WILLIAM ADCOCK

It is generally considered by those in the habit superficial thinking that the history of so-called great men only is worthy of preservation and that little merit exists among the masses to call forth the praises of the historian or the cheers and the appreciation of mankind. A greater mistake was never made. No man is great in all things and very few are great in many things. Many by a lucky stroke achieve lasting fame, who before that had no reputation beyond the limits of their neighborhoods. It is not a history of thelucky stroke which benefits humanity most, but the long study and effort which made the lucky stroke possible. It is the preliminarywork, the method, that serves as a guide for the success of others. Among those in this county who have achieved successalong steady lines of action is the subject of this sketch, who is now rendering efficient service as cashier of the Citizens National Bank of Greenwood.

William Adcock was born in Carroll county [sic], Kentucky, February 11, 1874 and is the son of S. B. and Alice (Jenkins) Adcock. The father, who is a native of Kentucky, is a successful farmer and has followed that vocation all his life, his present residence being at Campbellsburg, Kentucky. To the subject and his wife were born five children all of whom are living. The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of his community and in a college at Campbellsburg. Completing his education, he became employed in the First National Bank at Carrollton, Kentucky where he remained for sixteen years, his faithful service and efficiency being rewarded by promotion from time to time until he became assistant cashier of that institution. In 1906 Mr. Adcock came to Greenwood and assisted in the organization of the Citizens National Bank which was organized with a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars and which opened for business in 1907, with the following officiary: President, Harvey Brewer; vice-president, D. E. Demott; cashier, William Adcock. The bank now has a surplus of fifteen thousand dollars and deposits of one hundred fifty thousand dollars and is considered one of the strong financial institutions of Johnson county [sic], much of the success which has attended the organization being due to the splendid ability, energetic efforts and the popularity of subject of this sketch. He is known to all who have formed his acquaintance to be a man of genuine worth and integrity, scrupulously honest all his dealings with his fellow men and he has won the respect and good will of a host of friends throughout the county.

Politically Mr. Adcock gives his support to the Democratic party [sic] while, fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic order, belonging to the blue lodge at Greenwood, the commandery of Knights Templar at Franklin, and to Murat Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Indianapolis. Genial and unassuming in his relations with others and a splendid conversationalist, he is welcome in any company which [sic] he chooses to enter, and among with whom he is associated in a business way he is held in the highest regard and esteem.

Branigin, Elba L. History of Johnson County. Indianapolis, IN: B. F. Bowen & Co., Inc., 1913. pp 615-616

Transcribed by Lois Johnson