a capacity of 1,000 cases of No. 3 goods and 1,000 five-gallon cans of pulp daily, in season employing about 135 persons. The company was organized in 1917 .with a capital of $20,000, and the officers besides Mr. RATHFON are David E. COOK, president: Clement ARTHUR, vice-president, and Harry L. AUKERMAN, treasurer. On November 27, 1917, Herschel E. RATHFON was united in marriage to Floss M. SELVEY, who was born and reared at Dunkirk, a daughter of Dr. Samuel and Alice (WILSON) SELVEY, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Walter F., born on February 2, 1921. Mr. and Mrs. RATHFON are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Redkey and are Democrats. Mr. RATHFON is a Royal Arch Mason, a member of the blue lodge at Redkey and the chapter at Dunkirk, and he and his wife are members of the Order of Eastern Star. Mr. RATHFON also is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Modern Woodmen at Redkey. He and his wife have a pleasant home at Redkey and have ever taken an interested part in the community's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.347. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

REAVER, LEWIS C

Lewis C. REAVER, one of Bearcreek township's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, now living retired from the labors of the farm at his pleasant place on rural mail route No. 11 out of Portland, has been a resident of Jay county for the past thirty years or more and during that time has done well his part in the development of the community in which he lives. Mr. REAVER was born on a farm in Carroll county, Maryland, February 25, 1855, and is a son of Washington and Rebecca (BOWERS) REAVER, both of whom were born in that same state. Washington REAVER was the owner of a 120 acre farm and he and his wife were the parents of nine children, five of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Jennie V., and three brothers, James B., Franklin P. and Joseph M. REAVER. Reared on the home farm in Carroll county, Maryland, Lewis C. REAVER received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and remained at home until he was twenty years of age, when (in 1875) he came West and for ten years thereafter was engaged in farm work in Wayne county, Indiana, and Preble county, Ohio. He was married in the latter county and then returned to his old home in Maryland, taking charge of the home farm, which he operated for six or seven years, at the end of which time, in 1891, he returned to Indiana and became a resident of Jay county. Upon coming here Mr. REAVER rented the farm of 160 acres in Bearcreek township, the place on which he is now living, and established his home there. Four years later he bought this place and has continued to make it his home. When he took charge of the place but sixty-five acres of it had been cleared and it was but illy improved. He has rebuilt the farm buildings and has long had an excellent farm plant and a well cultivated place. Since 1916 Mr. REAVER has been living retired from the active labors of the farm, renting his place. He is a Democrat and is a member of Omega lodge No. 281, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Portland. It was in 1885, in Preble county, Ohio, that Lewis C. REAVER was united in marriage to Lottie FLEISCH, of that county. Mrs. REAVER was born in Preble county and is a daughter of Joseph and Lucinda ( LAFLAN ) FLEISCH, who were the parents of eight children, seven of whom are living, those besides Mrs. REAVER being Ida, Olie, Jacob, Lawrence, Warren and William. Mr. and Mrs. REAVER have no children of their own, but have reared two children, William and Iva REAVER, born at Dunkirk, who were of the age of four years and six years, respectively, when they took them under their care. William REAVER, now a farmer in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, the owner of 140 acres, married Mabel MARTIN and has two children, Robert and Charlotte, Iva REAVER married Sylvester STARR, who is now operating Mr. REAVER's farm, and has two children, sons both, Lewis and Paul E. STARR.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.387-388. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

REED, CHARLES F

Charles F. L. REED, for many years a teacher in the high school at New Corydon and for the past ten years a merchant in that pleasant village, one of the best known men in the northern part of Jay county, was born at New Corydon and has lived there all his life. Mr. REED was born on December 13, 1870, and is the son and only child of Hezekiah and Harriet ( THOMPSON ) REED, the latter of whom also was born in this county, a member of one of the pioneer families here. Hezekiah REED, an honored veteran of the Civil war, now living retired at New Corydon, was born in Darke county, Ohio, and was but a child when he came over into Jay county with his parents, the family locating in Wabash township. At the age of seventeen he enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union in the struggle against the rebellion of the Southern states and went to the front. At the battle of Stone River he was captured by the enemy and for three months thereafter was kept a prisoner in Libby prison at Richmond. He then was exchanged and returned home, but shortly afterward re-enlisted and returned to the front. After serving his term of enlistment he again returned home, but it was not long until he again got in the army, this time going out as a substitute for one of the men drafted from Wabash township, and in this service continued till the end of the war. In all this service he came off without a wound. Upon the completion of his military service Hezekiah REED returned to his home in Wabash township and after his marriage established his home at New Corydon, where he became a building contra.ctor and also carried on the local undertaking business, and was thus engaged until his retirement in 1908. Reared at New Corydon, Charles F. L. REED received his early schooling in the schools of that village and then took a term of instruction in the Normal School at Ridgeville, after which, in the winter of 1889-90, he began teaching school, a vocation he has followed continuously since, mea.nwhile for six years after entering upon his teaching career attending the summer sessions of the old Portland Normal School. Mr. REED's first school was the Staphon school (district No. 1) in Wabash township, and his work has been carried on in that township and in the New Corydon schools with the exception of one term (1900-01) when he taught in Jackson township. In the meantime he had been given considerable attention to the study and practice of pharmacy during the vacation periods and in 1899 took a course in pharmacy in the university at Valparaiso, from which he was graduated. In the summers of 1904 and 1905 he also attended the Valparaiso university, taking an extension of normal work and since 1904, with the exception of the years 1911 and 1913, when he was engaged in the Wabash township grade schools, has been teaching in the high school at New Corydon. In 1912 Mr. REED opened a paint and wall paper store at New Corydon and has since been carrying on that business in addition to his work as a teacher. He is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church at New Corydon. On May 13, 1900, Charles F. L. REED was united in marriage to Nora E. ASHCRAFT, a teacher in the schools of this county, and to this union two children have been born, sons both, Frederick L, H., born on June 6, 1902, who died on November 27, 1917, and Ernest D., born on January 16, 1908. Mrs. REED was born in Wabash township and is a daughter of Daniel and Viola ( GIBSON ) ASHCRAFT, well known residents of that township and members of pioneer families in Jay county. She completed her schooling in the old Portland Normal School and in the normal school at Ada, Ohio, and for five years prior to her marriage had been teaching in the schools of this county, one term in Jackson township and four terms in Wabash township. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.274-275. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

REICHARD. GEORGE D

George D. REICHARD, one of the well known farmers and landowners of Madison township, proprietor of a well kept farm on rural mail route No. 3 out of Ft. Recovery (Ohio), was born in that township and has lived there all his life. Mr. REICHARD was born on January 25, 1886, and is a son of Henry G. and Elizabeth ( THEURER ) REICHARD, the latter of whom was born in Marion county, Ohio, and was ten years of age when she came to Jay county with her parents, John F. and Elizabeth ( JACOBY ) THEURER, the family settling in Noble township. Henry G. REICHARD was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, May 8, 1841, son of Michael and Fannie ( GOSS ) REICHARD, the latter of whom died in that state in the spring of 1849. Michael REICHARD in 1854 moved with his family to Ohio and two years later came over into Indiana and settled on a farm in Madison township, this county, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1880. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, five of whom grew to maturity. Two of his sons were soldiers of the Union during the Civil war and the eldest son, Israel G. REICHARD, died in service in a hospital at New Orleans in 1863. Henry G. REICHARD was fifteen years of age when he accompanied his father to Jay county in 1856 and he was living here when the Civil war broke out. In 1864 he entered the service of the Union army, a member of Company A, 41st regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and with that command was attached to the Army of the Cumberland. He took part in the battle of Franklin (Tenn.) and not long afterward was taken to a hospital at Nashville, where he presently was invalided and in June, 1865, received an honorable discharge on account of physical disability. Upon the completion of his military service Henry G. REICHARD returned home and resumed his place on the farm. After his marriage to Elizabeth THEURER he began farming on his own account and in 1881 bought the old Lotz farm of 160 acres in Madison township and established his home there, this being one of the very first farms opened in Jay county. He later increased his holdings until he became the owner of 240 acres and was accounted one of the substantial farmers of the neighborhood. He was a member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Salamonia, had served the public as constable and as road supervisor and he and his wife were members of the Reformed church at Salamonia, in the faith of which their children were reared. On this old Lotz farm Henry G. REICHARD and his wife spent their last days, her death occurring on December 15, 1907, and his, April 26, 1916. They were the parents of five children, all of whom are living save John F., who died at the age of twenty-one years, the others besides the subject of this sketch being Mrs. Emma Caroline CULL, James J. and Noah W. Reared on the farm on which he was born, George D. REICHARD received his schooling in the Lotz school (district No. 1) and remained at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-two, when he began farming for himself as a renter on his father's farm. Upon his father's death he inherited part of the eighty-acre tract on which he is now living and bought the remainder and has since resided there. Since coming into possession of this place Mr. REICHARD has made numerous substantial improvements on the same and now has a well equipped farm plant. On October 8, 1908, George D. REICHARD was united in marriage to Lillie HALL, who was born in Pike township, this county, daughter of Lorenzo and Mary ( BRICKER ) HALL, and to this union five children have been born, Chella, Henry, Elgia, Hazel and Vivian, the four elder of whom are in school, attending the Lotz school. Mr. and Mrs. REICHARD are members of the Reformed church at Salamonia. They have a pleasant home and have ever taken an interested and helpful part in the social activities of the community in which they live. In his political views Mr. REICHARD reserves the right to be independent. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.114-115. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

REINHARD, W G

W. G. REINHARD, a well known tailor and haberdasher of Portland and member of the firm of Reinhard & Nichols, doing business in North Meridian street, is a "Buckeye" by birth but has been a resident of Portland since he was twenty years of age. Mr. REINHARD was born on a farm in Mercer county, Ohio, September 18, 1869, and is a son of Joseph and Felicitas ( VOLK ) REINHARD, the latter of whom was born in Germany but had come to this country when a child, the family settling in Mercer county, Ohio, where she spent the rest of her life. Joseph REINHARD was born in Columbus, Ohio, but had moved with his parents to Mercer county when a lad and there had grown up and taken to farming, a vocation he followed the remainder of his life, his death occurring on his farm in that county in 1893, he then being fifty-nine years of age. He and his wife were the parents of eleven children, nine of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being John, Henry, Margaret, Frank, Theresia, Charles, Anna and Agnes. Joseph REINHARD and his wife were Catholics and their children were reared in that faith. W. G. REINHARD's boyhood was spent on the home farm in Mercer county and his early schooling was received in the neighboring district school. When fourteen years of age he started out "on his own" and until he settled at Portland when twenty years of age had been variously occupied. Upon coming to Portland he secured employment in the tailoring department of the Cartwright & Headington store and after working there for four years went to New York city, where he took a course in the Mitchell Cutting School with a view to fitting him for entrance into business on his own account. He then returned to Portland and opened a tailoring establishment at the point where he now is located and has been there for twenty-four years. In 1910 Mr. REINHARD added to his stock a general line of haberdashery, at the same time forming a partnership with C. N. NICHOLS, who looks after the haberdashery end of the business, the combination proving an effective one. Mr. REINHARD is a Democrat. He is a member of the Catholic church at Portland and of the Union City council of the Knights of Columbus and is affiliated with the local lodges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland, in the former of which he served as exalted ruler during the term of 1916-17. On December 28, 1892, at Portland, W. G. REINHARD was united in marriage to Jessie M. MCLAUGHLIN, who was born in that city, daughter of Francis M. and Susan ( KECK ) MCLAUGHLIN, and to this union have been born four children, Vera, Herbert, Erma and Virginia, all of whom are living. Vera REINHARD married William KIRKPATRICK, a salesman for the Hancock County (Ohio) Brick Clay Tile Company, and is living at Findley, Ohio. Upon America's entrance into the World war in the spring of 1917, Herbert REINHARD enlisted for service in the Officers Training Camp at Fort Benjamin Harrison (Indianapolis) and a month later was transferred to Fort Monroe, where he entered the coast artillery service and was presently commissioned a second lieutenant in that service, being assigned to the Sixty-first Coast Artillery Corps and sent to Ft. Barancas, Fla. About nine months later he was sent overseas with his command and there served for a year or until his return to the United States on July 5, 1919. He was discharged on July 29 (same year) at Camp Taylor and returned to Portland. He then entered Purdue University and on June 8, 1921, was graduated from that institution, shortly afterward being taken into the service of the pure food department of the Indiana State Board of Health in the capital at Indianapolis, where he is now engaged. On June 16, 1921, Herbert REINHARD married Inez HILL, of Winchester, Ind., and established his home at Indianapolis. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.204-205. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut

RESUR, LEWIS S

Lewis S. RESUR, who died at his farm home in the immediate vicinity of Como, in Jefferson township, in the fall of 1919, was one of the substantial and energetic farmers and landowners of that neighborhood, widely known throughout Jay county, and it is but fitting that there should be here carried in the history of the county in which all his life was spent some modest tribute to the good memory he left at his passing. Lewis S. RESUR was born on the farm on which he died on November 18, 1870, and was a son of Cyrus and Mary ( WEST ) RESUR, who in their generation were among the best known and most influential residents of that neighborhood. Cyrus RESUR was a Pennsylvanian by birth and grew to manhood in the old Keystone state, where he was trained to farming. As a young man he came to Indiana and located in Jay county. After his marriage he established his home on a tract of eighty acres three-quarters of a mile east of the village of Como and here spent the remainder of his life, creating there an excellent piece of property. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, four of whom, Ruth, Orphia, John and George, are still living. The late Lewis S. RESUR was reared on the farm where he was born in the Como neighborhood and where his widow is now living, and from the days of his boyhood was a helpful factor in the labors of developing the home place. He received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and after his marriage continued to make his home on the old home place, which, after the death of his father, he bought from the remaining heirs, and on that place spent his last days, an industrious, progressive farmer, his death occurring on October 21, 1919, he then being in his forty-ninth year. Mr. RESUR was a Republican, a member of the Christian church, as is his widow, and was a member of the local aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland. It was on November 26, 1903, that Lewis S. RESUR was united in marriage to Maud METTIER, who was born in Darke county, Ohio, daughter of Daniel and Mary METTIER, and to this union six children were born, Teddy, Ralph, Harry, Marjorie, Ada and one who died in infancy. Since the death of her husband Mrs. RESUR has continued to make her home on the farm, where she and her family are very comfortably situated. The RESUR's have a pleasant home on rural mail route No. 5 out of Portland and have ever taken an interested and helpful part in the general social activities of the community in which they live. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.187-188. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

REX, JOSEPH

Joseph REX, proprietor of a garage at Redkey and one of the best known citizens of that town, was born in Hardin county, Ohio, on October 12, 1871, and is a son of William and Emmaline ( LANTZ ) REX, the former of whom was a veteran of the Civil war. William REX was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and was but a lad when his parents moved with their family to Hardin county, Ohio, where he finished his schooling and early became engaged as a workman in a sawmill. He was thus employed when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted his services in behalf of the Union and went to the front as a member of the 45th regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was presently advanced to the rank of sergeant. He was in all the engagements participated in by the 45th Ohio and at the battle of Resacca was wounded three times. Upon the completion of his military service, Mr. REX returned to Ohio and became engaged in mechanical pursuits at Lima. where he established his home after his marriage. He and his wife were the parents of five children, one of whom died in infancy, the others besides the subject of this sketch being Henry U., Orpha and William. Reared at Lima, Joseph REX received his schooling in the schools of that city and early became a trained mechanic. He married at the age of twenty-one and when the automobile industry entered upon the amazing development that has marked its progress during the past two decades he took up that branch of mechanics and became thoroughly qualified along that line. In 1902 he moved to Redkey and in 1903 bought a livery barn and about 1910 began the garage business, which he has since operated with much success, his garage being admirably equipped and one of the most popular service stations hereabout. It was in 1892, at Lima, Ohio, that Joseph REX was united in marriage to Daisy PLACE, who was born in that city, and to this union two children have been born, sons both, Ralph R. and Fred S. the latter of whom is unmarried, and both of whom received their schooling at Redkey. Ralph R. REX, who is a veteran of the World war, married Lela BARTLETT, who was born in the neighboring county of Delaware, daughter of Arthur BARTLETT and wife, and has two sons [?], Ronald J. and Jane E. Ralph R. REX enlisted his services in behalf of the United States army shortly after America's declaration of war against the Central European powers in the spring of 1917, enlisting at Fort Wayne on July 30, 1917. He was sent to Ft. Thomas and two weeks later was transferred to Kelly Field, where he was attached to the Aviation Corps and where he remained in training for eight months, with special reference to electrical equipment. He then was transferred to the gun works at Utica, N. Y., where he was made special instructor in electrical equipment, an assignment which kept him occupied until he was sent to Ellington Field on aerial combat work. At this latter field he remained for three months, at the end of which time he was transferred to the flying field at Dayton and assigned to the task of compiling field textbooks on aviation. Mr. REX enlisted as a private and was advanced in the ranks to the grade of second lieutenant, his commission being awarded as a mark of merit in service. He was discharged on January 20, 1919. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.220-221. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

RILEY, IDA M

IDA M. RILEY, a member of the excellent teaching staff of the Portland public schools and for years an active participant in the cultural activities of, that city, was born in Ohio but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of her childhood. Miss RILEY was born at Phillipsburg, Ohio, and is a daughter of Davis and Mary J. ( MORGAN ) RILEY, the latter of whom was born in Lancaster county, Ohio, and was three years of age when her parents, Isaac and Sarah MORGAN, came to Indiana and located at Bluffton, where she grew to womanhood and was married. The late Davis RILEY, who died at Portland at the age of eighty-five years, also was a native of Ohio. He grew up to the harness-maker's trade and as a young man came to Indiana and located at Bluffton, where he presently was married. Not long afterward he returned to his former home at Phillipsburg, Ohio, but after a sometime residence there came back into Indiana and located at Huntington, where he remained for three years, at the end of which time he came with his family to Jay county and settled at Pennville, where he made his home for twenty years, or until he moved to Portland, where his last days were spent, one of the best known men in Jay county. Davis RILEY and his wife were the parents of six children, of whom four are still living. Miss RILEY having three sisters, Jessie, wife of William GRIEST, of Portland, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work; Catherine RILEY, who has for years been a clerk in the Portland post office, and Aletta, wife of W. H. WILLIAMS of Winchester, Ind. Miss RILEY was but a child when her parents moved to Pennville and the greater part of her early schooling thus was received in the excellent schools of that village. This she supplemented by a course in the old Portland Normal School and then began teaching school, a profession she since has followed. For seven years she was a teacher in the schools of Peimville and Penn township and then she became a teacher in the Portland public schools and has since been associated with the work of the Garfield school. Miss RILEY is a member of the Presbyterian church at Portland and is a Republican. She is a member of the Mississinewa chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution at Portland, of which her sister, Mrs. GRIEST, is the present (1921) regent, and is also a member of the local lodge of the Daughters of Rebecca, the woman's auxiliary of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, her father having for years been an influential and active member of this order. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.49-50. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

RINES, ELI

Eli RINES, an honored veteran of the Civil war and one of Jay county's best known retired farmers, now living at his pleasant home on rural mail route No. 10 out of Portland, in Wayne township, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Jay county since he was five years of age and thus has been a witness to and a participant in the amazing development which has marked this region during the past seventy years and more. Mr. RINES was born on a farm in Carroll county, Ohio, June 26, 1844, and Is a son of James and Mary J. ( SKYHAWK ) RINES, the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania and had moved to Ohio with her parents when a child, the SKYHAWK's settling in Carroll county. James RINES was born in Virginia and was but a lad when he went to Ohio with his parents, the RINES also settling in Carroll county, where he grew to manhood and was married. In 1849 he disposed of his interests in that state and with his family moved to Indiana and settled in this county, where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of nine children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Mrs. Ira LOY and Mrs. James GRIFFIS. As noted above, Eli RINES was five years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents in 1849 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in this county, and was living there when the Civil war broke out. On August 28, 1862. he then being but eighteen years of age, Mr. RINES enlisted his services in behalf of the cause of the Union and went to the front as a member of Company H, 100th regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was a fine, upstanding figure of a young soldier and his comrades honored him by making him the color bearer of their outfit. With this gallant command Mr. RINES served for nearly three years, or until honorably discharged on June 21, 1865, the war then being over. Upon the completion of his military service he returned to the old home and for two years thereafter was engaged in working as a farm hand here. He then rented a farm and operated as a renter until 1870, when he bought a tract of eighty acres in Wayne township, the place now being farmed by his son, Philip S. RINES. and there made his home until his retirement in 1914 and removal to Portland, where he had bought a house and lot. Five years later he sold his home in the city and moved to the place on which he is now living on rural mail route No. 10 out of Portland, where he has a plot of ground sufficient for gardening purposes and to give him a motive for proper exercise. Mr. RINES was for years one of the active members of Stephen J. Bailey post, Grand Army of the Republic, and took an earnest interest in the affairs of that patriotic organization during the years of its greatest activity. He is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs, and is a member of the Christian church at Salamonia, a deacon of the congregation for thirty-five years and for fifty-four years a teacher in the Sunday school. Mr. RINES has been thrice married and by his earlier marriages has two sons, Curtis H. and Charles L. RINES. On September 8, 1884, he was united in marriage to Mary POWELL, who was born in Franklin county, Ohio, July 23, 1849, a daughter of William and Mary ( HAUGEN ) POWELL, and to this union two children have been born, Eva and Philip S., the former of whom married Oliver SMITH, a farmer of Pike township, this county, and has four children, Carl, Clarissa, Dewey and Eunice SMITH. Philip S. RINES married Velva KIRBY and, as noted above, is farming his father's farm in Wayne township. He and his wife have one child, a daughter, Margie J.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.305-306. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

RODKEY, ORA

Ora RODKEY D. D. S., a veteran of the World war, commander of the local post of the American Legion at Redkey and a well known dentist of that city, where he has been practicing ever since lie came out of dental college, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Doctor RODKEY was born on a farm in Whitley county, Indiana, December 30, 1889, and is a son of J. E. and Hattie May ( RICHARDS ) RODKEY, who are now living in Wabash county. J. E. RODKEY also was born in Whitley county, a member of one of the pioneer families of that county, and early became engaged in farming, the vocation to which he had been trained from youth. After some years on the farm in Whitley county he moved to North Manchester, Ind., where he became engaged in the restaurant business, but after four years of that form of experience decided that farming was better suited to his tastes and inclinations and he bought a farm of eighty acres in the North Manchester neighborhood in Wabash county and has since resided there. It was thus that the greater part of Doctor RODKEY's youth was spent on the farm. He finished the course in the public schools of North Manchester and in 1910, entered the Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis, from which institution he was graduated in 1913. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor RODKEY opened an office at Redkey and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession in that city. During the period of America's participation in the World war Doctor RODKEY enlisted his services and after a period of training was commissioned a lieutenant in the Medical Corps of the army and was stationed at Camp Custer (Michigan), where he served for five months or until his discharge on December 31, 1918, the war then being over. The Doctor was one of the active promoters of the organization of Ralph Williamson Post (No. 238), American Legion, at Redkey, and is now serving his second term as commander of that post. He also is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Redkey, is a member of the Portland lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is affiliated with the Greek Letter fraternity Xi Psi Phi, the dental college fraternity. He is a Republican and has ever taken a good citizen's interest in local civic affairs. On February 23, 1916, Dr. Ora RODKEY was united in marriage to Rhea G. THOMAS, who was born in Wabash county, this state, daughter of E. F. and Zora B. THOMAS. Doctor and Mrs. RODKEY have a pleasant home at Redkey and take an interested part in the community's general social activities.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.140. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ROOK, JOHN T

John T. ROOK, a well known real estate dealer and auctioneer at Dunkirk and a substantial landowner of this county, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived here practically all his life, the exception being a period of several years during which he was engaged in the mercantile business at Albany, in the neighboring county of Delaware. Mr. ROOK was born on a farm in Richland township on June 7, 1855, and is a son of Jacob and Jane ( SHRACK ) ROOK, who were among the well known pioneers of that township. Jacob ROOK was born in Virginia, where his youth was spent, he having been well grown when he came here with his father, Samuel ROOK, who had entered a tract of land in Richland township, this county, where he built a cabin and proceeded to clear the land. Jacob ROOK presently bought a forty-acre farm, which he proceeded to develop on his own account, but when the railroad came along sold the place to the railroad company and for some time thereafter was engaged in general activities until he bought a farm of forty acres in the immediate vicinity of Pennville, where he established his home and spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring on November 18, 1897. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the only present survivor, the others having been William, Margaret, Catherine, Samuel, Price, Daniel, Charles and one who died in infancy. John T. ROOK completed his schooling in the local schools and continued engaged in farming on the home place until he was twenty-one, when he became engaged in cutting and making headings, staves and ties, that being in the days when this was an important industry here in the timber country. In 1877 he bought a tract of forty acres in Knox township and proceeded to develop the same, continuing thus engaged until after his marriage in 1881, when he established his home at Albany, Ind., {Delaware Co.] and opened there a grocery store. For three years Mr. ROOK continued engaged in the mercantile business at Albany and then he returned to this county and took: up his residence on his Knox township farm, where he remained until 1895, in which year he moved to Dunkirk and has since then been engaged in the real estate business, in which he has done well. Mr. ROOK also for years has rendered service in the community as a crier of public sales and is widely known hereabout in that connection. He has a tract of 160 acres where he now lives, two and one-half miles from Dunkirk, and besides this has in the neighborhood of 800 acres elsewhere, having other land interests in this county and in the states of Michigan and Washington. Mr. ROOK is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Dunkirk. It was on February 27, 1881, that John T. ROOK was united in marriage to Mary J. WRIGHT, who also was born in this county, daughter of Peter and Eliza (WINTERS) WRIGHT, pioneers of the county, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Pearl, who married Dr. Erastus HENLEY and is now living in Seattle, Wash. Mrs. Henley completed the course in the Dunkirk schools and then was graduated from Franklin (Ind.) College, after which she was for four years engaged in teaching school at Dunkirk. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.381-382. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ROOK, JOSEPH M

Joseph M. ROOK, one of the best known farmers and landowners of Knox township, now living practically retired from the active labors of the farm at his home in that township, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and has lived here all his life. Mr. ROOK was born on a farm now included in the site of the city of Dunkirk on January 27, 1858, and is a son of David C. and Nancy (CLOUSE) ROOK, both of whom were members of pioneer families in that neighborhood, both the ROOK's and the CLOUSE's having been here since the days of the early settlement of this county. David C. ROOK was born in Ohio and was six years of age when his parents, Samuel and Mary (CANTRELL) ROOK, came over here with their family and settled on an "eighty" which Samuel ROOK had entered from the government in the Sutton neighborhood, or what is now the city of Dunkirk, in Richland township. Samuel ROOK was one of the useful and influential pioneers of that section and did his part in the work of developing the country. He spent his last days there, his death occurring in 1858, four or five years after his neighbor, Isaiah SUTTON, had filed the original plat of the town of Dunkirk. It was on this pioneer farm that David C. ROOK grew to manhood. He received his schooling in the somewhat primitive schools of the time and place and after his marriage continued to make his home on the old home place, where he remained until 1875, when he moved to a farm of ninety acres which he owned just north of the town of Dunkirk, where he died two years later, in 1877. He and his wife were the parents of six children, of whom four are living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Harmon C. and James H. ROOK, and a sister, Sarah, the widow of Prusia J. BAKER. Joseph M. ROOK was seventeen years of age when his father moved to the farm just north of Dunkirk. He received his schooling in the Dunkirk schools and from the days of his boyhood. was helpful in the labors of the home farm. He was twenty years of age when his father died and he remained on the home place until his marriage at the age of twenty-five when he established his home on a forty-acre farm owned by his wife in Knox township and has since resided there. To this original tract Mr. ROOK has added until he now has 120 acres, well improved and profitably cultivated. He has built all the building's on the place and has a modern house and an admirable farm plant, his operations being carried on in accordance with up-to-date methods. In 1907 Mr. ROOK retired from the active labors of the farm and has since rented his fields, though continuing to keep a generally supervisory eye on affairs. He is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Ridertown United Brethren church. It was on October II, 1883, that Joseph M. ROOK was united in marriage to Alice L. KESLER. who was born over the line in the neighboring county of Blackford, daughter of Adam and Eliza KESLER, Pennsylvanians who had settled in that county, and to this union two children have been born, daughters both, Pearl and Mabel, the latter of whom married Arthur DILLMAN, of this county, and died on March 9, 1913, at the age of twenty-four years, leaving two children, Helen Marie and Kenneth D. The elder daughter, Pearl, is the wife of John W. LANDON, of Blackford county. Mr. and Mrs. ROOK have a pleasant home and have ever taken an interested part in the community's general social activities.SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.372-373. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ROPP, JOHN B

John B. ROPP, former treasurer of Jay county, former-! trustee of Greene township, a substantial landowner of that township and a property owner in Portland, where he has made his home for the past ten years or more and of which he is a councilman-at-large, is a native of the old Buckeye state whose youth was spent in Iowa, but has been a resident of Indiana and of Jay county for the past thirty years. Mr. ROPP was born on a farm in Hardin county, Ohio, December 5, 1854, and is a son of John and Percella ( ELDER ) ROPP, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania, who moved to Ohio with their respective parents in the days of their youth and grew up in Hardin county, where they were married. Some years later they moved with their family to Iowa, where they established their home and there spent the remainder of their lives. John ROPP and wife were the parents of eight children, six of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, William and Robert ROPP, and three sisters, Catherine, Caroline and Fannie. John B. ROPP was but a lad when he moved with his parents to Iowa and he grew to manhood on the home farm in that state, receiving his schooling in the schools of the home neighborhood. He remained on the farm with his father until he attained his majority when he returned to Ohio and was there employed as a farm hand for about two years, at the end of which time he rented a farm and began operations on his own account. He married in 1881 and continued to make his home in Ohio until 1893, in which year he came to Indiana with his family and located on a farm of eighty acres which he had bought in Bearcreek township, this county. For three years he made his home on that farm and then traded it for a tract of 100 acres in Greene township, to which he presently added an adjoining fifty-acre tract, thus giving him a fine farm of 150 acres, which he still owns. Mr. ROPP is a Democrat and has ever given his thoughtful attention to local civic affairs. Not long after moving to Greene township he was elected trustee of that township and served in that capacity for one term. In 1910 he was elected treasurer of Jay county and moved to Portland, where he has since resided, owner of a very comfortable home in that city. In 1912 he was re-elected treasurer and thus served two terms in that important public capacity, and on November 8, 1921, was elected councilman-at-large for the city of Portland. Mr. ROPP is affiliated with the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Portland and is also a member of the local lodge of the Daughters of Rebekah. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. It was on December 29, 1881, that John B. ROPP was united in marriage, in Ohio, to Arminda FOGLE, who was born in Hancock county, that-state, daughter and only child of Noah and Adaline ( MOORE ) FOGLE, the latter of whom also was born in Hancock county. Noah FOGLE was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, and was a lifelong farmer, a substantial landowner in his home county. To Mr. and Mrs. ROPP have been born three children, Bert, Walter and Freddie, the latter of whom died on May 14, 1916, at the age of sixteen years, nine months and fourteen days. Bert ROPP, who is now superintendent of an oil lease in Kentucky, married Nortinsa McKINLEY and has one child, a daughter, Agnes. Walter ROPP, now a merchant at Fiat, this county, married Myrtle HARTER and has two children, Harold and Virginia. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.280-281. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ROUSH, WILLIAM A

William A. ROUSH, trustee of Madison township, former township assessor and for years a well known farmer of that township, proprietor of a well kept place on rural mail route No. 1 out of Union City, Ind., was born in Madison township and has lived there the greater part of his life. Mr. ROUSH was born on June 5, 1861, and is a son of John and Sarah ( DARST ) ROUSH, both of whom were born in Gallia county, Ohio, where they were married. In 1850 John ROUSH and his wife came to Jay county and settled in Madison township, where he bought a tract of eighty acres of land and established his home. To that farm he later added an adjoining tract of thirty acres and thus had a farm of 110 acres which he brought to a fine state of cultivation. Mrs. Sarah ROUSH died there on February 7, 1897. John ROUSH survived his wife for more than thirteen years, his death occurring on June 2, 1910. They were the parents of thirteen children, those besides the subject of this sketch (the fourth in order of birth) having been Haskell R., Mrs. Ella VINNING, Mrs. Eudora MARK, Mrs. Delia ARNSBAUGH, Mrs. Anna DUNIFON, James A., Samuel D., Joseph W., Mrs. Lydia SHREEVE, Augustus, who died in infancy, Amanda, who died in infancy, and John A., who died at the age of seven years. Reared on the home farm in Madison township, William A. ROUSH received his schooling at the College Grove school (district No. 7) and as a lad was a helpful factor in the labors of developing the home place. As a young man he went to VanWert, Ohio, where he spent a year and then went to Kansas. A year later he returned to Indiana and located at Salem, where he spent a couple of years, at the end of which time he returned to Jay county. He married when twenty-seven years of age and for a year thereafter made his home on his father-in-law's farm in Randolph county. He then became employed in the butter tub factory at Portland and was thus engaged for a year, at the end of which time he moved back to Randolph county and for ten years thereafter was engaged in farming in that county, renting a farm from his father-in-law. At the end of this period Mr. ROUSH returned to Jay county and made his home on a farm of 113 acres which he rented in Madison township. Six years later, in 1906 he bought a tract of thirty acres in that township, a part of the farm on which he is now living, and has since resided there. In 1908 he bought an adjoining tract of ten acres and since then has brought his "forty" out in fine shape, having made numerous substantial improvements on the same. In 1914 Mr. ROUSH turned the management of the farm over to his son, Harmon W. ROUSH, who carried on operations there for three years, since which time the place has been rented by the fields, Mr. ROUSH giving his chief attention to his public and other affairs. Mr. ROUSH is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Pleasant Hill Christian church. Mr. ROUSH has long given his earnest attention to civic affairs and during the period 1914-18 served as assessor of Madison township. In the latter year he was elected trustee of Madison township and is now serving in that important public capacity. It was on March 31, 1889, that William A. ROUSH was united in marriage to Minnie B. KEMP, of the neighboring county of Randolph, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Harmon W„ born on January 29, 1890, who is now employed by Morehouse Bros. at Salem in this county. On February 26, 1911, Harmon W. ROUSH was married to Eva Hanks and to this union one child has been born, a son, William W„ born on December 31, 1912, who is now attending the Salem school (district No. 8). Mrs. Minnie B. ROUSH was born in Jackson township, in Randolph county, this state, where she was reared, a daughter of Benjamin F. and Maria ( ALLEN ) KEMP, the latter of whom was born in that same county, a member of one of the pioneer families there. Benjamin KEMP was born at Mansfield, Richland county, Ohio, and was but a child when his parents came over into Indiana with their family and settled in Randolph county. He early qualified himself as a school teacher and was for years engaged as a teacher in the schools of Randolph county. He also was ordained a minister of the Christian church and was for years engaged in preaching in that county, at the same time carrying on his operations as a farmer. He was successful in his operations and at one time was the owner of 355 acres of land in Randolph and Jay counties. The Rev. Benjamin KEMP and wife were the parents of eleven children, all of whom are living save two, Lewis K., who died at the age of twenty-one years, October 14, 1887, and Cora Ellen, who died at the age of five months, April 14, 1883, the others besides Mrs. ROUSH being Mrs. Blanch A. KEITNER, Mrs. Charlotte E. PEDEN, Mrs. Willa R. MILLIGAN, Mrs. Daisy RICKERT, Mrs. Eva CIRCILE, Mrs. Ethel PERRY, the Rev. Alphonso E. KEMP and Roy KEMP. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.147-148. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ROWE, BENJAMIN

Benjamin R. ROWE, the leading harness manufacturer of Portland, was born in the village of Etna, Licking County, Ohio, the date of his birth being October 19, 1856. He was about eight years old when his father, R.T.ROWE, came to Jay County with his family and settled in Noble Township, where he still owns a fine farm. For many years the father followed mercantile pursuits, but later has been engaged as traveling salesman. Benjamin R. spent his youth in alternately working on his father's farm and clerking in the store, being thus engaged until he began learning his trade. He came to Portland in the spring of 1873, in May of that year becoming apprenticed to John BRADLEY to learn the trade of harness-making. He remained with Mr. BRADLEY three years, and at the expiration of his apprenticeship, wishing to learn more thoroughly the details of his trade, he went to Columbus, Ohio, and worked under instruction for eighteen months. He worked at his trade at Portland, Greenville, Ohio, and Unionville, Indiana, until March, 1881, when he established his present business in Miller's Block, Meridian street. He is master of his trade, understanding thoroughly all its details, and has met with excellent success in business. In addition to a large and complete stock of harness, he also deals in boots and shoes, his store-room, which is 22 X 70 feet in size, being well filled with his stock of goods. Quiet, industrious in his habits and strictly honorable in his dealings, he has gained the confidence and esteem of all who know him, and is classed among the respected citizens of Portland.

RUSSELL, ALBERT

Albert RUSSELL, civil engineer and surveyor, Pennville, is a native of Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana, born February 10, 1849, a son of Isaac and Rachel ( JANNEY ) RUSSELL. He was reared on a frontier farm in his native township, receiving his early education in the district schools, completing his studies at Lebanon (Ohio) normal college. While at college he studied civil engineering, which he has followed since 1874. He remained at home with his parents until attaining his majority. October 1,1878, he was united in [p. 318] marriage to Miss Ellen ENGLISH, a daughter of Thomas and Cynthia ( BOLAND ) ENGLISH, who came from Ross County, Ohio, where Mrs. RUSSELL was born in 1855. They are the parents of one son, named  William E. In 1882 Mr. RUSSELL engaged in the drug business at Pennville, which he followed with fair success until 1887, when he disposed of his drugstore. In 1876 he was elected to the office of county surveyor, serving as such two years. In 1884 he was elected township [sic] trustee, re-elected in 1886, and is still serving in that capacity with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. He is a member of the Odd Fellows order, Relief Lodge, No. 145. Politically he is a Republican. He is a member of the Society of Friends. Isaac RUSSELL, the father of our subject, was born in Adams County, Pennsylvania, August 18, 1810, a son of Jesse RUSSELL, a native of Frederick County, Maryland, and a grandson of John RUSSELL, who was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1736. The latter came to American in 1750,but subsequently returned to his native country, coming again to America in1764, when he settled in Maryland. He married Rebecca FINCHER, a native of Pennsylvania, whose ancestors came to America with William PENN. Jesse RUSSELL married Content GARRETSON, a native of Pennsylvania. Isaac RUSSELL was married in 1830 to Miss Rachel JANNEY in Warren County, Ohio. She is a daughter of Stephen and Letitia (TAYLOR) JANNEY, natives of Loudoun County, Virginia, her father, a son of Joseph JANNEY, a native of Baltimore, Maryland, and a grandson of John JANNEY, a native of Pennsylvania, whose father Joseph JANNEY came from Yorkshire, England, to America with William PENN in 1684, and settled in Philadelphia. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Isaac RUSSELL located in Vigo County, Indiana, where the father followed carpentering. He remained in Vigo County until 1845, when he came with his family to Jay County, and settled on a heavily timbered farm which had been previously entered from the Government by his father-in-law. He cleared and improved a tract of 160 acres and followed farming until his death, September 7, 1881. He was a consistent member of the Society of Friends. His widow who still survives, is yet a member of the Society. She is now seventy-one years old and is living with her son, the subject of this sketch. Isaac RUSSELL served Jackson Township as trustee for three years.He and his wife had a family of five children, of whom four still survive --Francis, living in Nemaha County, Kansas, was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, being a member of Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry; Albert, our subject; James A., a publisher living at Pennville, Indiana, and Mary L., wife of A. C. NORWOOD, of Albuequerque [sic], New Mexico. Jesse J. was a member of Company F., Seventy-fifthIndiana Infantry, and died in the service of his country at Memphis, Tennessee, in February, 1863. SOURCE: p.317 "Biographical and Historical Record of Jay County, Indiana," Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1887. Reprinted by Mayhill Publications of Knightstown,Indiana, 1974. This is the reprinted Jay County section out of the original combined 1887 History of Jay and Blackford counties. Submitted to GenWeb by: (Betty Creath)


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