RESEARCH INDEX
 

Carlow County - Ireland Genealogical Projects (IGP TM)


How to Order
Birth, Marriage & Death Certificates

New location of

Office of the Registrar-General, Dublin.

The General Register Office (Oifig An Ard-Chláraitheora) maintains a genealogical/family history research facility at:

3rd Floor, Block 7, Irish Life Centre, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1.

The Research facility is open Monday to Friday, (excluding public holidays) from 9.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. for the purpose of searching indexes to birth, death and marriage records and for obtaining photocopies of records identified from the indexes.

General Register Office in Dublin

All births, marriages and deaths occurring since 1864 (and all non-Roman Catholic marriages occurring since 1 April 1845) should be on record in the General Register Office, For the period before 1864, parish registers provide the only record of most births, marriages and deaths. Catholic parish registers are normally still held by the parish priest, but there are microfilms of most of them for the period up to 1880 in the National Library, Kildare Street,  Dublin 2.  In some cases,  the written permission of the parish priest must be obtained before the microfilms can be seen. The National Archives has a copy of the National Library's list of the registers

The master indices for the entire country, produced at the General Register Office in Dublin, are used for public research. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, the Mormons, has copies of almost all of the General Register Office indices and some registers, making direct access to both registers and indices possible through the local Family History Centres. Research in a Family History Centre can often be more fruitful, and less costly, than a visit to the General Register Office itself. In addition, some parts of the early years of birth registrations appear to be included in the International Genealogical Index.

A certain proportion of all three categories, births, marriages and deaths, simply went unregistered. It is impossible to be sure how much is not there, since the thoroughness of local registration depended very much on local conditions and on the individuals responsible, but experience in crosschecking from other sources such as parish and census records suggests that as much as 10 to 15 per cent of marriages and births simply do not appear in the registers.

Recently, the GRO sent me rather specific instructions:

Search Fees: (See links below).

Foreign applications:

Fees are payable in Irish pound currency (Punts), Draft I.E.P. or Euro checks or bank drafts drawn on an Irish Bank, made payable to the 'Registrar General'. Sterling checks, Postal Orders, US$ checks are accepted. The minimum amount for a check drawn on a non-Irish bank is 12.70 Euro. I bundle my requests so that I meet the minimum fee.

The GRO Search Room is open Monday to Friday from 9:30 am to 12:30 and from 2:15 to 4:30 pm.

Births, Death and Roman Catholic marriages certificates are available from:

  • The General Register Office

  • 3rd Floor, Block 7,

  • Irish Life Centre,

  • Lower Abbey Street,

  • Dublin 1.

  • Ireland

    See below for local county office addresses.

    Registration of non-Catholic marriages began in 1845 in Ireland.


    General Register Office - History


    Birth, Marriage & Death Records

    The BMD records from 1864 (1845 in the case of Non Catholic Marriages) are fully intact and are held at the General Registers Office (addresses at this link http://www.rootsweb.com/~irldubli/ ).

    If during your search of records on Microfiche you find reference to a volume number and a page number you can now write to the GRO and get a photocopy which will contain the rest of the information on the cert for about 4-5 Euro.

    Registration of births, marriages and deaths, regardless of religion, began January 1, 1864. The obligation to register these events rested on the public and failure to do so carried hefty fines. Certificates for births, marriages and deaths for all of Ireland until 1922 are housed in Dublin. Belfast has the records for Northern Ireland from 1922 to present. Clues to family history and genealogy are found in the civil records. The occupation or title gives clues to the family's lifestyle. Birth certificates include the date and place of birth; the name; the sex; the name, surname and residence of the father; the name, surname, maiden surname of the mother; the rank, profession or occupation of the father; and the name and qualifications of the informant, usually a family member. A given name was not obligatory, so some entries are Kelly, Male or Clarke, Female.

    The FHLC holds  microfilm copies of the index and certificates for 1864-1955. Marriage certificates include the date and place of marriage; groom's name, age, marital status, occupation or title, and residence; bride's name, marital status, age, occupation or title, and residence. The names of the fathers of both parties and their occupations or titles are given which makes them particularly relevant to genealogy. The church and the names of two witnesses are also listed. Witnesses to the marriage are commonly family members and may add clues to family linkages. Full age indicates that the person was at least 21 years old.

    Registration of non-Catholic marriages began in 1845 in Ireland. Registration of births, marriages and deaths, regardless of religion, began January 1, 1864. Certificates for births, marriages and deaths for all of Ireland until 1922 are housed in Dublin. Belfast has the records for Northern Ireland from 1922 to present.

    General Register Office,

    General Register Office
    Government Offices,
    Convent Road
    Roscommon.
     
    Tel: +353 (0) 90 6632900
    LoCall: 1890 252076
    Fax: +353 (0) 90 6632999
    Fax: +353 (0) 90 6632988

    Fees are payable in Irish punts and cash (Irish, Sterling, US dollars) for any amount but the minimum amount for a check drawn on a non-Irish bank is 12.70 Euro.

    A photocopy of an entry will contain the same details as a certificate but is not suitable for administrative matters. However, it is ideal for genealogical purposes. If more than one certificate relating to the death of the same person is required an additional fee of  €5.08 should be sent for each extra certificate.

    What is required for search: Name in full, date of event, place of event, age of deceased, occupation of deceased, whether single, married, widow.


    The information contained in these pages is provided solely for the purpose  of sharing with others researching their ancestors in Ireland.
    © 2001 Ireland Genealogy Projects, IGP TM By Pre-emptive Copyright - All rights reserved