Welcome to

Scott County, Indiana
Genealogy and History

a small part of the INGenWeb and USGenWeb Projects

CEMETERY


ALSUP CEMETERY

Finley Township
Scott County, Indiana

This small family graveyard, which is no longer used, is located on a wooded knoll about 20 yeards east of county road 300 West, and one-fourth mile south of the Leota-Vienna Road. It is in Section 2, T. 2 N., R. 6E. on an original tract of land of 157 acres bought or entered by Soloman Beach on 11/23/1820. An iron fence, thirty-five feet square, encloses the eight marked graves. Sunken spots show the presence of graves without markers or marked only with rough stones.

. . From CEMETERY RECORDS, SCOTT COUNTY, published in 1978.

This cemetery has been cleaned and restored by the Scott County Cemetery Commission.

BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH CEMETERY
Finley Township
Scott County, Indiana

Bethel Baptist Church was organized in 1835. The first pastor was Rev. Joshua Cummings, who was born in Virginia in 1809. He came to Indiana in early life, married Mahala Swope, and died in 1885.

The church is located in the village of Leota, which previous to 1884, was known as Finley's Crossroads (so-called from John Finley, (1789-1872). The north-south road here, once known as the Valionia Trail, was the route taken by the Shawnee Indians when they committed the Pigeon Roost massacre in 1812. In 1820 it was laid off as the McDonald's Ferry-Brownstown State Raod. The east-west road, which passes along the south side of the cemetery, was surveyed in 1799 by Ephraim Kibbey and was known as the Cincinnati Trace, since it ran from that city to Vincennes.

The church is located in the northwest fourth ofthe Northwest quarter of Sections 3, Township 2 North, Range 6 East, on land entered on October 29, 1833, by Zacheus Sutton. The cemetery is across the road in another section in the fourth of the Northeast quarter of Section 34, North, R6E. It is on land entered on March 18, 1834, by John H. Hamilton.

. . From CEMETERY RECORDS, SCOTT COUNTY, published in 1978.

BETHEL CHRISTIAN CHURCH CEMETERY
(Split Stump)

Lexington Township
Scott County, Indiana

In 1862, Elder Wesley Hartley (1819-1897) began to preach in the home of Jacob Crist (1810-1874), about one-fourth of a mile south of where the meeting house was eventually built. In the same year John and Sarah E. Stucker deeded to Emsley Hough, Milton Kimberlin, and James Park, trustees of the Bethel Christian Church, one acre of land near the Split Stump Schoolhouse, and about two miles west of Nabb. This was in the southwest corner of tract 279 of Clark's Grant which had originally been granted in 1784 to the heirs of Captain Leonard Helm (who had died in 1782). A church was built here in 1863, and the congregation continued to prosper. Then in 1868-1871 the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad (now the B.&.0.), was built through Scott County, and people began moving to Nabb (astride the Scott-Clark County line, and to Marysville, in Clark County, and the church began to decline.) Regular services were not held there after 1886, and the church organization passed out of existence. However, the building was kept for funeral purposes until 1938, when a violent windstorm wrecked the old church and the remains were removed. All that remains today are the concrete steps and the cemetery, which can be seen just off State Road 203 on Split Stump Road.

. . From CEMETERY RECORDS, SCOTT COUNTY, published in 1978.

This cemetery has been cleaned and restored by the Scott County Cemetery Commission.

BRIDGEWATER OR OWENS CEMETERY

Lexington Township
Scott County, Indiana

This old cemetery, occasionally still used today, is located in southwestern Lexington Township, in "Fractional Section" 11, Township 2 North, Range 7 East, which had been originally entered on Oct. 20, 1820, by Jabez Reeve (1781-1865). The triangular tract contained 251.42 acres and was a fraction of a full section since it bordered on Tract 295 of Clark's Grant. The cemetery is entered by a lane (an abandoned county road which once continued on east to State Road 3) which passes alongside Kinderhook Lake. There are sunken spots (and several rough field stones) denoting unmarked graves.

. . From CEMETERY RECORDS, SCOTT COUNTY, published in 1978.

This cemetery has been cleaned and restored by the Scott County Cemetery Commission.

FAIRVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH CEMETERY

Finley Township
Scott County, Indiana

This cemetery, well-kept and still in use today (1978), is located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 14, Township 2 North. Range 6 East, on land originally patented on September 7, 1833, by Nicholas Nunamaker.

In 1880 Elder Thomas Jones, of Little York (Washington County) began preaching in the Poverty Point Schoolhouse, west of Underwood, in Finley Township. He preached in the winter and spring in the schoolhouse and in the summer and fall in a grove of trees south of where the present church stands. In 1882 Joseph and Sarah Collings deeded to the Trustees of the church land for a building and cemetery. John J. Tobias superintended the contstruction of the church, which was completed in 1883 and dedicated in 1884.

. . From CEMETERY RECORDS, SCOTT COUNTY, published in 1978.

JOHN KIMBERLIN CEMETERY

Lexington Township
Scott County, Indiana

This long abandoned and neglected cemetery is located about one-half mile northeast of the Village of Nabb. It is in Tract 264 of Clark's Grant, which was originally granted in 1784 to Capt. William Harrod for his services with Gen. George Rogers Clark during the conquest of the Northwest (1778-1779).

John Kimberlin, son of Peter Kimberlin, was born in Virginia in 1751. Previous to 1779, he married Ruth Jones and he served in the American Revolution. In 1804, while living in Pennsylvania, he bought this five acre tract from Thomas Hughes, and in 1805 he and his family moved here as the first permanent settlers in Scott County. He built a large two-story log house, which served as a fort after the Pigeon Roost Massacre. This old pioneer died in 1834, and he and his wife are buried here in unmarked graves *. There are many rough rocks marking burials. The few remaining tombstones are broken, toppled over, and badly eroded. We could locate only seven marked burials.

. . From CEMETERY RECORDS, SCOTT COUNTY, published in 1978.

This cemetery has been cleaned and restored by the Scott County Cemetery Commission.

KIMBERLIN CREEK CEMETERY

Lexington Township
Scott County, Indiana

Kimberlin Creek Church and Cemetery are located in Lexington Township, three miles west of Lexington, Indiana, on State Road 356.

The church was constituted on Friday, June 11, 1849, and received its name from the creek that runs nearby

The site was given by Samuel Hamacher (1/22/1790-4/28/1858) and his wife, Elizabeth (Craun) Hamacher (8/8/1794-5/31/1862) for a church and school. The old homestead of the Hamacher's is nearby. At one time, they owned 500 acres. The Hamachers are buried in the Lexington Cemetery, but many of their descendents are buried at Kimberlin Creek.

MT. PLEASANT or MOON CEMETERY

Finley Township
Scott County, Indiana

This cemetery is in Northwestern Scott County, just north of the road leading from Boatman Road to Little York, and one mile east of the Washington-Scott County line. It is near an abandoned sawmill village once known as Thomastown. It is located in the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter, Section 17, R8E, T3N, on land originally entered by John Moon on January 21, 1839. There was once a Methodist Church here, known as Mount Pleasant, which burned and a new church was erected across the road in 1890. Now it, too is gone but the cemetery is still used occasionally and is well kept. (1991)