GOSCH, Lee M.

Date of birth: 20 January 1908 Bartholomew County, Indiana

Date of death: 2 March 1993 Gulfport, Florida

Franklin Daily Journal, 6 March 1993

Lee M. Gosch
  Lee M. Gosch, 85, died Tuesday at
Gulfport, Fla.  He was a resident
of Brownsburg.
  He was born Jan. 20, 1908, in
Bartholomew County.  His parents
were George Michael Gosch and Emma
F. (Stillabower) Gosch.  He married
Goldie E. Milnes Dec. 30, 1933. 
She surviives.  Other survivors
include two foster daughters, Betty
Green of Indianapolis and Edna
Marie Goodfellow of Salt Lake City,
Utah; two foster sons, Melvin C.
Alcorn of Manchester, Ohio and
Anthony Hughes of Indianapolis.
  He was a farmer and also had been
employed by Detroit Diesel Allison
in Indianapolis as a foreman at
plants #2 and #5.
  He was a member of Brownsburg
Christian Church and the Flying
Farmers of America.
  The Rev. Steve Reeves will conduct
a service at 10 a.m. Monday at
Conkle Funeral Home, Hendricks
County Chapel in Avon.  Friends may
call from 2 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the
funeral home.  Burial will be at
Rest Haven Cemetery in Edinburgh. 
Burns Funeral Home in Milroy is
handling the arrangements.
  Memorial contributions may be made
to the American Cancer Society. 


Brownsburg Guide, 9 March 1993
Lee M. Gosch
  Lee M. Gosch, 85, Brownsburg, died
Tuesday, March 2, at Gulfport, Fl.
  Born Jan. 20, 1908 in Bartholomew
County, he was the son of George
and Emma Stillabower Gosch.
  Mr. Gosch, a member of Brownsburg
Christian Church, had been a farmer
and foreman at Detroit Diesel
Allison Division of General Motors
Corporation.
  Services were Monday, March 8, in
Conkle Funeral Home, Hendricks
County Chapel, Avon.  Rev. Steve
Reeves officiated, with burial in
Rest Haven Cemetery, Edinburg.
  Surviving are wife, Goldie E.
Milnes Gosch; four foster chidlren:
Betty Green, Indianapolis, Melvin
C. Alcorn, Manchester, Oh, Anthony
Hughes, Indianapolis, and Edna
Marie Goodfellow, Salt Lake City,
Utah.
  Memorial contributions may be made
to the American Cancer Society.
Submitted by Mark Wirey