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Carlow County - Ireland Genealogical Projects (IGP TM)


Carlow 1846

Source: Pat Purcell Papers & The Nation Archives


Pat Purcell Papers.

Carlow Sentinel.

August 1846.

Arrival of The Lord Lieutenant in Carlow.

Viceregal Lodge, Phoenix Park, Dublin.
Source of image: http://www.libraryireland.com/Atlas/Dublin-Viceregal-Lodge.php

His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant left Viceregal Lodge, on Thursday last, at one, and arrived by a special train in Carlow, at 20 minutes past two o'clock, the journey, 56 miles, being performed in one hour and 29 minutes - the speed at some parts of the line averaging 50 miles an hour.

His Excellency was accompanied by Sir John Macneil, Engineer - in-chief, Mr Durance, head of the locomotive department, who drove the engine himself; and by Mr Elwin, chief superintendent of the traffic department.

 His Excellency expressed to Sir John Macneil and the officers of the company, his marked approval of the entire arrangements, and observed that hitherto he entertained no idea of the perfection to which railways had approached in Ireland.

 There were eight horses from the Carlow Club House in readiness at the terminus, and his Excellency, without further delay, accompanied by Ladies Harriett, Emily and Kathleen Ponsonby, the Hon. Gerald Ponsonby, Captain Henry Ponsonby, and Mr Gerry Connellan, in two private carriages, proceeded to Bessborough, the family residence of the noble Earl at Piltown.

We are happy to learn that his Excellency appeared in the enjoyment of good health.  His Excellency travelled in a strictly private capacity, and, consequently, there was no guard of honour in waiting to receive him.

Transcribed by Selina Lawlor.
Source: M. Purcell c2012

Carlow Court 1846.

Pat Purcell Papers.

Carlow Sentinel.

Report of case tried at Petty Sessions in Carlow Courthouse, October 1846, before Mr Duckett, Resident Magistrate.

A Delicate Investigation.

Betty Murphy, a woman far advanced in years, summoned Bridget Bigley for the committal of a serious assault on Friday last, by which she suffered serious injury. Betty Murphy stated that the assault was entirely unprovoked, Bridget Bigley having unexpectedly attacked her in the public streets.

Addressing the Court, Mrs Bigley (a comely looking woman) - Your worships I suppose I will be heard. I found that woman in the house with my husband, and I trashed her (laughter). - She is a terrible character.

Mr Burgess stated - In this case - a serious one (laughter) - I am engaged by the defendant, who claims that she is the aggrieved party.

Mrs Begley - "I'll tell your worships the case. Betty Murphy has taken up with my husband. I watched her, and I saw her taking my place in the bed with him (roars of laughter).

Betty Murphy was cross-examined by Mr Burgess.  I am not a married woman now; I was married, but my husband is dead.

Mr Burgess was about to proceed to put other questions, when the Judge stated that the witness need not answer if she thought proper.

Mrs Bigley - Is there no justice for married women (laughter).  There's a woman who has deluded no less, your worship (addressing the Judge), than six men (great laughter).  It's the truth, and the bishop and clergy can vouch for it; for her conduct has been brought under their notice.  Is that woman to take my place, and to delude my husband? (laughter).

Mr Duckett - It is a very delicate question (laughter).

Mr Burgess - Well, I will put an end to the discussion by calling on the husband; then you will perceive whether Mrs Bigley was the aggrieved party.  True, she committed the assault, but she got great provocation (laughter).

Mrs Bigley - "True for you, I did; but that woman (pointing to Betty Murphy) must be taught a lesson" (great laughter).

Richard Bigley was then called, and, as the subject of the dispute, it is necessary to observe, that he was anything but a personification of an ADONIS; his appearance in the witness box to settle the dispute between the ladies excited great laughter.

On being sworn, he was examined by Mr Burgess.

Mr Burgess - Now, as an honest man, I ask you, on your oath, so far as regards Betty Murphy, had your wife any cause to be jealous of you?

The witness hesitated.

Mr Burgess-Tell the truth, man.

Witness - Well, if I must, I will.  I think she had (roars of laughter).

Mr Duckett - I think the case is of too delicate a nature to inquire further (laughter).

The Bench dismissed the case.

Mrs Bigley - I thank your worship for your proper decision (laughter).

Betty Murphy, on retiring from the court, was followed by a crowd, principally of women, and hooted through the town, and but for the constabulary she would be roughly handled by the fair sex, who took a deep interest in the injuries inflicted by Mrs Bigley.

Transcribed by Selina Lawlor.
Source: M. Purcell c2012

County Carlow December 22d 1846

"I have the honor to transmit a representation from the Magistrates of Carlow relative to the sale of a large number of fire arms which is to take place in this Town for the Information of His Excellency The Lord Lieutenant."

C.H. Tuckey Resident Magistrate
N. T. Redington Esquire

Turn Over [page 2]

"We the undersigned Magistrates of the County of Carlow residing in the town of Carlow beg leave to call the attention of the Government to the enclosed Hand bill several copies of which were posted through this town on yesterday."

"Having no power under the existing laws to prevent or restrict the indiscriminate sale of arms amongst the people, we feel it to be our duty to lay the matter before the Government Authorities, and at the same time we cannot but express our serious apprehension that the distribution of arms amongst the peasantry is calculated, under existing circumstances, to lead to consequences dangerous to the public tranquillity."

W. Cary
Thomas Haughton
John Tuomy
Mathew Esmond White
C.H. Tuckey Resident Magistrate
Carlow 22d December
Source: The Nation Archives
Supplied by Terry Curran c2008