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Porter County Views: Furnessville

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TITLE: Grieger Crossing on the Michigan Central Railroad, Furnessville, Indiana. Individuals identified as Veterley, Thad Forbes, Tom Forbes, and MacDonald.
DATE: circa 1908 
PUBLISHER: unknown 
POSTMARK: none
COLLECTION: S. Shook
REMARK: The brick house shown in the background of this photograph is the Lidke house.
 

TITLE: Michigan Central Railroad Station, Furnessville, Indiana.
DATE: April 1, 1920
PUBLISHER: Michigan Central Railroad 
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: C. Harris
REMARK: The house to the left of the depot was the Louis Payne house. The Payne house was moved further back in later years when the Dunes Relief Highway (US Highway 20) was constructed through the area. The roofline on the right side of the photograph is the Furness mansion.
 

TITLE: Lewry & Sons Groceries and Provisions, Furnessville, Indiana
DATE: circa 1895
PUBLISHER: Lee and Lee's Atlas of Porter County, Indiana, 1895
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: S. Shook
REMARK: William Lewry was a native of Brighton, County Sussex, England, and emigrated to the United States in 1855. He and his wife, Sarah, moved to Furnessville in 1858. William opened his Lewry & Son store in 1878. William's son, Henry, operated the store after his father's death in 1917. The original complex illustrated here includes Lewry's store, wagon shop, and blacksmith shop. All three buildings were destroyed by fire in 1923, and only the store was rebuilt. Henry Lewry served as postmaster of Furnessville from 1883 to 1909, operating the post office from the grocery and provisions store. The newly built store remained in operation until the construction of the Dunes Relief Highway (US Highway 20), where it was in the path of the road construction. The store was removed to the Porter where it served as a church and later as a private residence. The structure is believed to still exist. Lewry is the storekeeper referred to in naturalist Edwin Way Teale's autobiography Dune Boy: The Early Years of a Naturalist [1943; Dodd, Mead, & Company].
 

TITLE: Residence of William Lewry, Furnessville, Indiana
DATE: circa 1895
PUBLISHER: Lee and Lee's Atlas of Porter County, Indiana, 1895
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: S. Shook
REMARK: William Lewry was a native of Brighton, County Sussex, England, and emigrated to the United States in 1855. He and his wife, Sarah, moved to Furnessville in 1858. On October 13, 1859, William purchased forty acres in Furnessville and began to build the brick house illustrated here in 1863. The construction of the house was interrupted in 1863 when William enlisted for service during the Civil War on September 28, 1864, in Company E of the Ninth Indiana Infantry. William was discharged from service on June 20, 1865, in Nashville, Tennessee. William's son, Henry, lived in this house until his death in December 1938. This house still stands and faces US Highway 20 (Dunes Relief Highway).

TITLE: Lewry Residence, Built in 1863
DATE: circa 1930
PUBLISHER: unknown
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: Trent D. Pendley
REMARK: This circa 1930 photograph of the Lewry house, constructed in 1863, shows the original porch that was removed a few years later. Well-known local artist Hazel Hannell painted the house in 1931 with four people visiting in the front garden. The house would again be painted for its centennial in 1964 by Columbia Studios artist Daniel McKee of California, and also in 2001 by the Wyeth-Hurd prodigy David Rogers of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The Lewry house was one of a few Furnessville homes facing the old Michigan Central Railroad tracks that did not have to be moved with the coming construction of the Dunes Relief Highway (US Highway 20) in the 1930s. The Furness mansion, the Welke house, and the Lewry house were far enough north and out of the path of the highway. By December 1938, the house became empty while Henry Lewry’s estate slowly was settled. Some of the furnishings that had mostly been procured from John M. Smith furniture in Chicago were reportedly stolen. During the period from 1940 through 1974, antique collectors Edwin and Bernice Burke reappointed the house with vintage antiques, including a settee by George Belter of New York. All but four acres of the original estate are now part of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore.
 

TITLE: Lewry Family at Lewry Residence
DATE: circa 1890
PUBLISHER: unknown
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: Trent D. Pendley
REMARK:
The William and Sarah Lewry family on the front porch of their 1863 brick home in Furnessville, circa 1890. William and Sarah immigrated to the United States from Brighton, England, in 1855 with their infant daughter Elizabeth. Their son Henry Lewry was born in Chicago in 1858, while all their other children were born in Furnessville. Photographed here are: Furnessville Postmaster Henry Lewry (1858-1939), Carrie Lewry (1866-1935), William Lewry, Sr. (1836-1917), Elizabeth Lewry (1855-1936), Richard David Lewry (1879-1957), Eugene Lewry (1861-1940), Sarah Lewry (1835-1929), Anna M. Lewry (1874-1966), and William Lee Lewry (1862-1945). The eldest two children, Henry and Elizabeth, stayed at the family home their entire lives. Eugene married Polly Sanderson in 1893. She arrived in the dunes from Yorkshire, England, in 1890. They made their home near his parents in Pine Township. William Lee Lewry moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where his parents visited on occasion and for the World’s Fair there in 1904. Carrie Lewry married Thomas Edward Morgan of Furnessville and lived at her husband’s family homestead. Anna M. Lewry married Professor Eugene Stanton Miller of Valparaiso. Richard D. Lewry married and lived in Chicago. He was the only child to return to England with his parents when they visited Brighton in June through September of 1884. His son, Richard Lewry, would purchase a home in Furnessville and resided there for a period during the 1930s. Richard David Lewry retired to Sault St. Marie, Ontario, and died in Cochrane, Ontario; he is interred on an island in Canada.
 

TITLE: Lewry House, Western Face
DATE: after 1960
PUBLISHER: unknown
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: Trent D. Pendley
REMARK: The Lewry house, constructed in 1863, is one of the oldest surviving residences in northern Pine Township. The house, with a facing of local bricks, had two additions. The additions, which occurred in the 1880s, added bedrooms to the back of the house and a dining room and kitchen that doubled the depth of the two-story structure. During the Erwin and Bernice Burke period from 1940 to 1974, a first floor family room with a fireplace was added. The residence originally hosted a butler staircase. Nearby are the vacant Furness mansion and also the vacant Lidke house. Furnessville saw the removal of many homes from their antebellum or Victorian era foundations with the path of the Dunes Relief Highway (US Highway 20) after 1929, as well as after 1966 with the establishment of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore.

 

TITLE: Musette Lewry
DATE: 1957
PUBLISHER: unknown
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: Trent D. Pendley
REMARK: This English vernacular brick cottage was built on the foundation of the former Cheney Homestead The Maples circa 1932. Edwin Way Teale inherited the property in the center of Furnessville facing the old Michigan Central tracks in 1926. At that time, the two-story Maples residence stood on the property. Edwin’s maternal grandparents had purchased The Maples a month after the burning of their antebellum Lone Oak Farm in February 1916. The house had to be moved with the coming of the Dunes Relief Highway (US Highway 20). The house was moved back out of the path of the highway onto a new foundation and all but one of the maple trees that gave the hilltop residence its name were felled. The house is thought to have burned in 1932. Although Edwin and Nellie Teale had lived in the house for a short time, they had moved to Long Island by 1928. Richard and Vera Lewry lived in the house for the next decade, and transferred title to Aura and Marvin Draper who took up residence here circa 1944. Mrs. Mary Cheney (1829-1917)  was Edwin’s paternal great aunt.  A widow since 1901, Mary Cheney sold her home to her sister and brother-in-law Jemima and Edwin Way and stayed in residence until her death the following year.   William and Mary Cheney are interred in Furnessville Cemetery.
 

TITLE: William and Sarah Lewry
DATE: 1904
PUBLISHER: Genelli
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: Trent D. Pendley
REMARK: This portrait of William and Sarah Lewry of Furnessville was taken during their visit to St. Louis, Missouri, for the Louisiana Purchase World's Fair in 1904. Their son, William Lee Lewry (1862-1945) married Agnes Hill in 1894 and removed to St. Louis. William Lee and Agnes Lewry had one daughter, Genevieve, who never married.
 

TITLE: Residence of E. L. Furness, Furnessville, Indiana
DATE: circa 1895
PUBLISHER: Lee and Lee's Atlas of Porter County, Indiana, 1895
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: S. Shook
 

TITLE: The Brick School, Pine Township, Building in 1883
DATE: circa 1919
PUBLISHER: Marie Lisle
POSTMARK: not applicable
COLLECTION: Trent D. Pendley
REMARK: In 1883, Pine Township Trustee, William Lewry, Sr., a Furnessville merchant and Democrat erected the first brick schoolhouse in his district. The structure was known thereafter as "The Brick School" and served as a public building for about forty-seven years until burning in 1930. The structure was physically located in the southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section 22 in Pine Township, essentially in the center of the the township. Schoolteacher Marie Lisle, of Valparaiso, took this photograph circa 1919 while she taught at the rural school. Marie eventually married George Lewry (1894-1930) and retired from teaching with her first pregnancy in 1921.
 

TITLE: Schoolhouse Shop. Northern Indiana's famous gift shop in the old Furnessville Schoolhouse, built in 1886. North of U.S. 20 in Furnessville, R.F.D. 2, Chesterton, Ind.
DATE: circa 1970
PUBLISHER: Harvey's Studio (#7415-B)
POSTMARK: none
COLLECTION: S. Shook
 

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