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Letters To / From USA

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Continued from previous page

Pat Purcell Papers.

Part 3 -

"Not We From Kings But Kings From Us".

The following Steuart "extending" family history was compiled by Henrietta Maria Hickey in 1862,..... if only we all had an obliging ancestor to leave us with such a gossipy family genealogy!....due to the time consuming task of transcribing the complete letters (and yes, there are another two letters in the same racy style and possibly a book therein, think of Elizabeth Burke-Plunkett, Countess of Fingall with her book - "Seventy Years Young"!) the content of the present letter has been edited and abbreviated by me, now on page 24 of 52 pages.

Henrietta Maria Steuart Hickey died in February 1876. Her husband was the highly regarded Rev. William Hickey of whom Pat Purcell, in a 3 page reply to the 1931 letters, recorded the following details, some of which is from Hart's "Irish Pedigrees".

---" Rev. William Hickey was well known for his efforts to elevate the condition of the peasantry of Ireland, he was the eldest son of Rev. Ambrose Hickey, rector of Murragh, County Cork, his mother was Jane Herrick, niece of Captain William Herrick, R.N of Ship Pool, Poulnalonge Castle in Cork.

William Hickey was born in 1788, he graduated at St. John's College, Cambridge, and subsequently took the degree of M.A. in Trinity Dublin.

He was ordained a clergyman of the Church of Ireland in 1811, and appointed to the curacy of Dunleckney, County Carlow.

In 1813 he married Henrietta Maria Steuart of Steuart's Lodge, Leighlinbridge, County Carlow. The only daughter of John Steuart, grandson of the Earl of Galloway and of the Royal House of Stuarts, whose family motto was "NOT WE FROM KINGS, BUT KINGS FROM US".

In 1820 William Hickey was inducted into the rectory of Bannow, County Wexford, whilst there he founded the Wexford Agricultural Society to try improve the lot of farmers in the Wexford area.

In 1826 was transferred to Kilcormick, near Rosslare.

In 1831 he was posted to Wexford town, and in 1834 to the rectory in Mulrankin, where he ministered for the remainder of his life.

As a parochial clergyman he was esteemed alike by Catholics and Protestants. He commenced his career as a writer in 1817, his first work being a pamphlet, of which I enclose a copy for you, titled "The State of the Poor in Ireland".

In the following years he published a series of letters under the nom de plume of Martin Doyle, and under which he continued to write.

His last work, published a few years before his death, was Notes and Gleanings of the County Wexford.

In all his writings he took the broadest philanthropic views.

All his life he studiously avoided religious and political controversy. He was awarded a gold medal by the Royal Dublin Society.

 In recognition of his services to Ireland, and enjoyed a pension from the Literary Fund.

He died comparatively poor on the 24th October, 1875, aged 87.

His wife, Henrietta, the writer of your family chronicle, is buried alongside him in Mulrankin, Ferns, County Wexford. She died aged 85 at her daughter's residence "The Rectory" in Camolin, County Wexford.

I enclose copies of Deeds to Steuart's Lodge and details of the present owners etc etc etc." (signed) Pat Purcell, November 1931."---- (for present day readers of this post I attached a Google extract on Rev. William Hickey appears at end of this email.) ]

Pat Purcell Papers.

Letter, Genealogical enquiry, Dated,  May, 1931.

From:  J. Hallam [ ? ],

Threadneedle Street, City of London, England.

To:  Pat Purcell,

Town Hall, Carlow, Ireland.

Part three of a FAMILY CHRONICLE compiled by Henrietta Maria Hickey in 1862. [Henrietta died in February 1876].

(Continued extracts edited by Michael Purcell  from 52 page letter (now on page 24 of 52 pages!).

My fourth great aunt (# 5) Lydia married John Nunn, Esquire, of the County of Wexford.

Her family consisted of four sons, John, Abraham, Lorenzo and Joshua, and two daughters , Mary married to the Rev. George Walters, and Susanna who married the Rev. Henry St. Eloy.

One of the sons, Abraham, commanded the 3rd West India Regiment at the siege of Domenica, and was killed at the taking of it.

Each of his brothers and sisters was presented by the Government with a silver cup on which is an inscription laudatory of his valour, and a representation of the siege. A handsome gilt sword was also given to his eldest brother, John.

This John married his cousin Helena Nunn, daughter of Joshua Nunn, Esquire, of Hill Castle.

The next Nickson sister, my great aunt Hester (#6), married Captain Stewart, one of the Castlereagh family. They had one daughter, Rachel, who died unmarried, and three sons, Annesley, Abraham, and James.

Annesley was the first British officer who leaped on shore at the disembarkation of the troops in Egypt, and his head was taken off by a cannon ball. He was unmarried.

James also died unmarried. Their brother Abraham Stewart was a clergyman, and had a large family ; one of his daughters is married to Judge Perrin.

My next great aunt, Mary Nickson, (#7) married the Rev. B. Mosse. She had three sons, Andrew, Thomas, and Peter, and three daughters, Mary, (Mrs McDonald), Frances, (Mrs Spriggs), and Eliza.

My eighth great aunt, (#8) Letitia Nickson, married a Mr Waller, of Dublin. She had two sons, Richard and Edward. Richard married a great beauty, Miss Harsfall, Edward married Miss Codrington. Letitia also had three daughters, Mary Waller, (unmarried), Jane married her cousin Josuha Nunn (already named); the third also married a cousin, Lorenzo Nunn (already named).

My ninth great aunt, Harriet (#9) also known as Henrietta Nickson, married her cousin William Butler, of Broomville, Carlow, the third son of Sir Richard Butler, of Ballintemple.

They had two sons and one daughter, Richard and James and Mary Butler (married Colonel Johnstone). Richard Butler was a Colonel in the army, and died at Java, unmarried. James Butler succeeded to the Broomville estate in Carlow and married a singularly amiable and pleasing English lady, Miss Charlton, by whom he had a large family.

Their eldest son married Miss Grey of Upton, Carlow. Their second son, Charles Butler, was Lieut-Colonel of the 20th Regiment, and died in Carlow, unmarried at the early age of 34 . He was one of the heroic defenders of the Sand-bag Battery on the memorable 5th November, when the Russians appeared in such overwhelming force at the battle of Inkerman, and theGuards and the 20th Regiment so greatly distinguished themselves.  He fought in India following the mutiny there and suffered severe hardships in the Crimean War. (of Charles Butler more anon).

Their third son, James Butler, became a resident magistrate, and married Miss Adelaide Keogh, of Kilbride, Carlow.

One of the Harriet's daughters married her cousin, William Gore Johnstone, whose father, Colonel Johnstone, had married Mary Butler, of Broomville (the only daughter of Mary and William Butler) Mary Butler was one of the dearest companions of my girlhood. She left but one son, the above named William Gore Johnstone, and one daughter (Mrs Echlin of Carlow) My tenth great aunt, (#10) Frances Nickson ..........

[to be continued]

[Extract on Rev. William Hickey, husband of Henrietta Maria Steuart. from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverend_William_Hickey]

Reverend William Hickey aka Martin Doyle (1787-24th October 1875), Irish writer and philanthropist. A descendant of the Ó hÍceadha bardic family of physicians, he was the eldest son of Rev. Ambrose Hickey, Church of Ireland rector of Murragh, County Cork.

He graduated from St. John's College, Cambridge, and received his M.A. from the University of Dublin. He was ordained in 1811 and appoined curate of Dunleckney, County Carlow. Between then and 1834 he served at Bannow, Kilcormick, Wexford and Mulrankin, remaining at the latter till his death.

A Compendium of Irish Biography says of him:

"When at Bannow he started the South Wexford Agricultural Society and the Bannow Agricultural School, both of which flourished while under his superintendence. As a parochial clergyman he was esteemed alike by Catholics and Protestants.

He commenced his career as a writer in 1817, his first work being a pamphlet on the State of the Poor in Ireland. Afterwards followed a series of letters under the pseudonym of "Martin Doyle," under which he continued to write. He t... was a regular contributor to Blackwood's Agricultural Magazine, Chambers' Journal, and other periodicals. His latest production, published a few years before his death, was Notes and Gleanings of the County Wexford. In all his writings he took the broadest philanthropic views, studiously avoiding religious and political controversy.

He was awarded a gold medal by the Royal Dublin Society, in recognition of his services to Ireland, and enjoyed a pension from the Literary Fund. He was a man of an eminently charitable and feeling nature, and died comparatively poor, 24th October 1875, aged 87. These particulars of his life have been furnished by George Griffiths, author of Chronicles of the County of Wexford, one of the best authorities upon biographical and archaeological lore of that part of Ireland."]

 Source: Michael Purcell c.2012


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