June 2011

June 21, 2011

President, Pat Cudworth, called the meeting to order.

Member Doug Brown conducted the installation of officers for the coming year. It was a very well presented installation. He then presented the officers for the year to the members. The officers from the previous year are continuing for 2011-2012.

Bob Hamilton, Sue Frank's brother of the Cambridge City, IN area, was introduced as a guest.

Secretary, Pat Summan, is on vacation. There were no additions or corrections made to the minutes of the last meeting so they were accepted as read.

The treasurer, Karen Creamer, is on vacation. There was no treasurer's report at this meeting. Many people have sent their dues for the coming year via mail and several members paid at the meeting.

Jim Wicker of the Ways and Means Committee reported he has typed two letters. The first letter was written by McFarland and the second was written in 1842 by a doctor. He has some copied and would like members to take the, read them, make corrections or comments, and bring them to the July meeting.

In old business, Jim Wicker has brought a cabinet for our items. He also put the box of marriage record books on top of the cabinet.

Charlie Hughes reported the Bicentennial Committee is hoping to have a float ready by fall. They also have a committee set up to solicit money for the upcoming event.

Karen Creamer agreed to be on the Heritage Days committee with Historic Connersville. Doug and Sandy Brown have also agreed to work on this committee. Heritage Days will be October 22, 2011. Other members will help when they learn what will need to be done,

In new business, outings were discussed. Be thinking of ideas!!! These can be during regular meeting times or another day. At one time a picnic was held at Mary Gray Bird Sanctuary.

President Pat had members sign the list for refreshments for the coming year. There are several months vacant including July and September.

Curtis Garrett motioned for adjournment of the business meeting and John Johnson seconded.

Vice President John Johnson started the program "The Civil War". This is the 150th anniversary of the war that was the most decisive period of our country. There were 600,000-700,000 deaths during this war....mostly from disease and a large number resulted in injury from battles. The main causes of the war were an effort to keep the Union together and Slavery/Negro rights. The war lasted four years.

The month of July saw more battles than any other month. The battle of Gettysburg lasted 3 days and the Union had 23,000 causalities and the Confederate had 28,000. He gave information on other battles including the causalities of these battles.

He gave the number of different ages with13 years of age being the youngest. Most of the younger men were drummers and those playing the fife. Six out of ten from Connersville were in the war.

Five men who served in the Civil War became presidents of the United States. They were US Grant, Garfield, Hayes, McKenley & B Harrison.

The Soldiers & Sailors Home came out of the war as a way to care for the wounded and to honor the Men in Blue.

The age after the Civil War was known as the Gilted Age.

Doug Brown told us that on his mom's side William Callihan, joined the Co I, 40th Kentucky Infantry for the Union. On his dad's side, Peter Brown, from Ohio joined the war as did his brothers, William and James. William joined Co C, 74th Infantry Indiana in April 1862.

Sandy Brown's third Great Uncle from Switzerland County, Indiana, was 21 years and 3 days old when he enlisted six days before the war was declared. Benjamin Cole first joined Co. G, 7th Indiana Infantry for three months and then was a butcher for Co A, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. He was disabled when he and his horse were thrown from a bridge during a charge at Mattaponi River, Virginia. After the war he was a butcher and merchandiser in Switzerland County except for one year in Colorado.

Jim Wicker had members of his family serving on both sides. One member was a POW and wrote a diary in blood.

Charlie Hughes had a great grandfather on both sides. Capt. Marcus Miller, was a teacher when he enlisted in Ft. Smith, Ark and became a Calvary instructor.

Thomas Garrison from Franklin Co., Indiana was in the 146th Indiana Volunteer, and received $300 as a bonus to enlist. He was 26 and the father of 2 children. (Charlie made a comment that Thomas probably joined to get away from his wife.)

Linda Mahan's relative was Edward Riley in Co K 59th Ohio. He had TB. He had a son in 1868 and died before 1870.

Sue Frank and Bob Hamilton had a great grandfather who went to Ohio and was in the 7th Calvary (1861-1869). William Marcus Hamilton was born in 1842 and died in 1902. His wife died in 1920 and received a 25-cent a month pension from the army. William was a wagon maker and bridge builder. He was caught for blowing up a bridge and placed in the notorious Andersonville prison. He was sick, paroled and spent 45 days in a hospital in Washington. When he was up and going again, he rejoined to serve his country.

Pat Cudworth reported her great grandfather, William S Kaler, born Aug. 16, 1835 in Richland Twp, Rush Co, Indiana and died February 28th, 1920 in Franklin Co, Indiana. He was in the Great War March 3, 1864 to Aug. 25, 1865. He was enlisted as a Sgt. in Co. K, 123rd Regiment. In April 1864 while marching at Lookout Mountain, he hurt his ankle and continued to march, causing much pain and convalescing at a camp at Cleveland, Tennessee. He was a clerk in the quartermaster's department. He compiled "The Roster and History of the 123rd Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in the War of the Rebellion". The Indiana State Library has the only know copy.

John Johnson shared many interesting facts. Lots of things came out of that war. Some of them were railroad arterially, subarmines, pier scopes, landmines, wire tangles, telegraph, flame throwers, torpedoes, ariel (balloons), repeating rifles, rifle scopes, iron clad ships, revolving guns, machine guns/gattling guns, nurse corps, hospital ships, legal voting for servicemen, secret service, draft (1863), bread lines, press/photography, taps, income tax, and withholding tax.

South Carolina was the first state to succeed from the Union.

When collecting information on soldiers you may learn their height, color of hair and eyes, date/place of birth, enlistment information, and parents/spouse names.

John Johnson reported his great uncle, Robert Johnson, enlisted in 1862 and went to Chicamonga. On Sept 19th he was wounded and was a POW for a few days. He was in and out of the hospital and discharged in 1864. He went to Brown County, ILL and Norton, KA. (His son went there to homestead and Robert followed to do the same although he didn't stay that long). Robert moved to Kentucky and married...he died there in 1910.

His great grandfather, Thomas Johnson was a Union (Republican) born 1849. There was a "family feud" as brother-in-laws were on opposite sides. There were two for the Red and one for the Blue. His great grandfather remembered living near Richmond, KY and hearing the cannons when he went home from school. He was not in the war.

John told us that Conner Prairie has a civil war enactment.

He also had a lot of his collection to show us including a "Diary of POW at Andersonville Prison" (Kellogg), several tin-type pictures of Civil War soldiers, ribbons, reunion badge, buttons, a 12 lb. canon ball, and other items of great interest. He also showed a Civil War sword that belonged to Andrew J McDowel, born 1842 in Wayne Co., Inidiana. He enlisted April 23, 1864 in Co B, IN 16th Infantry and mustered out may 23, 1862. According to the 1870 census, he lived in Richmond, IN and was a policeman. In 1883 he was a patient at the Vet Center. It showed he had no family when admitted. He died in June 1886 and is buried at Dayton, OH.

Refreshments were provided by John Johnson....thanks for the delicious pies!!!

Members present were Sue Frank, Charlie Hughes, Doug and Sandy Brown, John Johnson, Jim Wicker, Curtis Garrett, Linda Mahan, Pat Cudworth, and guest Bob Hamilton.

 
Sandy Brown/Patricia Cudworth for Pat Summan, Secretary