Ireland's History in Maps
The Baronies of Ireland


BARONY INDEX: Antrim to Down -- Dublin to Laois -- Leitrim to Offaly -- Roscommon to Wicklow

BARONY MAPS: Connacht -- Leinster -- Munster -- Ulster -- Ireland

This is simply a work in progress, in honor of the history, geography and genealogy of the ancient Irish tuath and septs. Content and Images are copyright of Dennis Walsh, © 2003, All Rights Reserved.


County Leitrim [5 baronies] - see Connacht map

  • All - The Ui Briuin Breifne. In the 9th to the mid-13th centuries the O Ruairc (O'Rourke) were chief Kings of Breifne which included counties Cavan and Leitrim. By the 13th century O Ruairc were lords of West Breifne (Leitrim) and O'Reilly were chiefs in East Breifne (Cavan).
  • Carrigallen - The Mag Dorchaidh (Darcy) were chiefs of Cinel-Luachain in the modern parish of Oughteragh. The MacRannall chiefs held much of this barony as part of the territory called Conmaicne Rein.
  • Drumahaire - The O Ruairc (O'Rourke) were Kings and Lords in this region for many centuries. O'Finn and O'Carroll were chiefs of Calraighe, which included the civil parishes of Drumlease and Killargy in Leitrim. The MacKenny's (Keaney) were chiefs in an area known as Muinter Mountains, or Muintir Kenny, an older name for the barony of Dromohair. Originally known as the Mac Consnamha, the Clan Kenny was said to originate in the parish of Innismagrath. They later were known as Mac Kinnawe and still later changed to Ford. The Mac Cagadhain (MacEgan?) were chief of Clan Fear a Muige here.
  • Leitrim - The area was part of Conmaicne Rein around the 8th century. The Reynolds (MacRannall) were chiefs of an area comprising much of the baronies of Mohill and Leitrim (Liathdromen), then known as Muinter Eolais.
  • Mohill - Early, this area was also part of Conmaicne Rein. The Reynolds (MacRannall) were chiefs of an area comprising much of the baronies of Mohill and Leitrim (Liathdromen), then known as Muinter Eolais.
  • Rosclougher - The O'Murroughs, or O'Murreys, were chiefs in the barony of Rosclougher. Their territory was the Hy Murragh. The Mac Murry or Mac Morrow were chiefs in Loghmoyltagh. The MacClancy's were chiefs of Dartraighe (Dartry) in the barony of Rosclogher. O Miadhachain (O'Meehan) is found here at the time of the Norman invasions.
  • Misc - Mac Fionbhair (Finnevar) are given as chiefs of Muintir Greadain in southern Leitrim. The MacCabe family were captains of the galloglass, serving both Breffni O'Rourke and Breffni O'Reilly, and coming from the Hebrides islands in the 14th century. The MacShanly chief is given as MacShanly of Dromod as neighbors to the MacRannells who destroyed their power in the 15th century.


    County Limerick [14 baronies] - see Munster map

  • All - Anciently inhabited by perhaps the Coriondi tribe, as translated from Ptolemy of the 2nd century. Later tribal names here include the Uaithne, the Ciarrage [Luachra] and the Ui Fidgeinte. With the ascendancy of the Eoganacht in the 7th century, part of the county came to be referred to as Eoghanacht Aine Cliach (Airthir Chliach), which was sub-divided into five cantreds: Carrigoginniol, Uaithne, Cairbre Aobhdha, Ui Conaill Gabhra, and Connalla. In addition to the septs who controlled these cantreds, the other principal families at the time of the Norman Invasion were O'Hurley, Mac Sheehy, O'Gorman, O'Collins, O'Coin, O'Scanlan, and O'Hallinan. At that time part of the county had been included within the O'Brien province of Thomond.
  • Clanwilliam - named for the Clanwilliam Burkes. The O'Cuircs (O'Quirkes) were noted here in the 11th and 12th centuries as kings of Muscraige Cuirc, sometimes called O'Quirkes Country. The O'Heffernans are cited here after being displaced by the Ryans from Owney and Owneybeg baronies. Also see County Tipperary. The Ó Conaings (O'Gunning), a sept of the Ui Bloid, were noted with territory near Castlegunning (Castleconnell) prior to being dispossessed by the MacWilliam Burkes in the 13th century.
  • Connello (Lower) - Anciently the Ui Fidhgeninte (Ui Conaill Gabra) occupied Connello, e.g. O'Flannery. Connalla was the name of the Eoghanacht cantred here, run by the O'Kinealys and O'Thyans. O'Coileain (Collins or Cullane) were lords of Connello until they settled in Cork in the 13th century. The chief of the O'Sheehans is found anciently here. O'Morny is cited in the barony of Lower Conello.
  • Connello (Upper) - Hy Cnocnuil Gabhra (aka Ui Conaill Uachtarach) was the name of the Eoghanacht cantred here, run by the McEneirys and O'Sheehans. MacEneiry (MacHenry) is further cited as chief of the Corca Muikedha (Muiceadha). O'Coileain (Collins or Cullane) were later lords of Connello until they settled in Cork in the 13th century. The O'Billrys were also cited as a chief in Ui Conaill Gabhra (Guara). O'Meehan is cited as chiefs in Connello, along with O'Cullane and O'Sheehan. O'Connell is cited as chief of Hy-Cuilean, a territory south-east of Abbeyfeale, before they settled across the border in Kerry in the 12th century.
  • Coonagh - Mac Ui Bhrian (Mac Brien). Mac Longachain (Long or Longan) is found alongside the O'Dwyers as chiefs of a territory which included part of this barony and part of Owney and Arra in Tipperary.
  • Coshlea - O'hAodha (O'Hea or Hayes) is given as chief of Muscraidhe Luachra, between Kilmallock and Ardpatrick.
  • Coshma - Hy Cnocnuil Gabhra was the name of the Eoghanacht cantred here. O'Kinealy (O'Kenealy) is given as an ancient chief in a territory (Eoganacht Grian Guara) which included Coshma and the barony of Small County. In the 11th century Ó Cleirchín, or O'Clerkin (Clerk, Cleary,), was recorded in this area as a "Lord of the Ui Fidhgeinte" and as lord of Ui-Cairbre.
  • Glenquin - Anciently it formed part of the territory of the Ui Fidhgeninte (Ui Conaill Gabra). O hAilgheanain (O'Hallinan) is cited with a six-story Tower House here before being superceded by the O'Briens. The barony was formed from the large barony of Connello in the 17th century.
  • Kenry (Caenraige) - O'Flannery and O'Clerkin are cited here as chief of Dal Cairbri. Cairbre Aobhdha (Dal Cairbre Eva) was the name of the Eoganacht cantred here, also ruled by the O'Donovans. The Irish family of O'Beargha (Barry) were chiefs here. O'Mulcallen (O Maolchallan) is cited as chief of Conriada in this barony.
  • Kilmallock - Cill Mocheallóg, in Irish, containing the single parish of St. Peter's and St. Paul's. The Desmond Geraldines (FitzGerald) were noted philanthropists here.
  • Limerick City - founded by the Vikings in the 9th and 10th centuries.
  • Owneybeg - Uaithney was the name of the Eoghanacht cantred here, controlled by the O'Maoilriain (O'Mulryan or O'Ryan) who were cited as chiefs of 'Owney Mulryan' which included both Owneybeg, and Owney in Co. Tipperary. Mac Eochaid (MacKeogh) were cited as chief of Uaithni Tire, or Owney, which also included the barony of Owney and Arra in Co. Tipperary. O'Dinan (Dinnahane) is cited as chiefs of Uaithne here, as hereditary chiefs of the Eoghanacht Uaithne Agamar. Ó Cathaláin (O'Culhane) is cited as a chief of Owney Beg before being dispossessed by the O'Mulryans in the late 12th/early 3th centuries.
  • Pubblebrien - Carrigoginniol was the name of the Eoghanacht cantred here, belonging to the O'Kiarwicks (afterwards to the O'Briens). Mac Ui Bhrian (Mac Brien) is a sept name here. The MacSheehy clan, along with the O'Hallinans, are cited as chiefs of Ballyhallinan. The MacSheehys were a gallowglass clan arriving in the Ireland in the 14th century and from Connaught in the 15th century to serve as bodyguards to the Fitzgeralds, earls of Desmond. MacArthur and O'Scanlan are noted in the barony of Pubblebrien.
  • Shanid - This was included in the ancient tribal territory of the Uí Fidgeinti (Ui Conaill Gabra). In later times Shanid Castle was a principal seat of the Fitzgeralds, Earls of Desmond. The barony was formed from the large barony of Connello in the 17th century.
  • Small County - O'Ciarmaic (O'Kirwick and Kirby) served as chiefs of Eoghanacht Ani (Ani Cliach) centered in the parish of Knockaney. O'Kirby and O'Muldoon are referenced as kings of Aine (Eoghanacht Aine). O'Cuning (Gunning) is cited as chief of Crioch Saingil and and Aosgreine here. O'Luain (O'Loane or Lambe) were lords of Deisbeg in this barony prior to the arrival of the Anglo-Normans.
  • Misc - The O'Berga served as chiefs of Ui Rossa (Tuath Rossa). Septs of the Uí Fidgeinti included O'Donovan, O'Collins, O'Flannery, and Lyons, among others. An O'Keeffe sept is referenced as chief of Triocha-Cead-an-Chaliadh in Limerick. An O'Casey (O'Cahassy) sept was seated at Liscannon, near Bruff.


    County Longford [6 baronies] - see Leinster map

  • All - The territory now called Longford anciently went by the names Teathba and Teffia. North Teffia was inhabited by the Glasraidhe, descendants of early inhabitants. By the 5th century Longford was divided into north and south. The northern territory became known as Cairbre Gabhra, after Cairbre a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. Another son received the southern half. In the 8th century the Conmaicne (e.g. O'Farrells) invaded the Ui Cairbre and by the 11th century were the dominant people as the territory became known as Annaly, and was considered part of the province of Meath. It was controlled in the north by the O'Farrel Ban (White) and in the south by the O'Farrel Buy (Yellow). Longford was formed as a county (shire) in 1576.
  • Ardagh - was formed from the territory of Sleughtwilliam (Mostrim parish), the territory of Clangillernan (Templemichael), and from part of the church lands in the parishes of Ardagh and Ballymacormick.
  • Granard - Anciently this was part of a territory known as Cairpre Gabra, alias Corpre Tethbae, or North Teffia. The barony was formed from the territory of Clanshane (Granard, Abbeylara, and part of Colmcille parishes), and from the territory of Slewcarberie (Clonbroney and part of Colmcille parishes). Muintir Geradhain was located on the west side of Lough Gowna, where Ó Geradhain (Gaynor or MacGinver) is mentioned as lord here in the 11th century.
  • Longford - was formed from the territory of Moytra (Clongesh and part of Templemichael parishes), and the territory of Clan Hugh (in Killoe parish). Anciently it was part of a territory known as Cairpre Gabra, and later Muinter Anghaile (Annaly).
  • Moydow - (Magh Dumha) Anciently it was part of a territory known as Tethba. The barony was formed from the territories of Clanawlye (Ardagh & Moydow), and parts of the territories of Moybrawne (Taghshinny parish), Clanconnor (part Kilcommock, part Cashel parishes), and Muintergalgan.
  • Rathcline - was formed from the territories of The Callow (left bank of Shannon, Lanesboro to Ballymahon) and the territory of Clanconnor (part Kilcommoc, part Cashel). Callow is derived from the gaelic 'Caladh na hAnghaile', a former name for the barony, located between Muinter Gillagan and the river Shannon. O Fergail (O'Farrell) is noted as chief here. O'Faughny is also noted as chief of the Callow (Callo) into the 16th century.
  • Shrule or Abbeyshrule - was formed from parts of the territories of Moybrawne (Shrule), Clanconnor and Muintergalgan. Moybrawne was anciently part of a territory known as Bregmaine, or Mag Bregmaine, in Cenél Maine.
  • Misc - The O'Cuinn (O'Quinn) was a principal chief of Teffia and later held a small territory in Annaly centered at Rathcline.


    County Louth [7 baronies including Drogheda Town] - see Leinster map

  • All - Louth was said to be part of the ancient tribe of the Voluntii in the time of Ptolemy (circa 125 AD). In later times it was part of the larger territory of Airghialla (Oriel) when the O'Carrolls were chiefs up to the 13th century. As a subordinate territory in Oriel, Louth formed a district called Conal Muithemne (or Conaille Muirtheimhne), called also Hy Conal and Machuire-Conal.
  • Ardee - was formed from the district of Hy Segan, or Hy Seanghain. In 841, the Vikings established a longfort (raiding base) at Linn Duachaill, Annagassan.
  • Drogheda -
  • Drogheda Town - Droichead Atha, meaning "bridge at the ford", the town was officially founded by Hugh De Lacy in 1194, although the Vikings were said to settle here as early as 911. Following the Norman invasion the de Berminghams and Plunketts were among the earls of Louth.
  • Dundalk (Lower) - was formed from the territory of Fera Lorg, Lorgan, or Lurgin. In Oriel, the MacScannlain are found centered here in the parish of Ballymacscanlan. The barony of Dundalk was the ancient home of the Conaille Muirtheimhne.
  • Dundalk (Upper) - was formed from Hy Mac Uais, the country of the Mac Scanlans. The barony of Dundalk was the ancient home of the Conaille Muirtheimhne.
  • Ferrard - was formed from the district of Fera Arda, or Fatharta. The ancient home of the Fir Arda Ciannachta.
  • Louth - was formed from Ludha, or Lugha, the country of the O'Carroll of Oriel.
  • Misc - O'hAnrachtaigh (O'Hanratty) were lords of Ui Meith Macha in the north of Co. Louth (Omeath and Dundalk). O'Marcaigh (O'Marky) is listed as a chief clan who possesed lands here as part of the ancient territory of Orghialla. The Norman family of Verdun had considerable holdings in the county.


    County Mayo [9 baronies] - see Connacht map

  • All - Anciently said to be inhabited by the Damnonian and Nagnate people with a small portion in the south inhabited by the Auterii. Much of Co. Mayo and Sligo was ruled by the Ui Fiachrach Muaide up to the 13th century, shared by the tuath of the Ua Maile and Gailenga. The MacWilliam Burkes held large possessions of the county in the wake of the Norman invasion.
  • Burrishoole - O'Malley were chiefs of the territory of Fir Umaille, or Hymalia.
  • Carra - aka Burriscarra. The old territory of the Partraige were noted in this area. O'Culachain (O'Colahan) was a sept of the Ui Fiachrach Muaidne (the Fir Ceara) who held sway here. The O'Gormog centered here once served as chiefs of the Ui Fiachrach. The Murrays were also cited as chiefs here. The O'Learghusa (O'Larrissey) family is cited early here. The O'Tierney sept is cited as Lords of the barony of Carra.
  • Clanmorris - aka Crossboyne, the barony was formed from the ancient territories of the Conmaicne Cuile Toladh.
  • Costello - aka Clancostello, it was formed from the ancient territory called Cairriage de Lough Nairn, and was later named for the MacCostello (Nangle) family, of Norman descent. The barony was also part of the ancient territory of Luigne at one time. The O'Garas spread into this district in the 13th century. O'Ceirin or O'Keerin was chief of an ancient territory in the parishes of Aghamore, Bekan and Knock.
  • Erris - aka Invermore, it was formed from the ancient territory called Irros-domnion, where the Gamanraige had been noted. The O'Dubhda (O'Dowd) were ancient chiefs in this area. O'Caithnaidh or O'Caithniadh (O'Caheny) served as lords of Erris, with MacCoinin (MacCuneen) as sub-chiefs. The Gibbons family was centered here.
  • Gallen - aka Bellalahen, the barony was formed from the ancient territory called Coranne. The barony was also part of the ancient territory of Gailenga at one time. O'Connellan (of Meath?) were centered here and in Kilmain. The Rowley family is cited in the parish of Kilshesnan. This area was later referred to as MacJordan's country, named for descendants of the Norman named Jordan d'Exeter.
  • Kilmaine - formed from the ancient territories of the Conmaicne Quiltola (Conmaicne Cuil Toladh) and Muinter Crechain (of Ui Eathach Muaidhe of Ui Fiachrach). The sept of O Talcaráin were noted as chiefs of the Conmaicne in this region. Later, the Jennings family, descended from the Anglo-Norman Burke family, had large holdings in this area.
  • Murrisk - O'Malley were chiefs of the territory of Fir Umaille, or Hymalia.
  • Tirawley - aka Moyne, the barony was formed from the ancient territories called Calrigiamuighemurisk-in-Amalgaid and later of 'Ui Fiachra Muaide'. O'Gaibhtheachain (O'Gaughan) was cited as a chief of Calry around Crossmolina. O'Toghda (O'Towey) is cited as chief of Bredagh in the parishes of Moygawnagh and Kilfian. The O'Dubhda (O'Dowd) were princes of the Ui Fiachrach at Carn Amalgaidh. The Murrays were cited as chiefs of the north of this barony, serving as chiefs of the Lagan. O'Maolfoghmair (Milford) and O'Maolbrennuin (Mulrennin) were chieftains of a family who ruled along the west banks of the Moy. The Cambro-Norman Barrett family were lords of Tirawley after the 12th century.
  • Misc - The O'Finans of the Fiachrach Muaide (Moy) were noted as early chiefs of Coolcarney.


    County Meath [19 baronies] - see Leinster map

  • All - Anciently inhabited by the Eblani, Meath later formed part of the fifth province of Ireland known as Midhe and Brega which included Westmeath and Longford counties as well as parts of Cavan, Kildare and King's county. The southern Ui Neill or Clan Colman (e.g. Melaghlin) held this territory up to the late 12th century. The O'Caindealbhain (O'Quinlan, O'Connellan or O'Kendellan) were princes of Ui Laeghari or "Ive-Leary", an extensive territory in the counties of Meath & Westmeath. The ancient kingdom of Meath was granted to Hugh de Lacy following the Norman Invasion.
  • Deece (Lower) - The Norman de Hose (Hussey) family is found here and were made barons of Galtrim.
  • Deece (Upper) - The ancient lands of the Déisi (Brega) were located here.
  • Drogheda - see County Louth.
  • Duleek (Lower) - Ua Dubhain (O'Duane or O'Devine) of Knowth, as well as Ua Maoil Lughdhach (O'Molluwey?) of Brug na Bóinne are cited here prior to the Norman invasion.
  • Duleek (Upper) - Anciently, this was the northern part of the territory of Ciannachta which stretched south to the River Liffey in Dublin.
  • Dunboyne - Ua hAonghusa (O'Hennessy) of Gailenga Becc was cited on the border of Counties Meath and Dublin in the 12th century.
  • Fore - The territory of the Delbna Bec was noted here from the 8th century. Ua hAonghusa (O'Hennessy) are noted as chiefs here in the 12th century.
  • Kells (Lower) - The territory of the Gaileanga Mora was noted near here from the 8th century. The Ua Leochain (O'Loughan) sept is noted as chiefs here in the 12th century. This area was granted to Philip Fitz Thomas after the Norman Invasion. The Cruys (Cruise) family held castles and estates of Cruicetown and Moydorragh.
  • Kells (Upper) - The territory of the Luigne was noted here in the 8th century, as well as that of the Fir Chúl Breg. Ua Conghalaigh (O'Connolly) of the southern Uí Neill is cited here prior to the arrival of the Normans, before being driven into County Monaghan. The area was granted to Philip Fitz Thomas after the Norman Invasion.
  • Lune - A territory of the Luigni was noted here from the 8th century. An Ua Braoin (O'Breen) sept was noted here in the 12th century, as well as Ua Cernachain (O'Kernaghan). It was granted to Robert Misset after the Norman Invasion.
  • Morgallion - Ua Leochain (O'Loughan) of Gailenga Mora were noted chiefs here. It was obtained by Gilbert de Angulo, or Nangle in the wake of the Norman Invasion.
  • Moyfenrath (Lower) - The territory of Lóegaire is cited here in the 8th century. Ua Fallamhain (O'Fallon) is noted here in the 12th century.
  • Moyfenrath (Upper) - The territory of Fir Bile is cited here in the 8th century. Ua hAinbheith (O'Hanfey) is noted here in the 12th century, as well as Ua Fallamhain (O'Fallon) of Crich na Cetach.
  • Navan (Lower) - A territory of the Ui Maic Uais Breg is noted here in the 8th century, with Ua hAonghusa (O'Hennessy) cited in the 12th century. Jocelin Nangle, son of Gilbert, obtained this in the wake of the Norman Invasion. They were afterwards barons of Navan.
  • Navan (Upper) - Ua Caindealbahin (O'Kenellan, Connellan, Quinlan) of Cenél Lóigaire is noted in the baronies of Navan in the 12th century, as was Ua Ceallaigh (O'Kelly) of Brega. Jocelin Nangle, son of Gilbert, obtained this area in the wake of the Norman Invasion. They were afterwards barons of Navan.
  • Ratoath - The Southern Ui Neill dynasty of Mac Giolla Seachloinn (Mac Glaughlin) of the Síl nÁedo Sláine held sway here in the centuries before the Norman invasion.
  • Skreen - formed from the territory of Magh Breagh, or Brega, which was centered around the ancient Hill of Tara. O'Haodha (O'Hea or Hughes) is given as chief of Odba (Odra?) here. The Ua Duinn (O'Dunne) of Brega were noted here prior to the Norman invasion. Territory here was granted to Adam Pheipo after the Norman Invasion.
  • Slane (Lower) - The Anglo-Norman Fleming family are cited as lords and barons of Slane.
  • Slane (Upper) - Ua Dubhain (O'Duane or O'Devine) of Knowth, as well as Ua Maoil Lughdhach (O'Molluwey?) of Brug na Bóinne are cited here prior to the Norman invasion. The Anglo-Norman Fleming family are later cited as lords and barons of Slane.
  • Misc - The O Connoly were one of the four tribes of Tara and Princes of Bregia prior to the coming o the Normans in the late 12th century. The four tribes of Tara included the O'Harts, the O'Regans, Connollys, and the O'Kellys. MacConmedha (MacConway) is cited as a principal chief in Teffia in the territory of Muintir Laodagain. O'Ruaidhri or O'Rory (Rogers) was lord of Finn Fochla in Bregia (Meath/Dublin area). The Annals record for 1018 that Ui Cleircein (O'Clerkin), Lord of Caille-Follamhaim died.


    County Monaghan [5 baronies] - see Ulster map

    Map
  • All - Prior to the 4th century the county was said to be inhabited by the Manaigh or Monaigh. Monaghan was part of the ancient territory of Oirghialla (Oriel), held by Ui Cremthainne septs and the Clan Colla (e.g. O'Carroll) from the 4th to the 12th centuries. Territories bordering or within Ui Cremthainne included Fernmag and Dartraige. In later times it was generally referred to as Mac Mahons country. In the mid-16th century the county was described as containing the countries of Iriell, Dartrey, Loghtie, and Trow. In 1585 the county was formed from the five baronies of Truagh, Dartrey, Monaghan, Cremorne and Farney.
  • Cremorne - Up to about 800 A.D. the Mugdorna territory stretched from Monaghan, where it is preserved in the name Cremourne (Crích Mugdorna "the territory of the Mugdorna"), south to the Boyne at Navan. O'Hanraghty (Hanratty) settled in this barony from Ui Meith Macha in Co. Louth following the Norman invasion. The Leslie family is cited in more recent times as Lords of Rothes.
  • Dartree - The (O)Boylan sept were kings of Dartraige from the 8th century, as well as a chief of Airghialla in the 11th century. Their reign of power in Oriel was broken by the MacMahons.
  • Farney - named for the ancient territory of Fernmag. O'Ciaran or O'Kieran is given as a chief of Fearnmuigh as a clan of Tir Eogain. The O'Larkin sept is cited as chiefs alongside the O'Neills and MacCanns in the old territory of Orghialla, where they were chiefs of Farney and West Ui Breasail (in Co. Armagh). O'Cosgrove (O Cosgraigh) was the name of the chiefs of Feara Ruis (Fir Rois) near Carrickmacross. MacArdle, a branch of the MacMahons of Oriel are noted here, as well as septs of Callan, O'Finn, O'Larkin, Hayes, and O'Donegan.
  • Monaghan - The MacMahons were chiefs in medieval times.
  • Trough - The Mac Kenna were chiefs of Truagh from which the barony receives its name. O'Clerkin is also noted here.
  • Misc - The O'Conghaile (O'Connolly) were driven into Monaghan by the Normans. O'Heighigh and O'Mulrooney are cited as chiefs of Oriel, of Muintir Maolruanaidh and of Maoith Leirg Monach. The MacConnon sept moved south from the Clones area in the 11th century to southern Monaghan adjacent to Co Louth.


    County Offaly (aka King's County) [12 baronies] - see Leinster map

  • All - Anciently formed part of Hy Falgia, and also forming part of Hy Laoighois. Later it became part of Hy Leigh, or Eile. The southern portion of the county became part of Eile Chearbhail, or Ely O'Carroll, the chiefs of which were called O'Carroll with a subordinate dynast under them named O'Delany who ruled over a district of the south call Dal-leagh-nui. The northern part of the county was occupied by the Mac Coghlans, O'Molloys and O'Conor (Faly), which afterwards united with the south under the ancient name of Hy Falgia, O'Faly or Offalia. It includes a small territory called Hy Bressail.
  • Ballyboy - O Maolmhuaidh (O'Molloy) of the southern Uí Niall were lords of Fir Cell, a territory here (and in Ballycowen) within the ancient province of Midhe. The baronies of Ballycowan, Ballyboy and Eglish were part of the country of the O'Molloys.
  • Ballybritt - Included in the northern part of the territory of the Ely or Éile, and in early times was a crossroads for the ancient borders of the kindoms of Mumhan, Midhe and Laigen.
  • Ballycowen - Part of the territory of the O Maolmhuaidh (O'Molloy) sept of the southern Uí Niall. The Ui Shuanaig (Fox?) sept is cited here near Rathan.
  • Clonlisk - Part of the territory of the O'Carrolls of Ely.
  • Coolestown - Part of the ancient divisions known as Tuath dá Maige (Tuath of the Two Plains), and Ferran Uí Muircáin lying east of the Figile river. The Uí Muircáin (Morahan or Moran) were a sub-sept of Clan Colgan. The tuath of Mag Lége is also noted here with its association to the Uí Failge septs of the Uí Onchon and Uí Cellaig.
  • Eglish or Fearcall - O Maolmhuaidh (O'Molloy) of the southern Uí Niall, prince of Fercall (Fir Cell).
  • Garrycastle - The ancient territory of the Delbna Ethra, represented in later times by the Mac Cochlain (MacCoughlan) sept. They were lords of Ahra, and chiefs of Delvin MacCoughlan. The Colgan family was also centered in this barony, as was the MacUallachain (MacCuolahan) sept of Muintir Cionaetha. The O'Malone sept is cited with early events involving Clonmacnoise Abbey in the northwest corner of this barony. O Madagain or O Madadhain (O'Madagan or O'Madden) of the Clan Colla are given as chiefs of Síl Anmchadha just west of here in the barony of Longford in Co. Galway.
  • Geashill - Roughly formed from the ancient Tuath Géisille of the Uí Failge septs of Leinster. As Lord of Clanmaliere the O'Dempsey held part of this barony, where the main castle of the clan was located. The Ó hAimherigin (O'Bergin) sept are noted as chiefs in this barony in medieval times.
  • Kilcoursey - The Sinnach (later Fox) O'Catharniagh (O'Carney) clan were chiefs in this territory, referred to as Muinter Tadgain, which also included Clonlonan barony in Westmeath. O'Carney (Kearney), princes of Teffia (Westmeath), are of this branch. The MacAuley sept are also cited as holding a portion of this barony.
  • Philipstown (Lower) - Roughly formed from the ancient tuaths; Tuath Rátha Droma and Tuath Cruacháin of the Uí Failge (O'Connor Faly). O'Hennessy alongside O'Houlihan are cited here as chiefs of Clan Colgan, near the hill of Croghan.
  • Philipstown (Upper) - as Lords of Clanmaliere the O'Dempsey held part of this barony, which was roughly formed from the tuath, Ferann Clainne Diarmata.
  • Warrenstown - Roughly formed from the tuath, Tuath Muighe Cloinne Cholgain, indicating a relationship to the O'Hennessy and O'Holihans. The Crích na Cétach (O'Fallon) and the Clann Máel Chéin are noted people early to this area. Tuath Muighe (aka Tuath dá Maige, or Tethmoy) was a ancient district which comprised the modern baronies of Warrenstown and the northern part of Coolestown. The Berminghams were early Anglo-Norman grantees of Tethmoy.
  • Misc - Mac Gilfoyle is described as chief of Clan Conliagan (Quilivan). The anglo-Norman de Bermingham family was established at Tethmoy by the mid 13th century. That part of the modern county incorporating the baronies of Ballycowan, Ballyboy and Eglish was formerly part of the kingdom of Meath as granted to Hugh de Lacy by Henry II. The medieval cantred of Ardnurcher (Ath-an-urchair) consisted of the Irish territories of Fear Ceall (in Offaly) and Cineal Fiachach (in Westmeath).


    Antrim to Down -- Dublin to Laois -- Leitrim to Offaly -- Roscommon to Wicklow

    Further Reference:
    Ireland's History in Maps
    Early Irish History: People, Place and Province

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