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Jay County Indiana Biographies Surnames  T - Z

 

TAYLOR, CHARLES H

Charles H. TAYLOR, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Jay county and the proprietor of a well improved farm of 190 acres in Penn township, situated on rural mail route No. 1 out of Pennville, has been a resident of this county for something more than twenty years. Mr. TAYLOR was born on a farm in Licking township, in the neighboring county of Blackford, on June 5, 1871, and is a son of William C. and Mary E. (CANTER) TAYLOR, the latter of whom was born in Clinton county, Ohio. William C. TAYLOR also was born in Ohio, where he remained until about seventeen years of age, when he came to Indiana with his foster parents, the family locating in Blackford county. He was reared as a farmer and after his marriage in Blackford county began farming as a renter. In 1875 he bought a farm of eighty acres, paying $10 an acre for the same, and on that place spent the remainder of his life, increasing his holding-s to 184 acres. He was a substantial farmer and helped to put through the big Lick Creek drainage ditch. He and his wife had seven children who grew to maturity, Robert E., Mary E., Joseph W., David W., Charles H., George C. and Eli L. Of these the subject of this sketch is the only one residing in Jay county. Reared on the home farm in Blackford county, Charles H. TAYLOR received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and from boyhood has been engaged in farming, and was thus engaged in his home county at the time of his marriage, he then being twenty-seven years of age. After his marriage he rented a farm in Harrison township (Blackford county) and continued living there for about three years, at the end of which time he came over into Jay county and bought forty acres of his present farm in Penn township, taking possession of the same on October 22, 1901. Since taking possession of this place Mr. TAYLOR has made extensive and modern improvements and has enlarged his holdings lo 190 acres. In addition to his general farming he has given considerable attention to the raising of live stock and has done well. He is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Knights of Pythias. It was in 1898 that Charles H. TAYLOR was united in marriage to Ocie Ethel HAVENS, daughter of Benjamin F. and Susanna ( BERGDOLL ) HAVENS. To this union have been. born five children, William Franklin, John Jacob, Mary Myrtle, Harley Henry and Ruth Rozelle. William Franklin TAYLOR married Florence EMSHWILLER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.309-310. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

TAYLOR, THORNTON J

Thornton J. TAYLOR, a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court and one of the organizers and a member of the board of directors of the Home Finance Corporation, of Indianapolis, local salesman for that concern in Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here practically all his life. Mr. TAYLOR was born on a farm in Wayne township on January 21, 1870, and is a son of David T. and Eliza B. (HAWKINS) TAYLOR, the latter of whom also was born in this county, a member of the well known pioneer HAWKINS family which has been so prominently identified with the affairs of Jay county since the very beginning of settlement here. David T. TAYLOR was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, and was but an infant when his parents moved from that county to Darke county, same state, where he grew to manhood. He was left an orphan when about ten years of age and he thus was deprived of some of the comforts that ordinarily come into the life of a boy, but his schooling was not neglected and after he had attained his majority he came over into Indiana and beg-an teaching school in Jay county. The Civil war then broke out and he enlisted his services in behalf of the Union cause and went to the front as a member of the 39th Indiana Volunteer Infantry regiment, later becoming attached to the 8th Veteran Cavalry, and saw considerable active service, the battle of Shiloh being his first engagement. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. TAYLOR returned to Jay county and here became engaged in the manufacture of brick and it was he who molded the brick that entered into the construction of the Jay county court house erected in 1868, as is set out elsewhere in this work. In 1867 he married Eliza B. HAWKINS, a daughter of Joseph C. and Sarah (BOSWORTH) HAWKINS, both members of pioneer families here, the latter a daughter of Dr. Jacob BOSWORTH, and until the death of his wife in January, 1872, made his home on the Joseph HAWKINS farm. In the meantime he had been continuing his studies in law and in 1873 was admitted to the bar. He opened an office for the practice of his profession at Pennville, but in 1880 moved from there to Portland and in the latter city was engaged in practice the rest of his life, his death occurring there on November 20, 1912. Of him it has been written that he "was easily one of the ablest and most successful members of this bar" and also that he "was one of the most thoroughly equipped men in the practice of any of his associates at the bar and never went into a trial without a brief of every question that he thought would likely arise." David T. TAYLOR was twice married and by his first wife, Eliza B. HAWKINS, had three children. Claudia M., Thornton J. and one who died in infancy. Following the death of the mother of these children Mr. TAYLOR married Mrs. Jane A. (HOWARD) HIATT, of Pennville, and to that union one child was horn, a son, Eugene B. TAYLOR, now a resident of Greencastle, Ind. [Putnam Co.] Thornton J. TAYLOR was about ten years of age when his father moved from Pennville to Portland and in the latter city he completed his schooling, finishing with a course in the old Eastern Indiana Normal School at Portland. From boyhood he had been devoted to music and as a young man joined a circus band and for three years after leaving the normal school followed the circus, returning home then and entering the law office of his father to take up the study of law, and in 1896 was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court. Until 1904 Mr. TAYLOR remained in practice at Portland and then became engaged in mercantile business there, continuing thus engaged for three or four years, at the end of which time he went to Greencastle and became engaged with his brother in the operation of a stone quarry, but after eight months of that form of employment returned to Portland and resumed the practice of law, in association with his father. A year later he gave up practice definitely and became engaged in the confectionery business at Portland, an enterprise which he maintained for about five years, at the end of which time he became connected with the office of the Hawking Mortgage Company at Portland, entering the office as a bookkeeper. He remained with this concern for three or four years and was advanced in the business until he became treasurer of the company and a member of the board of directors, acquiring a degree of experience in this line that gave a particular value to his services when he was asked to lend his technical assistance in the organization of the Home Finance Corporation, the concern with which he is now associated and of which he is a director. The Home Finance Corporation is a concern with state wide connections and is incorporated for $1,000,000, with the home office at Indianapolis and the following officers: President, O. E. Pierce, of Portland; vice-president, Charles L. Watson, of Indianapolis: secretary and treasurer, Frank L. Braden, of Indianapolis, the board of directors, besides these officers, being Mr. TAYLOR, Fred E. Meeker and David Abramson, of Portland, and Bert Thurman, of New Albany, Ind. On November 28, 1894, Thornton J. TAYLOR was united in marriage to Lillie E. SMITH, who was born in Portland, daughter of Frank and Sarah (CAIN) SMITH, the former a native of Highland county, Ohio, and the latter of Randolph county, Indiana. Frank SMITH, who formerly and for years was engaged in the restaurant business at Portland, served as treasurer of the city of Portland for three terms. He and his wife were the parents of three children, two of whom are living, Mrs. TAYLOR having a sister, Ollie. Mr. and Mrs. TAYLOR are members of the Presbyterian church and are Republicans. Mr. TAYLOR is a member of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Portland and is also affiliated with the local aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and with the Portland Chamber of Commerce. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.392-393. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

TEETERS, HIRAM

Hiram TEETERS superintendent of roads in this district and one of the best known and most substantial farmers and landowners of Jay county, proprietor of a well-kept farm in Wabash township, residing on rural mail route No. 9 out of Portland, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here and has resided in this county all his life. Mr. TEETERS was born on a farm in Noble township on August 24, 1855, and is a son of John H. and Margaret ( DAVIS ) TEETERS, both natives of Ohio, the latter of whom, born in Preble county, was but a child when she came to Jay county with her parents in pioneer days. John H. TEETERS was born in Portage county, Ohio, December II, 1828, and was but a lad when he came to Jay county with his parents, the family settling in Noble township, where his father had entered a tract of eighty acres from the Government, this land now being the property of the LEONHARD heirs. On that pioneer farm John H. TEETERS grew to manhood. In his twenty-third year, February 5, 1852, he married Margaret DAVIS and settled on a farm of forty acres in Noble township, where he was living when the Civil war broke out. Despite the family obligations he had incurred he went out with the last draft levied in this county and was in service about eighteen months. Upon the completion of his military service he returned home and thereafter was engaged in working at the carpenter trade, which he had learned in his boyhood, his sons taking over the work of the farm as they came into maturity, and as a carpenter and builder he spent the remainder of his active life, one of the best known men in that community. John H. TEETERS and wife were the parents of nine children, all of whom are living save James B., the others (besides the subject of this sketch) being Jackson, David, Edward, Hannah, Leah, Amanda and Margaret. Reared on the home farm in Noble township, Hiram TEETERS, the third in order of birth of this family of nine children, received his schooling in the old Premer school (district No. 2) and from the days of his boyhood was helpful in the labors of the farm, remaining there until his marriage in his twenty-third year, after which he began farming for himself on a rented "eighty" in Noble township. Four years later he bought a half cleared tract of forty acres in that same township, paying for the same $900, and on that place established his home and started in to clear the remainder and make a farm out of it. About a year later he bought an adjoining "forty" and on this place of eighty acres made his home for about twenty-two years, or until 1905, in which year he sold that farm and bought his present farm of 160 acres in Wabash township and on this latter place has since made his home, he and his family now being very comfortably situated. On May 17, 1916, the dwelling house on this farm, together with its contents, was destroyed by fire and Mr. TEETERS then erected his present modern and commodious residence. He also is the owner of property in the city of Portland and since 1917 has been living practically retired from the active labors of the farm,, renting his fields. His place is well kept and is equipped with an excellent farm plant. Mr. TEETERS is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local public affairs, at present serving as superintendent of highways in his road district, the Twelfth. He is a member of the Mt. Zion Evangelical church, as was his wife, who died on May 5, 1907. She was born Sarah A. HOUDESHELL in Noble township this county, December 23, 1857, and was a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth ( STAUFFELL ) HOUDESHELL, who were the parents of seven children, four of whom, David, John, Luanda and Allie, are still living. It was on July 25, 1878, that Hiram TEETERS was united in marriage to Sarah A. HOUDESHELL and to that union eleven children were born, all of whom are living save two, Opal and Arthur, the others being Dora, Homer, Pearl, Margaret, Orville, Russell, Elmer, Glenn and. Fred, all of whom are married and who in the aggregate have given Mr. TEETERS nineteen grandchildren, in whom he takes much pride and delight. Dora TEETERS married Alfred Miller, a farmer of Noble township, and has two children, Madonna and Glenn. Homer TEETERS, present surveyor of Jay county and of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work, married Lola THORNTON and has three children, Edna, James and Mary. Pearl TEETERS married Leonard PENROD, a farmer of Jackson township, and has had five children, Mary A., Hiram, Fred, Wanda and Viola, all of whom are living save Fred, who died on January 13, 1922, at the age of five years. Margaret TEETERS married Jesse NEARON, a farmer of Wabash township, and has three children, Mildred, Marceil and Eldon. Orville TEETERS, a bridge contractor, now living at Bellefontaine, this county, married Ada SHAUVER and has three children, Thelma, Ruth and Noah. Russell TEETERS, now farming in Michigan, married Mamie HUEY and has two children, Pauline and Eugene. Elmer TEETERS, who is now engaged in the mercantile business at Spartansburg, Ind., married Alma ARNOLD. Glenn TEETERS, a farmer of Mercer county, Ohio, married Zola BRIGNER and has one child, John Hiram, and Fred TEETERS, now a merchant at Bellefontaine, married Susan HARTZELL. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.230-231. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

TEETERS, HOMER

Homer TEETERS, county surveyor of Jay county and formerly and for years engaged hereabout in the road and bridge contracting line, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. He is a member of one of the real pioneer families of this county, his great-grandfather, David TEETERS, having settled here with his family about the time Jay county was erected as a separate civic unit in the group of counties which go to make up the state of Indiana. David TEETERS settled on a tract of Government land in Noble township, where he established his home. One of his sons, John H, TEETERS, grandfather of Homer TEETERS, also became a landowner in that township and reared his family there, one of his sons, Hiram TEETERS, father of Homer TEETERS, in turn establishing his home there after his marriage. Hiram TEETERS married Sarah A. HOUNDESHELL, who also was born in Noble township, a member of one of the pioneer families there, and became one of the substantial members of that community, the owner of an excellent farm of 160 acres. He and his wife had nine children, those besides the subject of this sketch the fourth in order of birth being Dora, Pearl, Margaret, Orville, Russell, Elmer, Glenn and Fred. Homer TEETERS was born on the home farm in Noble township, August 29, 1882, and was reared there, receiving his schooling in the Metzner school. He remained at home, an assistant to his father in the operations of the farm, until he had attained his majority when he became engaged in the road and bridge building business, becoming a general contractor and continuing in that line for twelve years, or until his election in 1916 to the office of surveyor of Jay county. When about twenty-four years of age Mr. TEETERS had entered upon a three-years course in surveying and mapmaking with the International Correspondence School and was graduated from that institution, thereafter giving considerable attention to surveying in connection with his other work. He was the first surveyor to occupy that office in the new court house and so admirably has he discharged the duties of the office that by successive re-elections he is now serving his third term in office. Mr. TEETERS is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church at Portland. On June 9, 1904, Homer TEETERS was united in marriage to Lolah E. THORNTON, who also was born in Noble township, and to this union three children have been born, Edna, James and Mary, the first named of whom is a member of the class of 1924, Portland high school. Mrs. TEETERS is a daughter of James and Mary ( ARNOLD ) THORNTON, also members of pioneer families in this county. James THORNTON is a landowner in Noble township and has also for years been engaged in ditch contracting. He and his wife have had five children, four of whom are living, those besides Mrs. TEETERS being Sylvia, Charles and Harley.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.75-76. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

TEMPLETON, HOMER J

Homer J. TEMPLETON, D.D.S. one of the best known dentists in this section of Indiana, with offices in the Bimel building at Portland, in which city he has been practicing his profession for about fifteen years, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Doctor TEMPLETON was born in Hamilton county, Indiana, October 5, 1878, and is the son and only child of Samuel and Mary J. ( CALVERT ) TEMPLETON, the former of whom, a cabinet maker, was born in Henry county, this state. Doctor TEMPLETON was reared in his native county and supplemented the schooling received in the local public schools by a course in the normal school at Anderson. He then entered the Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis and after a three-years course there was graduated from that institution in 1900. In the following year he married and some time afterward opened an office for the practice of his profession at Westport, in Decatur county, and established his home there. For four years Doctor TEMPLETON remained at Westport and then he moved to Geneva, in Adams county, where he remained for four years, at the end of which time, in 1908, he moved to Portland, where he established an office and where he since has continued in practice, having an extensive clientele hereabout. The Doctor is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. On February 22, 1901, Dr. Homer J. TEMPLETON was united in marriage to Maud BOWMAN, who was born in Union county, Indiana, daughter of Millard and Elizabeth ( COX ) BOWMAN, and to this union four children have been born, Theresa, Homer, Jack and Millard, the last named of whom died at the age of seven years. Theresa TEMPLETON is a member of the class of 1924, Portland high school. Doctor and Mrs. TEMPLETON have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.216-217. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

THEURER, JACOB

Jacob THEURER, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Madison township, owner of an excellent farm on rural mail route No. 4 out of Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. THEURER was born on a farm in Madison township on February 22, 1864, and is a son of Mathias and Sarah ( KURTZ ) THEURER, the latter of whom was born in Ohio, daughter of Michael KURTZ and wife, who later came to Jay county and became pioneers of Noble township. Mathias THEURER was of European birth, born in the kingdom of Wurtemburg, October 15, 1829, and was twenty-one years of age when he came to this country, landing in New York City on June 29, 1851, after a tempestuous voyage, the sailing vessel on which he came over requiring three months to make the passage. The vessel was cast upon the rocks not far out of harbor but the passengers were all taken off safely. For about two years after his arrival here Mathias THEURER worked in a brickyard in New York and then joined his parents, John George THEURER and wife, who meanwhile had come to this country with the other members of the family and had located at Marion, Ohio. Not long afterward the THEURER's came over into Indiana and settled in this county, John G. THEURER buying a tract of eighty acres in Madison township, where the family home was established. Mathias THEURER took up farming upon his arrival here and in the spring of 1854 was married. He continued farming after his marriage and after his father's death bought the interests of the other heirs in his father's estate and thus became the owner of the home "eighty." To this tract he later added until he was the owner of a good farm of 180 acres. Mathias THEURER was twice married. On March 25, 1854, not long after his arrival in Jay county, he was united in marriage to Sarah KURTZ and to this union were born five children, those besides the subject of this sketch having been Mrs. Justina WIGGER, who died in November, 1919; Tobias, who is still living in this county; Mrs. Caroline HEIBY, of Ft. Recovery, Ohio, and John G. THEURER, of this county. The mother of these children died on June 8, 1868, and on November 30, 1868, Mathias THEURER married Rosenna KLINGEL, of this county. To this union three children were born, all of whom are living, namely: Sarah, Mrs. Mary GRIESINGER and Mrs. Emma ABEL. Mrs. Rosenna THEURER died on February 28, 1919, and Mathias THEURER afterward made his home with his children, chiefly with Mrs. John HEIBY and Jacob THEURER, the remainder of his life, his death occurring on November 13, 1921, he then being at the great age of ninety-two years and twenty-eight days. He was for years one of the leaders in the Lutheran church at Salamonia and his children were reared in that faith. Reared on the home farm in Madison township, Jacob THEURER received his schooling in the old Center school (district No. 5) and remained at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-four, after which he rented from his father the home place and continued to make his home there. Twelve years later, in 1902, he bought forty acres of this tract and in 1912 bought an adjoining tract of sixty acres, In the following year (1913) he bought ten acres more and thus at present has 110 acres, which he has improved in substantial manner anc on which he has a well equipped farm plant. Mr. THEURER is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church at Salamonia, of the congregation of which he has been treasurer for the past twenty years. It was on November 8, 1888, that Jacob THEURER was united in marriage to Catherine GRIESINGER, also of Madison township, and to this union three children have been born, Carl M., born on October 20, 1889; Nora, March 9, 1892, and Hilda, January 22, 1899, who died on October 13, 1920. Mrs. THEURER was born in Marion county, Ohio, May 6, 1866, and was but a babe in arms when her parents, Mathias and Mary ( HEIL ) GRIESINGER, in 1867, came to Jay county and settled in Madison township. Mathias GRIESINGER, a native of Germany, born in the grand duchy of Baden, came to America in the days of his young manhood and located in Marion county, Ohio, where he presently married Mary HEIL, who was born in that county. He remained in that county until 1867, when he came to Jay county and bought a tract of fifty acres in Madison township, on which he established his home, remaining there until he sold the place in 1913 and retired from the farm. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, five of whom are still living, Mrs. THEURER having two brothers, Frank and Charles GRIESINGER, and two sisters, Mrs. Emma WAGNER and Mrs. Edna THEURER. The deceased members of this family were Elizabeth, Mrs. Lena PETERS, Flora, Jacob and Mrs. Anna BEARD. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.289-290. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

TULLIS, ISAAC

Isaac TULLIS, a well known retired farmer of Bearcreek township, living on his well kept place on rural mail route No.1 out of Bryant, is a member of one of Jay county's pioneer families and has been a resident of this county all his life. Mr. TULLIS was born on a farm in Noble township on March 12, 1853, and is a son and the only surviving of the four children born to Jonathan and Jane (GRATTIS ) TULLIS, both of whom also were born in this county, their respective parents having been pioneers here. Jonathan TULLIS was born here in 1829, not long after his parents had come up here from Cincinnati [Hamilton Co.]and settled in this county, his father having entered from the Government a tract of 120 acres in Jay county about the time the county was organized. The GRATTIS family came here from Virginia from that section of the Old Dominion that later came to be set off as West Virginia, and both they and the TULLIS family were substantial pioneers of this section of Indiana. Isaac TULLIS's mother died when he was twelve years of age. He received Ins schooling in the old Hode log school house in Noble township. He early became engaged as a farm hand in the neighborhood, making his home at the various places of his employment during the time of his young manhood, and was thus engaged until his marriage, after which he rented a forty-acre farm in Noble township and there made his home for nine years, at the end of which time he bought a farm of forty-eight acres in Jackson township. On this latter place he made his home for twenty years, meantime increasing his acreage by the purchase of an adjoining tract of thirty acres, and then he sold that farm and bought eighty acres of the place on which he has since resided in Bearcreek township. When Mr. TULLIS bought this latter place there were but sixteen acres of it cleared and the task of clearing and improving the farm fell upon him, but he got the job done in good time and has long had a comfortable home there and a well improved farm plant, everything being kept up in "shipshape" fashion. As his affairs prospered on this farm Mr. TULLIS bought an adjoining tract of fifty-five acres and now has a good farm of 135 acres. Since 1914 he has been living practically retired from the active labors of the farm, the place being rented by his son. Charles TULLIS, who thus has the active management of the farm. Mr. TULLIS is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the West Liberty Christian church. In November, 1875, Isaac TULLIS was united in marriage to Nancy J. FAIRCHILDS and to this union ten children have been born, all of whom are living save Mrs. Margaret LAYMAN,, who died at the age of thirty-five years. The other members of this family are Mrs. Mollie BOWLER, Mrs. Ida FLAUDING, Mrs. Anna BUTCHER, William, Henry and Charles TULLIS, Mrs. Essie MACKLIN and Mrs. Hattie GLENTZER. Mrs. TULLIS was born in the neighboring county of Adams and is a daughter of Smith and Margaret (JOHNSON) FAIRCHILDS. who had come over here into Indiana from Greenville, Ohio, [Darke Co.] and established their home in Adams county. Smith FAIRCHILDS was a substantial farmer and he and his wife were the parents of ten children, five of whom are living, Mrs. TULLIS having a brother, Griffith FAIRCHILDS, and three sisters, Rachel, Charity and Elizabeth. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.379-380. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

TURNER, WILLIAM H

William H. TURNER, who for many years was engaged as a superintendent of mines in the West, but who for some years past has been making his home on a farm in Jackson township, this county, is a Hoosier by birth and inclination though for many years his lines were cast in far away places. Mr. TURNER was born on a farm in the neighboring county of Randolph on April 22, 1855, and is a son of William and Margaret ( MONKS ) TURNER, who later became residents of Jay county, where their last days were spent. William TURNER was a Virginian by birth. As a young man he came to Indiana and located in the vicinity of Winchester, in Randolph county, where in time he became the owner of 1,500 acres of land and where he remained until 1878, when he disposed of his interests in that county and came up into Jay county and bought a tract of 1,100 acres in Penn and Jackson townships and here established his home and spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1905. He and his wife were the parents of thirteen children, of whom seven are living, those besides the subject of this sketch being John, Susanna, Sarah, Matilda, Jesse and Lucinda. Reared on his father's extensive landed estate in Randolph county, William H. TURNER received his schooling in the local schools, taking the high school course, and was twenty-three years of age when his father moved from Randolph county up into Jay county. From the days of his boyhood he had been interested in mining and mineralogy and presently he left here and went to Denver, Col., where he spent two years in the School of Mines equipping himself for the technical side of mining. Thus equipped Mr. TURNER became engaged as the superintendent of a mine and for thirty-nine years, or until his retirement and return to Jay county, he was thus engaged, superintending work in both gold and silver mines in the mountain states. Upon his retirement he returned to Jay county, the old home place of both himself and wife, and established his home on a. tract of eighty acres in Jackson township, where he and his wife are now living, very pleasantly situated. It was on June 30, 1895, that William H. TURNER was united in marriage to Alice HARTLEY, who was born in this county, a daughter of Enoch B. and Lydia H. ( SHANKS ) HARTLEY, both members of pioneer families here and of whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere in this volume. Mr. and Mrs. TURNER are members of the Christian church at Pennville and are Republicans. Mr. TURNER is a 32d degree (Scottish Rite) Mason and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Knights of Pythias, affiliated with lodges of those orders in Colorado. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.261. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

VANCE, MERRITT W

Merritt W. VANCE, one of Wayne township's well known and progressive young farmers and landowners, is a native of the state of Illinois but a Hoosier by choice and in putting in his lot with that of the people of Jay county was actuated by sound judgment and wise consideration of circumstances. Mr. VANCE was born at Leroy, Illinois, January 6, 1899, and is the son and only child of Noah and Eda ( STERLING ) VANCE, both of whom had been married before, the former having had two daughters, Mrs. John ROBERTS, of Leroy, III., and Mrs. Effie KENNEMER, of Raymore, Mo., by a former marriage and the latter a son, Mark S. WEBB, of Bloomington, Ill., by her first marriage. The late Noah VANCE, a former well known resident of Wayne township, was a Virginian by birth but was reared in McLean county, Illinois, where his parents had established their home when he was a child. He became a substantial farmer in that county, the owner of right around 200 acres, and there was engaged in farming until in 1906 when he sold the farm and moved to the town of Leroy, III., where he resided for a year, at the end of which time he came to Indiana with his family and settled on a farm of 155 acres which he had bought in Wayne township, this county. Three years later he sold that farm and bought an "eighty" in that same township, the place now owned and occupied by his son Merritt, and there spent his last days, his death occurring in August, 1911. His widow and her son Merritt then returned to Leroy, but she survived her husband but a few months, her death occurring in January, 1912. Mrs. Eda (STERLING) VANCE was a native of Ohio, but was but a child when her parents moved to Illinois and located in the vicinity of Leroy, the family having driven through in a covered wagon, and there she was reared and had her schooling. Merritt W. VANCE was eight years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents ii 1907 and was twelve when his father died and he went back to Illinois with his mother. He completed his schooling in the Western Military Academy at Alton, III., from which he was graduated in 1917 and then turned his attention to the farm his father had left ii this county, and after his marriage a couple of years later returned to Jay county and established his home on the farm in Wayne town ship, the place where he is now living and where he and his family are very comfortably situated. It was on May 17, 1919, that Merritt W. VANCE was united in marriage to Bertha F. EDWARDS, of Illinois, and to this union two children have been born, Alice M,, born on May 17, 1920, and Florence I., September 27, 1921. Mrs. Vance was born on a farm in Lexington township, McLean county, Illinois March 21, 1902, and is a daughter of Alvin and Delia ( JONES ) EDWARDS, both of whom also were born in Illinois and the former of whom is a substantial farmer and landowner in that state. To Alvin EDWARDS and wife five children were born, four of whom are still living. Mrs. Vance having three sisters, Edna M., Margaret and Mrs. Christian HARDT. Mr. & Mrs. Vance are Republican and are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Portland. They have a very pleasant home on rural mail route No. 2 out of Portland and take an interested part in the social activities of the community in which they live.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.259-260. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

VANMATRE, OTTO

Otto VanMATRE, one of Jackson township's well known and substantial agriculturists and landowners, is a native Hoosier and has been a resident of Indiana all his life. Mr. VanMATRE was born on a farm in Madison county, this state, December 14, 1873, and is a son of Andrew and Louisa ( BROWN ) VanMATRE, who were well established farming people in that county. Andrew VanMATRE was a Virginian by birth, born in that section of the Old Dominion now included in West Virginia. He came to Indiana in 1864 and ever afterward remained a resident of this state, becoming a farmer and landowner in Madison county. He and his wife were the parents of six children, four of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Ozro VanMATRE, and two sisters, Laura and Etta. Reared on the home farm in Madison county. Otto VanMATRE received his schooling in the schools of that county and remained at home until he was twenty-six years of age, when he bought a forty acre farm in that county and began working "on his own." In 1901 he sold that place and came to Jay county and bought an eighty-acre farm in Jackson township, the place on which he is now living. Since taking possession of that place Mr. VanMATRE has made numerous improvements on the same and now has an excellent farm plant. In 1898 Otto VanMATRE was united in marriage to Olive HOGG, who was born in West Virginia, and to this union seven children have been born, Mildred, Marion, Robert, Frieda, Howard, Horace and Virginia, all of whom are at home save Mildred, the first born, who married William McCROSKEY, an oil man, and is living near Torrent, Ky. Mr. and Mrs. McCROSKEY have one child, a daughter, Margaret McCROSKEY. The VanMATRE's have a pleasant home on rural mail route No.2 out of Portland. Mr. VanMATRE is a Democrat and a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Portland, and he and his wife are members of Union Chapel. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.238-239. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

VOTAW, Charles F

Charles F. VOTAW, a well known and substantial farmer of Jackson township and owner of a well improved farm in that township, is a member of one of Jay county's pioneer families, the VOTAW's having been here since the year following the organization of this county. Mr. VOTAW was born in Jackson township on August 9, 1861, and is a son of Quimby B. and Mary (MASON) VOTAW, who were among the pioneers of Penn township and later became residents of Jackson township. Quimby B. VOTAW was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and early was trained as a carpenter and cabinet maker. He also became a landowner in Ohio, the owner of eighty acres of land, but in 1837 he disposed of his interests there and came over into Indiana, one of the considerable number of persons from Columbiana county who became residents of Jay county in pioneer days. Upon his arrival here he bought a farm in Penn township and made his home in that township for several years, later moving to Jackson township, where he had bought a quarter section of land and where he spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife were the parents of three children, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Elizabeth and Emma. Reared on the home farm in Jackson township, Charles F. VOTAW received his schooling in the old Union school house and from the days of his boyhood has devoted himself to farming. He remained on the home farm until he was twenty-five years of age when he bought a "forty," which he still owns, and started in on his own account. For ten years thereafter he made his home on a rented farm, and also farmed his ''forty," or until he bought another "forty" and established his home on the place on which he is now living in Jackson township. Mr. VOTAW's operations prospered and he has added to his land holdings until now he is the owner of a well kept farm of 200 acres, on which he is living practically retired, renting his fields. Mr. VOTAW is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Sardinia Christian church. On August I, 1886, Charles F. VOTAW was united in marriage to Mary E. POND, who was born in Miami county, Ohio, daughter of John G. and Rebecca Jane (MONGER) POND. Mr. and Mrs. VOTAW have a pleasant home and have ever taken a hospitable interest in the general social affairs of the community in which they live.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.382-383. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

VOTAW, JENNIE SIMMONS

VOTAW, Jennie Simmons Jay County, Indiana Portland Daily Sun, Centennial Edition September 21, 1936 Mrs. Jennie VOTAW, at the age of 96, is one of Portland's most interesting women, still enjoying life, and taking an active interest in modern improvements. Her mind is keen, hearing good, but her eyesight is not the best. However she can read all except fine print. She is a vital part of the early history of Jay County, one of the courageous pioneers that made this county what it is today. Her memory is remarkable and she can relate hundreds of interesting stories of pioneer days when this section was a wilderness. She has seen fine farms and cities hewed out of the rough timber, seen the corduroy road replace the trail through the swamps, the gravel road replace the corduroy, the paved road replace the gravel, and the ox team relegate to the past for the modern automobile. Mrs. VOTAW was born in Randolph County . Her father James SIMMONS, was born at Richmond. Her mother was Avaline HAWKINS, a member of one of the very first pioneer families, her mother being a daughter of John J. HAWKINS, the first white man to be buried in Jay County. She was married in 1866, to W. C. VOTAW, the first of James VOTAW's children, another pioneer, and they came to Jay county in 1867. She has been a resident of Portland for nearly 70 years. At the time of Abraham Lincoln's election to the presidency she was 18 years of age. She well remembers the campaign when Lincoln ran against Buchannan and tells of students of Liber college going to the VOTAW place and building a huge float, 100 feet long to use in a Lincoln rally at Union City. The float was drawn by a number of yoke of oxen.

WATSON, CHARLES C

Charles C. WATSON, of Wayne Township, is one of the prominent citizens of Jay County, with whose interests he has been identified for many years. His father, Brooks WATSON, was a native of the old Granite State, born in the town of Ware, April 3, 1793. He married Abigail CALDWELL, who was born in Franklin County, Vermont, September 28, 1798, the date of their marriage being July 8, 1817. The children born to them are -- George B., of Portland, who was born in Franklin County, Vermont, August 30, 1818; Mrs. Abby REPLOGLE, born in Lower Canada, November 14, 1820, is now a widow, and resides in Portland; Charles C., whose name heads this sketch, was born in Colchester, Vermont, September 24, 1822; Shuball, born in Vermont, August 15, 1825, and died before the family moved West; James, born in New York September 2, 1827, and died in Pekin, Tazewell County, Illinois, February 8,1864; William H., born in Vermont October 14, 1830, is now living in Kansas; Samuel L., born in Vermont Oct 16, 1833, lives in Pekin, Illinois; Maryette was born in Fairfax County, Vermont, March 14, 1836, and Ophelia was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 11 1838. In 1837 the parents removed with their family from Vermont to Butler County, Ohio, and in 1839 settled in Cincinnati, Ohio. They came to Jay County, Indiana, in 1849, and settled on a farm in Jackson Township, which had been bought by their son, Charles C., the year before. The father died in Jackson Township in 1857, and the mother died February 22, 1885, in Wayne Township. Charles C. WATSON, the subject of this sketch, remained with his parents until after they removed to Cincinnati. When seventeen years old he returned to Vermont, and there served an apprenticeship of two years at the painters trade. He then returned to Cincinnati, and for a time worked at his trade, when he engaged in boating on the Miami, Wabash and Erie canals. He followed the canals about nine years, attaining to the position of Captain. In 1849 he came to Jay County, Indiana, and bought a farm in Jackson Township. He spent his time in boating during the summer months, returning to his farm in winters for several years. In 1857 he married Miss Mary TOPPING, who was born February 14, 1836, a daughter of Josiah H. TOPPING, one of the old and honored pioneers of Jay County. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. WATSON, two of whom are living -- Frank V., born October 9, 1857, and Flora B., born July 9, 1860. Adah A. and Irvin L. died in infancy. After his marriage Mr. WATSON settled with his wife on his farm and began making a home. He had already done much toward improving his land, and in 1855 he erected a fine residence at a cost of over $2,600. He purchased the material for the building of his residence at Grand Rapids, which was shipped to Fort Wayne, thence by wagon to Jay County. The cement used in its construction was bought at Lockport, New York. The lumber was of the best quality, and 26, 000 bricks were used to build the cellar walls and chimney. This was at the time considered one of the finest farm residences in Eastern Indiana. In the spring of 1858 he sold his farm to George W. TEMPLAR, the place being now known as the SHAFER farm. Mr. WATSON then settled on his present farm on section 4, Wayne Township, where he has 129 acres of well improved land, on which he has 1.000 rods of tiling. His land is divided into convenient lots, well fenced. His residence which cost over $2,000, is situated on a beautiful elevation seventy-two feet above the site of Portland, located on the State road about two miles north of Portland. His barn and other out-buildings compare favorably with his residence. For about five years Mr. WATSON has given much attention to the raising of fine stock, and in 1886 he began raising Holstein and Jersey cattle, and now has some very fine specimens of those noted breeds. The same year he purchased a Kentucky blooded horse. His stock is supplied with water raised by windmill power from a never-failing source. Mr. WATSON commenced life a poor boy, and his success has been attained by his own unaided efforts. He has always been a valuable citizen, contributing liberally of his means to the support of church, schools, and all public improvements. He is independent in his religious views, possessing a liberal feeling toward all religious denominations. He is an advocate of the cause of temperance and is a strict temperance man. In politics he has always affiliated with the Democratic party, casting his first vote for James K. Polk in 1844. Josiah H. TOPPING, the father of Mrs. WATSON, was born in Connecticut, February 10,1797, and when a child was taken by his parents to Sandusky County, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. He was there married April 3, 1834, to Belinda McCULLOUGH, a native of Sandusky County, born May 10, 1812. They came with their family to Jay County in 1837, Mr. TOPPING having come here prior to this time, and made his location. The family settled on section 4, Wayne Township, where he entered and improved a farm of 200 acres, on which he lived until his death, which occurred April 21, 1873. His wife died four years after coming to Jay County, the date of her death being January 25,1841. They were the parents of four children -- Leroy, born February 16,1835, was a resident of Wayne Township until his death June 25, 1886; Mary, wife of our subject, born February 14, 1836; John, born May 26, 1837, is now living in Colorado, and Thomas M. C., born July 12, 1840, died in infancy. Josiah H . TOPPING was a prominent pioneer of Jay County, and was esteemed for his many sterling qualities, and was in all respects a worthy representative of the grand old pioneer element that is fast passing away. In politics he was in early life a Whig, later an Abolitionist, and on the organization of the Republican party he became identified with it, affiliating with that party until his death. In early life he became a member of the United Brethren church, but subsequently severed his connection with that church and united with the Presbyterian church, but on account of the views of that church, he withdrew his membership, and joined the Congregationalists, being a member of that denomination at the time of his death.S OURCE: p.306-308 "Biographical and Historical Record of Jay County, Indiana," Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1887. Reprinted by Mayhill Publications of Knightstown, Indiana, 1974. This is the reprinted Jay County section out of the original combined 1887 History of Jay and Blackford counties. Submitted to GenWeb by: Betty Creath

WEAVER, JACOB C

Jacob C. WEAVER, a well known farmer of Richland township and the owner of a well kept farm in the immediate vicinity and north of Redkey, is a native of the "Buckeye" state, but has been a resident of Indiana and of Jay county since he was seven years of age and thus feds himself to be thoroughly "one of the folks" here. Mr. WEAVER was born on a farm in Greene county, Ohio, July 9, 1869, and is a son of John H. and Hannah E. ( IRELAND ) WEAVER, who established their home in Jay county in 1875. John H. WEAVER also was born in Greene county, Ohio, about 1837, and grew up there as a farmer. After his marriage he established his home on a farm in that county and there remained until he was thirty-eight years of age, when, in 1875, he disposed of his interests m Greene county and came over into Indiana with his family and settled in Jay county, buying a tract of 215 acres in the neighborhood of what then was called Greene Post office and there established his home, he and his wife spending the remainder of their lives there. They were the parents of nine children, of whom four are living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, George and Frank WEAVER, and a sister, Mina. As noted above, Jacob C. WEAVER w as but seven years of age when he came with his parents to Jay county and he grew to manhood on the home farm in the vicinity of Greene. He continued to farm at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-three years, after which he bought a tract of eighty acres a mile north of Redkey and there established his home. Four years later he returned to the old home farm and farmed the same for four years, at the end of which time he returned to his own farm north of Redkey and has continued to reside there, he and his family being very comfortably situated. It was in 1892 that Jacob C. WEAVER was united in marriage to Clarissa E. COALTER, who was born in this county, daughter of William and Elizabeth COALTER, and to this union four children have been born, namely: Clay R., who married Sadie HAHN and has one child, a son, Robert; Fay M., who married Almeta SAFFERS, who died leaving one child, Jean; Nila, who married Robert SILVERS and has a son, Max SILVERS; and Maud, who married Arthur PECK, and now lives at Hartford City, Ind. The WEAVER's are Democrats.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, p.235. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WEBSTER, I FRANK

I. Frank WEBSTER, former mayor of the city of Dunkirk and one of the active and progressive business men of that city, proprietor of an old established meat market, and who also has the honor of having been the youngest man to sit in the Dunkirk city council, has been a resident of Dunkirk since the days of his early childhood and has thus "grown up" with the town. He was born on a farm in Union county, this state, August 4, 1878, son of John W. and Amelia F. ( ROBERTSON ) WEBSTER, the latter of whom was born in Montgomery county, Virginia, in 1853, and who are now living in Dunkirk. John W. WEBSTER was born on a farm in Union county, this state, in 1852, a member of one of the pioneer families of that section of the state. He was reared on the farm and received his schooling at Brownsville and at Oxford, Ohio. For a time after his marriage he continued farming on the home place in Union county, but in 1880 moved to a farm in the vicinity of Eaton. The next year (1881) he moved to Dunkirk, where for about three years he was engaged in the tile business. He bought part of the old Sutton homestead farm and operated the same for about twenty-five years, also renting land, in the meantime, in 1886, opening a meat market in Dunkirk, this latter enterprise being operated in association with his son Frank WEBSTER. In 1908 John W. WEBSTER went to Petersburg, Va. where for ten years he was proprietor of the Prospect hotel. He then retired from business and returned to Dunkirk, where he and his wife are now living. I. Frank WEBSTER was but two or three years old when his parents moved to Dunkirk and there he received his schooling. As a boy he was a valued assistant to his father in the labors of the farm and when twenty years of age became associated with his father in the retail meat business at Dunkirk and when his father retired in 1906 assumed complete control of that business, which he since has maintained, one of the best known business men in the city. Mr. WEBSTER is a Republican and from the days of his boyhood has taken an active interest in local political affairs. When but twenty-one years of age he was elected to represent his ward in the city council and by successive re-elections served in that capacity for three terms, the youngest man who ever occupied such a seat in Dunkirk. In 1917 Mr. WEBSTER was elected mayor of the city and served for four years, his term of service having been marked by several notable public improvements in the city. Mr. WEBSTER is a member of the local lodge of the Improved Order of Red Men. In 1907, I. Frank WEBSTER was united in marriage to Jessie M. MILLER, who was born in Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born two children, sons both, Kenneth and John. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.181-182. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WEEKS, HERMAN B

Herman B. WEEKS, agent for the Pennsylvania Line at Redkey and for thirteen years a prominent factor in the general commercial and industrial life of that city, is a Buckeye by birth, was reared in Michigan and is a Hoosier by choice, having been a resident of this state since the year following the attainment of his majority. Mr. WEEKS was born in Ashland county, Ohio, April 23. 1870. and is a son of Schuyler and Emily ( BEATTIE ) WEEKS, whose last days were spent in Michigan. Schuyler WEEKS also was born in Ashland county, Ohio, a member of one of the old families in that part of the state, and early became engaged in the lumber and saw-milling business. In 1874, he disposed of his interests in Ohio and moved with his family to Eaton county, Michigan, where for some time he was engaged in saw-milling and where he also became the owner of a good farm. On this farm he and his wife spent their last days, her death occurring in 1914 and his in 1916. Herman B. WEEKS was but four years of age when his parents moved to Michigan and he was reared on the farm there. He supplemented the schooling received in the local schools by a course in a business college in New York and then about 1889, took up railroading. He became a competent railway clerk as well as a telegraph operator and was employed at various places on the Pennsylvania railroad until in 1908, when he was sent to Redkey as agent in the office of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at that place, and he has ever since occupied that position, one of the best known railway agents on the line. In 1891, the year before his arrival at Redkey, Herman B. WEEKS was united in marriage to Dorothy WIRT, who was born in Michigan, and to this union have been born seven children, namely: Ralph, a conductor on the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern railroad, who married Edna DILLON, of Albany, Ind., and has two children, Herman A. and Paul; Walter B., a veteran of the World war, who is connected with the operations of the Reo Automobile Company; Inda., who married I. H. O'BRIEN, of Hartford City, Ind., and has one child, a son, Robert; and Dorothy, Claude, George and Harry, who are at home. Mr. and Mrs. WEEKS are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are Republicans. Mr. WEEKS is a Freemason, a member of the local lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons at Redkey, and is a charter member of the lodge of the Modern Woodmen at LaCrosse, Ind. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.132-133. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WEHRLEY, BLAINE P

BLAINE P. WEHRLY, a well known jeweler at Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has resided here all his life with the exception of a period of eight years during which he was engaged in business at Hartford City. He was born at Salamonia on August 31, 1884, son of William P and Olive J. (SMITH ) WEHRLY, the latter of whom also was born in Indiana. William P. SMITH was a farmer, lumberman and thresher man at Salamonia and he and his wife were the parents of thirteen children, of whom eleven are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being John W., Prudence, Barbara, Catherine, Henry, Harvey, Alvah, Ida, Ethel and Martin. Reared at Salamonia Blaine P. WEHRLY received his schooling there. He early became interested in the jewelry business, his elder brother John W. WEHRLY, having a jewelry store at Portland, and after a course at the Philadelphia College of Horology and Optics entered his brother's store at Portland and was there engaged for a year, at the end of which time he was made manager of his brother's store at Hartford City. For eight years he remained in the latter city and then he returned to Portland and resumed his place in the local store, continuing thus engaged until in 1919, when he started in business for himself at Portland. Mr. WEHRLY has a well stocked and admirably equipped store in North Meridian street and his long experience preparatory to entering business for himself gave him an insight into the needs of the local trade which has enabled him to meet most satisfactorily the demands along this line. On November 28, 1909, Blaine P. WEHRLY was united in marriage to Gladys ASHCRAFT, who also was born in this county, I and to this union one child has been born, a son. William Lewis WEHRLY, born on May 27, 1913. Mrs. WEHRLY was born on a farm in Wabash township, this county, daughter of William and Blanche ( LEWIS ) ASHCRAFT, both of whom also were born in Jay county, members of pioneer families here, and who were the parents of four children, Mrs. WEHRLY having three sisters, Pearl, Inez and Glee. Mr. and Mrs. WEHRLY are members of the West Walnut Street Christian church. Mr. WEHRLY is a Republican and is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Portland. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.65-66. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WENTZ, CHARLES C

Charles C. WENTZ, a well known bachelor farmer of Jefferson township and owner of a well kept farm on rural mail route No. 5 out of Portland, was born in that township, on the place on which he is now living, and has lived there all his life. Mr. WENTZ was born on January 6, 1878, and is a son of William and Hannah ( GEISER ) WENTZ, the latter of whom was of European birth, born in the vicinity of Stuttgart, the metropolis of the kingdom of Wurtemburg, June 8, 1835, and was six years of age when she came to America with her parents, the family locating at Dayton, Ohio. William WENTZ was born at Hanover, in York county, Pennsylvania, July 13, 1833, and was there reared. When twenty-one years of age he went to Columbus, Ohio, with a view to locating there, but presently returned to Pennsylvania and remained there, working as a cooper, until 1855, when he came to Indiana and began working as a farmer in Jay county. Two years later he went down into Wayne county and was there until after his marriage to Hannah GEISER in the spring of 1859, when he returned to Jay county and bought a quarter section of land in Jefferson township. On this place he established his home and there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in the spring of 1889. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having three sisters, Mary, Lucy and Rose, and three brothers, John, William and Earl WENTZ. Reared on the home farm in Jefferson township, where he was born, Charles C. WENTZ grew to manhood there, receiving his schooling in the neighborhood schools. From the days of his boyhood he was a helpful factor in the labors of carrying on the operations of the farm, where he ever has made his home. In 1916 Mr. WENTZ purchased from the other heirs their respective interests in the place and now owns the same, a well improved and profitably operated farm of 120 acres, on which he has an excellent farm plant. In addition to his general farming Mr. WENTZ gives considerable attention to the raising of live stock, with particular reference to Duroc Jersey hogs, and is doing well. He also makes somewhat of a specialty of single comb White Leghorn chickens. Mr. WENTZ is a Republican and is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Ridgeville. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.219-220. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WHEAT, JOHN M

John M. WHEAT, one of Jay county's best known farmers and landowners, proprietor of an excellent farm in Bearcreek township, now living retired at his farm. home there on rural mail route No. II out of Portland, is a native son of this county, a member of one of the pioneer families, and has lived here all his life. Mr. WHEAT was born on a farm in Wayne township on January 31, 1847, and is a son of William and Mary ( MASON ) WHEAT, who were the parents of three children, two of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, William WHEAT. The elder William WHEAT died at the age of thirty-three years and his widow presently remarried and continued to make her home in this county. John M. WHEAT remained at home with his mother and stepfather and received his schooling in Jackson township. After his marriage at the age of twenty-one he farmed for himself for a year and then formed a partnership with his stepbrother, Aaron VOTAW, in the blacksmith business. He continued this line for eighteen months, at the end of which time he traded his interest in the blacksmith shop to his stepfather for a tract of thirty-two acres of practically unimproved land in Jackson township, on which he made his home for about ten years. He then traded that place for an eighty in Bearcreek township, a part of the place on which he now resides, and has since lived there. Two years after taking possession of this place he bought an adjoining forty and has since been the owner of 120 acres, which he has brought to a high state of cultivation and which he has improved in admirable fashion. In 1914 Mr. WHEAT turned the management of the farm over to his son, Charles WHEAT, and has since been taking things a good deal easier than during the earlier and busier years of his life. He is a Republican and has ever taken a good citizen's interest in local political affairs, but has not been a seeker after public office. On September 12, 1868, John M. WHEAT Was united in marriage to Elizabeth SANDERS, who was born in the neighboring county of Delaware, but was reared in Jay county, a daughter of James and Phoebe SANDERS, the former of whom was the owner of an eighty acre farm in Wayne township. James SANDERS and his wife later moved to Page county, Iowa, where their last days were spent. To John M. and Elizabeth ( SANDERS ) WHEAT four sons have been born, all of whom are living save one, Clyda M., the others being Alvin M., William M. and Charles A., the latter of whom, as noted above, is now farming the home place and is carrying on the operations of the farm in up-to-date fashion. Charles A. WHEAT married Anna M. FARRELL and has four children, William A., Catherine M., Laura V. and Mildred I. Alvin M. WHEAT, who is now living in Arkansas, where he is engaged in farming, married Tempa CLIMBER and has two children, John and Arba H. William M. WHEAT, who is now living at Portland, married May WELLER, who died on July 6, 1921, and has two daughters, Mildred and Mabel. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.125-126. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WHEAT, ROSCOE D

ROSCOE D. WHEAT, former prosecuting attorney for this judicial circuit, former county attorney, present attorney for the city of Portland, vice-president of the Jay County Savings and Trust Company and a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court for nearly twenty-five years, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and has lived here all his life, ever actively interested in the development- of the best interests of the community. Mr. WHEAT was born on a farm in Jackson township on February 22, 1876, and is a son of William R. and Naomi V. ( TUCKER ) WHEAT, both of whom also were born in this county. William R. WHEAT, a substantial landowner of Jackson township, now living retired at Portland, is a son of William R. WHEAT, Sr. who came to Indiana from Virginia and became one of the first landowners in Jackson township, this county, and an influential figure in the development of that community in pioneer days. Reared on the home farm in Jackson township, R. D. WHEAT received his early schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and when little more than a boy began teaching school, a vocation which he followed for six winters, meanwhile continuing his studies in the old normal school at Portland and at the Tri-State College at Angola, from which latter institution he was graduated in 1897. During this period he also was for a time engaged as a traveling salesman, but his inclinations ever were toward the law and he was pursuing his studies along that line in the law office of George BERGMAN at Portland, under which preceptorship he was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court in 1897, following his graduation from college. Not long after his admission to the bar Mr. WHEAT became associated with Judge J. W. HEADINGTON in the practice of law at Portland and this mutually agreeable arrangement continued until the death of Judge HEADINGTON, since which time Mr. WHEAT has been practicing alone. He has served two terms as prosecuting attorney for this judicial circuit, has also served as county attorney and is the present attorney for the city of Portland. Mr. WHEAT also has ever given proper attention to the general business affairs of the community and is vice-president of the Jay County Savings and Trust Company, one of the most influential fiduciary institutions in this part of the state. Mr. WHEAT is a Republican and has long been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in this congressional district. He is a Freemason, is the exalted ruler of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and is also affiliated with the Portland Rotary Club and the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. Mr. WHEAT married Nina G. BISHOP, daughter of Peter L. and Maria J. BISHOP, and he and his wife have one child, Alwyn Cree WHEAT. The WHEAT's have a pleasant home in Portland and have even taken an interested part in the city's general social activities. During the time of America's participation in the World war, Mr. WHEAT became associated with the Y. M. C. A. work overseas and was also attached to the motor transport corps, rendering eight months of service overseas. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.45-46. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WHIPPLE, S A D

S. A. D. WHIPPLE, former assistant attorney general of the state of Indiana, former city attorney of Portland and for many years one of the best known members of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, with offices at Portland, is a native of the neighboring county of Randolph, but has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his young manhood. Mr. WHIPPLE was born on a farm in Randolph county on August 25, 1860, son of Jason and Celia ( PEELE ) WHIPPLE, the latter of whom was born at Centerville, [Wayne County] Ind., February 21, 1819, a member of one of the real pioneer families of Wayne county. Jason WHIPPLE was born at Providence, R.I., January 30, 1804, and grew to manhood there, becoming a machinist and wheelwright. As a young man he determined to try his fortunes in what then was regarded as the far West and after prospecting a bit in Ohio came on over into Indiana and in 1823 settled in Delaware county, where he remained until in 1838, when he came up into Jay county and located at Portland, where he became engaged as a wheelwright. Jason WHIPPLE was a man of force and individuality and during the time of his residence here impressed himself upon the community. He served as the second sheriff of Jay county and in other ways rendered public service. During the '40s he moved down into Randolph county, where he established himself as a millwright and also as a landowner, and there he spent the remainder of his life. S. A. D. WHIPPLE was reared on a farm. in Randolph county and when twenty years of age, in 1880, began teaching school there. He taught for one term in that county and then came up into Jay county and on September 3, 1881, entered upon a term of teaching in the old Booth school, in Richland township. For ten years Mr. WHIPPLE continued his service as a teacher in the schools of this county, in the meantime reading law, and on July 1, 1890, entered upon a term of service as deputy to the county clerk, thereafter making his home at Portland. He served as deputy county clerk for three years and then, on July 1, 1893, was admitted to practice at the bar of the Jay Circuit Court. Meantime, beginning in 1891, he had been serving as a deputy to the attorney general of the state of Indiana, Alonzo G. Smith at that time being attorney general, and he continued to serve in that capacity until 1895. Upon entering practice at Portland Mr. WHIPPLE formed a partnership with Theodore BAILEY, but this association soon was discontinued and he then entered into a partnership with W. H. WILLIAMSON, which continued for three years. In 1894 he was elected attorney for the city of Portland and for seven years continued to serve in that important public capacity. Mr. WHIPPLE has long been recognized as one of the leaders in the Democratic party in Jay county and in the Eighth congressional district. He is affiliated with the local lodges of the Knights of P'ythias and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Portland. Mr. WHIPPLE is something more than locally known as a student of literature at its best and is the author of a story that was well received by the reviewers when it came out some years ago. This story, "Arthur St. Clair of Old Fort Recovery," is a historical romance portraying the incidents of one of the bloodiest Indian battles ever fought in America. The scenes and incidents of the tale revolve around the great Indian battle fought on the present site of the little city of Ft. Recovery, just over the Ohio line adjacent to the eastern border of Jay county, in which General St. Clair was defeated in 1791 and his army almost annihilated. Two hundred and fifty women and children were present, most of whom lost their lives in the battle or on the retreat to Ft. Jefferson, a distance of twenty-seven miles. The remnant of the army was saved by a red-headed woman ( Catherine Miller ) and around and through Mr. WHIPPLE's engaging tale of the soldiers' struggles with the Indians is woven a romance bubbling over with loves discordant trials, culminating in the union of two fond hearts which harl been separated by family feuds. Mr. WHIPPLE married Christiana H. HARKER, daughter of D. S. HARKER, and to this union were born three sons, John K., James G. and Tod L., all of whom are married. James G. WHIPPLE has two children, Mildred and Josephine, and Tod L. WHIPPLE has two children, June and Montez. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.46-48. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WHITACRE, PHILIP SHERIDAN

Philip Sheridan WHITACRE, one of Madison township's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, proprietor of an excellent farm on rural mail route No. 3 out of Ft. Recovery (Ohio), is a native of the Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Jay county the greater part of his life. Mr. WHITACRE was born on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, May 24, 1867, and is a son of Robert B. and Rebecca ( HIESTAND ) WHITACRE, both of whom were born in that same county, the latter on October 8, 1847. daughter of Tobias and Elizabeth ( FOLTZ ) HIESTAND, the latter of whom was born in Virginia but was but a child when her parents, John FOLTZ and wife, moved with their family to Ohio. Tobias HIESTAND, who died in 1888, and who was for years well known throughout this section and in western Ohio as a traveling minister of the United Brethren church, was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, in 1815, and was a son of Samuel HIESTAND, a bishop of the United Brethren church, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1781 and who became one of the pioneers of Darke county, Ohio, where his last days were spent. Bishop Samuel HIESTAND did much toward the establishment of the United Brethren communion throughout this section of Indiana and in western Ohio and in his generation had a wide acquaintance among the pioneers of Jay county, even as had his son Tobias in the succeeding generation, and the memory of these two good men still persists in this community. Robert B. WHITACRE, an honored veteran of the Civil war, who died at his home in Jay county in 1921, was born in Darke county, Ohio, September 5, 1842, and was a son of Francis and Nancy ( REPLOGLE ) WHITACRE, both natives of that same state, the former born in Warren county and the latter in Darke county. Francis WHITACRE became a resident of Darke county when he was twenty years of age and the remainder of his life was spent there, his death occurring in 1901. His wife had preceded him to the grave in 1894. They were the parents of ten children and three of their sons served as soldiers of the Union during the Civil war. The late Robert B. WHITACRE was under twenty years of age when on August 15, 1862, he enlisted his services in behalf of the Union cause and went to the front as a member of Company H, 110th regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned to the Army of the Potomac, and with that gallant command he took part in the battle of Winchester, his admiration for Gen. Philip Sheridan, the hero of that engagement, later being reflected in the naming of his first son, the subject of this sketch. During this battle, June 15, 1863, Robert B. WHITACRE was taken prisoner by the enemy and was confined m the military prison at Richmond until the following November, when he was exchanged and rejoined his regiment at Culpeper Court House in time to participate in the battle of the Wilderness and in the succeeding campaigns before Petersburg and Cold Harbor, his special detail being that of a sharpshooter. He participated in the Grand Review at Washington at the close of the war and received his honorable discharge at Columbus, Ohio, July 2, 1865. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. WHITACRE returned to his home in Darke county and there on September 27, 1866, was united in marriage to Rebecca HIESTAND. He had been trained both as a carpenter and as a farmer and after his marriage he remained in Darke county, carrying on both vocations, until in April, 1881, when he came over into Indiana with his family and settled on a farm of 120 acres which he had previously bought in Madison township, this county. There he not only carried on his farming operations, but did much of the carpenter work and building done during that period in that neighborhood. When Mr. WHITACRE began to feel the weight of years he sold his farm and retired to a small tract of five acres on which he spent the remainder of his life in quiet comfort. He was past commander of Henry McLaughlin post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Salamonia and he and his wife were active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he long served as class leader and steward. To Robert B. WHITACRE and wife were born thirteen children, all of whom are living save two, Charles S. who died in 1901, and one who died in infancy, the others besides the subject of this sketch being Francis Tobias, Mrs. Nancy Elizabeth DAVIS, Robert G., Edward M., William H., Samuel H., Mrs. Grace Myrtle BAKER, Mrs. Margaret Belle RICHARD, Mrs. Eleanor COOK and David Nathaniel. Philip Sheridan WHITACRE was fourteen years of age when his parents came to Jay county in 1881 and he completed his schooling in the Chapel school in Madison township. He early was trained in the craft of carpentry by his father and as an assistant to the latter both on the farm and in his building operations his youth was spent. When twenty-two years of age he went to Dayton, Ohio, and there became engaged in the Bamey & Smith car works, and was there thus engaged for about four years, at the end of which time he returned to Jay county and was here married. After his marriage Mr. WHITACRE rented a farm and for twelve years thereafter was engaged here as a tenant farmer. His wife inherited forty acres of the tract on which he is now living and he has since resided there. Since taking possession of this place Mr. WHITACRE has bought an adjoining tract of ten acres and has improved the place by the erection of new buildings, now having a very well equipped farm plant. He is also renting an adjoining "eighty" and is thus farming 130 acres, his sons being helpful factors in these operations. It was on December 24, 1892, that Philip S. WHITACRE was united in marriage to Maggie ARMSTRONG, who was born in Franklin county, Ohio, but was reared in Jay county, she having been but a child when her parents, Joshua and Emeline ( TRISH ) ARMSTRONG, of whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere in this volume, became residents of Madison township, and her schooling was completed in the old school in district No. 1. To Philip S. and Maggie ( ARMSTRONG ) WHITACRE have been born seven children, Pearlie A., Clara M., Philip E., Dwight E., Charles L., Paul A. and Maggie E., all of whom are at home save the first born, Pearlie A., who married Earl Bickel, now farming in the neighboring county of Randolph, and has one child, a son, Sterling W. Mr. and Mrs. WHITACRE are members of the First Church of Christ at Ft. Recovery and he has been an elder of the church for about twenty-five years. He also is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Ft. Recovery.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.121-123. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WHITE, HARVEY H

Harvey H. WHITE, one of Jackson township's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, is a native of Ohio but has been a resident of Jay county the greater part of his life. Mr. WHITE was born in the vicinity of Frankfort, Ohio, June 14, 1858, and is a son of George and Martha (BOLDEN) WHITE, whose last days were spent in Ohio. George WHITE was born in that state and followed the vocation of shoemaking the most of his life. He and his wife were the parents of five children; Lewis, Ellis, John, William and the subject of this sketch. Harvey H. WHITE received his schooling in Ohio and was married at the age of sixteen, after which he rented a farm and made his home in that state for eight years, at the end of which time he came to Indiana and located on a farm in Penn township, renting an "eighty" there. Four years later he went to Illinois, but a year later returned to Jay county and not long afterward went to Fayette, this state, where he remained for three years, at the end of which time he returned to Jay county and located on the farm on which lie is now living in Jackson township, a well kept place of 120 acres, forty acres of which his wife inherited and eighty acres of which he bought. Mr. WHITE has been twice married, his first wife having been Lucinda IRWIN, of Ohio, and his second wife, Sarah FRIDLEY, who also was born in Ohio but who came to Jay county with her parents in 1866, she then having been six years of age. Mr. WHITE has six children, Elizabeth, Della, Elba, Herman, Helen and Martha, the latter of whom is unmarried and is making her home at Portland. Elizabeth WHITE married Alva HINSHAW, of the neighboring county of Adams, and has two children, Dale and Gale. Delia WHITE married Will GROMAN and has three children, Thelma, John and Harvey A. Elba WHITE married George BAIR, of Hartford City, Ind. [Blackford Co.], and has one child, a daughter, Sarah. Herman WHITE married Iva FLAUDING and has one child, Reba, and Helen WHITE married Everett LEWIS and has two children, Herman and Doris. During the time of America's participation in the World war Herman WHITE served as a soldier in the Tank Corps overseas and was severely gassed during one of the actions in which he participated at the front. He went into the service as a member of Company G, the local unit of the Indiana National Guard at Portland, which was federalized and its members apportioned to various departments of the service, and he was mustered out as a sergeant.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.375-376. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WILKINS, JACK

Jack WILKINS, a well known young business man at Portland, proprietor of a well equipped tinshop and general sheet metal works as well as a dealer in furnaces and general supplies along that line, was born in Portland and has lived there all his life. Mr. WILKINS was born on May 16, 1889, and is a son of James and Martha E. ( SMITH ) WILKINS, both of whom were born at St. Marys, Ohio, from which place they moved to Portland after their marriage. James WILKINS was thirty-five years of age when he located at Portland, where he became engaged in the live stock business, later taking up the harness business and also became a dealer in agricultural implements. His wife died on May 5, 1894, and he survived until March II, 1921. They were the parents of four children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Grace, who married Bert HARRUFF and has two children, Dorothy and Jeannette HARRUFF; Roy, who married Cora POLLY and has two children, Roy and Ray, and Lillian, who married Harley WEYMOUTH and has two children, Ned and James WEYMOUTH. Reared at Portland, Jack WILKINS completed his schooling in the high school there and then became an apprentice in a tinshop. He learned the trade thoroughly and in 1914 became engaged in business on his own account, opening a completely equipped tinshop, with equipment for general sheet metal work, and-also prepared for furnace installation and general service along that line, and has done well in his business. On June 14, 1911, Jack WILKINS was united in marriage to Frances C. McCOID, who was born in Logan county, Ohio, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Mary C. Mr. and Mrs. WILKINS are members of the Presbyterian church and in their political views are independent. Mr. WILKINS is a member of the local lodges of the Free and Accepted Masons and of the Knights of Pythias at Portland and in the affairs of these organizations takes a proper interest. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.103-104. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WILLIAMS, C

C. WILLIAMS, senior member of the firm of WILLIAMS & KENDRICK, wagon makers, was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, February 2, 1847, son of Jeremiah and Elizabeth ( LAKE ) WILLIAMS, who were the parents of six children, our subject being the third child. When he was six years of age his parents came to this county, where his youth was passed at farm work. After he reached his majority he worked at carpentering for some time, and then engaged in black smithing and wagon ironing. In 1863 he, with Mr. KENDRICK for a partner, started the Briant Wagon Works. Mr. WILLIAMS married March 17, 1860, to Laura KING, of this county, and they have one daughter, Gertrude.

WILLIAMSON, AUSTIN H

Austin H. WILLAMSON, prosecuting attorney for this judicial district and one of the best known members of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, is a Missourian by birth but a Hoosier by choice, a resident of Indiana since he was three years of age and of Jay county since he was eleven. Mr. WILLIAMSON was born at Osceola, Mo., June 19, 1871, and is the son and only child of David R. and Minerva (ASHWILLE) WILLIAMSON, the latter of whom is still living, making her home at Redkey, where she has resided for many years. The late David R. WILLIAMSON, a former member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court and for many years justice of the peace in and for Richland township, was a native of Ireland, born in County Donegal on November 23, 1844, son of Hugh and Mary (WARD) WILLIAMSON, both of Scottish stock, and was but an infant in arms when he came with. his parents to the United States, the family for awhile making their home in Pennsylvania and then moving over into Ohio and settling in Warren county, where they remained until the winter of 1853-4, when they came to Indiana and settled in the vicinity of the Daycreek school m Pike township, this county. For some time Hugh WILLIAMSON conducted a tavern on the old Quaker Trace. In 1861 he and his youngest son, J. H. WILLIAMSON, opened a store at New Mt. Pleasant. Some years later he moved to Ridgeville, where his last days were spent, his death occurring at the age of seventy-three years. He also was the owner of a good farm in Jefferson township, this county. J. H. WILLIAMSON, above referred to, became a lawyer, with offices at Ridgeville, and died there more than twenty years ago. David R. WILLIAMSON was about ten years of age when he came with his parents to Indiana and he completed his schooling at Ridgeville, where he also received some commercial training, and as a young man was engaged in mercantile pursuits variously at Ridgeville, Bluff Point and Winchester.[Randolph Co.] He married when twenty-five years of age, in 1869, and not long afterward went to Missouri, where he became engaged in mercantile business at Osceola. When the panic of 1873 struck the country he met reverses there and came back to Indiana, again locating at Ridgeville, where he remained until 1884, in which year he moved with his family to Redkey, in this county, where he established his home and where he spent the remainder of his life. In his youth David R. WILLIAMSON had given considerable attention to the study of law in association with his brother and after taking up his residence at Redkey resumed these studies at his leisure and was presently admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court. In 1894 he was elected justice of the peace and by successive re-elections served in that magisterial office for sixteen years, so it thus may be said that his son Austin "just naturally grew up to the law," even though he did not enter into the practice of that profession until he had given railroading a pretty thorough try-out. Austin H. WILLIAMSON was about three years of age when his parents returned to Indiana from Missouri and his early schooling was received at Ridgeville. He was about thirteen years of age when his parents moved to Redkey and he completed his schooling in the schools of that city. He early became attracted to railroad work and became a clerk in the office of the Lake Erie & Western Railroad Company at Redkey, later occupying similar positions at Hartford City, Muncie and Peru. and was thus engaged for twelve years, at the end of which time he transferred his connection to the Chicago & Erie Railroad Company and was for eighteen months or more engaged in that company's offices at Chicago. In the meantime Mr. WILLIAMSON had been devoting a good deal of his leisure to the study of law and had decided to give up railroad work for the profession of law. He entered the Indiana Law School at Indianapolis and after being graduated from that institution was admitted to the bar and opened an office for the practice of his profession at Redkey, where he since has made his home, he and his mother being very pleasantly situated there. Mr. WILLIAMSON is a Republican and has for years been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in Jay county. For eight years he served as city attorney at Redkey and was serving- as city treasurer when in 1920 he was elected prosecuting attorney for this judicial district (Jay county) for the two-year term beginning January 1, 1921, and has since then been devoting his attention to the affairs of that office. Mr. WILLIAMSON also has been admitted to practice in the United States District Court for the district of Indiana. He is a member of the Presbyterian church at Portland and is affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of that city and with the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen at Redkey. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.369-370. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WILLIAMSON, DAVID R

David R. WILLIAMSON, one of the numerous representatives of the old families of Greene county, Ohio, who are to be found in Jay county, a substantial farmer and landowner of Noble township and one of the best known men in that section of the county, living at his pleasant farm home on rural mail route No. 3 out of Portland, has been a resident of this county for many years and has done well his part in development work in the community in which long ago he elected to make his home. Mr. WILLIAMSON was born in .Greene county, Ohio, December II, 1847, and is a son of William and Jane ( McCROSKEY ) WILLIAMSON, the latter of whom, born at Rockbridge, Va., July 15, 1813, died on September II, 1877. William WILLIAMSON was born in York county, Pennsylvania, April 1, 1810, and when a lad became a resident of Greene county, Ohio, to which county his parents had moved. There he grew to manhood and married and made his home until he moved to Hancock county, same state, where he became the owner of a 240-acre farm and spent his last days. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, of whom five are living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Emma and Amanda, and two brothers, Harvey and William WILLIAMSON. David R. WILLIAMSON was but a child when his parents moved from Greene county to Hancock county (Ohio) and in the latter county he received his schooling and grew to manhood. He remained at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-four years and then began farming on his own account, renting a farm in his home county. He was thus engaged there for about six years, at the end of which time, in 1878, he moved with his family to Indiana and settled in Noble township, this county, where he remained for three years, during which time he became the owner of a forty-acre farm in that township. He then returned to Ohio and was for a year engaged in farming on his father-in-law's place after which he returned to Jay county and located on his "forty" in Noble township. To this he presently added by purchase a tract of thirty acres and on this seventy-acre farm lived for twenty years, at the end of which time he sold it and then for seven years was engaged as a renter, continuing to farm in Noble township. He then bought a tract of sixty-five acres, the place on which he is, now living, and to this presently added an adjacent tract of fifteen acres, now being the owner of an excellent farm of eighty acres on which he and his family are very comfortably situated. Since taking possession of this place Mr. WILLIAMSON has made numerous substantial improvements and has a well equipped farm plant. In 1919 he rented his farm and has since been living practically retired from the active labors of the farm. Mr. WILLIAMSON is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church. On March 14, 1872, David R. WILLIAMSON was united in marriage to Hannah McKINLEY, who also was born in Ohio, and to this union nine children have been born, three of whom Leroy, James and Charles are deceased, the others being Nelson, John, Jennie, Homes, Robert H. and Dassie, all of whom are married. Mrs. WILLIAMSON was born in Hancock county, Ohio, and is a daughter of John and Maria ( MARSHALL ) McKINLEY, substantial farming people of that county. John McKINLEY and his wife were the parents of eleven children, William, James, Rachel, Oliver, Lydia J. (I ), Robert, John H., Elizabeth, Lydia J. (II), Hannah and Mary. Of these but two now survive, Mrs. WILLIAMSON and her sister, Lydia.  SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.110-111. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WILLIAMSON, NELSON R

NELSON R. WILLIAMSON, proprietor of Shadow Lawn Funeral Home, one of the most thoroughly equipped undertaking establishments in this part of Indiana and who has been engaged as a funeral director at Portland for years, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Indiana and of Jay county since the days of his boyhood. He formerly and for years was engaged as a school teacher in this county and there are few men in the county who have a wider acquaintance than he. Mr. WILLIAMSON was born in Hancock county, Ohio, December 23, 1872, and is a son of D. R. and Hannah M. ( McKINLEY ), WILLIAMSON, both of whom were born in that same county, members of pioneer families in Ohio. D. R. WILLIAMSON came to Indiana with his wife and the three children that then had been born to them, in the spring of 1879, and settled on a farm in Noble township, this county, where he established his home and where he is still living, the owner of a well kept farm of eighty acres and one of the best known men in that community. He and his wife have had seven children, six of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being John W., Jennie L., Homer E., Robert H. and Dessie. Nelson R. WILLIAMSON was but six years of age when he come to this county with his parents in the spring of 1879 and he was reared on the home farm in. Noble township, receiving his early schooling in the schools of that neighborhood. He early began to teach school, meanwhile attending the old Normal School at Portland during several summer sessions, and for ten years was engaged as a teacher in the district schools. He then took a course in the university at Valparaiso and for three years thereafter was engaged in teaching at Salamonia, this county. In the meantime he had married and made his home at Salamonia. During this time Mr. WILLIAMSON became attracted to the undertaking business and took a course in a school of embalming, but did not immediately enter the undertaking field, instead moving to Portland, where he formed a partnership with E. G. WILHELM in the farm implement and fence business, a line which he followed for three years, or until on April 5, 1906, when he and Mr. Wilhelm sold their place of business. Mr. WILLIAMSON then bought the HINES interest in the undertaking firm of HINES & STOLZ at Portland. A year later the new firm admitted to partnership F. A. STRALEY, at the same time buying the old established CRING furniture store, and continued operations under the firm name of STOLZ, WILLIAMSON & STRALEY. Two years later Mr. STOLZ sold his interest and the remaining partners continued the business for two years, at the end of which time they sold the furniture department and confined themselves exclusively to the undertaking line. Two years later, in 1912, Mr. WILLIAMSON bought the interest of his partner, Mr. STRALEY, and has since been sole proprietor of the establishment the Shadow Lawn Funeral Home, which he has equipped in strictly up-to-date fashion, adding a new chapel and motor equipment. Mr. WILLIAMSON is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the United Brethern church, in the affairs of which they take an active interest, Mr. WILLIAMSON being a member of the board of trustees of the same and the superintendent of the Sunday school. He also is a Freemason and is likewise affiliated with the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. On August 5, 1899, Nelson R. WILLIAMSON was united in marriage to Gertrude V. McBRIDE, who was born in Crawford county, Ohio, daughter of Stephen A. and Emma ( LEARCH ) McBRIDE, and who was nine years of age when she came to this county with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAMSON have four children, Darwin J, who was graduated from the Portland high school in the spring of 1921, Juanita, Nadene and Kathleen. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D.,History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.61-62. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WILLSON, C FOSTER

C. Foster WILLSON, of Pennville, one of the best known and most successful oil operators of Jay county, has been a resident of this county since the days of his babyhood. He was born in Union county, Ohio, September 22, 1879, and is a son of James and Mahalia (KELSEY) WILLSON, the latter of whom also was born in Ohio. James WILLSON was born at Pennville (then Camden), this county, but when a child moved with his parents to Union county, Ohio, where he grew to manhood and was married. He had early learned the trade of wagon making and followed that vocation in Ohio until 1881, when he returned to Jay county, established his home in Jackson township and there set up a wagon shop which he continued to operate until his death. He and his wife were the parents of five children, four of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having three sisters, Essie, Leola and Leona. C. Foster WILLSON was two years of age when his father returned to Jay county and established his home in Jackson township and there he grew to manhood, receiving his schooling in the local schools. When fourteen years of age he became employed as a pumper on an oil rig and he has followed the oil-producing business ever since. In due time he began contracting on his own account and brought In many wells for others until presently he took up the producing end and has for years been engaged as a producer, now having twenty-six producing wells and operating a thousand acres of leases, one of the best known oil men hereabout. Mr. WILLSON is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. He is a Freemason and also a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. In 1899 C. Foster WILLSON was united in marriage to Allie HAFFNER, daughter of Mrs. Mary O. (WILLIAMS) LETTS, and to this union three children have been born, Ruby, Pearl and Vera. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.339-340. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WILT, FRANK W

Frank W. WILT, manager of the extensive Cline-Wilt lumber business at Portland, an active member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce and one of the important factors in the general commercial and industrial life of Jay county, is a native of the Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Indiana and of Portland since he was thirteen years of age and has thus been a participant in the wonderful development which has marked this section during the past few decades. Mr. WILT was born in Darke county, Ohio, September 24, 1866, and is a son of John S. and Martha A. ( EVANS ) WILT, the former of whom was for years engaged in the lumber business at Portland. John S. WILT was born in Darke county, Ohio, where he remained until 1879, when he moved over into Indiana with his family and became engaged in the grocery business at Portland. Two years later he established a sawmill at Portland and was engaged in operating the same until 1884, when he became associated with Daniel SPADE in the general lumber business in that city and thus continued until the business was taken over by the present Cline-Wilt firm, with Frank W. WILT as general manager of the business. As noted above, Frank W. WILT was but thirteen years of age when he came to Indiana with his parents in 1879, and his schooling was completed in the schools of Portland. He "grew up" to the lumber business, becoming thoroughly schooled in all details of that business during the time of his father's long connection with the lumber industry hereabout, and has been in business for himself, a member of the well established Cline-Wilt firm since that firm was organized in 1901. Mr. WILT is a Democrat, is a member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce, the Kiwanis Club, the Knights of Pythias, the Elks, the Modern Woodmen and the Country Club and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 1892, Frank W. WILT was united in marriage to Judith METZ, who was born in this county, a daughter of Cornelius METZ, a prominent contractor of Portland, and to this union have been born nine children, seven of whom are still living, Mildred, Ralph M., Mabel, Robert L., Hugo M., Frank, Jr. and Judith A. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.135-136. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WILT, GEORGE A

George A. WILT, druggist at Redkey, a veteran of the World war and one of the best known young business men at Redkey, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life with the exception of the time spent away in schooling and during his period of military service in France. Mr. WILT was born at Redkey on June 24, 1894, 'and is a son of Daniel and Bertha ( McARTHUR ) WILT, the former of whom, born at Deerfield, Ind., is a banker. Reared at Redkey, George A. WILT received his early schooling in the excellent schools of that city and then entered Purdue University, where he spent a year pursuing the pharmaceutical course. Thus equipped for the vocation to which he had devoted himself he returned to Redkey and in 1914 became engaged as druggist in the drug store of Doctor Pierce, and was thus employed when the United States took a hand in the World war. On July 27, 1917, Mr. WILT enlisted in the Medical Corps of the United States army and was sent to Ft. Thomas. Three weeks later he was transferred to Ft. Benjamin Harrison, where he was kept eight days, at the end of which time he was sent to Camp Devens, where he spent eleven months in training and was advanced to the grade of first class sergeant. From Camp Devens (Massachusetts) . Mr. WILT was sent with his command overseas, the transport putting in at Liverpool, whence his command presently was transported to France and attached to the Seventy-sixth Division, with which command Mr. WILT served as sanitary inspector during the continuance of his service abroad. He returned with his command to the United States on April 2, 1919, and was mustered out at Camp Sherman (Chillicothe, Ohio) on the following April 25. Upon his return to Redkey Mr. WILT decided to go into business for himself and opened the drug store he is now conducting in that city, where he is doing very well. Mr. WILT is a member of the Methodist church and is a Republican. He is a Freemason and a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Redkey and of the Portland lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.146-147. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WINGET, CHARLES C

Charles C. WINGET, former trustee of Penn township and for years one of the best known and most active figures in the oil and gas field in this part of Indiana, a successful producer to this day, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. WINGET was born on a farm in Knox township on June 27, 1865, and is a son of Francis M. and Sarah C. ( SOMERS ) WINGET, the latter of whom was born in New Jersey. Francis M. WINGET was born in Ohio. When a youth he came to Jay county with his mother and was reared in Knox township, where after his marriage he became a farmer and came to be the owner of an excellent farm of 160 acres. He took an active interest in general public affairs and for some time served as trustee of that township. He and his wife were the parents of six children, four of whom are now living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Frank W. WINGET, and two sisters, Nina O. and Grace. Reared on the home farm in Knox township, Charles C. WINGET completed his schooling in the old normal school at Portland, attending there three summers, meanwhile teaching school during the winters, and then took up farming, renting his father's farm, and was thus engaged for four years, at the end of which time he moved to Pennville and became associated with the work of the Portland Gas Company, which then was supplying natural gas to the Pennville community. For fifteen years he was thus engaged, during the later part of this period becoming a producer on his own account, taking leases and bringing in several successfully productive oil wells, and after leaving the service of the Portland company, which about that time gave up the field, he and Mr. Carroll bought some wells and continued to supply Pennville with gas until the supply became so diminished as to render unprofitable any further effort along this line. At the same time Mr. WINGET continued his activities in the oil field and presently became known as one of the most successful producers in this section. He literally "grew up with the field" and is thus thoroughly familiar with all details of oil production throughout this section. As a contractor he has brought in a large number of profitable oil wells and his work along that line promises to continue so long as this field continues reasonably productive. Mr. WINGET is a Republican and since the days of his young manhood has taken an interested part in local civic affairs. For four years (1915-19) he served as trustee of Penn township and has rendered service a member of the township advisory board. Mr. WINGET married Minnie GRAY, who also was born in this county and who is a daughter of Morgan and Phoebe Elenna ( HUGHES ) GRAY, both of whom were born in Ohio but who had come to Jay county with their respective parents in the days of their childhood and were here reared. Morgan GRAY, who died at his home in this county in 1881, was a veteran of the Civil war and was in his day one of the best known live stock buyers in this part of the country. He served in the Union army as a member of the 7th Indiana Cavalry, this service covering a period of four years, and upon his return to civil life became engaged as a stock buyer and with the exception of about four years during which he was engaged in the mercantile business in the neighboring county of Wells, followed that vocation until his death. He and his wife had three children, Mrs. WINGET having a sister, Jessie, and a brother, Charles GRAY. To Charles C. and Minnie ( GRAY ) WINGET five children have been born, namely; Cosette, who after three years of service as a teacher in the public schools of this county is now attending Indiana University; Eleanor, who was graduated at Indiana University and is now a teacher in the Pennville high school; Francis, now a senior at Purdue University; Morgan, a student in the junior high school, and John, who is in grade school. The WINGET's have a pleasant home at Pennville and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of the community. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.205-206. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WINTERS, NATHAN C

Nathan C. WINTERS, an honored veteran of the Civil war and formerly and for years one of Jay county's well known and substantial farmers and landowners, who died at his home in Wayne township in the year 1894, left a good memory at his passing and it is fitting that there should here be presented some modest tribute to that memory. Mr. WINTERS was a native son of Jay county and had resided here practically all his life, the exception having been a brief period following his return from the army when he was "looking around" out West. He was born on a pioneer farm in Wayne township on October 4, 1845, and was a son of Obediah and Frances ( ENSMINGER ) WINTERS, who were among the early settlers in that part of the county. Reared on the home farm in Wayne township, Mr. WINTERS completed his schooling in old Liber College and at the age of seventeen years enlisted for service as a soldier of the Union and went to the front as a member of Company C, 39th Indiana Cavalry. During this term of service he was compelled to lie in the hospital at Jeffersonville, Ind., for six months as a consequence of a gangrenous infection of saddle galls. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. WINTERS went out into the Indian Territory country and was there engaged in selling fruit trees for a year, at the end of which time he returned to Jay county and started farming and raising fine horses and in the latter phase of his operations soon became one of the best known horsemen in this part of Indiana, a reputation he long maintained, for he kept up his interest in horses to the last, his specialty having been heavy draft horses, and to him there must ever remain the credit of having done much to promote the elevation of the standards of horse flesh in this region. Mr. WINTERS married when twenty-five years of age and for more than six years thereafter continued to make his home on the home farm, his mother having died and he and his wife looking after the affairs of the household. He then bought 120 acres of uncleared land in Wayne township, adjoining a tract of forty acres owned by his wife, the place on which his daughters, the Misses Florence and Edith WINTERS, are now living, and settled down to make a farm out of the place. He had the greater part of it cleared in good time and later added an adjoining "forty," so that at one time he and his wife were the owners of 200 acres of land in that township, and there he spent his last days, his death occurring on August 12, 1894. It was on January 14, 1871, that Nathan C. WINTERS was united in marriage to Martha COULSON, also a member of one of the pioneer families of this county, and to this union were born four children, John and Frances R., now deceased, and Florence and Edith, who still make their home on rural mail route No. 12 out of Portland. Mrs. WINTERS was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and was but a babe in arms when her parents, John and Rachel ( RISH ) COULSON, both of whom were born in that same county, came with their family to Indiana in 1846 and settled on an unimproved tract of land in the New Mt. Pleasant neighborhood in Jefferson township, this county. John COULSON was born on March 30, 1816, and grew to manhood in Columbiana county, Ohio, where in 1842 he married Rachel RISH, who was born in that same county on February 8, 1827, and he remained in that county until he became a resident of Jay county. He was a man of force and intelligence and so quickly did he impress his personality upon his new neighbors that in 1850, four years after coming here, he was elected auditor of Jay county. Upon taking office he moved to Portland and so satisfactorily did he perform the duties of this office that he was re-elected and thus served for eight years as auditor of the county. He subsequently was elected treasurer of the county and served for four years in that capacity, after which he retired to his farm in section 30 of Wayne township and there spent his last days, his death occurring on October 1, 1873, he then being in his fifty-eight year. He left a widow and six children, one son, John R. COULSON, and five daughters, these latter (besides Mrs. WINTERS) having been Harriet, who married Seth JONES; Mrs. Mary Jane CARTWRIGHT, Ruth, who married Charles S. MILLER; and Anna, who married Sumner B. MILLER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.284-285. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WOLF, JACOB

Jacob WOLF, one of Jay county's well known farmers and stockmen and joint proprietor, in association with his brothers, John and George WOLF, of an excellent farm in Noble township, where the brothers reside, on rural mail route No. 2 out of Ft. Recovery [Mercer Co.,Ohio], was born over in the neighboring county of Mercer, in Ohio,. but has become well established as a citizen of Jay county. Mr. WOLF was born on May 9, 1870, and is a son of Jacob and Catherine (BALTZLEY) WOLF, both natives of Germany and the latter of whom was but a babe in arms, hardly more than a month old, when her parents came to this country with their family and settled in the vicinity of Delaware, Ohio, where she lived until her marriage. The senior Jacob WOLF was but a lad when he came to this country with his parents, the family locating in Morrow county, Ohio, where he remained until after his marriage at about the age of twenty-one, when he established his home on a farm of forty acres in Mercer county and there he spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife were the parents of eleven children, five of whom are still living, the three sons above mentioned, and two daughters, Mary, wife of George NOBLE, and Sarah, wife of Jacob SAUNTMAN. The junior Jacob WOLF and his brothers, John and George WOLF, were reared on the home farm in Mercer county and became practical farmers and stockmen. On March 8, 1902, they bought the farm of 208 acres on which they are now living in Noble township, this county, and have since resided there, bringing the place up to a high standard of cultivation. Since taking possession of this place they have finished clearing all but about thirty acres, which they have left as a woodlot, and have their fields well drained and profitably cultivated. They carry on their operations in accordance with approved modern principles of agriculture and a tractor is one of the valuable adjuncts of their well equipped farm plant. In addition to their general farming operations they give considerable attention to the raising of pure bred Big Type Poland China hog's and are doing well in that line. The brothers are bachelors. In their political views they reserve the privilege of maintaining their independence of partisan ties. Jacob WOLF is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Ft. Recovery and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that popular order. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.307-308. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

WOODWARD, A B

A. B. WOODWARD, carpenter and contractor, of Briant, Jay County, Indiana, was born in Licking County, Ohio, June 10, 1833, son of Rheuny and Persis ( ABBOT ) WOODWARD, who were natives of Vermont, and who were the parents of two children, A. B. and Orren. When our subject was five years old he lost his parents by death, and he was reared by his relatives and friends. He engaged in carpentering at eighteen years of age, and has followed that trade a greater part of his life. In 1862 he removed from Fairfield County, Ohio, to Jay County, Indiana, locating at New Corydon. Two years later he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Indiana Infantry, serving five months. He was honorably discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, and returned home; then resided north of New Corydon in Adams County, and afterwards was drafted in his former place of residence in Jay County. He with others raised a township fund of $5,500, hired men to fill the draft. In this sum he gave $50. He was selected justice of the peace by the Democrats, but was always a Republican. In 1873 he moved to Briant, erected the first school house, now used for a church; he also built four school houses in the township, and built the first business house in the town for Messrs. FREEMAN & BAILEY. He is an excellent workman and understands all the details of his trade. During the winter season he has been engaged in clerking in the drug store of Dr. MILES. He was married November 27, 1872 to Miss Mary E. WAGNER. Politically he has been a strong Republican, voting for all presidents the party ever had; but is now a member of the Union Labor party. He joined or became a member of Post No. 83, G. A. R., Geneva, Adams County, Indiana, in 1883, and was transferred to Post No. 488, Briant, Jay County, Indiana, and is and has been quartermaster ever since the organization.

WRIGHT, JOHN W

John W. WRIGHT, a well known and substantial farmer and landowner of Knox township was born in that township and has been a resident of this county all his life. Mr. WRIGHT was born on April. 26, 1862, and is a son of Samuel and Mary Ann (BABB) WRIGHT, both of whom were born in Ohio and whose last days were spent in this county. Samuel WRIGHT was born in Perry county, Ohio, April 20, 1825, and grew up in his native state, where he remained until in the early '50s when he came over into Indiana and bought an eighty acre farm in Knox township, this county. When the Civil war broke out he enlisted his services in behalf of the Union and served as a soldier for a year. He remained on that farm in Knox township until 1881 when he moved to an "eighty" he had bought in Penn township and on this latter place he continued farming until his retirement In 1894 and removal to Pennville, where his last days were spent, his death occurring on May 18, 1905. Samuel WRIGHT was twice married. By his first wife, who was Susan GARBER of Darke county Ohio, he had two children, Alpheus and Marietta, both of whom are deceased. On March 2, 1854, he married Mary Ann BABB, who also was born in Ohio, and to that union there were born six children, of whom. three are living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Rachel, and a brother, Frank WRIGHT. The three other sons in this family, now deceased, were Calvin, Thomas and William WRIGHT. Reared on the home farm in Knox township, John W. WRIGHT received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and remained on the home farm until he had attained his majority when he rented a farm and began operations on his own account, gradually extending these operations as his affairs prospered until he was operating more than 200 acres oi land. In 1902 Mr. WRIGHT bought an "eighty" in Penn township and made his home there for a year, at the end of which time he bought an "eighty" in Knox township and returned to this latter township. Three years later he returned to Penn township,, where he bought another eighty-acre farm and remained for nine years, or until he bought his present farm of seventy-four acres in Knox township and returned to his old home township where he has since resided. In addition to his general farming Mr. WRIGHT pays considerable attention to the raising of live stock and is doing well. John W. WRIGHT has been twice married, his first wife having been Lillie May SULLIVAN, who was born in this county, a daughter of Levi and Elizabeth SULLIVAN, and to whom he was married on March 13, 1884. On August 23, 1902, he married Mary Frances McEWEN, of this county, and to this union was born a child who died in infancy. Mrs. WRIGHT was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, and was but a child when she came to Jay county with her parents, Horace and Elizabeth McEWEN, who became residents here and in this county spent their last days. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.385-386. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.

ZIMMERMAN, JACOB

Jacob ZIMMERMAN, for more than thirty years a resident of Jay county, proprietor of a well kept farm in Noble township and lands in the neighboring county of Mercer over in Ohio, and one of the best known farmers in his neighborhood, now living retired at his home in Noble township, rural mail route No. 3 out of Portland, has done well his part in community development during the years of his residence in this county. Mr. ZIMMERMAN was born on a farm in Auglaize county, Ohio, May 26, 1858, and is a son of Charles and Ann M. ( CROFT ) ZIMMERMAN, the latter of whom was born in Trumbull county, same state. Charles ZIMMERMAN was of European birth, born in the city of Wittenburg in Prussian Saxony, and was three years of age when he came to America with his parents) the family settling in the vicinity of Loraine, Ohio. Two years later they moved to Marion county, that same state, where the father bought a sixty acre farm and established his home. It was on this farm that Charles ZIMMERMAN grew to manhood. After his marriage at the age oi twenty-four years he moved to Auglaize county and settled on a forty acre tract of timber land he had bought and which he presently sold and then bought an eighty-acre farm in that same county. On this latter place he spent the rest of his life, gradually increasing his holdings until he became the owner of 200 acres. He died on March 17, 1901, and his widow survived for more than fifteen years, her death occurring on August 19, 1916. They were the parents of twelve children, ten of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Hannah, Henry, George, Lewis, Mrs. Catherine HAGGAR, Mrs. Phoebe WALTER, Samuel, David and Frank E. Reared on the home farm in Auglaize county, Jacob ZIMMERMAN received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and remained at home, assisting in the labors of the farm, until he had attained his majority, when he began working at the carpenter trade and continued thus engaged for four years, or until his marriage when he bought a tract of sixty-four acres of timber land and established his home on the same, building a log cabin on the place out of hewed logs taken from a barn built on his father's place years before. Mr. ZIMMERMAN cleared all but eight acres of this place and continued to live there until 1889 when he sold it and came to Jay county) buying here a partly cleared tract of sixty acres in Noble township, the half of the farm which he now owns there and on which he is living, having since then added another "sixty" to the place, thus having a farm of 120 acres, well improved and well cultivated. In addition to this tract Mr. ZIMMERMAN owns an "eighty" over in Mercer county. For some time past he has been living practically retired from the active labors of the farm, renting his fields. He is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church at Ft. Recovery. It was on October 4, 1883, that Jacob ZIMMERMAN was united in marriage to Caroline STUBER who was born in this county, and to this union ten children have been born. eight sons and two daughters, all of whom are living save one son, Leonidas, the others being John H., Clara E., Otto C., Charles D., Alma E., Harvey W., Roy E., Russell G. and Ernest G., the last three of whom are unmarried and at home. Clara E. and Alma E. ZIMMERMAN were both graduated from the nurses training school in the City Hospital at Lima, Ohio, and are occupied as trained nurses in that city. John H. ZIMMERMAN, a druggist at Ray, Ind., married Edith MILLER and has two children, Forest D. and Fern N. Otto C. ZIMMERMAN, a druggist at Ft. Recovery, Ohio, married Oma HINKLE and has one child, Harold E. Charles D. ZIMMERMAN, a veteran of the World war and now serving as a telegraph operator in the office of the Big Four Railroad Company at Angola, Ind., married Bernice LEWIS. The detachment to which he was attached during the war was not called into overseas service and he received his discharge at Camp Sherman. Harvey W. ZIMMERMAN also is a veteran of the World war and had some very interesting overseas service. He enlisted at Cincinnati in May, 1918, for service in the Marine Corps and was in service for fourteen months, a member of the 47th Company of the 5th regiment of the United States Marine Corps, attached to the 2d Division. During his service he was on the battle front in France from October 3, 1918, until the armistice was signed on November II, and during that time "went over the top" twice. Harvey W. ZIMMERMAN, who is now farming in the neighborhood of Spencerville, Ohio, married Hazel SCHAFFER and has one child, a son, Lowell E. Mrs. Caroline ZIMMERMAN, mother of these children, was born in Noble township and is a daughter of John D. and Rosena. ( MYERS ) STUBER, both of whom were born in the city of Neckarwein, in the Kingdom of Wurtemburg and the latter of whom is still living, now in the ninetieth year of her age. She came to America when twenty years of age, the sailing vessel on which she had taken passage being thirty-nine days making the trip. John D. STUBER came to America when he was twenty-one years of age, his passage over requiring twenty-eight days. lie shortly afterward made his way out into Indiana and bought a tract of sixty acres of land in Noble township, this county, ten acres of which had been cleared and on which there was a log cabin for a dwelling house. At Marion, Ohio, he married Rosena MYERS and immediately thereafter established his home on the place he had bought in this county. As his affairs prospered he added to his holdings there until he became the owner of a well improved farm of 152 acres. There he spent his last days, his death occurring on July 10) 1921. Of the five children born to John D. and Rosena ( MYERS ) STUBER all are living save one son, John STUBER, who died at the age of nineteen years, Mrs. ZIMMERMAN having a sister, Mrs. Mary SCHALAMB, and two brothers, Jacob and Henry STUBER. SOURCE: Milton T. Jay, M.D., History of Jay County Indiana, Historical Publishing Co., Indpls. 1922, Vol. II, pp.298-300. Transcribed by Eloine Chesnut.



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