Ireland's History in Maps
The Baronies of Ireland


BARONY INDEX: Antrim to Down -- Dublin to Laois -- Leitrim to Offaly -- Roscommon to Wicklow

BARONY MAPS: Connacht -- Leinster -- Munster -- Ulster -- Ireland

This is simply a work in progress, in honor of the history, geography and genealogy of the ancient Irish tuath and septs. Content and Images are copyright of Dennis Walsh, © 2003, All Rights Reserved.


County Dublin [10 Baronies including Dublin City] -- Leinster map

  • All - The earliest inhabitants were cited as the Blanii or the Eblani by Ptolemy, with their capitol at Eblana, the present site of Dublin city. A few centuries later the country south and east of the river Liffey was known as Coigh Cuolan, and that of the north was part of Midhe or Meath. The Vikings (Danes) arrived in the 8th century. In the late 12th century as the Cambro-Normans arrived the north of County Dublin became known as Fingall and the south, Dubhgall. From the 13th to the 17th century Dublin was part of "the Pale", an area of English influence.
  • Balrothery (East) - The Ui Colcan are noted early in this barony. The Landy family is cited here in the 17th century.
  • Balrothery (West) - The Saithne are noted very early here. O'Cathasaigh (O'Casey) were lords of Suaithni.
  • Castleknock - The Gailenga Becc (e.g. O'Hennessy) are cited here anciently.
  • Coolock - The Ui Cumain sept is noted very early here. The Norman family of Talbot is found centered at Malahide for many centuries.
  • Dublin - The Uí Fergusa, a sub-sept of the Uí Dúnlainge dynasty are noted very early near here, being pushed back by the establishment of a Viking settlement here in the 9th century.
  • Dublin City - founded by the Vikings in the 9th century, the city has been a center of English influence following the Norman Invasion, when it became the center of "the Pale". Principal families here included Grattan, Howth, Hussey, Plunkett, Synnott, Sweetman.
  • Nethercross - This was the center of the Viking territory known as "Fine Gall" following their settlement here by the 10th century.
  • Newcastle - The powerful Uí Dúnchada (e.g. Fitz Dermot) sept of the Uí Dúnlainge are noted very early in this barony.
  • Rathdown - The Ui Briuin Cualann (e.g. Cosgrave) are cited here prior to the Norman invasion. They were related to the powerful Uí Dúnlainge dynasty.
  • Uppercross - The Ui Ceallaig Cualann (e.g. O'Kelly) are cited here prior to the Norman invasion. They were cousins to the Uí Máil. A branch of the Fothairt are also noted here.
    Misc - O'Murcan is cited as a chief of Fidhgaibhle, on the plain of the river Liffey which flows across the border of Kildare and Meath. Mac Muregain is cited as a prince of East Liffey in the 10th century.


    County Fermanagh [8 baronies] -- Ulster map

  • All - Anciently inhabited by the Erdini according to Ptolemy, or by the Naganate according to Whitaker. In early days the county was divided into two portions; one called Targoll, the ancient seat of the Facmonii and of the Macmaniim, or the MacManuses; and the other named Rosgoll, occupied by the Guarii or Guirii, from whom the MacGuires derive their name. The most prominent clan in Fermanagh prior to the Maguire ascendancy was the Clann Lugain made up of the Ó hEignigh, Ó Maolruanaidh and Ó Dubhdara families. The Maguire were chiefs here from the 13th to the mid-17th centuries, and Fermanagh has been cited as 'Maguires country'.
  • Clanawley - this barony named in honor of clan MacAuley (MacAwley), a branch of the Maguires. The homeland of the O'Droma (Drum) family is cited near here in the parish of Kinawley, a parish which extends into northern Co. Cavan.
  • Clankelly - Named for clann Cheallaigh, originally derived from Cellach, son of Tuathal, king of the Ui Chremthainn who was killed in 731. A Mac Domhnaill (MacDonnell) sept of this clann Cheallaigh is noted here. O'Cannon, ousted as kings of Cinel Conaill in the 13th century, settled here for a time here.
  • Coole - referred to in the Annals as Cuil na nOirear. O'Caiside (O'Cassidy) is sited as Chief of Coole.
  • Knockninny - A MacManus sept (of Clan Maguire) was centered here prior to the 1400s. It was noted as an early Maguire stronghold. The barony is named for hill of St. Ninnidh on the southern shore of Upper Loch Erne
  • Lurg - the Monaghan sept were said to be of the original inhabitants of the area, the Fir Manach, the namesake for Fermanagh. The O'Muldoons were chiefs here. The MacEntaggarts were said to be originally from here. The Mac Tullys (Muintir Tiathligh) are cited as chiefs of Lough Lir near here.
  • Magheraboy - In the 8th century this area was known as Cenel Enda. The O'Flanagan are also given as a chief of Tuath Ratha in this barony.
  • Magherastephana - formerly Machaire Stepanach. Mac Caffrey of the Maguire clan centered at Ballymacaffry.
  • Tirkennedy - said to be named from Fergus Cennfhota son of Cremthann, the earlier forms of the name appear as Ui Cennfota, Ui Ceinneidigh, and Tír Cendfhada. The Ua Daimhín family ruled as Lords of Tirkennedy before the power of the Maguires. The MacManus family were hereditary supervisors of the fisheries under MacGuire here. Mac an Mhaighisitir (anglicized MacMaster or Masterson) were noted as septs of Fergus Cennfhota.
  • Misc - The O'Bannion from Lower Ormonde were later in Co. Fermanagh. Mac Giolla Fhinnein were chiefs of Muintir Pheodachain and held the kingship of Fir Manach for a time. O'Dubhdara (O'Darrah) is cited as a chief of Oirghialla. The O'Maolruanaigh (Mulrooney) clan held great power here before the rise of the Maguires.


    County Galway [17 baronies] -- Connacht map

  • All - In the time of Ptolemy (125 AD) this region was inhabited by the Auterii. At later dates it was parcelled out as follows: Clancnow or Clanmacnnon among the Burkes (an Anglo-Norman family); Clanfirgail among the O'Hallohans; Hy Maine among the O'Dalys and O'Kellys; Maghullen, now Moycullen among the O'Flahertys; Silnamchia, now Longford; and Hy Fiachra Aidne, afterwards Clanricarde as possessed by the Burkes (de Burgo).
  • Athenry - O'Haverty is given as one of the chiefs here. Bermingham, lord barons of Athenry, were of Norman descent.
  • Ballymoe - The O'Finnachta (O'Feenaghty) were chiefs here and in the barony of Ballymoe in Roscommon.
  • Ballynahinch - The old Ballynahinch castle was once headquarters of the O'Flaherty's, and home to Grace O'Malley, Connemara's sea Queen, in the 16th century. It later came into possession by the Martin family (e.g. "Humanity Dick") who built the castle in its present form.
  • Clare - Mac Aedha (MacHugh), of the same stock as the O'Flahertys, is cited chief of Clan Coscraigh on the east side of Lough Corrib. The O'Flahertys were chiefs of Clan Murcadha. In the 16th century, Richard de Burgo drove the O'Flaherties from their lands. The Norman family of Hackett had a castle in this barony.
  • Clonmacnowen - O'Muldoon of Aughrim is cited as a chief of the Eoghanacht Ani (Aidhne), Aughrim being a parish extending partly into the barony of Kilconnell.
  • Dunkellin - The (O'hEdihin) O'Heyne, along with the O'Clery and the O'Shaughnessy held the territory of the Ui Fiachra Aidne here and in the barony of Kiltartan. The O'Clerys were cited as chiefs of the Ui Fiachra Finn up to the 13th century. O'Finn is cited as eranaghs of Kilcogan. The O'Cosgroves (O Coscraigh), of the Ui Maine, are noted in territory east of Galway Bay. Following the coming of the Normans, the Blake (Caddell) name was prominent here.
  • Dunmore - The Conmaicne are noted very early in this area. The O'Mulally's, a branch of the Ui Maine of the same stock as the O'Naghtens, were early Irish chiefs just south of the Tuam area. The Norman family Bermingham arrived in the early 13th century and this area became known as "Bermingham's Country", while the O'Mulallys moved north into the neighborhood of Tuam. The Jennings family, descended from the Anglo-Norman Burke family, had large holdings in this area.
  • Galway - The O'Halloran sept served as chiefs of Clann Fearghaile here and were driven with the O'Flahertys when the Normans arrived. After the arrival of the Normans the terriory around Galway was held by the merchant families of the Kirwans, Martins, Blakes, Skerrets, Lynches, Frenches, Brownes and Darcys.
  • Kilconnell - The O'Donnellan, a Ui Maine sept, were centered here at Ballydonellan castle, originally built as a stronghold in 936. MacGilduff amd O'Leahy are cited as chiefs of Caladh here.
  • Kiltartan - The (O'hEdihin) O'Heyne, along with the O'Clery and the O'Shaughnessy held the territory of the Ui Fiachra Aidne here and in the barony of Dunkellin. The O'Shaughessys were chiefs of Conally Hugh (of Echty). They took command of the area over the O'Cahills and O'Clerys by the middle of the 13th century and the lands became known as O'Shaughnessys country. The O'Cahill head was styled 'Chief of Kinalea' (Aughty). O'Heyne (Hynes) was styled prince of Ui Fiachra Aidhne, the name taken from Eidin, a 10th century chief.
  • Killian - O'Moran is cited as chiefs of Criffon here and in part of the barony of Balymoe. Mulrooney is given along with O'Cahill and O'Moran as one of the three chiefs of Crumthan here and partly in the barony of Ballymoe. . Cheevers later controlled lands here.
  • Leitrim - The O'Donnellans were cited as chiefs of Clan Breasil. The O'Naughton and O'Mulally were chiefs of Moenmoy up to the 13th century, an area which also included Loughrea barony. The Mac Egan were chiefs of Clan Diarmada here.
  • Longford - O Madagain or O Madadhain (O'Madagan or O'Madden) are given as chiefs here and in the barony of Garrycastle in Co. Offaly.
  • Loughrea - The O'Naughton and O'Mullaly were chiefs of Moenmoy up to the 13th century, an area which also included Leitrim barony. The Ui Fiachra Aidne held part of this territory as well. O'Fahy is cited here as a sept of the Ui Maine in Galway, along with O'Horan, O'Lane, Larkin and O'Gevenny. O'Gauran or O'Gabrain are cited as chief of Dal Druithne here.
  • Moycullen - O'Flaherty, lord of Moycullen and Iar Connacht. MacConroy were chiefs of Gno Mor on the western banks of Lough Corrib.
  • Ross - Ancciently inhabited by the Partraige. After forming an alliance with the O'Flahertys, the de Jorse (Joyce) family received large grants here, and the area near here became part of Joyces Country.
  • Tiaquin - O'Concheanainn (O'Concannon) held a center of power in Kilkerrin parish and were styled 'lords of Ui Diarmada' in the Annals. The "6 Sodhans" of Galway were located here with six chiefs including O'Cashin, O'Giallain, O'Lennon, Maginn, O'Scurry, and MacWard. O Mainnín (O'Mannin or Mannion) is cited as a main chief at Sodhan centered at the castle of Clogher, and said to be of early Pictish origin.
  • Misc - O'Culachain (O'Colohan) were lords of Sil Anmchadha. The tribes of Galway included Athy, Blake, Bodkin, Browne, D'Arcy, Ffont (or De Fuente), Ffrench, Joyes (or Joyce), Kirwan, Lynch, Martin, Morris and Skerrett.


    County Kerry [9 baronies] -- Munster map

  • All - Ptolemy cites the Velabri or Vellibori, and the Luceni as ancient inhabitants of this area. At the coming of the Normans, the O'Connor Kerry held the north, the O'Moriaritys held the middle parts, and the southern portion was occupied by the O'Sullivans, O'Donoghues and O'Mahonies. By the end of the 13th century the county was subject to the power of the Fitzgerald lords of Desmond, the Fitz-Mauirce lords of north Kerry, and the Irish McCarties, tanists of the elevated central and southern regions. By the mid 14th century the Fitzgeralds were Earls of Desmond over the liberties of Kerry.
  • Clanmaurice - Formerly called Altry, it was named for Maurice FitzThomas FitzGerald, an early Cambro-Norman. From Maurice came the Fitzmaurice family of the area known as Lixnaw, later known as earls of Kerry. Stack's country is given here between Tralee and Abbeyfeale.
  • Corkaguiny - Dingle Peninsula was a homeland for the Corcu Duibhne from the 6th century. The O'Falvey sept were chiefs here from the 12th to the 17th century. O'Shea and O'Connell are also mentioned alongside the O'Falveys as chiefs of Corco Duibne.The Bowler family was also cited in this barony. Corcaguiney with Dingle became the land of Fitzgerald, the Knights of Kerry, in the 13th century.
  • Dunkerron (North) - The O Sullivan Mor were lords in this area at the coming of the Normans in the early 13th century. Their descendants, the MacGillycuddys (of the Reeks) are also cited here.
  • Dunkerron (South) - O'Sullivan's country. The O Sullivan Mor were lords in this area from the 13th century, holding these lands prior to the coming of the Normans. O'Moriarity is cited here in the parish of Templenoe as chiefs of Aes Asdi.
  • Glanarought - O'gRiobta (Griffin) were chiefs centered at Ballygriffin. The McCarties were centered here in the mid 13th century.
  • Iraghticonnor - O'Connor of Kerry held sizable estates in north Kerry, their territory named Hy Cain air Ciaruidhe.
  • Iveragh - formerly Ui Ráthach, the O Seaghdah (O'Sheas) were chiefs of Iveragh, and Corco Duibne. Falvey and O'Connell were also noted as chiefs of Corco Duibne. The O'Mahoneys were noted as the later Lords of Iveragh into the 16th century.
  • Magunihy - O'Conghail (O'Connell), of Corco Duibne, ruled as chiefs here. By the 11th century the O'Donaghues forced them towards the west coast, as the O'Donaghues were driven from Cork by the MacCarthys and O'Mahanoys. The Mac Carthaigh (MacCarthy Mor) were centered at Muckross, near Killarney, south of the O'Donaghue territory. The ancient clan names of the O'Donaghue clan were Cinel Laoghaire and Clan tSealbach. The Mac Gillycuddys are also noted here.
  • Trughanacmy - Formerly called Aicme Ciarraighe, the O Muircheartaigh (O'Moriarity), chief of Eoghanacht Locha Lein, is cited here and in the barony of Magunihy up to the time of the Norman invasion (c. 1200). O'Laeghain (O'Leyne or Lane) is given as chief of Ui Ferba (Offerba, a district along the coast northward from Tralee). The MacElligott family is cited here for the parish name of Ballymacelligott.
  • Misc -


    County Kildare [14 baronies] -- Leinster map

  • All - The territory of the Uí Faeláin was the tribal grouping who ruled the northern part of County Kildare up until the coming of the Cambro-Normans. The cantred of Uí Faeláin was granted to Adam de Hereford before 1176. The O'Byrnes and O'Tooles (of Uí Faeláin) were the early chief septs here and were later driven into Wicklow. The Fitzgerald Earls of Kildare controlled much of the county from the 14th to the 16th century. The Cambro-Norman Grace family was prominent here through the 17th century.
  • Carbury - O'Ciardha (O'Keary or O'Carey), lords of Carbury until about the time of Norman Invasions, were of the southern Ui Neill group.
  • Clane - These were part of the ancient lands of the O'Byrnes before the 13th century.
  • Connell - ancient territory of the Ui Faelain sept, ancestral home of the O' Byrnes before the arrival of the Normans. The O'Tooles, allies of the O'Byrnes, were also here.
  • Ikeathy & Oughterany - The name of the barony is preserved in the older tribal names of the Uí Cheithig and the Uachtar Fine. The Cenel n-Ucha were also noted here. In later times the Lawless family were lords of Cloncurry (parish).
  • Kilcullen - named for the O'Cuilinn (O'Cullen) sept. These were part of the ancient lands of the O'Tooles before the 13th century, retaken in the 14th.
  • Kilkea & Moone - These were the ancient lands of the Dal Chormaic.
  • Naas (North) - These were part of the ancient lands of the O'Byrnes before the 13th century, retaken in the 14th. The Ui Ceallaig Cualann (O'Kelly) were also noted early in the eastern section. An Ui Fionain (O'Finan) sept is noted in the north part of this barony.
  • Naas (South) - These were part of the ancient lands of the O'Byrnes before the 13th century, retaken in the 14th.
  • Narragh & Reban (East) - These were part of the ancient lands of the O'Tooles before the 13th century, retaken in the 14th. An Ui Garrchon branch is also noted here.
  • Narragh & Reban (West) - These were part of the ancient lands of the O'Tooles before the 13th century, retaken in the 14th.
  • Offaly (East) - These were part of the ancient lands of the O'Connor Faly. As Lord of Clanmaliere the O'Dempsey held part of this barony.
  • Offaly (West) - These were part of the ancient lands of the O'Connor Faly. As Lord of Clanmaliere the O'Dempsey held part of this barony.
  • Salt (North) - The Ui Gabla sept of the Dal Chormaic is noted early here. O'Gelbroin is found as a chief of Clar Life on the plains of the river Liffey here.
  • Salt (South) - These were part of the ancient lands of the Ui Dunchada, early kings of Leinster. This area was also part of the ancient lands of the O'Byrnes before the 13th century.
  • Misc - O'Muiridhe (O'Murray) were chiefs of Cinel Flathemhuin (Flahaven). O'Hugh or O'Hea was given as a chief of Ui Mella, and also as a chief of Ui Degadh. MacKeogh is found along with the O'Byrnes and O'Tooles early in Kildare and subsequently in Wicklow and Wexford. Woulfe's country was named for the family settling around Athy after the Norman invasion.


    County Kilkenny [11 baronies] -- Leinster map

  • All - Mac Giolla Phadraig (Fitzpatrick) were chiefs of Ossory which included all of Kilkenny and part of Laois. By the 13th century they were driven into Cavan and Leitrim after the arrival of the Butlers. Others Gaelic septs in Ossory included O Braonain (Brennan), O Caollaidhe (Kealy), O Faoileain (Phelan), Mac Braoin (Breen), O Maoldomhnaigh (Muldowney), and O Cearbhaill (Carroll). The Butler family were Earls of Ormonde and controlled much of the county from the 13th century.
  • Callan - The O'Gloiairn (O'Gloran) were chiefs of Callainn.
  • Crannagh - Noted here early was the O'Caibhdeanaich (O'Keveney or O'Coveney) sept, chiefs of the plain of Magh Airbh. Following the Norman invasion the Graces are noted here as Barons of Courtstown. O'Delahunty, of the same stock as the O'Carrolls of Ely, was a principal name here in the 17th century.
  • Fassadinin - O'Brennan, chiefs of Ui Duach (Idough), their lands taken in the wake of the Cambro-Norman Invasion by the Wandesfords.
  • Galmoy - The Bryan family held territory here. The Archdeacon (Cody) family was also noted here.
  • Gowran - O'Carroll of the Reddened Spears, chiefs of northern Gowran. The O'Dunphy territory here was given to Theobald Fitzwalter (Butler) following the Norman invasions. The Dobbyn family is cited as early landed gentry here in the 15th century.
  • Ida - An ancient sept of the Ui Dheaghaidh (O'Dea) would appear to have given their name to the barony? The O'Kealys of Ui Bearrchon occupied an area west of the Barrow in the north of this barony.
  • Iverk - from the ancient sept of Uibh Eirc, the descendants of Erc. The O Faolain (O'Phelan) of the Decies family were chiefs in the barony at the time of the Normans. O'Dunphy was a principal sept here.
  • Kells - The O'Gloiairn (O'Gloran) were chiefs of Callainn (parish of Callan). Huolyn (Howlin) served as lords of Kilree following the Norman invasion of the late 12th century. The Norman family of Tobin is noted here.
  • Kilkenny City - Butler, earl of Ormond. The Rothe family is later noted here following the Norman invasion.
  • Knocktopher - MacBraoin (MacBreen), overtaken in the wake of the Cambro-Norman Invasion by the Walshs.
  • Shillelogher - from Siol Ui Luachra, the descendants of Luachair? The Norman family of Wall is found here early.
  • Misc - O'Buadain (O'Boden) is cited early here, as was Mac Oistigin (Mac Costigan) in the territory of Ossory. The O'Shees served as one of the noted tribes of Kilkenny. Sweetman was a principal family here from the 12th to the 15th centuries.


    County Laois (aka Leix or Queen's County) [11 baronies] -- Leinster map

  • All - Anciently inhabited by the Brigantes. O'More (O'Moore) was the leading sept at the coming of the Normans, their territory was the Ui Laoighis. Fitzpatrick ruled the three southwestern baronies as king of Ossory at that time. The seven septs of Laois included O'Moore (O'More), O'Kelly, O'Devoy, O'Doran, O'Lalor, O'Dowling and McEvoy. The seven tribes (settlers) of Laois were Cosby, Barrington, Hartpole, Bowen, Ruish, Hetherington, and Hovenden (or Ovington).
  • Ballyadams - Very early this area was home to an Uí Buide sept which became known under the surname O'Kealy. When marcher lorships were setup here in the late 12th century, the area was part of the cantred of Oboy (Uí Buide). It was later included in the O'More territory of Ui Laoghis during the Gaelic revival of the 14th century.
  • Clandonagh - Once included as the territory of Upper Ossory where the Mac Giolla Phádraig (Fitzpatrick) were Kings and Earls. The Ui Duach as well as a small sept of the Ui Dega are noted here in early centuries.
  • Clarmallagh - Once included as the territory of Upper Ossory where the Mac Giolla Phádraig (Fitzpatrick) were Kings and Earls.
  • Cullenagh - included in the O'More territory of Ui Laoghis.
  • Maryborough (East) - This area was included in the O'More territory of Ui Laoghis. O'Lawlor or Lalor, one of the 7 septs, is also cited here.
  • Maryborough (West) - The ancient home of the Loigis, or Laoighis, for which the county is subsequently named. This area was a center for the O'More's of Ui Laoghis. The O'Devoys or Deeveys, one of the 7 septs of Leix, were styled lord of Creamhthainn (i.e. Maryborough) in the 11th century.
  • Portnahinch - As Lords of Clanmaliere (or Clánn Maelugra) the O'Dempseys held part of this barony. The Ui Celliag (O'Kellys) and Ui Onchon are also noted here, along with the territory referred to as Tuath Léghe.
  • Slievemargy - part of the ancient O'Gorman (MacGorman) territory of the Ui Bairrche before the coming of the Normans. It was at one time included in the O'More territory of Ui Laoghis. O'Treasaigh (O'Tracy) is cited here as Lords of Slievemargy.
  • Stradbally - included in the O'More territory of Ui Laoghis. O'Dubhuidhe (O'Devoy) is cited as chief of Ui Crimthainn Áin near here. The O'Lalors along with the MacEvoys were chiefs here.
  • Tinnahinch - The O'Regan and the O'Dunne septs were chiefs of Ui Riagan (Iregan) here. The area marked by the River Barrow was referred to as O'Dowlings country.
  • Upper Woods - Upperwoods or in Irish "Coill-Uachtorach" used to be called "Upper Ossory". The cantred was called "Caill Uachnach"; the tribe lands of the O' Delaney's (O' Leary 1907, 294). The hUrachán (Horahan or Hourihan) of Ui Fairchelláin are also noted early here. The area was included in the territory of Upper Ossory where the Mac Giolla Phádraig (Fitzpatrick) were chiefs. This was part of O'Delaney country as they were noted as chief of Tuath-an-Toraidh, "from the delightful Coill Oughteragh".
  • Misc - Upper Ossory - Mac Giolla Phadraig (Fitzpatrick) were lords of Upper Ossory. In ancient times they were chief in parts of south Laois and all of Kilkenny. The O'Kellys in Laois are connected with the territory of Leighe, Gallen and Magh Druchtain. The MacEvoys were centered in Mountrath and Raheen parishes.

    Antrim to Down -- Dublin to Laois -- Leitrim to Offaly -- Roscommon to Wicklow

    Further Reference:
    Ireland's History in Maps
    Early Irish History: People, Place and Province

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