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Carlow County - Ireland Genealogical Projects (IGP TM)


The History And Antiquities Of The County Of Carlow.

by John Ryan's  1833


CHAPTER XXI

Reign of James I (James VI of Scotland) A.D. 1605 to A.D. 1625

JAMES VI of Scotland succeeded to the crown on the death of Elizabeth I. Lord Mountjoy returned to England on the 28th May, 1603; when honours and wealth were abundantly showered on him, in requital for his brilliant and important services.

Much was done in this reign for ameliorating the condition of Ireland: the particular attention of government was justly directed to a clear arrangement of the rights of property. Sir John Davies gives us the following information as to the mode adopted in this case: " Since his majesty came to the crown, two special commissions have been sent out of England, for the settling and quieting of all the possessions in Ireland; the one for accepting surrenders of the Irish and degenerate English, and for re-granting estates unto them, according to the course of the common law; the other for strengthening of defective titles. In the execution of which commissions, there hath ever been had a special care to settle and secure the under tenants; to the end, there might be a repose and establishment of every subject's estate, lord and tenant, free-holder and farmer, throughout the kingdom. "

Upon surrenders, this course hath been held from the beginning: when an Irish lord doth offer to surrender his country, his surrender is not immediately accepted, but a commission is first awarded, to inquire of three special points. First, of the quantity and limits of the land whereof be is the reputed owner. Next, how much he himself doth hold in demesne, and how much is possessed by his tenants and followers. And thirdly, what customs, duties, and services, he doth yearly receive out of those lands. This inquisition being made and returned, the lands which are found to be the lord's proper possessions in demesne are drawn into a particular; and his Irish duties, as coshering, sessings, rents of butter and oatmeal, and the like, are reasonably valued and reduced into certain sums of money, to be paid yearly in lieu thereof. This being done, the surrender is accepted ; and thereupon a grant passed, not of the whole country, as was used in former times, but of those lands only, which are found in the lord's possession, and of those certain sums of money, as rents issuing out of the rest. But the lands which are found to be possessed by the tenants, are left unto them, respectively charged with their certain rents only, in lieu of all uncertain Irish exactions. In like manner upon all grants, which have passed by virtue of the commission for defective titles, the commissioners have taken special caution, for preservation of the estates of all particular tenants."

The foregoing explanatory observations will throw much light on the proceedings relative to property and other matters in our county, which we shall now introduce, and which will be found most interesting. This information has been collected from the most authentic source, namely, the public records of the kingdom.

By inquisition taken at Carlow, 16th September, 1607, it was found that Theobald, Viscount Butler, of Tullowphelin, was seized of several castles, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, in Carlow county, viz., Cloghgrenan, Garrymore, &c. (The remainder will be found in grant, dated 20th December, 1607.) GRANTS, &c. in this reign.

King's letter for grant of pension to Bryan McDonough Kavanagh, six warders, at eight pence per day each, for his castle of Ballylorgane (now Ballylaughan)4th September, 1st year of James I.

Grant by the king to Theobald Butler, son of Sir Edmund Butler, knt., second son of James Butler, late earl of Ormonde and Ossory, of the title and dignity of Viscount Butler of Tullowphelin (Tullow) in the county of Carlow, with remainder to his heirs male. — 4th August, 1 st year of James I.

Grant from the king to John Eustace, gent. — Carlow and Kildare Counties. The titles of the rectory, church or chapel of Donnaghamocke, and Ballaghmore, and of the rectories, churches and chapels of Straboe, Rathmore, and Mohacon or Moyacon, the estates of St. Thomas Court, near Dublin; rent 21L 16s 8d Irish. Wexford County. Darbie's island, parcel of the estate of the late earl of Salop; rent 2L. 6d. — Kildare County. The castle and village of Harreston, and also the site, circuit, and precinct of the chief house, containing two castles, a wall, one garden, the orchard, the haggard-place, one chapel upon a vault, one church yard, with certain other buildings, containing by estimation three acres and more; rent 2I. 13s. 4d. Irish — two messages, five cottages; rent \1. 12s. Irish. — Arable one hundred acres, small measure ; rent 5L. Irish — pasture forty acres, with liberty of the moor for digging of turf; rent 10I. \3s. 4d. — a watermill with the watercourse, rent 1l. 13s. 4d. ; the estate of James Eustace, late viscount Baltinglass, attainted — the altarages, oblations, and profits of the parish church or rectory of St. Bride, near Osbertstown, rent 2I. ; parcel of the estate of the late hospital of St. John of Jerusalem. — Dublin County. Three small closes or parks in Kilmainham, rent 8s., the estate of said hospital ; total rent 4L. 19s. 2d. to hold for twenty-one years at the rent above stated, -together with sixty-five pecks of port-corn, of half wheat and here malt, and the other half oat malt, for the said rectories, for which he is to be allowed 2d. per peck yearly in his account. Not to lease any part of the premises, except to Englishmen, without the lord deputy's consent. — 15th May, 1st year of James I.

Grant from the king to the earl of Ormonde. — Carlow County. Two parts of the tithes of the rectory of Killeston or Kellystoune. — 1st December, 1st.

Grant from the king to John Simberbe, or St. Barbe, gent. — Carlow County. The rectory of Cloydagh, in the Dollough, extending into the towns, &c. of Cloughgrenan, Ballinabrenagh, Ballitrolly, Garromore, Ballybrin, Stradnefusboke, Clogheristick
and Cloughna; parcel of the possessions of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Conell, Kildare County; rent four pounds six shillings and eight pence Irish. — To hold for twenty one years (with other grants) at a rent of thirty-five pounds three shillings and six pence Irish, in consideration of his good and faithful service. — 18th May, 1st.

NOTE It may be advisable here to state, that each acre of great country measure, contained fifteen acres of the small measure

General pardon to Kathetine Cavanagh McDonnell Reagh of Clonmullin, Ac.

Letter from the Privy Council of England in favour of Donell Cavanaghe or Spanniagh and his kinsmen, notifying the king's pleasure, that he should be entered in the cheque roll as a pensioner, to have ten shillings sterling English per day, till he recover his rights or be better provided for. — 22nd August, 1st.

Grant to Thomas Tedder, clerk, of the deanery of the cathedral church of Laughlin, now vacant by the death of Moses Powell, and in the king's gift of full right. — 22nd, Feb. 1st.

General pardon to Conleigh M'Gillpatrick O'Birne, of Catherlogh county, yeoman, &c., 25th Nov. 1st.

Grant of the office of general cessor and collector of Catherlogh, Wexford,; Kilkenny, King's and Queen's counties, to Sir Jefferie Fenton, Knt., chief secretary of state for Ireland. — 22nd Sept. 1st

Grant from the King to Sir Oliver Lambert, Knt., and privy counsellor. After others, Carlow County. — The fourth part of the town and fields of Kilgreny, in Foert O' Nolan, containing five acres small county measure; the lands of Callough M'Edm. O'Nolan of the same, gent. slain in rebellion; rent two shillings — one third part of Ballykenny in Foert, containing six acres small measure; the lands of Donel Enass M'Dermot O'Nolan of the same, gent. slain in rebellion; rent two shillings and three pence. Killinclonboly in Foert containing 9 acres small measure; the lands of Gerald Killin of the same, attainted of felony, rent three shillings— the moiety of Killmoglish in Foert, containing seven acres small measure — two-third parts of Lisgra in Foert, containing six acres in like measure, and the moiety of Templepedder in Foert, containing ten acres like measure; the lands of Gerald  McDonough Duffe O'Nolan of Killmoglish; rent six shillings and eight pence  two-third parts of Ballyvendon in Foert, containing four acres small measure, and two-third parts of Balliochill in Foert, containing eleven acres like measure, and two-third parts of Ballivickfinn in Foert, containing six acres like measure; the lands of James Eustace, late viscount Baltinglass, attainted; rent six shillings — the third part of Kilbride in Foert, containing twenty- six acres small measure; the estate of Roderick O'Nolan of the same, gent. slain in rebellion ; rent six shillings — another third part of Kilbride, containing twenty-six acres small measure; the estate of Marrogh Ny Dowry O'Nolan of the same, gent., attainted of felony; rent six shillings and four pence — the old castle of Ballytrarney in Foert, and two-third parts of the following towns, Ballytrarney twenty acres, Rahin seven acres, Killean six acres, Aghclare five acres, and Ballivoige six acres, containing in all forty-four acres small measure; the lands of CaMr M'Donogh O'Nolan of Ballytrarney, gent., dead without heirs; rent ten shillings and eight pence — in Ballykely in Foert, a messuage and four acres; the lands ot Donogh M'Lisagh O'Nolan of the same, gent., dead in rebellion ; rent one shilling and two pence — two- third parts of Balligilbert in Foert, containing forty acres small measure; the lands of Terence or Tirlagh Ballagh O'Nolan of the same, attainted of felony; rent nine pence; together with all their appurtenances of what kind so ever.

To hold forever in free and common soccage, by fealty only, for all rents, services, and demands whatever; in consideration of his good, true, and acceptable service to Queen Elizabeth. — 22nd Feb. 2nd year of James I.

Grant from the king to Sir Henry Broncar, Knt., Lord president of Munster. — Carlow County — Certain lands called a marte-lande in the towns and fields of Polmoatie, Balliowniloure, Ballinebarne, Qoranroe, Dromyne, and Clonagh — a marte-lande in Rathphandinbry, Ballydoubeg, Monenemogh, Ballindounemore, and Askarny — a marte-lande in Cloneleigh. Downe-Rone otherwise Doronarde, Ballibirne, Ballygalgirt, and Rathsillagh — a marte-lande in Templeowtegan and Balliwilliam — two parts in three of a marte-lande in Rahinmore, Ballinvege, Ballingobban — a marte-lande in Ballileigh, Ballinecowlagh, Owlard, Mastine, Pollraghbegg, Ballinknockcrompane, Glancon, Crompane, and Ballinekillee — a marte-lande in Balliane, Ballinebanogee, Cowlebacke, and Rathgirrock — a marte-lande in Ballycromegannecarlane and Dorronagh — a marte-lande in Behanagh, Ballylinge, Timolirge and Ballegilligan, — a marte-lande in Ballyhegan, Ballimickevlicke, Ballinowlarde, Skehanagh and Ballineclogh — a third part of a marte-lande called Carrigleod — a marte-lande in Kilcharry, Barreduffe, Moyneachrin, Owlordfyan, Balliredmonde, Loginch, Kill clonegell, the bounds of Knockaffa and the sixth part of Dromganow and Alleknockegh — a marte-lande in Ballihometly, Glanmcollitan and Torragh — a raarte-lande in Ballinebrannagh, . Rathgeirin and Killorian — a marte-lande in Ballihimocke, Ballicrome, Gameiskegh, Ballicromeganbeg, Newton and Corvalty — a marte- lande in Cowlelehone, Knockduffe, Knockynalud Ballinegreeny — a marte land in Cowlenemare and Ardagh — the sixth part of a marte-lande called Ballyeine — a marte-lande in Balliroughan, Tynecargy, Killecolena and Siskenrath — a marte-lande in Ballibrack, Kilrathginney and Lasaluan — a marte-lande in Ballibane, Monemolinge and Tomeneyre, all being the lands of Thomas, late duke of Norfolk, and of the lord Barkley ; each marte-lande being valued at five shillings and four pence by the year; total five pounds. (Several grants in other counties.) To hold forever, as of the castle of Dublin, in free and common soccage, by fealty only, in consideration of his faithful service to Queen Elizabeth. —29th Aug 2nd.

Grant from the King to Thomas earl of Ormonde. — Carlow County. Certain lands in the lordship of Foert otherwise Foert O'Nolan, viz. — in the quarter of the said lordship called Sleight Shean, the third part of Kilbride, viz., twenty acres arable, six and a half pasture — the third part of Garrincoilcoil-wood, five acres — the third part of Kilbrenie or Kilgrenye, six and a half acres arable, pasture and mountain, one acre wood — the third part of Ballemolin, containing six acres arable — the like of Ballybohell, containing six acres arable — the like of Carrickenislane, containing three and a half acres arable, and one and a half acre moor, and one stang of wood — the like of Kilnocke, containing twenty acres arable, and ten acres pasture; thirty acres — the like of Balligilbert, containing seven acres arable; the third part of Ballivendon, otherwise Garrinlyne, containing two acres arable — the like of Ballekillie, viz. six and a half acres — the like of Barragh, viz., one and half acre pasture, and one and a half acre wood; three acres — in the quarter of the said lordship called Sleighmorrogho, the third part of Ballynowric and Killmorric, viz. thirteen acres arable; the moiety of Grange-Snyddocke otherwise Graigneshiddock or Granges-peddocke, viz., four acres arable — the moiety of Grange- luge otherwise Graiglug, viz. one and a half acre wood — the third part of Templered and Cloghmaghronin, viz., eleven and a half acres arable — the like of Ballemore otherwise Ballemoge, viz. three acres and a half arable — the like of Ballitrahin and Kilbrickan, viz. ten and a half arable, four acres pasture, and three acres wood; seventeen and a half acres; the like of Kilbea otherwise Kilkaa, viz., two acres arable, and one acre moor; five acres — the like of Killean, viz. three acres arable, and two moor; the like of Ollard, viz. two acres arable, and one acre and a stang of wood; the moiety of Kilinogles otherwise Kilnoghglesh, five acres arable, two acres moor, and one acre wood, eight acres; the third part of Kilshegaroen, viz. two acres arable, and one and a half wood ; three and a half acres; in the quarter of the said lordship called Slightcoyne, the town of Rathtoroth, viz. twenty acres arable; the third part of Ballevalden and Balligodenan, viz. four acres arable; the like of Radowgin, viz. three arable; the like of Rathbrege and Rathragh, viz. four acres arable; the like of Ballin, viz. five acres arable, and four acres mountain, nine acres; the like of Keppagh, viz. two acres arable, and one acre and a stang of wood; the like of Mornex otherwise Morney, viz. two acres arable, and three stangs of wood; the like of Ballelion, viz. two acres arable, one acre and a half wood, and two and a half acres mountain, six acres; in the quarter of the said lordship called Publedrome, the third part of Ballefright, otherwise Ballefirish, and Balledonnogh, viz. four acres arable; the moiety of Balle temple, viz. six acres arable ; the third part of Balleclaneboy otherwise Killinclonboy, viz. two acres arable and one and a half wood, three and a half acres; the moiety of Ballyenowe, viz. six acres arable; the like of Shraghsellie otherwise Straighshelle, viz. six acres arable; the like of Ballinhombin otherwise Ballihomiliu, viz. six acres arable; in the quarter of the said lordship called Breeklagh otherwise Bresklagh, the moiety of Ballinbeale, viz. fifteen acres arable; the third part of Mogishell and Birragh, viz. two acres arable; a stang of wood, and one acre and a half mountain; the moiety of Ballinruish, viz. three acres arable, and two of wood, five acres ; the third part of Rossecloie, viz. two acres arable, and one acre and a half wood, three and a half acres ; the moiety of Kilavy, and Shanganie, viz. six acres arable ; the like of Kileere otherwise Killeor and Tyroline, viz. six acres arable ; the third part of Tontancaple, viz. five acres arable ; the like of Lisnecielce and Tecoline otherwise Teycolne, viz. four acres arable ; the like of  Shian, viz. two acres arable, and one acre and a half of wood, three acres and a half; the like of Cowldonnogh, Kittagh, CoilteHenrie, Henrie, and Garrin-pursin, and the town of Cowlwilliam M'Donnogh otherwise M'Onogh, and Boghan Oniell, otherwise Donill, viz., six acres arable, and three acres pasture, nine acres; granted to him and his heirs male, by patent dated 13th September, (or December), in the 5th and 6th of Philip and Mary, to hold by the 20th part of a knight's fee, and the rent of forty-nine pounds three shillings and nine pence Irish, which rent by patent, dated 8th March, 5th Elizabeth was remitted to the earl — (with other grants in different parts of the kingdom). To hold forever, by the 20th part of a knight's fee, for all other rents, services, and demands whatever. — 26th November, 2nd.

Grant from the king to Theobald Bourke, baron Burgh of Connell, otherwise Castleconnell. — Carlow County. Knockine, Balliclogh, and Inchenephooke, containing about four acres great measure; parcel of the estate of Moriertagh McCahir M'Arte Kavanagh of Knockine, attainted; rent four shillings — (together with grants in other counties).

To hold forever, by fealty only, in free and common soccage. — 22nd March, 2nd.

Grant from the king to Donatus, earl of Thomond. — The manor of Catherlogh or Catherlagh; the old castle with four turrets on the east of the Barrow, with the precinct and buildings thereto belonging, excepted- — the custom of a salmon yearly, out of every net used in taking salmon in the Barrow, running by the bounds of the said castle — the demesne lands, within the site and circuit of said manor, viz. Queen s County.

In Barniglasse, besides the Barrow in the Queen's county, three acres great measure, each acre containing four small measure, twelve acres; in Ardconran otherwise Arconeryan or Archonyrian, three and a half acres great measure; in Rathmore, one and a half acres; in Carnmore, otherwise Coranmore or Carramore or Cranmore, Ferrancloghhelagh or Ferreneclogh, and Heyclogh, arable three acres; in Moneshill or Monesnekille, arable two acres; in Skemrath or Sheghnaragh or Shenrirath, and Rathvill or Rathirllie, arable three acres; in Corranbegg, arable one acre, all great measure. 

Carlow County. In Burlow, on this side the Barrow, arable three acres; in Knockanreogh otherwise Knockancroigh, arable two acres; the earl's meadow, one and a half acre, all great measure; a water mill there, all of the demesne lands.

In Carlow twenty-two messuages, and arable eighty-four acres great measure, parcel of said manor, with thirty-one cottages there, which lands were lately held by Dermot M'Teige, Edward M'Rorie and others, with nine plows, paying yearly for each plow a carcase and a half of beef and seventy-two gallons " lagena" of beer, and eighteen loaves " tortus" of bread; also nineteen of the tenants of the said cottages paid a rent of one pound thirteen shillings and four pence, and the rest paid nothing but labour and customs several yearly customs, viz., all the farmers and tenants of said messuages and cottages to render one sheep out of every flock exceeding seven in number, and one penny for every sheep under that number; a hen at Christmas; a dish of butter in May, and another in autumn, every dish containing three and a half parts of one gallon " lagena"; from every tenant keeping cows, and from every cottager making butter, a dish of butter in Ma; four gallons of ale out of every brewing by every dealer in beer; for every cow killed within the town for sale, the hide, or in lieu thereof fourteen pence, and for a smaller cow's hide six or eight pence ; in all works made within the castle, the inhabitants of Carlow to find six workmen or labourers daily, during the said work, at their own expense; also each tenant and cottager to weed the demesne corn yearly for three days, and a woman out of every house in Carlow to bind the sheaves for one day ; each tenant and cottager to cut wood for the use of the castle for three days in summer, and each of them having a draught horse to draw the wood to the castle for three days; also to draw the corn out of the fields to the area of the said castle for three days; to give one cart-load of wood, and one truss of straw at Christmas and Easter; and each cottager one truss of rushes at the said feasts; the said tenants to plough with their said nine ploughs in the said demesne lands, viz., for the sowing of wheat three days, and of oats three days, and to carry the sheaves of corn in their waggons for sale at the yearly fairs in Carlow, viz., on the feast of the Assumption of the B, V. Mary; which profits are collected as follows ; out of every shop and booth, four pence, for every horse sold two pence, for every cow sold one penny, for every horse load of goods set upon the ground, one penny, for every whole piece of woollen cloth sold one penny, for every lesser piece one halfpenny, for every sack of salt one penny'; also the following customs in the name of herriot, collected in Carlow, viz., after the death of every tenant and cottager inhabiting within the said town, the lord shall have the second best beast, and if there be but one living animal the same to be appraised by the neighbours, and the lord to have the third part of the price, and if no animal, then his other goods to be appraised, and the lord to have six shillings and eight pence if they amount to twenty shillings, but if less, nothing — in Martelston, three acres; in Dowganston, four cottages and four acres arable ; in Ballinragh'or Ballinrath, five acres arable; in Abate or Athroe, four acres arable; in Killienmore, Killynowre or Killemore one acre; eight messuages, four cottages and twenty-six acres arable, pasture, bog and wood in Carlow county, all great measure, with certain customs from the tenants of the manor there, viz., every messuage and cottage to find a horse to draw wood and corn, as before, to the castle of Carlow, for one day each ; and every tenant and cottager to weed and reap for one day, and a woman out of every two houses to bind corn for one day ; the inhabitants of Kellieston, Dowganston, Painston, Johnston, and Pollardston, (except the free tenants), having ploughs and carts, to plough the demesne lands for one day in wheat and oat sowing ; and every house having a draught horse, to draw wood and corn to the castle of Carlow for one day, as before, and all others customs and services accruing out of the lands of Johnston, Unythlin, Ballikethlan, Killerick or Killericket, and Ballihewitt or Ballihead, Frompston or Frompelston, and in Carlow county, Killerick, Knockane, Pollardston, Kingston or Caslanreddery, the baronies of Tillagh or Tully, Donleck or Dowlekeney, in Idrone and Obergie, GlasCastle, Ballilonan, Killesa or Killehawe otherwise Killossan, Gurtinewacan, Ardneheue, Painston, Dowganston, Typerynthio or Typeratheo orjTypynthokergie, Okergey, Arthebeston, Ardenbeath, Ardneketh, or Aherd, Kilborgb, or Kilbroth, Kenlis in Frothered, Ballymorkill, or Ballivorgill, Balliscanden, and certain lands opposite to the castle of Carlow; all the perquisites of the manor courts, liberty to hold courts leet within the said manor, and certain lands and tenements at Fothrie otherwise Foherthric, Forthred, or Forthro, in Kavanagh's country, among the Irish; parcel of said manor; demised 31st October, 30th Elizabeth, to Robert and William Harpoole for twenty-one years, at twenty-three pounds three shillings and one penny Irish, and in reversion, 17th August, 41st Elizabeth, to Sir Robert Napper, knt., for forty years, at the same rent — (with grants in other counties). To hold forever in fee simple, as of the castle of Dublin, by fealty only, for all other rents and demands whatever. — 30th July 2nd. —

Note. This grant was made as part of one hundred pounds a year, of crown lands in fee simple, in consideration of his surrender to the crown, made 14th July, 1604,'of lands, castles, &c., in the counties of Limerick and Tipperary.

Grant of the office of constable of Carlow castle, to Donogh, earl of Thomond, and Brian O'Brien his son. — 30th July, 2nd. Presentation of Thadeus Curren otherwise Tankard, clerk, to Balliline vicarage, Leighlin diocese, vacant by the death of Maurice or Murtagh Cavanagh, and in the king’s gift of full right — 30th July, 2nd.

Grant from the king to Sir Garret Moore of Mellefount, Louth county, knt., privy counsellor. — Leighlin diocese. — Arbistell, Ruskogh, Templemoric, and Rathcough; rent sixteen shillings and eight pence Irish; demised 28th December, 22nd Elizabeth, to Sir Edward Moore, for forty-one years, at a rent of sixteen shillings and eight pence Irish, after a grant to Sir William Brabazon, knight, for twenty-one years from Easter 1558 — (with grants in other counties and dioceses). To hold for sixty years after the expiration of his former leases respectively; to pay all synodals, proxies and stipends of curates; to keep up all chancels, castles, houses, cottages, fences and ditches — 23rd April, 3rd.

Grant of the office of Clerk of the Peace and of the Crown, in Carlow, Kildare, King's and Queen's counties, to Eusebius Andreivs, gent. — 4th June, 3rd.

Grant of the office of Lieutenant of Carlow county, to Theobald, Lord Butler, viscount of Tullie* (Tullow)— 18th June, 3rd.

Grant from the king to George Tutchett, knt., lord Awdeley — Carlew County. The site, &c. of the castle called Blackcastle within the precinct of the friary of Laughlin-bridge; rent thirteen shillings and four pence; the site, &c. of the late monastery or Carmelite friary of Laughlin-bridge, with all its messuages, cottages, lands, customs, and hereditaments, spiritual and temporal; rent two pounds eight shillings and eight pence Irish, parcel of the estate of Pierce, earl of Ormonde, grandfather of Thomas, now earl of Ormonde, who surrendered the same to the crown — (with, grants in other counties). To hold forever, in common soccage — 20th July, 3rd.

Grant from the king to James Hamilton, Esq. Carlow County. In or near the town of Laughlin, a water mill and thirty-one tenements; parcel of the estate of Pierce, late earl of Ormonde; rent five pounds one shilling and five pence farthing; a castle and
a mart-lande, otherwise a plough land, in Clonmullin, Kiltranish, and Tavickeshonicke, parcel of the estate of the late duke of Norfolk and the earl of Shrewsbury; rent nine shillings; (with grants in other counties). To hold in fee farm, as assignee to Thomas Ireland of London, merchant, as of the castle of Dublin, by fealty only, and in common soccage. — 14th February, 3rd. Livery of Seisin to Nicholas Bagnoll, son and heir of Dudley Bagnoll, late of Idrone in Carlow county Esq. deceased, for a fine of six pounds sterling. — 26th November, 3rd. The king's letter to promote Thomas Rame, dean of Cork, to the bishopric of Leighlin and Ferns, vacant by the death of Nicholas Stafford, permitting him to retain the parsonage of St. Mary's in Wexford, the deanery of Ferns, the chantorship of Christ Church, and Balrothery vicarage, in commendam. — 6th Feb. 2nd.
Letters patent for the consecration of same. — 25th April, 3rd.

Letters patent for the restitution of temporalities to same. — 25th April, 3rd.

General pardon to Brene M'Donogh Kavanagh of Ballenloghan in Carlow county, Esq., Morrogh M'Donnell Kavanagh of Carlead, Donnogh M'Brien O'Birne of Old Laughlin, Dowlinge M'Murtagh O'Birne of BalHteigleigh, Morragh M'Morrice Kavanagh of Rathvilla, Philip M'Hugh O'Kena of the same, Donell Ower M'Shane O'Birne of Ballenloghan, Richard Folan of the same, Brene O'Bolger of Rathbindine, Brene M'Donell Kavanagh of Carglead, Edmond M'Tirlagh Kavanagh of Raherin, Mortagh M'Tylagh Kavanagh of the same, Peirs M'Melaughlin O'Rian of Ballengarie, Edward M'Gilpatrick O'Dowran, Morrice M'Gerrald Kavanagh of Ballelin, Thomas Butler of Clonemore, Owen M'Tirlagh O'Birne of Balli-Rian, Morragh Roe of Glorouske, Feige M'Morrice O' Doyle of Knockroai Morrice M'Teige O'Doyle, Cilpatricke More O'Doyle of Knockroa, Walter Butler of Knockin, Foris M'Cavell of Killgrene. Edward M'Tirlagh O'Birne of Binecherie, Thaddeus Dowlinge of Old
Laughlin, Morragh M'Mortagh Kavanagh of Ballilin, Thaddeus O'Rian of Balliclere, Ulick Wale M' William of Urchlin, Teige M'Shane O'Nowlan of Boerduffe, Art M'Caher Kavanagh of Balleshane-parragh, Gerrald M'Brene Kavanagh of Killerieriie,Redmond M'Mortagh O'Rian of Bellingarie, Donell Kavanagh Otherwise Spaniagh of Clonmullin, Caber Kavanagh of the same, Chriffon Kavanagh of Kilbreanies, Ellenor Kavanagh of Clonmullin, Hugh M'Donell of Polmonte, Brian M'Edmond O'Donell of Kilkern, Dan. Folam of Balliloghan, Donell Glas M'Tiege Owre of Rathirke, Bran M'Owen O'Brian of the Ceskran, David M'Donogh O'Rian of Ballilien, Walter O'Bolger of Ballihomulty, Cahir M 'Edward Kavanagh of the Bunes, Brian M'Tirlagh, piper, of Ballipiers, James M'William Butler of Gortamore, Fardoragh M'William O'Maccaghes otherwise Donell O'Maccaghes or O'Managhes of the Bournes, all in Carlow county. — 5th December, 3rd.

Grant from the king to Theobald lord viscount Butler of Tulleophelim, of the lands, &c. granted to the earl of Ormonde and Ossory, 1st December, 1st James I. 13th September, 4th. Livery of seisin and pardon of intrusion to Robert Sentleger, eon and heir of Thomas Sentleger, late of Doughaneston in Carlow county, gent. deceased, without fine. — 11th July, 4th.

Grant from the king to Theobald viscount Butler of Tulleophelim— Carlow County. The castle, towns, and lands of Cloghgrenan and Garrimore, and half a marte-land of the country measure; Clodagh, half marte-land, Ballnarolly or Ballintrolly, and Rathynydorane, containing half marte-land ; Ballinebranagh, Balligowne, and Coranloskie, two marte-lands ; Tullaghcroyne and Tomard, half marte-land ; Rathooran and Curraghfyan, one marteland; Rathvinden, Cowlenekiske, and Lauglea, one marte-land; Cloughroaske and Ballikavale, half marte-land; Cloughcristicke, one marte-laud ; the moiety of Mortelston, quarter marte-land ; Lehin, half marte-land ; Castlegrace, the same ; Ardistin and Clognemony, one marte-land ; Castlemore, three fourths marteland — The moiety of Tomdarragh and Cloughwouny, quarter marte-land ; Newston, seven acres country measure ; Kilbride, Kilkele, and Killgreny, half marte-land; Ballinvury and Killinurry, quarter marte-land ; Kappagh, twelfth marte-land ; Bowlinekrehe, two acres county measure ; all the lands that belonged to certain persons called Owencloghes in .Ballinesragh. Boledonogho, and Kilballinoe, and everywhere in Pobbledrome; rent for all the aforesaid premises, four pounds nine shillings and four pence Irish. — Ballivare, Clonemulske, Carrickebroughan, otherwise Garriehondon, (Chappelston) and Powerston, viz. a ruinous castle, a messuage, six cottages, sixty-seven acres arable, three acres under wood, forty-two acres pasture and bog in Ballivare; a castle, four cottages, sixty-two acres arable, and forty-four pasture, in Clonemulskye; six cottages, thirty-eight acres arable, and twenty- three pasture, in Carrickebroughan otherwise Garriehondon; a castle, six cottages, one hundred and twenty-two acres arable and thirty-eight acres pasture, in Chappeleston; sixty-six acres pasture in Poweraton, and the customs of the tenants of Ballivare, and the aforesaid towns — (with grants in other counties). To hold forever, by several tenures, viz., the lands in Carlow county, except those hereafter specified, as of the castle of Dublin, by the twentieth part of a knight's fee, and riot in capite; Ballivare, Clonemulske, Carrickebroughan or Garrihondon, Chappelton, and Powerston, in Carlow county, and others by the fortieth part of a knight's fee; for the fine of six pounds thirteen shillings and five pence Irish. — 20th December, 1607.

Power of Attorney from Henry Davells* of Laughlenbridge in Carlow county, Esq., to Richard Barry of Dublin city, merchant, to make a surrender of the rectories of Bananeough, &c., in the county of Kilkenny. — 24th May, 6th.

NOTE *Probably son of Captain Henry Davells, already mentioned

Presentation of James Waddinge to Barragh, Ballielin, and Kiltennille vicarages, Leighlin diocese, vacant and in the king's gift of full right, and united, for this turn only, on account of the smallness of their incomes. — 10th May, 6th.

Grant to Sir Adam Loftus, knight, of a daily pension of nine I shillings English for life, being the amount of a daily pension of / three shillings surrendered by Gerald M'Murtagh Kavanagh of 1 Ballintraine, in Carlow county, gent., and another of six shillings surrendered by Thomas Perrott, gent. — 25th June, 6th.

General pardon to Edmond M'Brien Kavanagh of Tononma, gent., Richard Fitz-Patricke of Clonmollen, gent., Teigeboy M'Deirmod of Kurenellan, yeoman, Neale M'Arte ot Clonegall, yeoman, James M'Teige O'Dowell of Knockroe, yeoman, Mor- rogh O'Rian of Clonmullen, Gerald M'Cahirre Kavanagh of Clonmullen, gent., James O'Rian of Cureynylan, all in Carlow county — (with others). — 19th March, 6th.

Grant from the king to Gerald earl of Kildare. — Carlow County. In Kinnagh, forty acres arable, twenty acres pasture, and half a wood containing one and a half acre, in Tomnegroghe, the moiety of forty acres arable, and twenty acres pasture : being the lands of Donogh Moynagh Kavanagh, attainted; rent two pounds six shillings and eight pence Irish; an old castle, six messuages, two hundred and forty acres arable, twenty acres pasture, twenty acres wood, and the moiety of the seventh part of a water mill in Gark hill, and a castle, six messuages, and one hundred and twenty acres arable, ten acres pasture, and ten acres wood in Ballicaslane; being the lands of Gerald M'Cahir, late of Garkhill, attainted; rent five pounds; the moiety of Dowganstown, containing nine acres county measure; except four acres late demised to Sir Anthony St. Leg or, for a term of years; parcel of the estate of the late earl of Marche; rent ten shillings — (with grants in other counties). To hold forever, as of the castle of Dublin, in commem soccage, in lieu of such pensions as he enjoyed from the crown, and in consideration of his services. — 3lst May, 1609.

Pardon of alienation to Thomas Butler, knight of the order of Probably son of Captain Henry Davells, already mentioned.the garter, earl of Ormonde and Ossory, viscount Thurles, as to the following lands. — Carlow County. Rathvilly, Tutlaghophelim, Clonmore, Cruffin, Kilasny, Powerston and Fortonsland. —- Wicklow late Carlow County. The manor of Arcloe. — (with several others). — 3l st May, 7th.

Grant from the king to Theobald, viscount Butler of Tullyophelim. — Carlow County. Licence to hold for ever a Saturday market, and two fairs on the vigils and feasts of St. Peter the apostle and St. Luke, at Tullyophelime (Varition of Tullow) — 8th December, 7th.

Grant from the king to Donogh, earl of Thomond. — Carlow County. The manor of Carlow, and all the lands granted by patent, dated 30th July, 2nd James I. (With grants in other counties). To hold to him and his heirs forever, except where otherwise mentioned, as of the castle of Dublin, by fealty, in common soccage, for a fine of thirty pounds Irish, and in virtue of the commission for remedy of defective titles. — 8th March, 7th

King's letter to receive surrenders from Thomas earl of Ormonde and Ossory, high treasurer of Ireland, and from Theobald, ,lord viscount Butler of Tulleophelim (Varition of Tullow), and their feoffees — of the castle of Kilkenny, and the lordships of Arcloe and Tulleophelim, and all other of their and either of their temporal and spiritual possessions; and to make a grant under the great seal to them or either of them, of the said premises, forever. — -3rd April, 8th.

King's letter for a grant to Captain Dennyes Dale, of a yearly pension of thirty pounds, a ward of six men, with eight pence daily for each, also two shillings and eight pence daily for himself, as constable of a fort, built by him on the confines of Wicklow, Wexford and Carlow counties; also twenty pounds towards the building of the said fort. 19th April, 8th.

Deed, dated 1st June, 1610, whereby George, lord Audley, in consideration of an annuity or rent charge of five hundred pounds English for life, assigned to Sir Maurice Tutchet, knight, his son and heir apparent, his whole estate in Ireland, to hold to him, his heirs and assigns for ever; together with all his stock of cattle and corn, and all other goods and chatties in Ireland ; reserving to his lordship all his utensils and household stuff, a coach, and all harness or furniture for horses, muskets, callivers, powder, arms, and other ammunition, a brown bay horse, lately bought by him of Sir James Marving, knight, two colts, lately brought out of England, a hunting gelding, a pyed mare, bought of Henry Gynes, and a black gelding, with certain cattle lately bought of Edward Blount, Esq. Sir Marving paying also to Sir Ferdinando Tutchet, knight, second son of the said lord Audley, an annuity of one hundred marks English, in the Middle Temple Hall, London, and after his lordship's death, to convey and make over to the said Sir Ferdinando, his heirs and assigns, land in England or Ireland, to the clear yearly value of one hundred pounds sterling.

Grant from the King to Jenico Preston, viscount Gormanston, Sir Christopher Plunket, Knt.", Thomas Aylraer, Pat. Baraevall, Esq., and Christopher Barnewall, Gent Carlow County. One castle and three houses in Frerton; in Court-Killargan otherwise Killerge, two mesmages, nine acres arable, and five acres pasture and underwood, of the great country measure; in Frereton and Russelston, fifteen acres of the like measure; in Tullaghphell, one acre of the like measure, containing sixteen acres of the small measure; half the town of Mygaune or Myganue, containing seven and a half acres of the great measure; the rectory of Killargye otherwise Killerge, which extends in the towns of Killerge, Russelston, Bossenton, Ardinheath, and Bally makinne otherwise Ballinrahine, with all the tithes, &c., thereto belonging; all which premises were the estate of the late preceptory of Killarge, and were parcel of the possessions of the hospital of St. John of Jerusalem; rent two pounds six shillings and nine pence, Ir. (With, grants in ether counties?) To hold in capite, by the twentieth part of a knight's fee for a fine of twelve pounds Ir. 24th July, 9th. General pardon for Thomas, bishop of Leighlin and Ferns. 20th January, 9th.

Grant from the king to Christopher Chivers, Esq. Carlow county. The manor, mansion house, castle, and lands of Graunge forth, and thirty-six acres; the tithes of the said manor, issuing out of Littleton, Ballygorie, Glenocke, Rathveon, otherwise Ravrehon and Clinclogh. (With grants in other counties.) To hold the lands in Meath county as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage, and all the rest in capite, by the twentieth part of a knights fee, and for a fine of ten pounds Irish. 10th Oct. 9th.

Grant from the king to Dowlin M'Brien Kavanagh of Toomecurry, and Dowlin M'Morough Kavanagh of Balligobbin, gent. Carlow County. Ballilene, Forraghbegg, Balligillegan, half of Behamagh-wood, and the sixth part of Timoling otherwise St. Moling, containing half marte-land; Ballivickvalaka and Ballihegan, containing the third of marte-land — Ballycruneganecaslane, half marte-land — two third parts of Ballickunckerrompane and Glannecorry, and a sixth part of Timoling otherwise St. Moling, one third marte-land; except all lands, advoweons of churches, &c., formerly granted to John de Bellomonte by patent, dated 28th April, 18th Richard II. (with grants in other counties.) To hold forever, as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage, and for a fine of twenty pounds. 21st December, 9th.

Grant from the king to William Brounckar, Esq. — Carlow County. One quarter of the town of Castlemore, containing six acres, great country measure, each containing fifteen acres of the small measure; parcel of the estate of the late monastery of
Thomas-court; rent, sixteen shillings and eight-pence. {With grants in other counties). To hold forever, as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage. 20th July, 9th. *

Grant from the king to Nicholas Netterville of Dowth in Meath county, Esq. Carlow County, In Symolin bar. Tinehinche and Toneran otherwise Cowlan-island, 1 caruc. Ballyhenrie, six marte-lands; rent, eight pounds ten shillings, (with grants in Other counties.) To hold forever, in common soccage, for a fine of fifty pounds Ir. 16th Dec. 9th.

King's letter for the plantation of Carlow, Wexford and Wicklow counties. 7th May, 9th.

Grant from the king to George Bagnall of Ballymone, Esq. Carlow County. The entire barony of Odrone otherwise Idrone, and all the hereditaments called or known by the name of Idrone; the manor, castle, town, and lands of Ballymone; the town and lands of Ballymone, containing by estimation one martland; Ballylowe, Old-town, Barduffue or Borduffue, a half martland each; Castlebury or Castlebuy and Donlickney or Donlackney, one and a half martland; Sleaduffe, Killcrutt, Rath, Ballyfollan, and Knockballynerahine, two martlands and one sixth martland, commonly called a " solidum" (shilling) of land; Agha, one martland; Rathwheate, two-thirds martland; Kilknock, one martland; Orchard, one half martland ; Killcarrigg, one and a half martland; Ballyfoyninge or Ballyfynninge, two solid, or two-sixth parts of a martland; Killinolappoge, half martland; Ballikillen, one martland ; Ballytarsna, one martland; Teghanrelan, one solid. Ballynalter, Rathellin, one martland ; Ballywilliamore or Ballywilliamroe, one solid. Parkvespane, half martland ; Seskinryan otherwise Seskyn, containing eighteen pence of land or three-twelfths of a martland; Ballinesillioge, the same; Ballinecarrige, four solid. Ballycarroge, half martland; Kelloge, one solid. Ballystapleoake, two solid. Ballyshane. In Clonen, half martland; in Ballyreigh or Ballinrighe, four solid. In Ballycormocke, one martland; in Cloghwalter, the same; in Ballyclantomacke, five solid. In Kilcalatrim, five martlands; in Uttermosk-Seskin or UppermostSeskiu de Downcroe, in Cloghcantwell, seven groat's land, or seven-eighteenth parts of a martland Corremore; in Killoghternan, one martland; Oldbegge or Olebegge, Clonelevett, Bowleria, Cowlanacappoge, Ballygowne, Clonagosfle, Garmonagh, Knocksquore, two solid. Knockbower, Killedmond, Rahindarragh, Ballinvallac, Bowliecullen, Kiltenell, Golegglowne, Knockroe, Balbobromell or Ballibroraell, Kilconer or Kilconnor, Ballirian, Kilrye and Corbegge, Killin-Earle, Downcore, half martland, Kilcomeney, two solid. Kilshanclone, the same. Orney, one martland; Ratheaden or Rathesilen, Balliteige, Kildrinagh, half martland ; Lomclone, one martland ; Clantomen's land, one mardand; Ballentomane, Fennough and Kill vidine or Killmaclyne, five solid. Ballyloghan, Ballyrean, all the manors, castles, lands and hereditaments whatever within the means or precinct of the barony of Idrone, specified in a certificate, made at Leighlin-bridge, 3rd October, 14th Elizabeth, and returned into chancery, called or known by the several names of Fennough otherwise Fynnagh or Fynnaghty, Monibegge, Bohermore, Knockmullen, Rathduff, Newtown, Ballinemeur, Balliderrinne, Ballihobogge, Tartanowle, Balliknockan, Ballibegge, Ballitomen, Cowlenesopp, Carrigbegge, Balliloe, Rathphillibin, Sereatrim, Glanhery, Farrenlaghan, Kenog, Knockenecrogh, Crannagh, Carrighracke, Rosdilge, Moyvalla, Rahinquoile, Toamduffe, Banogebegge, Kilvearie, Kilgarran, Achavick, Ballyduey, Ballinegran, Knocknegondon, Killedame, Killgreanie, Ballinatten, Rahanna, Ballinlinckard, and Raherkan.  Rent free; except the royal composition, and risings out. To hold two fairs annually at Knockmullin, one on St. Bartholemew's day, and the other on the feast day of St. George the martyr and the day after each, unless when the said feast days or either of them fall on Saturday or Sunday, then they said fairs respectively to commence on the following Monday ; also two fairs at Orchard, viz. the one on the Tuesday and Wednesday before the feast of Pentecost, and the other on the feast of St. Mathew and the day after, unless when the said feast day falls on Saturday or Sunday, then the said fair to commence on the following Monday; with courts of pie powder, and the usual tolls. — Rent one pound six shillings and eight pence; courts leet and baron, waifs, strays, &c. To hold forever, as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage. — 11th June, 10th.

Grant from the king to Sir Nicholas White, knight. — Late Carlow now Wicklow county. The rectory of Baltinglass, the Grange, Killmurre, Hiltonstown, Sclerath, Newgrange, Cargen, Tenawrin, Rathenne, Redetown, Rathbran, Hockeston, Grange with Griffinston and Borranston. — Carlow county. Chappelston and Clonagh in Idrone, Ladyton near Rathville and Great-castle — (with grants in other counties) — 8th April, 10th.

Lease from the king to John Eustace, gent. — Carlow, Kildare and Wexford counties. The tithes of the rectory, church, or chapel of Donnahannock and Ballaghmone; the tithes of the rectories  of Strabo, or Srughboe, Rathmore, and Moyacon; parcel of the estate of Thomas-court ; rent, twenty-one pounds sixteen shillings and eight pence; sixty-five pecks of port corn out of all these rectories, at the purification in Carlow, to be allowed two shillings per peck — (with grants in other counties). — 28th October, 10th.

King's letter for a surrender and re-grant of lands to George Bagnall of Ballymone in Idrone barony and Carlow county Esq. 6th May, 8th.

King's letter to call to the house of lords, by writ, lord Audley, and others.— 31st March, 11th. Surrender by George Bagenall of Ballymone in Carlow county, of lands in the same county — 7th June, 10th — Note. These lands were re-granted to him, 11th June, 10th.

Charter of Carlow. — 19th April, 11th year of James I. (Yr 1614)

Grant from the king to alderman Nicholas Weston of Dublin. Carlow County. Half of Dowganston, containing nine acres great measure ; except four cottages, and four acres of like measure, demised to Sir Anthony St. Leger, knight, and afterwards granted in fee to Donogh, earl of Thomond ; parcel of the estate of the earl of March ; rent, one pound — (with grants in other counties). To hold for ever, as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage. — 7th January, 11th.

Grant from the king to Edward Southworth, gent. Carlow County. The parcel or precinct called the martland of Rathnegeragh, with its hamlets of Rathnegeragh, Knockenarraen, Rahenlagh, Dromeown, Dromefoy, Knocktompene, and Ballimo- rough; the marte land of Carranrany, with its hamlets of Carranrany, Ballimertin, Kilughternan, and Ballihave ; the marte-land of Lowrein, with its hamlets of Lowren, Balligennill, and Barroge- begga ; the marte-land of Mohill, with its hamlets of Mohill, Kilballaghkie, Balliverran, Cargin, and half of Templepedder ; the marte-land of Shian, with its hamlets of Shian, Knocktian, Rosslie, Cloanfeart, Closgany, half of Kilmaglise, Bolyreay, and Owlardmore ; the marte-land of Lavienesway, with its hamlets of 'Lavieneswey, Ballinekilly, Knockulard, Gurtingravogy, and Cloneglass ; the half marte-land of Ballintample, with its hamlets viz. two-third parts of each of the denominations following, Ballintample, Ballinowe, Ballineshragh, Ballyonoge, Ballidonogh, Ballyhemlin, CoHomormore, Collomorebegg, Kilenclonboly, Raheny, Ravarrin, Aghcon, Ardattin, and Shraghkilly, lately in the occupation of Gerald M'Murtagh Kavanagh, gent , rent, four pounds six shillings and eight pence' — In Garrinfine otherwise Flax-garden, eight acres ; in Ullevogh, eight acres; in Knockgrout, fifteen acres ; in Turtane, eight acres; in Kilbreckan, twenty-five acres; rent, five shillings — (with grants in other counties). To" hold for ever, as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage. — 26th January, 11th.

Deed, dated 4th October, 1612, whereby Christopher Payton, Esq. demised to Francis Blundell, Esq. — Carlow County. The town, village, or hamlet of Castlemore — (with other property.)

Grant from the king to Sir Charles Wilmott, knight. — Carlow County. The castle and bawn of Carlow, with the site thereof and the buildings therein ; value, six shillings and eight pence. — The castle, town, and lands of Chappelstown, containing six cottages, one hundred and twenty two acres arable, and thirty-eight acres pasture, with the customs of the tenants ; Ballibare, containing a ruinous castle, a house, six cottages, sixty- seven acres arable, three acres underwood, and forty-two acres pasture and bog; Clomulskie, containing a castle, four cottages, sixty-two acres arable, and forty-four acres pasture ; Carrickbroghan, containing six cottages, eighty- three acres arable, and twenty-three pasture; Powerstone, containing sixty-six acres pasture ; the customs of said towns ; all parcel of the estates of the abbey of Baltinglass.

King's letter to accept a surrender from Donell Kavanagh otherwise Spaniagh, of a daily pension of ten shillings; and to grant the same pension to Sir Roger Jones, knight, during life. — 8th August, 13th.

Surrender by Donell Kavanagh, otherwise Spaniagh, of Clonmullin in Carlow county, Esq. of a daily pension of ten shillings English. — 6th November, 13th.

Pardon of intrusion and alienation for Christopher Cheivers and his feoffees, for a fine of eighty pounds. — 23rd November, 13th. Note the modern equivalent of a feoffee to uses is the trustee, one who holds a legal and managerial ownership in trust.

Grant to George Tutchet, lord Audlay of Heleighcastle in Stafford county, and his heirs male, of the title and dignity of baron of Audelay of Orier in Armagh county, and earl of Castlehaven in Cork county, with an annual fee of twenty pounds sterling to him and his heirs male, in consideration of his military services in the Netherlands, France, and Ireland, and more particularly at the siege of Kinsale, where he was severely wounded. — 6th September, 14th.

King's letter to restore to Thomas, earl of Ormond and Ossory, any lands which may have been wrongfully granted to others to his prejudice ; also, to protect the rights of his wife, dame Ellen, and of his daughter, the lady Elizabeth ; also, to receive a surrender and make him a re-grant of the castle and manors of Kilkenny and Gowran, the lordships of Tulleophelim and of Arklow, and the manor of Carrickmagriffen, with rights and privileges which are specified, to hold to the earl for life, and after him, to his nephew, Sir Walter Butler, and his heirs male for ever, who is heir to the earl in consequence of the death of the viscount Butler.— 29th June, 12th.

Grant from the king to Sir John Davys, knight, attorney general. — Carlow county. The castle, town, and lands of Cloghna, Rathaskert, Ballibrien, and Ballyvannen, with their hamlets, containing twenty- seven acres country measure; rent, thirteen shillings and four pence — (with grants in other counties). To hold forever, as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage. —27th February, 14th.

Grant from the king to Sir Arthur Savage, knight, privy counsellor. —Carlow county. In Carigneslane, seven acres; in Ballienoioge or Ballimoyoge, and Boggan, twelve acres; in Ballienvalley and Lanaghteige, twelve acres; rent, ten shillings Irish; in Ballellin, thirteen acres; in Cloghmony, two and a half acres; in Tomdarragh, two and a half acres; in Rathmoyle, two and a half acres; lately in the tenure of Donell M'Teige of Tomdarragh; rent, seven shillings Irish; in Templeneboegh, six acres; in Ballon-Iskine, two and a half acres; in Ballicloiro, two and a half acres, besides the seven acres lately granted to Terence Birne; in Ballinegreney, one and a half acre, besides the four acres lately granted to the said Birne, lately in the tenure of Morgan M'Brian Kavanagh, gent.; rent, six shillings and eight pence Irish; in the same one and a half acre; pared of the estate of Melaghlin O'Rmn, attainted ; rent, nine pence Irish; Bohermore, Brenshaghbegg, and Lackeran, in the town and fields of Ballinlintie, quarter caruc; rent, two shillings and six pence Irish; in Balligibbon, three half quarters of a plough land, viz, in Lissneleyn, one quarter, and in Garranekkinardae, half quarter; parcel of the estate of Morrogh Ivoreh, slain in rebellion; in Clonecrgliffin or Cloneoglissin, Lacknyvamey, and Shaereghnrenagh, quarter caruc, parcel of the estate of Mahowne M'Edmond O'Kenedy, slain in rebellion ; in Fidanebegg and Ballinkinashe, half caruc, parcel of the estate of Owen M'Connor O'Clery, slain in rebellion; in Fedanemore and Ballinkinashe, quarter and eighth caruc, parcel ef the estate of Edmond M'Donogh O'Kery, slain in rebellion; in the same, and in Glahasken, quarter earuc, parcel of the estate of Dermot Roe O'Clery, slain in rebellion; rent, fifteen shillings Irish — (with grants in other counties). To hold forever, .as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage. — 21st February, 12th.

Grant from the king to John Bathe, Esq. — Carlow county. The tithes of the rectory of Finagh in Idrone ; the tithes of the rectories of Drombaragh, of Killrossenaren, Ballykelly, and Tullaghnebraer, and of Dromphe, two parts of the tithes of the town of Castlemore ; the tithes and altarages due to the vicar and curates, and the advowsons, knight's fees, &c., and other casualties are excepted — (with grants in other counties). To hold from Michaelmas, 161(5, for the term of forty-three years. — 24th April, 15th.

Grant from the king to Sir Anthony Savage, knight, vice-treasurer of Ireland, and privy counsellor. — Carlow county. Ballikeallie, twenty-eight acres country measure; Bellar or Ballen six acres, except the glebe lands; Ballewer and Coranpursin, twenty-four acres ; Tormene and Ardbirne, twelve acres ; Rabeggan, eight acres; Rathrushe, Ballyvalden, Brishtowne, Balliowdernan, and Rathbrege, sixty acres; Ballelion and Ballinvalley, eighteen acres ; Cappagh, twelve acres; Corrigan, fifteen acres; Killane, six acres ; Graigloge, twelve acres: the castle, town, and lands of Graignespeddocke, twelve and a half acres ; Bollibrin, five acres ; Kilcowle, sixteen and a half acres; Srahe, twelve and a half acres ; Ballymullen and Kilpatricke, thirty acre; Ballakerrin, six acres ; Bogandonill, seven acres ; Moynicrogh, ten acres,' Meshell, twenty acres; Locklin, twenty-five acres; Knocknyeny, five acres; Shanegarry and Killavy, twenty acres; Ballinruish, twenty acres; Tecollome, eight acres; Lisseconly or Lissenconelly, eight acres; Cappwater, eight acres; Ballaghmore, BallyRedmond , and Killeine, fifteen acres; half of Lessegarvine, eight acres; Owerney and Nicholston, eight acres, all country measure; rent, ten pounds Irish; Grangwatt, seven acres; rent, shillings and four pence Irish; and the tithes of said lands, being parcel of the estate of the late abbey of Duske— (wit A grants in other counties). To hold for ever, as of the castle of Dublin, in common soccage. — 20th August, 15th

Surrender by Dowlinge M'Brian Kavanagh, of a daily pension of two shillings and six pence, Irish. — 29th October, 14th.

Grant to Dermot M'Dolwlinge Kavanagh of the daily pension of two shillings and six pence Irish, so long as he continues to be a loyal subject, surrendered by his father, as in the preceding article- — 11th November, 14th.

King's letter for a grant of land in Carlow, Kilkenny, and Wexford counties, to Edward Butler of the Low Grange in Kilkenny county, Esq. — 13th November, 15th.

Grant from the king to Patrick Barnwall of Shankill in Dublin county, Esq. — Carlow and Wicklow counties. The tithes of the towns, villages, hamlets, and lands of Rathville, Ballyvett, Walterston, Tobinston, otherwise Ballytobin, Ballywilliam, Knockoye, Lissenevy, and Killranalagh otherwise Killranelogh; the small tithes, offerings, and all other duties belonging to the viear extepted ; parcel of the estate of David Sutton, late of Castletown,Kildrought in Kildare county, attainted. — Total rent, ten pounds Irish. To hold for twenty -one years from last Easter, for a fine of ten pounds English. — 25th July, 15th.

Licence to the following persons to keep taverns, and make and sell wine and ardent spirits, during life in the following places : — to Sir Barnaby Brian and Dame Mary his wife, in the town and liberty of Carlow. — 22nd December, 15th.

Licence to the following persons to keep taverns and sell wine and ardent spirits, at the following places: — to Nicholas Caffoie of Leighlin-bridge in Carlow county, and Joane his wife, during their joint lives, in Leighlin-bridge and two miles round: — to James Knowles of Carlow, merchant, and Rose his wife, during their lives, within the town of Tullaghphelim, and two miles round. — 1st April, 16th.

Grant to John Parker of the deanery of the cathedral of Laghlin or Leighlin, vacant and in the king's gift of full right with a stall in the choir, and a voice in the chapter. — 6th July, 16th.

In order to ascertain the best mode of improving the state of the country, it was necessary to collect the opinions of intelligent persons by means of a parliament. The privilege of returning, members being, however, confined with narrow limits at the accession of James I, an extension of the franchise was desirable. Accordingly many boroughs were now empowered to send their representatives to parliament, and among the rest we find Carlow, the people of which place are indebted to James I. for this second charter, which was granted in the eleventh year of his reign.

Some information relative to the creation of boroughs at this period may be collected from the following extract from a letter of lord deputy Chichester to Sir John Davies, bearing date at Dublin, 14th Aug. 1012: " In making of the borough towns, 1 find more and more difficulties and uncertainties ; some return that they are but tenants at will and pleasure to certain gentlemen, who have the fee-farm, or by lease for a few years, so as they are doubtful to name themselves for burgesses without the landlord's consent; and the landlord is of the church of Rome, and will return none but recusants ; of which kind of men we have no need, and shall have less use. Some other towns have few others to return than recusants, and others none but soldiers ; so as my advice in that point is, that you bring direction and authority to make such towns boroughs only as we think fit and behoveful for the service; and to omit such as are named, if they be like to be against us; and to enable others by charter, if we can find them answerable to our expectation, albeit they be not in the list sent thither by the lord Carew, nor returned as allowed there."

CHARTER GRANTED BY KING JAMES THE FIRST TO THE

INHABITANTS OF CARLOW.

(Translation of which)

JAMES the FIRST, by the grace of God, of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, KING, Defender of the Faith, and so forth, To all to whom these presents shall come, greeting. Know ye, that as well at the humble request of the inhabitants of the town of Carlow in the county of Carlow in our Province of Leinster and Kingdom of Ireland, as also for the purpose of cultivating and planting those parts in our said kingdom which were depopulated and laid waste according to the form of our government in our kingdom of England so happily established of our special knowledge and mere motion with the consent of our right well-beloved and trusty counsellor, Arthur, lord Chichester of Belfast, our deputy general of our said kingdom of Ireland, and also according to the tenor and effect of certain letters under our royal signet and sign manual, dated at our palace at Hampton Court, the twenty-ninth day of September, in the tenth year of our reign of England, France, and Ireland, and of Scotland the forty-sixth, and now enrolled in the rolls of our chancery of our said kingdom of Ireland, do decree, declare, and ordain by these presents that the said town of Carlow, and all and singular, castles, messuages, tolls, mills, houses, edifices, structures, cortilages, gardens, wastes, soils, waters, rivulets, lands, tenements, and hereditaments whatsoever, with their appurtenances lying or being in or within the said town or village or precincts thereof for ever hereafter shall be one entire and free borough of Carlow, forever shall be called and named and all and singular the premises into one entire and free borough of itself by the name of the borough of Carlow we do erect, constitute, make, and ordain by these presents. And further, we will, ordain, and decree, by these presents, that within said borough of Carlow there be one body corporate and politique, consisting of one portrieve, twelve free burgesses, and the commonalty, and that all the inhabitants within the said town and lauds for ever hereafter shall be by virtue of these presents, one body corporate and politique in deed, fact, and name, by the name of portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the borough of Carlow, one body corporate and politique in deed, fact, and name, really and fully for us, our heirs, and successors ; and that they by the name of the portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the borough of Carlow shall be at all times hereafter persons fit and capable in law to have acquire, receive, and possess lands, tenements, liberties, privileges, jurisdictions, franchises, and hereditaments whatsoever of whatsoever nature, kind, or species they may be, to them and their successors in fee and perpetuity: and also goods and chattels, and all other things of whatsoever kind, nature, or species they be: and also to give, grant, assign, and demise lands, tenements, and hereditaments; goods and chattels, to do and execute all and singular other acts and things by the name aforesaid. And that by the name of the portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the borough of Carlow they may plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered, defend and be defended, before us, our heirs and successors, and before any the justices and judges of us, our heirs, and successors, and others whomsoever, in all the courts of us, our heirs, and successors, and elsewhere, where so ever, of and in all and all manner of actions, suits, pleas, quarrels, complaints and demands whatsoever against them or by them in any manner to be prosecuted or obtained: and that the said portrieve and free burgesses of the said borough and their successors, forever may have full power and authority to elect and return two discreet and proper men to serve and attend in every parliament in our said kingdom of Ireland hereafter to be held and that the men so elected, sent, and returned, shall have full power and authority to consult and treat of those matters and things which to them and others shall be declared or expounded, and therefore freely to give their votes and suffrages and to do and execute all other things as fully as any other burgess of any other ancient borough in our said kingdom of Ireland or in our said kingdom of England in the parliament there have been used to do or execute. Wherefore, we will, and by these presents, for us, our heirs, and successors, we do give and grant to the said portrieve and free burgesses of the said borough and their successors, and also order and firmly for us, our heirs, and successors, command all the sheriffs, officers, ministers of us, our heirs, and successors whomsoever of our said county of Carlow for the time being to whom any of our writ or writs for the election of burgesses of parliament within our said county of Carlow at any time shall be directed, that every such sheriff, officer, or minister to whom any such writ or writs as aforesaid shall be directed, shall make his precept to the portrieve and free burgesses of the said borough of Carlow for the time being for the election and return of such two burgesses according to the form and effect of such writ or writs : And these our letters patents or the inrollment thereof shall be as well to the said portrieve and free burgesses of the said borough and to their successors as to all and singular the sheriffs, officers, and ministers of us, our heirs, and successors, whomsoever, a sufficient warrant and discharge in this behalf. And intending that hereafter it may appear that this new corporation was first composed of good and honest men, WE do make, constitute, and name, John Kerton, gent., the first and modern portrieve of said borough, to continue in the said office until the feast of St. Michael the archangel next after the date of these presents ; and we do likewise make, constitute, and name, John Bare, Esq., our serjeant at law, in our said kingdom of Ireland, Sir Robert Jacoh, knight, Sir Adam Loftus of Rathfarnham, Anthony St. Ledger, Peter Wright, William Greatrake, Nicholas Harman, John Bromfield, John Ely, Robert Whitacre, Robert Sutton, and Richard Keating, to be the first and modern twelve free burgesses of the said borough to continue in the said office of free burgesses of the said borough during their several lives, unless in the mean time, for misconduct or any reasonable cause they or any of them be removed from the said offices, and that all the inhabitants of the said town and such and so many other men as the portrieve and free burgesses of the said towns for the time being shall admit to the freedom of the same borough we will constitute and ordain shall be the commonalty of the said borough. And further we will, that the said John Kerton, whom by these presents we have made portrieve of the said borough, shall come before our justices at the next general assizes after the date of these presents, to be held within our said county of Carlow, and shall in due manner take as well the oath commonly called the oath of supremacy as also his corporal oath well and faithfully to execute his office of portrieve of the said borough until the feast of St. Michael the archangel then next following, as aforesaid ; and that the portrieve of the said borough be annual and elective, and therefore we will, and by these presents for us, our heirs, and successors

DO GRANT to the said portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the said borough and their successors, that the said portrieve and free burgesses of the said borough for the time being, forever, every year at the feast of the nativity of St. John the Baptist can and may assemble themselves in any convenient place within the said borough, and that the said portrieve and free burgesses so assembled or the major part of them before they depart may there elect one of the more discreet free burgesses of the said borough to exercise the office of the portrieve for one year from the feast of St. Michael then next following, and until another of the burgesses of that said borough into that office shall be in due manner elected, perfected, and sworn, and that every portrieve so elected before he be admitted to exercise that or be considered as portrieve shall take as well the oath commonly called the oath of supremacy, as also his corporal oath well and truly to execute the office of portrieve of the said borough, at the feast of St. Michael the archangel, next after such his election, before the portrieve, who the year before had preceded him in that office.

AND WE GRANT full power and authority to every last predecessor of every portrieve of said borough for the time being to take the said oath from every such portrieve to be newly elected.  Moreover, of our like special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion, we will, and by these presents, for us, our heirs, and successors, do grant to the said portrieve, free burgesses and commonalty of the said borough and their successors, that if, and whenever it shall happen that the portrieve of the said borough for the time being within one year after he be elected and sworn into the office of portrieve of the said borough as aforesaid shall die, or in any manner vacate said office, that then, and so often the free burgesses and commonalty of the said borough and their successors can and may within the space of fifteen days next after such vacancy, elect another fit person out of the said number of free burgesses to be portrieve of the said borough for the remainder of that year to rule and govern said borough, and that every person or persons so elected to the office of portrieve of the said borough can and may execute the office of portrieve of the said borough until the feast of St. Michael the archangel next following such his election, first taking the oath called the oath of supremacy, and also the oath for the due execution of his office of portrieve. And further of our special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion, we will and by these presents for us, our heirs, and successors do grant to the said portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of said borough and their successors, that if any of the said free burgesses of the said borough as aforesaid in these presents named, or any of the free burgesses of the said borough hereafter to be elected shall die or be removed from that office' while free burgesses, and every of them for misconduct in that office, we will shall be amoveable at pleasure .of the portrieve, and the major part of the free burgesses of the said borough for the time being, that then the portrieve, and the remaining free burgesses of the said borough for the time being, within seven days next after the death or removal of such free burgesses can and may assemble themselves in any convenient place within the said borough, and that the said portrieve and free burgesses, so assembled, or the major part of them, before they depart can and may elect one, or so many as shall be wanting of the said number of twelve free burgesses, out of the better and more honest inhabitants of the said borough, into the place or places of such free burgess or free burgesses, so dead or removed from that office, to continue in the said office during their natural lives, unless in the meantime for misconduct, or ill-government, in that behalf they or any of them be removed, and that every person so elected into office of a free burgess of the said borough before ha be admitted to execute that office, shall take his corporal oath, well and truly to execute his office of a free burgess of the said borough, within seven days after such his election, before the portrieve of the said borough for the time being, or before the remaining free burgesses of the said borough, then surviving and remaining in that office, or the major part of them, to which portrieve for the time being, or to which free burgesses or the major part of them, for the time being, we do give and grant full power and authority to take the said oath, from every such free burgess to be newly elected, and so often as the case shall happen. And further of our special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion, we will, and by these presents, for us, our heirs, and successors,

DO GRANT to the said portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the said borough, and their successors, that they and their successors, forever, can and may have hold one court in any convenient and open place within the said borough, to be held before the portrieve of the said borough, for the time being, and in the said court to hold pleas on every Monday, from week to week, of all and singular actions of debt, covenant, trespass, detenue, contract and personal demands whatsoever, not exceeding the sum of five marks sterling, which shall arise or happen within the said borough, or the liberties thereof, and that said court be reputed and held a court of record for ever. We will also, and of our more abundant special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion, by these presents for us, our heirs, and successors do grant to the said portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the said bo. rough and their successors, forever, that they and their successors, from time to time, as often as they shall think expedient, can and may meet and assemble themselves in any convenient place within the said borough and in their meetings there, make, decree, ordain, and establish, such and the like acts, ordinances, and by-laws for tie good rule and sound government of the said borough, and the inhabitants thereof, as to them or the major part of them shall think necessary ; and that they shall have power and authority by fines and pecuniary mulcts to punish, chastise, and correct, any persons breaking through such acts, ordinances, and by-laws, provided said acts, ordinances, and by-laws, fines and mulcts be reasonable and not contrary or repugnant to the laws and statutes of our said kingdom of Ireland. And further, we will, and by these presents, for us, our heirs, and successors, do grant to the said portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the said borough, and their successors, forever, that they may have a guild mercatory within the said borough, and one common seal, engraven with such form and device as to them shall seem fit, to serve for ever for the affairs of the said borough, and that they can and may, from time to time, as often as need shall require, out of themselves elect, constitute, and ordain two serjeants at mace, and the other inferior officers and ministers necessary for the better government of the said borough and the inhabitants thereof, and every person, so from time to time elected, constituted, and ordained,WE do make, constitute, and ordain to be the serjeant at mace and other officers and ministers of the said borough respectively, and to continue in their offices during their good behaviour, or at the will and pleasure of the portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the said borough; and that every such serjeant, officer, and minister before he be permitted to exercise his office, shall take before the portrieve of the said borough, for the time being, his corporal oath well and truly to exercise his office.

And further of our special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion, we will, and by these present for us, our heirs, and successors, do give and grant to the said portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the said borough, forever, that the portrieve of the said borough for the time being, forever, shall be the clerk of the market within the said borough and the liberties thereof, and shall from time to time have full power and authority to do and execute all things to the office of clerk of the market within the said borough belonging or appertaining; so that no other clerk of the market of us, our heirs, and successors, shall enter into the borough aforesaid, or the franchises thereof, to do or execute the office of clerk of the market or anything to the said office belonging or appertaining, or in any manner interfere with anything touching the office of clerk of the market within the said borough; or the liberties thereof. And further, of our more ample special grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion, we grant to the portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the said borough and their successors, forever, that these our letters patent and every article and clause therein contained, or the enrollment thereof, shall be construed, interpreted, and adjudged to the best advantage, benefit, and favour of the said portrieve, free burgesses, and commonalty of the said borough and their successors against us, our heirs, and successors, as well in all the courts of us within our said kingdom of Ireland, or elsewhere, wheresoever, without any confirmation, licence, or toleration hereafter to be procured or obtained; notwithstanding that our writ of ad quod damnum hath not issued to inquire of the premises before the making of these our letters patents; and notwithstanding any other defect or any other thing, cause, or matter whatsoever to the contrary notwithstanding. Because &c. we will also &c. without fine in the Hamper &c.

In witness whereof we have caused these our letters to be made patent. Witness our aforesaid deputy general of our kingdom of Ireland, at Dublin, the nineteenth day of April in the eleventh year of our reign of England, France, and Ireland, and of Scotland the forty-sixth.

Nicholas Stafford, bishop of Leighlin and Ferns, governed these sees three years and eight months, and died on the 15th November, 1604. He was buried in St. Mary's church Wexford.

His successor was Thomas Ram, born at Windsor, in Berkshire, and educated firstly at Eton, and afterwards at King's College, Cambridge; where he took his degree of master of arts. On the appointment of Robert earl of Essex, as lord lieutenant of Ireland, Mr. Ram attended his lordship as chaplain, which office he filled in 1599. In 1601, he became chaplain to Charles, lord Mountjoy (who succeeded the earl of Essex), by whom he was presented to the deanery of Cork, and afterwards to that of Ferns. He also held the offices of rector of St Mary's, Wexford, vicar of Balrothery, in the diocese of Dublin, and Chantor of Christ-church; which preferments, together with the deanery and Chantorship of Ferns, he held with the sees of Leighlin and Ferns.

He was consecrated bishop of these dioceses at Christ church, Dublin, on the 2nd of May, 1605, by Henry Ussher, archbishop of Armagh, (assisted by the archbishop of Cashel and the bishop of Kildare), the see of Dublin being at that time vacant. It would seem, that the appointment could not have fallen on a more diligent, pains-taking person, as will fully appear on perusal of the following minute and interesting report of the state of his ecclesiastical charge, made seven years after his elevation to the superintendence of these sees. It is matter of great regret, that much of this curious document is defaced, and a great part of it totally destroyed. "

A TRUE ACCOUNT of the BISHOF OF LEIGHLIN AND FERNS, how he hath performed those duties which the right reverend father in God, the archbishop of Dublin, being his metropolitan, undertook unto his majesty for him and the rest of his suffragans; made this 1st of September, 1612.

"1. Concerning the order and course which I have holden for the suppression of popery and planting the truth of religion in each of my dioceses, it hath been of two sorts — first being advised by some in authority (unto whom his majesty's pleasure and the state of those times were better known than unto me) to carry myself in all mild and gentle manner toward my diocesans and circuits, I never (till of late) proceeded to the excommunication of any for matter of religion, but contented myself only to confer with divers of each diocese both poor and rich, and that in the most familiar and kind manner that I could, confirming our doctrines and confuting their assertions by the touchstone of all truth, the holy Scriptures. And for the poorer sorts, some of them have not only discovered unto me privately their dislike of popery and the mass, in regard they understood not what is said or done therein, but also groaned under the burthen of the many priests in respect of the double tithes and offerings, the one paid by them unto us and the other unto them. Being then demanded of me why they did not forsake the mass, and come to our church, their answer hath been (which I know to be true in some) that if they should be of our religion, no popish merchant would employ them being sailors, no popish landlords would let them any land being husbandmen, nor 'set them houses in tenantry being artificers, and therefore they must either starve or do as they do. As for the gentlemen and those of the richer sort I have always found them very obstinate, which hath proceeded from the priests resorting unto their houses and company, and continual hammering of them upon their superstitious anvil.

Touching the second course, since the time that his majesty signified his express pleasure that the censures of the church should be by us practised against recusants after often (....................................................................................................................................................................page torn...........................) plain and mild manner, but all to no purpose, I (.........torn page.........................) to repair unto their parish church on days .(...............................remainder of the sheet destroyed................................................)

Sheriff, I caused to be brought before me, hoping then that my persuasion and reasons, together with their apparent and present danger, would make them relent ; myself prevailing nothing with them, I entreated their landlord, Sir Henry Wallop, to try what he could do with them, but all in vain : this done 1 singled them out one by one and offered each of them this favour to give them any reasonable time to bethink themselves, upon these conditions, first, that they would repair to their curate's house twice or thrice a week, and hear our service privately in his chamber read unto them, next, that they would put me in good security for the delivery of their bodies unto the sheriff, at the end of the time to be granted, if they conformed not themselves ; but they jumped all in one answer as if they had known before hand what offer I would tender unto them, and had been catechised by some priest, what answer to make, viz.  ‘that they were resolved to live and die in that religion, and that they knew that they must be imprisoned at length, and therefore, (say they), as good now as hereafter.’

"2. I have continually resided either in the diocese of Ferns or of Leighlin, sometimes in the one, sometimes in the other, and in which so ever myself have been I have exercised the ecclesiastical jurisdiction in person, when I was not, mine official supplied my room. "

3. Having been about seven years bishop, I have every year once visited each of my dioceses in person, and have called before me my clergy in each deanery, and two at least of the laity out of every parish for sides men upon their oaths to detect all the offences and defects of ecclesiastical cognizance committed within their several parishes, and have accordingly proceeded therein. "

4. If I be authorized under the seal to tender the oath of allegiance to every man of sort within my dioceses, I am most ready and willing to put it in execution, to persuade them in the best and serious manner that I can to take that oath, and duly and truly to certify the lord deputy from time to time the names both of the takers and refusers thereof. "

5. There was never any yet admitted by me or mine official unto any spiritual living within either of my dioceses, but he did' distinctly with his mouth pronounce and (I doubt not) but truly and willingly with his heart embrace and take the oath of supremacy. "

6. Having as diligently as I can inquired what priest, &c resort each of my dioceses, and who are the ordinary harbourers of them.

In the diocese of Leighlin

1 . Sir Laghlin Oge, keeping for the most part either at the house of John Browne in the town of Carlow, or at the house of Margaret Archer, widow, or at the house of Walter Butler of Carlow, merchant."

2. Sir Murtogh O'Dowling, a vicar general of the diocese of Kildare coming by starts, harboured at the house of William Dun of Binnekerry, near Carlow. "

3. Luke Archer, vicar general for the diocese of Leighlin, keeping for the most part in Kilkenny; at his coming into the county of Carlow resorting unto the house of Edmond McvTirielogh of Ravilly. "

4. Sir Christopher Priest, sometimes keeping at the house of Nicholas Caffory of near Leighlin, but I heard not of his resort thither of late. "

5. Sir Thomas Reugh, priest, keeping about a twelvemonth since at the house of Garret M'Teg of Ratellick in the parish of Killabban : where (his arm being broken) he lay at cure, but since I have not heard of him. "

6. Sir Murtogh Dun, priest, coming by starts into this diocese, but residing ordinarily with his brother James Dun of Dunmannock in the diocese of Kildare. "

7, One Gilloduff, a young priest, roaming hither and thither. "

8. Sir Patrick Oge, keeping here and there in about the parish of Tulleghfelim. "

9. Sir Thomas Oge O'Hinnagan, frequenting the house of Garret McKilpatrick in the Rahen in the parish of Clonmore. "

10. Sir Molrony McGrew, priest, keeping in the parish of Raville in no certain place that I can yet learn, but as his occasions lead him.

"No popish priest hath ever been admitted either to church living or cure within either of my dioceses during mine incumbency; neither (God willing) during my time ever shall.

" All the churches within both my dioceses are builded according to the country fashion, or bonds taken for the building of those few that are unbuilded, except some few parishes, wherein there is yet little or no habitation"
Lastly, though I have used my best endeavour according to my simple skill to reform recusants, yet have I come far short of what I ought to have done ; and I must needs acknowledge myself to be an unprofitable servant. But by the grace of God, I am what I am, and by the said grace assisting me, I will endeavour myself daily more and more to root out popery and to sow the seed of true religion in the hearts of all the people committed to my charge; which, though I have no hope to effect as I would, yet, est aliquid prodire tenus, cum non da fur ultra."

The humble answer of Thomas bishop of Ferns and Leighlin, to his majesty's instructions and interrogations lately sent unto the archbishops and bishops of this realm. *

"1. Touching the first article, I have answered particularly unto each branch thereof in my former certificate."

2. Concerning the true value of the benefices of each diocese aforesaid, and the names and qualities of the present incumbents, they are (so near as I can learn) Worth communitus annis as followeth.

The Bishopric of Leighlin.

(Note some of the sheets are decayed)

"The present incumbent thereof Thomas Ram, holding it by union with, the bishopric of Ferns durante vita, by virtue of bis majesty's letters patent. The annual rent thereof is twenty-four pounds sterling besides the demesnes, which are very large, if the bishop might enjoy his right. But in respect they are almost all mountainy grounds, and-much of them is withholden by the neighbours thereof, yield very little profit. The detainers of the demesnes of Old Leighlin are, Sir Richard Butler of Poleston, knight, Richard Comberford of Ballerloghna, Esq., William Fannynge of Ballecloghna, gent., who taking advantage of rebellion in these parts, and of the often and long vacancy of this poor bishopric, have detained (and still so do) almost three, miles of land belonging unto it. The encroachers of the manor of Shanecourt alias Woodstocke in the Queen's county, are, Sir Richard Greame of Ballelehan, knight, and Piers Ovington of Amorstown, Esq. who have the one of the one side and the other of the other side, so encroached upon the said manor, that whereas it consisted of eight score acres arable land in the fifth year of Edward I. as by the exchequer then being, his accompt appeareth in the king's rolls, and so much hath been in possession with the bishop of Leighlin his tenant within fifty years last past: they have left with the house but one acre of land. If I hoped that these lands could be recovered in law by any reasonable charge. .. (..........the remainder of this sheet destroyed....) '

Names of Benefices

Names of the Incumbents

Annual value in peace        Sterling

Annual val. During late rebellion  Sterling

Treasurer Robert Cleere

Robert Cleere a reading minister born in Ireland, having the English, Irish and Latin tongues

7

3

V. of Cymolins

The same Clecre holding the same with the treasurership by union during his life, according to the ancient custom of this diocese

10

15

V. of Sleguffe Archdeacon

Ditto, .................ditto                                Piera Corse, an ancient minister born in Ireland, skilful in the English, Irish and Latin tongues, keeping hospitality according to his means

5

2

V. of Lowron

The same Gone holding the same by the union for life

8

2

V. of Tullogh  Preb.of lllard

Ditto                                                             David Ready, a reading minister of Irish birth, having the English, Irish  Latin tongues   

5

10

V. of Dunleckny

The same Ready .................ditto

6

10

Preb of Tulmagymah

John Parker bachelor of arts and preacher, who was lately admitted
thereunto residing yet at Dublin

12

6

Preb of Ahold

Richard Thompson, bachelor of arts and student in Trinity College near Dublin

7 10s

6

V. of Ballerony

Thomas Manly, a reading minister of English birth, having the English and Latin tongues

7

6

V. of Gallon

The same Manly holding by union

8

6

V. of Berragh

James Waddinge, a reading minister o English birth

8

6

V. of Balleelin

The same Waddinge, united for life residing within the parish of Balleellin

8

4

V. of Kiltinuill

Ditto, .............................ditto,

5

4

V . of Rathmore

John Bradish, residing in Munister

2

4

V. Temohoe

The bishop of Kerry holding it in com mendam

12

7

V. of Fonts town

Arthur Bladesmith, an English ministor, having some skill in the Latin tongue, residing therein

7

3

V. Ballyaquillan

The same Bladesmith

3

3

V. Rahaspeke

Ditto

2 10s

3

V. of Cloidagh

Oliver Keatinge, an ancient reading minister of Irish birth, skilful in the English and Irish tongues residing therein

6

3

V. of Killeshin

same Keatinge, holding it by union

5

3

V. of Nowghall Villy

Willyam Hilton, a reading minister of English birth, having some skill in the Irish tongue, residing thereon

6

3

V. of Monner 

The same Hilton, holding them by union

9

3

V. of Corclone

John Mooren, a reading minister of Irish birth, very ready in the
English and Irish tongues

9

3

V.of Killabban

The same Mooren, holding it by union and residing thereon

18

8

R of Temogi 

Walter Fullan, an ancient reading minister of Irish birth, having the English, Irish, and Latin tongues re- siding thereon

10

3

R. of Tullomoy R.of Killana

The same Fullan, holding it by union teaching school there

2

3

Rectory of and Kilclonebrocke

Walter Skelton The remainder of the sheet decayed

6

3

V. of Shankill

Tege O'Curren, a reading minister of Irish birth, having the English, Irish and Latin tongues

7

3

V. of Catherlogh

Piers White, a reading minister of Irish birth, having the English, Irish and Latin tongues residing in same living in Munster by dispensation out

7

7

Names of Benefices

Names of the Incumbents

Annual value in peace Sterling

Annual val. during late rebellion    Sterling

V of Kellestown

Henry Welsh a reading minister of Irish Birth having English and Latin Tongues resident in the diocese of Dublin by dispensation out of office faculities

9

6

V of Clonekine

Thomas Smyth, master of arts and a preacher, residing within half a mile of the same

9

5

V of Clonekine

Derby O'Horraghan, an old reading minister of Irish birth, having the English, Irish, and Latin tongues

7

5

V. of Clonenah

The same Horraghan, holding them both by union

8

5

V. of Burroes

David Goode, an ancient reading minister of English birth, skilful in the Irish tongue --  -- The same Goode, holding them by union

8

4

(Decayed)

 

9

4

Preb. of Cross Patricks

Robert Ram a bachelor of Arte’s student at Trinity College near Dublin

5

4

V. Of Kilcowan

Patrick Kelly, an ancient churchman of Irish birth, skilful in the English and Irish tongues residing therein

5

41

V. Ramacknee

The same Kelly, holding it by dispensation out of the office of faculties

10

10

V. of Maglors

James Stafford, an ancient reading minister, residing in the same, and having the English and Latin tongues

15

15

V. R. Kilscowran

Adam Hay, as yet but deacon residing thereon

20

20

R. of Roslare

Thomas Gallamore, a master of arts and preacher, residing thereon and keeping good hospitality 

30

30

R. of Shanboe

The same Gallamore, holding by dispensation out of the office of faculties

20

5

V. of Roslare

Richard Reigh, ancient churchman, keeping residence and hospitality

15

15

(decayed)        V.of Millenoch

Murtogh Mackaparsons, a reading minister of Irish birth, having the English, Irish, and Latin tongues

7

5

R. of Kilteanill

James Lee, a master of arts and a preacher, lately admitted thereunto reside thereon very shortly

12

5

R. of Kilcoman

Vacant — it was leased long since with a reservation only of

1

1

R. of Ambrose Town

Willyam Underwood, a scholar of sixteen years of age or thereabouts

5

3

R. of Kilgarvan

John Batison, a scholar aged seventeen or  thereabouts.

5

3

"At my first preferment unto these bishoprics, and finding such' want of clergymen within both my dioceses, especially of Leighlin that some of the parishioners being by me blamed for carrying their children to popish priests to be christened, answered (though rather for excuse, as I found afterwards in that they were compelled so to do, in regard that they had no curate of our religion near unto them; in imitation of the reverend bishops living in the beginning of the reign of our late queen of happy memory, I entreated three or four men of English birth of staid carriage and good report, being well able to give an account of their faith in the English tongue, and to instruct the people by reading, to enter orders of the church, and provided for them first cures among the English parishes, afterward small vicarages which they enjoyed at this lime, and reside upon them. And whereas two or three of the natives of this country being well able to speak and read Irish unto their countrymen, sought unto me for holy orders, I thought likewise fit in the great scarcity of men of that quality to admit them thereunto (being likewise of honest life and well reported of among their neighbours) and to provide them some small competency of living in the Irish parts ; furthermore being desirous, serere alteri seculo, by providing a learned ministry which shall be able to preach nuto the people hereafter, I have also according to the ancient custom of my diocese dispensed with three or four youths of fifteen or sixteen years of age to hold each of them a church living under ten pounds in true value, studii gratia, having taken order with the churchmen adjoining to discharge the cures of the same, and having had a watchful eye over these young men that they did and do bond fide follow (............rest of the sheet mutilated...........)

May be dealt withal to authorize one or two of the bishop's choice and nomination for the executing of the writs de excommunicato capiendo. Next that none be suffered to be gaolers or inferior officers unto them, but such as resort unto our church without- the former the excommunicates for matter of religion will hardly be attached; without the latter they being attached and committed will be encouraged to continue in their obstinacy. "

Secondly, there being divers impropriations within my dioceses which have no vicars endowed, whose possessioners are bound by their leases or fee farms to find sufficient curates ; mine earnest request is that a competent stipend may be raised out of every able impropriation whereby the curate thereof may be maintained : and that two or three of the impropriations of small value may be united amongst themselves, if they be together; 'and a competency raised out of them all so united for an incumbent, but if they be asunder, that then they may be united to the next parsonage or vicarage adjoining and contribute towards the bettering thereof: provided always, that in whichsoever of the united churches divine service is celebrated, thither all the parishioners of the churches united be compelled every Sabbath and holyday to repair in their course and turn. Now the competency which I conceive will be fittest for the improprietaries to yield, and of the curates to receive, is the small tithes of every such parish.

"THO. FERNESS AND LEIGHLIN."

 A parliament met at the Castle of Dublin, on the 18th of May, 1613. Among the members, there were one hundred and one Roman Catholics. The representatives returned from our district were the following: —

For the county of Carlow: George Bagenal, and Morgan Kavanagh, Esqrs.

For the borough of Carlow: John Bere, Esq., serjeant at law, and Sir Robert Jacob, knt., solicitor general.' The two latter persons were among the first twelve Burgesses of the borough of Carlow.

We take the following report of the proceedings from the Journals of the House of Commons. October, 11th, 1614. The greater part of the knights, citizens, and burgesses of the Gammons House of parliament being this day assembled by eight of the clock in the morning, public thanks were given to God, by Sir John Davies, knight, speaker of the said House of Commons.

October 29th 1614. Mr. George Bagenal moved that Mr. Johnson, one of the attorneys in the court of Common Pleas, might be brought into the house, to be punished for arresting him in Easter term last.

Sir Oliver St. John spoke touching the privilege of the house for forty days before and forty days after; doubtful of too large. Sir John Everard, that it is fit to be punished. Dr. Reeves, with Sir Oliver St. John. Mr. Fernham, touching his knowledge of the arrest. Mr. Sherlock, to have the statute pursued. Mr. Waddinge, the like. Mr. Crewe, to make a difference between a prorogation and adjournment. Sir Charles Nugent, to follow the statute and that Johnson be sent for.

Mr Treasurer that the statute helps the privilege of the house, and is to be followed It is Bordered, that if Johnson can be had here this sitting, then the serjeant is to bring him in, and the officer that made the arrest also; but if he be not in town, the warrant to issue for bringing him in on Monday next.

October 31st, 1614. Mr. Johnson being brought to the bar was by the speaker charged for arresting Mr. George Bagenal, a member of this house, which he confessed, but stuck at the expounding of the statute here, and yet submitted.

Agreed by the house, that Mr. Johnson shall be imprisoned in the castle during the pleasure of the house, and shall, for his offence, pay unto Mr. George Bagenal the sum of nine and thirty pounds, ten shillings, sterling; before he be enlarged, or admitted to his petition for his release.

November 3rd, 1614. Mr. John Johnson's petition was motioned by Mr. Disney, but the speaker acquainted the house with the former order, that satisfaction must be made before the petition be read, and thereupon Mr. Bagenal acknowledged satisfaction, and so his petition was read, and the house gave order for his enlargement, but with caution, that before he be discharged, it shall appear that the said Johnson had either paid unto Mr. Richard Hadsor the thirty pounds, which Mr. Bagenal paid upon the arrest unto the said Johnson, in discharge of so much due by him to the said Mr. Hadsor, or else shall give good security for the said Mr. Richard Hadsor' s satisfaction in that behalf.

November 7th, 1614. In a conference between the lords and commons, the bishop of Leighlin and Ferns was one of those who acted for the former. The second session met on the 18th April, 1615.

May 1st, 1615. Mr. George Bagenal*, upon the beginning of the reading of the bill of Scots, desired that the bill of the natives might have the precedency in reading. Sir James Hamilton condescended that the bill for the natives should have the precedency, and that in old time, Ireland was called Scotia major, and Scotland Scotia minor; therefore amity to be betwixt both. (NOTE* This name we find also spelt Bagnall

Mr. Justice Sibthorp, That both English, Irish, and Scots being under one God and one king should be equally capable of preferment.

Mr. Armesly. The bills are not denied, therefore he desired that the blemish should be taken away; therefore, both to be read and committed, and the house to be an humble suitor to the king for repeal of any statute that shall disable any native to be capable of any office in this realm.

2nd May, 1615. In a difference between lord Howth and Mr Lutterel, the house agreed that Sir Laurence Esmonde, Sir Adam Loftus, and Mr. Bagenal, shall repair to the Lord Howth, and give his lordship notice of the committee's next sitting, and that his lordship should there bring all his proofs.

8, May, 1615. The house was this day called, when some of the members being absent, were fined, “and others to lose their wages."

The Bishop of Leighlin and Ferns was an active member of this parliament it was dissolved on the 24th October, 1615.

As already noticed, inquisitions were frequently taken in these times, in order to ascertain the nature and extent of property appertaining to individuals or corporate bodies. The following inquisitions, taken in this reign, are preserved in the chief remembrancer's office of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer, Dublin,

COUNTY OF CATHERLAGH JAMES I.

Name of person

Date

Place where taken

Thomas the Duke Norfolk

7th June Anno 2

Catherlagh

Donogh McLiseagh O’Nolane

13th Sept Anno 2

Rathvilly

John Dogan

28th July Anno 4

Catherlagh

Edmond St Leger

6th May Anno 12

Catherlagh

James Fitz-Pierce

16th Jan 1617

Catherlagh

Daniel O’Nolane

9th June 1617

Catherlagh

Maurice Leaghe  McCahir Cavanaghe

21th Mar Anno 18

Catherlagh

Donat O’Nolane

24th Oct Anno 20

The Session House

In 1622, Robert Grace, baron of Courtstown, in the county of Kilkenny, was the feoffee of the lady Elizabeth Butler, wife of Richard, earl of Desmond, and daughter and sole heir of Thomas, earl of Qrmonde and Ossory, K.G. A great number of manor and other lands in the counties of Carlow, Kilkenny, and elsewhere, were thus assigned to him; forming, altogether, the largest estate then enjoyed by any subject of the united kingdom.

In reference to the county of Carlow estates of the Ormonde family, it may be proper to advertise the. reader, that in consideration of the eminent services of Peter, earl of Ormond and Owory, and of his son James, lord Butler, treasurer of Ireland, in opposing the Geraldines when in rebellion, Henry VIII., by letters patent dated at Westminster, 23rd October, and 29th year of his reign, granted to the said Peter and James, the manors, castles, and towns of Rathvile, Clonmore, Calleghniefelleyne, Kallasne, Powerstown, and Leighlin, in the county of Carlow, for their lives, or to the longest liver, and the heirs male of the body of the said Peter forever, by the service of one knight's fee. This grant was made in the year following the enactment of the statute of absentees, by which the possession of the county of Carlow was resumed by the crown,

During this reign, the frequent inquiries regarding the titles to property gave great dissatisfaction to the generality of the country gentlemen. This circumstance is not very surprising, as the tenure of property was thus rendered extremely precarious. Where no grant; or no inheritance by descent or conveyance in pursuance of such grant could be produced, the estate was immediately pronounced the property of the crown. These inquisitions, though afterwards more extensively called into operation, were at first applied to cases in which it was obvious the parties had no legal title to their lands; such as those of the various Irish septs in the county of Carlow who had intruded on the estates of the duke of Norfolk. James I. died on the 27th day of March, 1625.

("Spelling are as seen in the book")


CHAPTER XXII

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