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Munster - aka Mumhan, Mumu, Muinhneach, Mumhain

Munster in the Early Annals of Ireland

Tha Annals cite:
  • The Age of the World 3579, Conmael, son of Emer, king of Ireland, is cited as having fought the battle of of Loch Lein, against the Ernai and the Martinei, during his lifetime.
  • The Age of the World 3579, This was the twenty fourth year, the termination of the reign of Fiacha Labhrainne; and he fell by Eochaidh Mumho, of Munster, in the battle of Bealgadan. It was by this Fiacha Labhrainne the following battles were gained: the battle of Gathlach, in which fell Mofebis, son of Eochaidh Faebharghlas; the battle of Fairrge, against the race of Emhear; the battle of Sliabh Feimhin; a battle against the Ernai, a sept of the Firbolgs, on the plain where Loch Erne now is. After the battle was gained from them, the lake flowed over them, so that it was from them the lake is named, that is, "a lake over the Ernai."
  • For 10, Corb Olum, o t-tád rioghraidh Eoghanachta h-i Mumhain.
  • For 56 AD, Foirbre, son of Fin, King of Munster, among the other provincial kings, slew (King) Fiacha Finnfolaidh.
  • For 165, Conaire, son of Mogh Lamha, after having been eight years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Neimhidh, son of Sruibhgheann. This Conaire had three sons, Cairbre Musc, from whom the Muscraighe are called; Cairbre Baschaein, from whom are the Baiscnigh, in Corca Baiscinn; and Cairbre Riadal, from whom are the Dal Riada. Saraid, daughter of Conn of the Hundred Battles, was the mother of these sons of Conaire, son of Modh Lamha.
  • For 186, The twenty first year of Art, son of Conn of the Hundred Battles, in the sovereignty of Ireland. The battle of Ceannfeabhrat by the sons of Oilioll Olum and the three Cairbres, i.e. Cairbre Musc, Cairbre Riada, and Cairbre Bascainn, against Dadera, the Druid; Neimhidh, son of Sroibhcinn; and the south of Ireland; where fell Neimhidh, son of Sroibhcinn, King of the Ernai of Munster; and Dadera, the Druid of the Dairinni. Dadera was slain by Eoghain, son of Oilioll; Neimhidh, son of Sroibhcinn, by Cairbre Rioghfhoda, son of Conaire, in revenge of his own father, i.e. Conaire.
  • For 186, Cairbre Musc wounded Lughaidh, i.e. Mac Con, in the thigh, so that he was ever afterwards lame. The cause of this cognomen was: Lughaidh was agreeable to a greyhound that was suckling her whelps in the house of his foster father, and he was used to suckle the teat of the aforesaid greyhound, so that Mac Con son of the greyhound adhered to him as a soubriquet.
  • For 195, After Art, the son of Conn of the Hundred Battles, had been thirty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he fell in the battle of Magh Mucruimhe, by Maccon and his foreigners. In the same battle, along with Art, fell also the sons of his sister, Sadhbh, daughter of Conn, namely, the seven sons of Oilioll Olum, who had come with him against Maccon, their brother. Eoghan Mor, Dubhmerchon, Mughcorb, Lughaidh, Eochaidh, Diochorb, and Tadhg, were their names; and Beinne Brit, King of Britain, was he who laid violent hands upon them. Beinne was slain by Lughaidh Lagha, in revenge of his relatives. Lioghairne of the Long Cheeks, son of Aenghus Balbh, son of Eochaidh Finn Fuathairt, was he who laid violent hands upon Art in this battle of Magh Mucruimhe, after he had joined the forces of Maccon.
  • For 234, Oilioll Olum, son of Mogh Nuadhat, King of Munster, died.
  • For 241, These are the battles of Cormac fought against Munster this year: the battle of Berre; the battle of Loch Lein; the battle of Luimneach; the battle of Grian; the battle of Classach; the battle of Muiresc; the battle of Fearta, in which fell Eochaidh Taebhfada of the Long Side, son of Oilioll Olum; the battle of Samhain, in which fell Cian, son of Oilioll Olum; and the battle of Ard Cam.
  • For 265, Ceallach, son of Cormac, and Cormac's lawgiver, were mortally wounded, and the eye of Cormac himself was destroyed with one thrust of a lance by Aenghus Gaibhuaibhtheach, son of Fiacha Suighdhe, son of Feidhlimidh the Lawgiver. Cormac afterwards fought and gained seven battles over the Deisi, in revenge of that deed, and he expelled them from their territory, so that they are now in Munster.
  • For 271, Three battles were fought by (King) Cairbre (Liffeachair) against the men of Munster, in defence of the rights of Leinster.
  • For 366, The first year of Crimhthann, son of Fidhach, son of Daire Cearb, over Ireland.
  • For 378, After Crimhthann, son of Fidhach, had been thirteen years as king over Ireland, he died of a poisonous drink which his own sister gave him.
  • For 489, Aenghus, son of Nadfraech, King of Munster, fell in the battle of Cell Osnadha fought against him by Muircheartach Mac Earca, by Illann, son of Dunlaing, by Ailill, son of Dunlaing, and by Eochaidh Guineach,
  • For 523, Eochaidh, son of Aenghus, King of Munster, died.
  • For 546, The battle of Cuilne, in which many of the Corcoiche were slain through the prayers of St. Ida, of Cluain Creadhail.
  • For 551, The battle of Cuilen in which the Corco Oche of Mumu perished through the prayers of Ita of Cluain Credail.
  • For 571, The battle of Tola, by Fiachna, son of Baedan, son of Cairell, against the people of Osraighe and Eile; and they were defeated. Tola is the name of a plain situated between Cluain Fearta Molua and Saighir.
  • For 571, The battle of Feimhin, by Cairbre, son of Creamhthann, King of Munster, against Colman Beg, son of Diarmaid; and Colman was defeated.
  • For 580, Fergus Scannal, rí Mumhan, was slain.
  • For 582/83/84, Fearadhach, son of Duach, Lord of Osraighe, was slain by his own people.
  • For 586/90, Feidhlimidh, son of Tighernach, King of Munster, died.
  • For 593/97, The battle of Sliabh Cua, in Munster, was gained over the Munstermen by Fiachna, son of Baedan. Tibraide, son of Calgach, died.
  • For 600, Cui Gan Mathair, King of Munster, died.
  • For 601, Colman, son of Fearadhach, chief of Osraighe (Ossory), died.
  • For 614, Aedh Beannan, King of West Munster, died.
  • For 620, Cathal, son of Aedh, King of Munster, died.
  • For 627/32, The battle of Ath Abla, where Dicul, son of Fearghus Tuile, was slain by the Munstermen.
  • For 628, The battle of Ath Goan, in Iarthar Liffe, by Faelan, son of Colman; by Conall, son of Suibhne, chief of Meath; and by Failge, or Failbhe Flann, King of Munster, wherein was slain Crimhthann, son of Aedh, son of Seanach, King of Leinster, with many others along with him.
  • For 632, The battle of Ath Abla, in which Dicuill, son of Fergus Tuile, fell by the Munster host.
  • For 633/37, Failbhe Flann of Feimen, King of Munster, died.
  • For 636/40, The battle of Cathair Chinncon, in Munster, was gained by Aenghus Liathan, over Maelduin, son of Aedh Beannan.
  • For 640, Scannlan Mor, son of Ceannfaeladh, chief of Osraighe (Ossory), died.
  • For 645, The battle of Carn Conaill was gained by Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine against Guaire, wherein were slain the two Cuans, namely, Cuan, son of Enda, King of Munster, and Cuan, son of Conall, chief of Ui Fidhgeinte; and Tolamhnach, chief of Ui Liathain; and Guaire was routed from the battle field.
  • For 658, Faelan, chief of Osraighe, was slain by the Leinstermen.
  • For 660, Maelduin, son of Aedh Beannan, died.
  • For 660, Maenach, son of Finghin, King of Munster, died.
  • For 664, There died also Maelbreasail, son of Maelduin, and Cu Gan Mathair, King of Munster; Aenghus Uladh.
  • For 666, The battle of Aine, between the Aradha and Ui Fidhgeinte, where Eoghan, son of Crunnmael, was slain.
  • For 666, Bran Finn, son of Maelochtraigh, chief of the Deisi of Munster, was slain.
  • For 669, Bran Finn, son of Maelochtraigh, chief of Deisi Mumhan died.
  • For 676, Tuaimsnamha, chief of Osraighe (Ossory), was slain by Faelan Seanchostol.
  • For 676, Colgu, son of Failbhe Flann, King of Munster, died.
  • For 687, Congal, son of Maelduin, son of Aedh Beannan, King of West Munster, was slain.
  • For 690, A battle between the Osraighi and the Leinstermen, wherein Faelchar Ua Maelodhra was slain.
  • For 694, Finnguine, son of Cu Gan Mathair, King of Munster, died.
  • For 698, Conall, son of Suibhne, chief of the Deisi, died.
  • For 699, Ailill, son of Cuganmathair [Cuí Gan Mathair], King of Munster, died.
  • For 699, Conall, son of Doineannaigh, chief of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 703, The battle of Corcmodhruadh, in which Celechar, son of Comman, was slain.
  • For 707, The battle of Dola, in Magh Ele, where Leathlobhar, son of Eochaidh, Cu Allaidh, and Cu Dinaisc, were slain.
  • For 710, Cucerca, chief of Osraighe, died.
  • For 710, The battle of Carn Fearadhaigh by the northern Des, wherein Cormac, son of Finghin, King of Munster, was slain.
  • For 711, Cormac, son of Oilioll, King of Munster, was killed in a battle.
  • For 713, Aedh Dubh, chief of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 717, A battle was fought between the Connaughtmen and the Corca Baiscinn, wherein the son of Talamhnaigh was slain.
  • For 720, St. Ruibin, son of the son of Connad, chief scribe of Munster, died.
  • For 726, The mortal wounding of Doedhghus, son of Baeth, chief of the Deisi.
  • For 726/32, A battle was fought between the South Leinstermen and the Munstermen; and the victory was gained by Aedh, son of Colgan.
  • For 726, Ceallach, daughter of Dunchadh, of the Ui Liathain, died.
  • For 730, The battle of Bealach Ele was fought between Cathal, son of Finguine, King of Munster, and the Leinstermen, where many of the Leinstermen were slain. There fell of the Munstermen here Ceallach, son of Faelchair, chief of Osraighe Ossory, and the two sons of Cormac, son of Rossa, chief of the Deisi, with three thousand along with them.
  • For 731, Bodhbhchadh, son of Conall Gabhra, chief of Cairbre, died.
  • For 733, A hosting was made by Cathal, son of Finguine, into Leinster; and he obtained hostages from Bran Breac, son of Murchadh, and carried off much property.
  • For 735, Forbasach, son of Ailell, Lord of Osraighe (Ossory), was slain.
  • For The battle of Carn Fearadhaigh, in which Torcan Tinereidh, was slain.
  • For 737, Cathal, son of Finguine, King of Munster, died.
  • For 737, Flann Feorna, Lord of Corc Modhruadh, died.
  • For 745, Blathmhac, son of Coibhdeanach, Lord of Muscraighe, died.
  • For 745, Dubhdabhoireann, Lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 745, Anmchaidh, chief of Ui Liathain, died.
  • For 746, Flann Foirtrea, Lord of Corco Laigde, died.
  • For 747, Flann, son of Ceallach, lord of Muscraighe (Muskerry), died.
  • For 751, Muirghiusa maic Fergusa, ríg ma n-Deise.
  • For 752, Cumasccach, tigherna Ua Failge, was slain by Maol Dúin, mac Aodha Bennáin, rí Mumhan.
  • For 755, Flann, son of Erc, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 757, Fogartach, son of Eochaidh, lord of Eile died.
  • For 759, Dunchadh, son of Eoghan, lord of the Deisi, died.
  • For 760, Dungalach, chief of Ui Liathain, died.
  • For 760, Torptha, son of Cearnach, lord of the Deisi, died.
  • For 767, Ceinnsalach, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 770, Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, King of Ireland, mustered an army and marched it into Munster. Munster was devastated by him, and great numbers of the Munstermen were slain on that expedition. They afterwards gave him his own demand.
  • For 770, Duibhinnreachtach, lord of Aradh, died.
  • For 770, Cuchoingealta, lord of Corca Laighdhe, died.
  • For 780, The battle of Muaidh by Tibraide, son of Tadhg, King of Connaught, and he routed the enemy before him. Another victory was gained by Tibraide over the Munstermen later that year.
  • For 781, Scanlann, son of Flann, chief of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 785, Cinaedh, son of Anmchaidh, lord of Ui Liathain, died.
  • For 791, Maelcobha, son of Flann Feorna, lord of Ciarraighe Luachra in the county of Kerry; Fogartach, son of Cathal, lord of Magh Aei; and Duineachaidh Ua Daire, lord of Ciarraighe Aei, died.
  • For 799, There happened great wind, thunder, and lightning, on the day before the festival of Patrick of this year, so that one thousand and ten persons were killed in the territory of Corca Bhaiscinn, and the sea divided the island of Fitha into three parts.
  • For 800, Maelbracha, son of Breslen, lord of Corca Loighdhe, died.
  • For 802, Murchadh Ua Flainn, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 807, Aedh Roin, lord of Corca Bhais Cinn, died.
  • For 807, A slaughter was made of the foreigners by Cobhthach, son of Maelduin, lord of Loch Lein.
  • For 809, Bruadar, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 816, Mac Lachtna, lord of Ciarraighe Luachra, died.
  • For 820, The plundering of Inis Doimhle and Corcach (Cork) by the foreigners.
  • For 821, Fineachta, son of Badhbhchadh, lord of the Deisi, died.
  • For 825, A royal meeting at Birra between Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, King of Ireland, and Feidhlimidh, i.e. son of Crimhthann, King of Munster.
  • For 825, Cormac, son of Domhnall, lord of Deisi, died.
  • For 829, Feidhlimidh, son of Crimhthann, with the forces of Munster and Leinster, came to Finnabhair Breagh, to plunder the men of Breagh; and the Liffe was plundered by Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, King of Ireland.
  • For 831, The burning of Tearmann Chiarain by Feidhlimidh, son of Crimhthann. Also, The plundering of Dealbhna Beathra thrice by him also.
  • For 832, A great number of the family of Cluain Mic Nois were slain by Feidhlimidh, son of Crumhthan, King of Caiseal; and all their termon was burned by him, to the door of the church. In like manner did he treat the family of Dearmhach, also to the door of its church.
  • For 832, Cobhthach, son of Maelduin, lord of West Munster, was slain.
  • For 833, A battle was gained over the Danes by Dunadhach, son of Scannlan, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, wherein many were slain.
  • For 834, Fearghus son of Badhbhchadh, lord of Carraig Brach Aidhe, was slain by the Munstermen.
  • For 834, Dunadhach, son of Scannlan, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 834, Cluain Mic Nois was profaned by Cathal, son of Ailell, lord of Ui Maine, against the prior, Flann, son of Flaithbheartach, one of the Ui Forga of Munster, whom he cast into the Sinainn, and killed. The rights of seven churches were for this given to Ciaran, and a great consideration.
  • For 834, A defeat was given by Cathal, son of Ailill, to Feidhlimidh, son of Crimhthann, King of Caiseal, in Magh I, where many were slain.
  • For 835, Dunlang, son of Cathasaigh, successor of Bara of Corcach, died.
  • For 836, A victory was gained over the Munstermen by Cathal, son of Muirghius.
  • For 837, Maelcron, son of Cobhthach, lord of Loch Lein, died.
  • For 838, The burning of Fearna and Corcach Mor by the foreigners.
  • For 839, Dubhdabharc, lord of South Munster, died.
  • For 843, Fearghal, son of Bran, son of Maeltuile, son of Tuathal, lord of Muscraighe, was killed, and Caicher, lord of Feara Maighe.
  • For 844, Clothnia, lord of Corca Laeghdhe, died.
  • For 843, Niall, son of Ceannfaeladh, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 844, The plundering of the Termon of Ciaran, by Feidhlimidh, son of Crimhthann; but Ciaran pursued hirn, as he thought, and gave him a thrust of his crozier, and he received an internal wound, so that he was not well until his death.
  • For 845, Feidhlimidh, son of Crimhthann, King of Munster, anchorite and scribe, the best of the Irish in his time, died on the 18th of August of his internal wound, inflicted through the miracle of God and Ciaran.
  • For 845, Connmhach, son of Cethernach, half chief of Ciarraighe, died.
  • For 845, Niall, son of Cinnfaeladh, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 846, Another battle was gained by Olchobhar, King of Munster, and by Lorcan, son of Ceallach, King of Leinster, having the Leinstermen and Munstermen along with them, over the foreigners, at Sciath Neachtain, wherein Tomhrair Earl, tanist of the King of Lochlann, and twelve hundred along with him, were slain.
  • For 846, A hosting was made by Olchobhar, to demolish the fort of Corcach against the foreigners.
  • For 846, A defeat by Dunadhach, son of Dunghaile, and the Osraighe, to the Deisi.
  • For 847, Tuathal, son of Ceallach, lord of Eile, died.
  • For 848, Cobhthach, son of Maelcobha, lord of Ciarraighe Luachra, died.
  • For 849, Olchobhar, son of Cinaedh, King of Caiseal, died.
  • For 851, Ailgheanan, i.e. son of Donnghal, King of Caiseal, died.
  • For 852, Maelseachlainn, King of Ireland, proceeded into Munster, until he arrived at Indeoin Na nDeisi; and he enforced hostages and submission from them, for they had given him opposition at the instigation of the foreigners.
  • For 852, Crunnmhael, son of Maelduin, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 852, Bruadar, son of Ceannfaeladh, lord of Musgraighe, died.
  • For 854, Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, went to Caiseal of Munster, and again carried off the hostages of the men of Munster.
  • For 856, A victory was gained by Cearbhall, lord of Osraighe, and by Imhar, in the territory of Aradh Tire, over the Cinel Fiachach, with the Gall Gaeidhil (the Dano Irish) of Leath Chuinn. Four hundred above six thousand was the number which came with Cearbhall and Imhar.
  • For 858, Aedh Dubh, son of Dubh Dabhoireann, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died, after being wounded.
  • For 859, Maelchron son of Muiredach, king of the Deisi, was slain.
  • For 859, Mael Guala, king of Mumu, was killed by the Norsemen.
  • For 860, Dub da Barienn, king of Ui Fhidgeinte, dies.
  • For 871, Flaithbheartach, son of Duibhroip, lord of Corca Modhruadh Ninais, died.
  • For 872, Cenn Faelad, grandson of Mochtigern, king of Caisel, rested in peace after prolonged suffering.
  • For 878, Finn, son of Dubhslaine, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, died.
  • For 883, Longbortan, son of Finnachta, lord of Muscraighe, was slain.
  • For 885/88, Dunchad son of Dub da Bairenn, king of Caisel, dies.
  • For 888, A battle was gained over the Eili by Maelguala and the men of Munster, at Caiseal, in which many noble youths were slain.
  • For 888, Cerball son of Dungal, king of Osraige, died suddenly.
  • For 889, Niall, son of Cormac, lord of the Deisi, died.
  • For 890, Dubhlachtna, son of Maelguala, King of Caiseal, died.
  • For 891, A slaughter was made of the Eoghanachta at Grian Airbh, by the Osraighi, i.e. by the son of Cearbhall, and the Leinstermen.
  • For 893, An army was led by the Deisi, the foreigners, and Ceallach, son of Cearbhall, over Osraighe, as far as Gabhran, where Maelmordha, son of Maelmhuaidh, and a great number of others along with him, were slain.
  • For 893, The mortal wounding of the three sons of Duibhghilla, son of Bruadar, and of the son of Eoghan, son of Cuilennan, in the territory of the Deisi.
  • For 895, Dub Lachtnai son of Mael Gualai, king of Caisel, dies.
  • For 896, A slaughter of the Eoganacht by the Osraige.
  • For 896, A change of kings at Caiseal, i.e. Cormac, son of Cuileannan, in the place of Cennghegan, i.e. Finguine.
  • For 897, Finguine, i.e. Cenngeagain, King of Munster, was slain by his own tribe.
  • For 898, Ciaran, son of Dunghal, lord of Muscraighe, was slain by his own people.
  • For 896 Flann son of Lonan grandson of Guaire, was slain by the Deisi of Mumu.
  • For 899, Macleighinn, son of Bruadair, lord of Muscraighe Breogain, died.
  • For 899, Bruaideadh, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Corcamdruadh, died.
  • For 900, Diarmaid, son of Cearbhall, was driven from the kingdom of Osraighe; and Ceallach, son of Cearbhall, was made king in his place.
  • For 900, A battle was gained by Ceallach, son of Cearbhall, and by the Osraighi, over the Eili and the Muscraighi, in which fell one hundred and ten persons, among whom was Techtegan, son of Uamnachan, lord of Eili, and many others of distinction.
  • For 901, Mudan, son of Donnghal, lord of Corca Laighdhe, died.
  • For 901, Ciarmhacan, son of Flannabhra Ua Dunadhaigh, lord of Ui Conaill Gabhra, died.
  • For 902, Finnguine, king of Caisel, was deceitfully killed by his associates.
  • For 902, Flann, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Corca Modhruadh, died.
  • For 903, Corbmac mac Cuilennáin, rí Caisil.
  • For 903, Foghartach, .i. eccnaidhe mac Suibhne, tighearna Ciarraighe Cuirche.
  • For 903, Maol Gorm, tighearna Ciarraighe Luachra.
  • For 903, Maol Mórdha, tighearna Raithlinne.
  • For 903, Cnáimheini, mac Maenaigh, tighearna Ele, died.
  • For 904, Colmán, mac Cionaith, tighearna Ciarraighe Luachra, died.
  • For 906, An expedition by Flann son of Mael Sechnaill against the people of Mumu, and he harried from Gabran (Ossory) to Luimnech (Limerick).
  • For 906, Ciarmac, king of Ui Fhidgente, died.
  • For 908, A battle was fought between the men of Mumu, the Leth Cuinn, and the Laigin in Mag Ailbi, and Cormac, son of Cuilennan, king of Caisel, was killed there, along with Fogartach, son of Suibne, king of Ciarraige; Cellach, son of Cerball, king of Osraige, among others at the Battle of Belach Mugna.
  • For 910, Corbmac, mac Indreachtaigh, tighearna Ciaraighe, died.
  • For 913/15, Ruarc, son of Mael Brigte, king of Muscraige Tire, was mortally wounded by treachery and cunning by the Ui Dungalaig.
  • For 914, Gebhennach, mac Aodha tighearna Ua Fidhgeinte, was slain by the Norsemen.
  • For 915, A great and frequent increase in the number of heathens arriving at Loch da Chaech, and laity and clergy of Mumu were plundered by them.
  • For 916, Ainnle, son of Cathan, king of Uaithne of Cliu [Cliach], was put to death by the foreigners of Loch da Chaech.
  • For 917, Ragnall, son of Imar, with his fleet moved against the foreigners of Loch da Chaech. A slaughter of the foreigners at Neimlid in Muma. The Eoganacht and the Ciarraige made another slaughter.
  • For 917, Niall, son of Aedh, king of Ireland, led an army of the southern and northern Ui Neill to Munster to make war on the heathens.
  • For 917, Corbmac, mac Mothla, tighearna na n-Déisi, died.
  • For 916/19, Cet, son of Flaithbertach, king of Corcu Mruad, died.
  • For 918/20, Cormac, son Cuilennan, [epscop Lis Móir], king of Deisi of Mumu, was killed.
  • For 921, Find, mac Cerráin, tighearna Muscraighe, died.
  • For 928, Diarmait, son of Cerball, king of Osraige, died.
  • For 932, Cuilen, son of Celach, king of Osraige, died.
  • For 940, Donnchad and Muichertach led an army to the Laigin and to Mumu, and both took their hostages.
  • For 941, An expedition was made by Muirchertach, and he plundered Mide and Ui Fhailgi, and went into Osraige, obtaining their submission. He ravaged the Deisi, and brought Cellachan, king of Caisel, in submission to Donnchad.
  • For 944, Cairpre, son of Mael Patraic, king of Ui Liathain, and Finn, son of Mutan, king of Corcu Laigdi, were killed by the men of Mag Feine.
  • For 944, The battle of Gort Rotachain was won by Cellachan against Tuadmumu (Thomond), and many fell in it.
  • For 949, Dubh Da Bharc, mac Maoil Mordha, tighearna Uaithne Tíre, was killed.
  • For 951, Cennetig, son of Lorcan, king of Tuadmumu, died.
  • For 951, Duibhgionn, mac Cuilennáin, tighearna Ua n-Duach.
  • For 953, Clonmacnoise was plundered by the men of Mumu, accompanied by the foreigners.
  • For 957, Mael Fothartaig, king of Caisel, died.
  • For 959, Dub da Bairenn, son of Domnall, king of Caisel, was killed by his own people.
  • For 963, Cellachan's son, king of Caisel, dies.
  • For 966, Faelan, son of Cormac, king of the Deisi of Mumu, died.
  • For 967, Mathgamain, son of Cenneitig, king of Caisel, plunderd and burned Luimnech.
  • For 974, Dhonnabhan mac Cathail, tigherna Ua Fidhgeinte.
  • For 974, Maol Mhuaidh, mac Brain, tigherna Desmumhan.
  • For 976, Mathgamuin, son of Cennetig, king of Caisel [and áirdrí Mumhan], was killed by Mael Muad, son of Bran.
  • For 976, Donnchad, son of Cellach, king of Osraige, died.
  • For 978, A battle between Brian [Borumha] , son of Cennetig, and Mael Muad, king of Desmumu (Desmond), in which fell Mael Muad.
  • For 987, Conghal, mac Anrudháin, tigherna Corcu Duibne, died.
  • For 983, Lochlaint, tigherna Corca Mo Druadh, died.
  • For 989/90, Domhnall, mac Lorcáin, tighearna Musccraighe Thíre & Ua Forggo.
  • For 990, h-Ua Dunghalaigh, tigherna Muscraighe.
  • For 990, The battle of Carn Fordroma was won by Mael Sechnaill over Tuadmumu, and Domnall, son of Lorcan, king of Ui Fharca, and many others fell therein.
  • For 995, Domhnall, mac Faoláin, tigherna na n-Deisi, died.
  • For 996, Gilla Patriac, son of Donnchad, king of Osraige, died.
  • For 997, Mael Sechnaill and Brian made an expedition and took the hostages of the foreigners to ensure good behavior towards the Irish.
  • For 998, Mael Sechnaill made an expedition into Connacht and ravaged it. Brian made an expedition also in Laigin and ravaged it.
  • For 999, Brian, king of Caisel, led an army to Glenn Mama and the foreigners of Ath Cliath (Dublin), accompanied by the Laigin, came to attack him. And they were defeated and a slaughter was inflicted on them. Brian afterwards entered Ath Cliath, and Ath Cliath was plundered by him.
  • For 1000, The foreigners returned to Ath Cliath and gave hostages to Brian.
  • For 1000, Brian made a hosting to Ferta Nime in Mag Breg. The foreigners and the Laigin, with a raiding party of horsemen, came before them into Mag Breg, and Mael Sechnaill came upon them, and they were nearly all killed. Brian then retreated without giving battle or making incursion -- by the Lord's insistence.
  • For 1001, A foray was made by the men of Mumu in southern Mide, and Aengus, son of Carrach, came upon them, and they abandoned their spoils and lost a great many heads.
  • For 1002, Brian brought an army to ath Luain and took hostages of the Connachta and of the men of Mide.
  • For 1003, Cellach, son of Diarmait, king of Osraige, was killed.
  • For 1003, Conchobor, son of Mael Sechnaill, king of Corcu Modruad, was killed.
  • For 1004, Muiredach, son of Diarmait, king of Ciarraige Luachra, died.
  • For 1006, Ua Dúnghalaigh, tigherna Musccraighe Thíre.
  • For 1007, Cu Chonnacht, son of Dunadach, chief of Sil Anmchada, was treacherously killed by Brian ,alias by Murchad, son of Brian, and by Ua Dungalaig, king? of Muscraige Tire, in the vicinity of Lothra.
  • For 1009/10, Muiredach ua hAeda, king of Muscraige, died.
  • For 1011, Brian led an army to Mag Corainn and brought back the king of Cenel Conaill, i.e. Mael Ruanaid ua Mail Doraid, in submission to Cenn Corad.
  • For 1013, The Laigin and the foreigners began warring against Brian, and the Munstermen and Brian were encamped at Sliabh Mairce, and they harried Laigin as far as Ath Cliath.
  • For 1013, Ruaidhri ua Donnaccáin, tigherna Aradh.
  • For 1013, Coirpre, mac Cleirceinn, tigherna Ua Fidhgheinti, was slain.
  • For 1014, Brian [Borumha], son of Ceinnetig, son of Locan, king of Ireland, and Mael Sechnaill, son of Domnall, king of Temair (Tara), led an army to Ath Cliath. Although victory was on the side of Brian, he fell in the counter-shock, along with his son Murchad, and the latter's son, i.e. Tairdelbach, son of Murchad; and Conaing, son of Donn Cuan, son of Cenneiteg, heir designate of Mumu; and Mothla, son of Domnall, son of Faelan, king of the Deisi Muman; and Mac Bethad, son of Muiredach Claen, king of Ciarraige Luchra; and Domnall, son of Diarmait, king of Corcu Biascinn; and Scannlan, son of Cathal, ling of Eoghanacht of Loch Lein, and many other nobles.
  • For 1014, Cathal m. Domnaill, ri H. n-Echdach, was slain by Donnchad m. Briain.
  • For 1014, A defeat was inflicted by Tadc, son of Brian, on Donnchad, son of Brian, and Ruaidri ua Donnocain, king of Arad, was left dead.
  • For 1014, Find mac Ruaidhri uí Dhonnagáin, tigherna Aradh, in h-Aradh Cliach.
  • for 1014, Muirchertach, mac Anmchada, tigherna Ua Liatháin, was slain.
  • For 1015, Domnall, son of Dub da Bairenn was slain in battle by Donnchad, son of Brian.
  • For 1015, Domhnall, ua Ruaidhri, tigherna Aradh.
  • For 1015, Mac Raith, mac Muiredhaigh Claoin, tigherna Ciarraighe Luachra, was slain.
  • For 1019, Cú Luachra ua Conchobhair, tigherna Ciarraighe Luachra, died.
  • For 1022, Mac Cerbhaill, tighearna Ele, was slain.
  • For 1022, Sitriocc, mac Iomhair, tigherna Phuirt Láirge, was slain by the king of Osraighe.
  • For 1025, Dúnghal ua Donnchadha, rí Caisil, died.
  • For 1026, Cu Duiligh ua Beargdu, tigherna Ua n-Duach.
  • For 1027, Maol Sechloinn, mac Concobhair, tigherna Corco Mo Dhruadh.
  • For 1031, Ua Donnacáin, king of Ara Tire (Aradh Thíre), was killed by Ua Briain, i.e. Toidelbach.
  • For 1031, Diarmait, mac Domhnaill, mic Faoláin, tigherna na n-Deisi.
  • For 1031, Raghnall mac Raghnaill, mic Iomhair, tigherna Puirt Lairge.
  • For 1032, Mac Mathghamhna, mic Muiredhaigh, tigherna Ciarraighe, was slain.
  • For 1033, Conchobor ua Muiredaig, king of Ciarraige, was slain.
  • For 1033, Aimirgein ua Cerbaill, king of Eile, died.
  • For 1033, Aengus ua Cathail, king of Eoganacht of Loch Lein, was killed.
  • For 1033, Aimhirgin Ua Cerbhaill, tigherna Ele, died.
  • For 1033, Find Ua Dúnghalaigh, tigherna Musccraighe Thíre, died.
  • For 1037, Cú Ionmhain ua Ruband, tigherna Puirt Lairge, was slain.
  • For 1039, Donnchad, son of Gill Patraic, overking of Laigin and Osraige, died.
  • For 1042, Murchad, son of Dunlang, king of Laigin, and Domnall, son of Aed, king of Ui Barichi, fell by Gilla Patraic, son of Donnchad, king of Osraige, and Mac Riath, son of Donnchad, king of Eoganacht.
  • For 1043, Ceinneitig ua Cuirc, king of Muscraige, was killed.
  • For 1043, The defeat of Mael Caennaig on the edge of the Suir was inflicted by Carthach, son of Saerbrethach, tighernae Eoghanachta, on the Osraige and the Airmumu (Ormond); and h-Echtighern ua Donnocain, king of Ara (Aradh), was left dead there.
  • For 1044, Domnall ua Cuirc, king of Muscraige, was killed by O Flaithein and O hOiseni.
  • For 1045, Congalach ua Lochlainn, king of Corcu Mruad, died.
  • For 1045, Carthach, son of Saerbrethach, king of Eoganacht of Caisel, was burned with many nobles in a house set on fire by the grandson of Lonharcan, son of Donn Cuan.
  • For 1049, Concobur h-úa Cind Fhaelad, rí h-Úa Conaill Gabra, was slain.
  • For 1049, Aneislis mac Domnaill, rí Corco Baiscind, was slain.
  • For 1050, Mael Ruanaid mac Conchobuir, ri Éile, was slain.
  • For 1050, Mael Ranaid, son of Cu Choirne, king of Eile, was killed.
  • For 10??, Muirchertach, son of Brec, king of the Deisi of Mumu, was killed in the stone church of Les Mor by Mael Schnaill ua Bric.
  • For 1052, Domnall Ban ua Briain was killed by the Connachta.
  • For 1052, Mac Raith ua Donnchada, king of Eoganacht of Caisel, died.
  • For 1054, Aedh, son of Ceinnetug, son of Donn Cuan, chief of Clann Tairdelbaig, was killed by the Connachta.
  • For 1055, A defeat was inflicted by Toirdelbach ua Briain on Murchad ua Briain in which four hundred fell including fifteen chieftains.
  • For 1057, Dungal ua Donnchada, king of the Eoganacht of Caisel, fell by Murchad, son of Brian, withmany others.
  • For 1057, Mael Ruanaid ua Focarta, king of south Eile, fell by Donchad, son of Birian.
  • For 1058, Rigbardan, son of Cu Coirne, king of Eile, fell in battle, with many others.
  • For 1063, Cathal mac Donnchadha, king of Ui Eachach Mumhan, that is, king of Raithlinne, was slain by his enemies, that is, an Fionnshúilech (Cenel Conaill).
  • For 1064, Donnchad, son of Brian Borama, overking of Mumu, was deposed and died in Rome on pilgrimage.
  • For 1067, A hosting by Tairdelbach is Briain to Loch Cime, and ua Conchobuir, king of Ciarraige Luachra, was killed on the hosting.
  • For 1072, Ua Focarta, king of Eile, was killed by the grandson of Brian.
  • For 1073, An army was led by Tairdelbach into Leth Cuinn and he took an innumerable prey from the Gailenga and killed Mael Morda ua Cathasiagh, king of Brega.
  • For 1075, An army was brought by Tairdelbach and by Leth Moga into Leth Cuinn, and they reached Ath Firdiadh, and the Airgialla inflicted the defeat of Ard Monainn on Muirchertach ua Briain, in which many fell.
  • For 1076, An army was led by Tairdelbach into Connachta, and the king of Connacht, i.e. Ruaidri ua Conchobuir, came into his house.
  • For 1077, An army was led by Tairdelbach ua Briain into Ui Cheinnselaigh, and he took captive the son of Domnall Remhar, i.e. the king of Ui Cheinnselaigh.
  • For 1078, Cend Faoladh Ua Dunghalaigh, tigherna Muscraighe Thire.
  • For 1080, Donnsleibe ua hEochada went into Mumu with the nobles of Ulaid to seek hire.
  • for 1080, Eochaidh Ua Loingsigh, tigherna Uaithne Thíre, died.
  • For 1084, An expedition was made by the men of Mumu into Mide, and it is on that expedition that Conchobor ua Cetfada died. The Conmaicne went into Tuadmumu in their rear, and burned fortresses and churches, and carried off prey.
  • For 1084, The defeat of Moin Cruinneoici was inflicted by Leth Moga on Donnchad, son of Cailech, ua Ruairc, in which fell ua Ruairc and Ceinnetigh ua Briain and many others.
  • For 1086, Mac Bethad ua Conchobuir, king of Ciarraige died.
  • For 1086, Tairdelbach ua Briain, king of Ireland, died in Cenn Coradh after great suffering and long repentance. Tadc, his son, moreover, died a month later.
  • For 1088, An army was led by Domnall, grandson of Lochlainn, king of Aileach, into Connacht and Ruaidri gave hostages of Connacht to him, and they went into Mumu and burned Luimnech (Limerick) and the plain as far as Dun Ached, and they brought away the head of the son of Cailech, and they razed Cenn Coradh and so on.
  • For 1088, A great slaughter was inflicted on the foreigners of Ath Cliath (Dublin) and Loch Carman and Port Lairge (Waterford) by the Ui Echach of Mumu on the day they intended to plunder Corcach (Cork).
  • For 1089, h-Úi Maelsechlainn do dul a n-Uaithne Thire & a n-Uaithne Fidbuidhe, co tucsat bu imdha leo.
  • For 1090, A meeting between Domnall, grandson of Lochlainn, and Muirchertach ua Briain, king of Caisel, and the son of Flann ua Mael Sechlainn, king of Temair (Tara), and they all gave hostages to the king of Ailech.
  • For 1092, Muiredach, son of Carthach, king of the Eoganacht of Caisel, died.
  • For 1093, Donnchad, son of Carrthach, king of the Eoganacht of Caisel, was killed.
  • For 1094, An army was led by Muirchertach ua Briain to Ath Cliath, and he expelled Gofraidh Meranach from the kingship of the foreigners, and killed Domnall ua Mael Sechlainn, king of Temair.
  • For 1094, The battle of Fidnach in which half of the west of Connacht fell and half of Corco Mruad, by Tadc, son of Ruaidri ua Conchobuir.
  • For 1094, Annadh h-Ua Céli, king of Aradh, was slain by the men of Munster.
  • For 1094, Ruaidri Ua Donnacan, king of Aradh, died.
  • For 1096, Mathgamain ua Segdai, king of Corco Duibhne, Conchobor ua hAiniarraid, king of Ciannacht, and Ua Cein, king of Ui Meic Cairthinn, fell by one another in battle.
  • For 1097, Muirchertach ua Briain and Domnall ua Lochlainn met at Mag Muirtheimhne (in Co. Louth) to do battle, and Domnall, successor of Patrick restrained them in a semblance of peace.
  • For 1099, Muirchrtach and the Leth Mogha again went north, to Sliab Fuait, and Domnall, successor of Patrick made a year's peace between them and the north of Ireland.
  • For 1100, An expedition was led by Muirchertach ua Briain to Eas Ruaidh.
  • For 1100, Gilla Brigdi ua Cuirc, king of Muscraige Bregain, died.
  • For 1101, An expedition was made by Muirchrtach ua Briain and by Leth Moga into Connacht, over Eas Ruaidh into Tir Eogain, and they razed Ailech and burned and outraged many churches also. They went thereafter over Fertas Camsa and burned Cul Rathain and committed slaughter there. They afterwards took the hostages of the Ulaid. They went home over Slige Midluachra.
  • For 1102, The hostages of the men of Ireland were handed over to Domnall, successor of Patrick, as surety for a year's peace between ua Briain, i.e. Muirchertach, and ua Lochlainn, i.e. Domnall, etc.
  • For 1102, Caisel was burned by the Eile.
  • For 1103, A great war between the Cenel Eogain and the Ulaid, and Muirchertach ua Briain came with the men of Mumu and Laigin and Osraige and with the nobles of Connacht and the men of Mide with their kings to Mag Coba (Co. Down) to assist the Ulaid. The men of Leth Moga were defeated.
  • For 1103, Ua Failbhe .i. ridomna Corco Duibhne, and Ua Muiredhaigh ri Ciarraighe
  • For 1104, An army was brought by Muirchertach ua Briain to Mah Muirtheimhne, and they destroyed the husbandry of the plain.
  • For 1104, Conchobhar mac Maoilechlainn Ua Conchobhair Corca M' Dhruaidh. died.
  • For 1105, An army was brought by Muirchertach ua Briain, and he expelled Donnchad ua Mael Sechlainn from the kingship of the west of Meath.
  • For 1105, Maol Ruanaidh Ua Bilraighe, tigherna Ua Cairpre, died.
  • For 1106, An army was brought by Domnall ua Lochlainn to help Donnchad ua Mael Sechnainn, and they plundered the west of Mide and Donnchad was overtaken on a raiding party and was killed.
  • For 1107, A year's peace was made by Cellach, successor of Patrick, between Muirchertach and Domnall.
  • For 1107, Cuilen Ua Cathalain, tigherna Uaithne Cliach, died.
  • For 1108, Ua Cerbhaill, tigherna Eoghanachta Locha Léin.
  • For 1109, An army was brought by Muirchertach ua Briain to assist Murchad ua Mael Sechnainn, and he plundered some of the Ui Briuin (of Connacht).
  • For 1109, A year's peace was made by Cellach, successor of Patrick, between Muirchertach and Domnall.
  • For 1113, Mael Sechnainn ua Conchobuir, king of Corco Mruad, died.
  • For 1113, More encounters between ua Lochlainn and us Briain, in Mag Coba. Again, peace was made by Cellach, successor of Patrick.
  • For 1114, A fit of sickness seized Muirchertach ua Briain, king of Ireland, and rendered him paralyzed and parted from his kingship. Diarmait, however, took the kingship of Mumu in his presence without asking permission.
  • For 1114, Domnall ua Lochlainn went to Telach ua nDedaigh in Dal Cais, and a year's truce was maded between Domnall's allies and the men of Mumu.
  • For 1115, Diarmait ua Briain, king of Mumu, was taken prisoner by Muirchertach ua Briain.
  • For 1115, A defeat was inflicted by Domnall ua Briain and the foreigners of Ath Cliath on the Laigin (of Leinster).
  • For 1115, Domnall, son of Tadc ua Briain, heir designate of Mumu, was killed by the Connachta.
  • For 1115, Muirchertach ua Briain assumed his kingship again, and came with an army into Laigin and Brega.
  • For 1117, Tairdelbach, son of Diarmait, and the Dal Cais were defeated by the Connachta.
  • For 1118, Diarmait ua Briain, king of Mumu and Leth Mogha also, died in Corcach mor of Mumu.
  • For 1118, An army was brought by Tairdelbach us Conchobuir, king of Connacht, and Murchad us Mael Sechlainn, king of Temair, along with him, and Aed ua Ruairc, into Mumu until they reached Glenn Maghair, and they gave Desmumu to Mac Carrthaigh and Tuadmumu to the sons of Diarmiat, and took hostages of both.
  • For 1119, Muirchertach ua Briain, king of Ireland, died.
  • For 1121, Domnall, son of Ardgar, son of Lochlainn, over-king of Ireland, died.
  • For 1121, An army was brought by Tairdelbach ua Conchobuir and the prvince of Connacht into Desmumu and they plundered from Mag Feimin to Traigh Li.
  • For 1121/22, Mael Sechlainn O Donnacáin, rí Aradh Tíre, died.
  • For 1124, Tadc, grandson of Carthach, king of Desmumu, died.
  • For 1124, The hostages of Desmumu were killed by Tairdelbach ua Conchobuir, i.e. Mael Sechlainn, son of Cormac, grandson of Carrthach, king of Caisel, and ua Ciarmaic from Aine, and ua Cobthaigh of the Ui Cuanach of Cnamchail.
  • For 1126, A plundering army was brought by Tairdelbach ua Conchobuir into Desmumu.
  • For 1127, An army was led by Tairdelbach ua Conchobuir into Desmumu.
  • For 1127, The men of Mumu and Laigin turned again on Tairdelbach ua Conchobuir and they forfeited the lives of their hostages, and Tairdelbach's son, Conchobor, was deposed as king of Laigin and the foreigners (installed by Tairdelbach in 1126).
  • For 1129, Úi Riada (O'Reidy), king of Aradh.
  • For 1131, A rading expedition by Tairdelbach ua Conchobuir and the province of Connacht into Mumu and they plundered Ui Conaill Gabra. The men of Mumu joined Tairdelbach on an army to take hostages in Laigin and Mide
  • For 1132, Cormac Mac Carthaig allied with Conchobar ua Briain, king of Thomond, Tigernan ua Ruairc, king of Breifne, and ua Mail Sechlainn, king of Mide, to launch a coordinated offensive against Tairdelbach ua Conchobuir, king of Connacht, challenging him for the high-kingship. Lochlann, son of Amlaib ua Lochlainn, king of Corco Mruad, was killed.
  • For 1133, Muiredach ua Dubhtaig, bishop of Tuam, concluded a peace between ua Conchobuir and the allies of Mac Carthaig.
  • For 1134, Corbmac mac Meic Carthaigh, rí Caisil.
  • For 1135, Aodh Ua Conchobhair, tigherna Corca Mo Dhruadh.
  • For 1135, Fionghuine Ua Caoimh, tigherna Glendamhnach.
  • For 1137, Conchobhar Ua Briain, tigherna Tuadhmhumhan & Urmhumhan.
  • For 1138, Mathghamhain Ua Conchobhair, tighearna Ciarraighe Luachra, died.
  • For 1138, Corbmac, mac Muiredhaigh meic Carthaigh, righ Desmhumhan.
  • For 1143, Tadhg Ua Briain, tigherna Tuadhmhumhan.
  • For 1144, Toirrdhealbhach Ua m-Briain, righ Mumhan.
  • For 1146, Giolla Pháttraicc mac mic Donnchadha, tigherna Osraighe.
  • For 1149, Ua Lochlainn, tigherna Corco Mo Dhruadh.
  • For 1151, Muirchertach mac Conchobhair Ui Bhriain, tigherna Tuadhmhumhan.
  • For 1151, Conchobhar, mac Domhnaill Ui Bhriain, tigherna Airthir Mumhan.
  • For 1152, Domhnall mac Ríoghbhardáin Uí Cherbhaill, tigherna Ele.
  • For 1152, Diarmaitt Ua Conchobhair, tigherna Ciarraighe Luachra.
  • For 1153, Gerr na c-Cuinneogh Ua Bric, tigherna na n-Déisi.
  • For 1154, Tadhg Ua Brian, rí Mumhan, died.
  • For 1154, Diarmaid Ua Conchobhair, tigherna Ciarraighe Luachra, died.
  • For 1158, Ua Failbhe, tigherna Corca Duibhne, was slain by h-Uibh Séghdha.
  • For 1158, Ua Domhnaill, tigherna Corca Bhaiscind, was slain by h-Ua c-Concobhair Corca Mo Dhruadh.
  • For 1159, Giolla Caoimhghin Ua Ceinneittigh, tigherna Urmumhan.
  • For 1163, Mac Find Ui Cherbhaill, tigherna Ele Tuaisceirt, was slain by Domhnall, mac Toirrdhealbhaigh.
  • For 1164, Amhlaoibh, mac Giolla Chaoimhghin Ui Cindéittigh, tigherna Urmhumhan.
  • For 1165, Mac Raith Ua Conchobhair, tigherna Ciarraighe Luachra.
  • For 1165, Diarmaid mac Corbmaic Méc Cárthaigh, tigherna Deasmhumhan.
  • For 1167, Toirrdhealbhach, mac Diarmada Uí Bhriain, rí Mumhan, & Lethe Mogha.
  • For 1168, Muirchertach, mac Toirrdhealbhaigh Uí Bhriain, rí Mumhan.
  • For 1168, Conchobhar Leth-dhearg, mac Maoil Seachlainn Uí Choncobhair, tighearna Corco Mo Dhruadh, was slain.
  • For 1169, Brian Slébhe Bladhma, mac Toirrdhealbaigh Uí Bhriain, rí Mumhan.
  • For 1170, Domhnall mac Toirrdhealbhaigh Uí Bhriain, tigherna leithe (half) Mumhan.
  • For 1170, Diarmaid Ua Cuinn (O'Quinn), toiseach Cloinne h-Ifernain, do mharbhadh lá Cenél Aodha na h-Echtghe.
  • For 1171, Domhnall Ua Fógarta, tigherna Ele Déisceirt, was slain.
  • For 1174, Melaghlin O'Donnagan, Lord of Ara (Aradh), was slain by O'Conaing.
  • For 1174, An English defeat at Thurles against the Earl (i.e. Richard) by Donnell O'Brien and the Dalcassians, King Roderic O'Conor of Connacht, among others.
  • For 1175, Roderic O'Conor, King of Ireland, marched with an army into Munster; he expelled Donnell O'Brien from Thomond, and much wasted the country on that expedition.
  • For 1176, The English were driven from Limerick by Donnell O'Brien, by laying siege to them.
  • For 1176, Donnell, the son of Turlough O'Brien, the heir apparent to the kingdom of Munster, died.
  • For 1176, Dermot,the son of Cormac Mac Carthy, King of Desmond, was taken prisoner by his own son, Cormac Liathanach; but Cormac was treacherously slain by his own people, and Dermot then re-assumed his lordship.
  • For 1179, Melaghlin Reagh O'Shaughnessy, Lord of half the territory of Kinelea, was killed by the son of Donough O'Cahill.
  • For 1180, Donnell, the son of Teige O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, died.\
  • For 1180, Hugh O'Caithniadh, Lord of Erris, was treacherously slain by O'Callaghan at Kilcommon.
  • For 1182, Brian, the son of Turlough O'Brien, was treacherously slain by Randal Macnamara Beg.
  • For 1185, Maelisa O'Daly, ollave (chief poet) of Ireland and Scotland, Lord of Corcaree and Corca-Adain, a man illustrious for his poetry, hospitality, and nobility, died while on a pilgrimage at Clonard.
  • For 1185, Donnell O'Brien defeat the forces of King Henry II.
  • For 1185, The West of Connaught was burned, as well churches as houses, by Donnell O'Brien and the English.
  • For 1185, Dermot Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, was slain by the English of Cork.
  • For 1192, The English of Leinster committed great depredations against Donnell O'Brien. They passed over the plain of Killaloe, and directed their course westwards, until they had reached Magh-Ua-Toirdhealbhaigh, where they were opposed by the Dalcassians, who slew great numbers of them. On this expedition the English erected the castles of Kilfeakle and Knockgraffon.
  • For 1192, Donnell O'Brien defeated the English of Ossory, and made a great slaughter of them.
  • For 1194, Donnell, son of Turlough O'Brien, King of Munster, a beaming lamp in peace and war, and the brilliant star of the hospitality and valour of the Momonians, and of all Leth-Mogha, died; and Murtough, his son, assumed his place.
  • For 1194, Donough, son of Murtough, who was son of Turlough, was slain by Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Brien.
  • For 1195, John De Courcy and the son of Hugo De Lacy marched with an army to conquer the English of Leinster and Munster.
  • For 1195, Cathal Crovderg O'Conor and Mac Costelloe, with some of the English and Irish of Meath, marched into Munster, and arrived at Imleach Iubhair (Emly) and Cashel. They burned four large castles and some small ones. Cathal Mac Dermot marched from Munster into Connaught, and passed victoriously through the province.
  • For 1196, Donnell, the son of Dermot Mac Carthy, defeated the English of Limerick and Munster in a battle, with dreadful slaughter, and drove them from Limerick. He also defeated them in two other battles in this year.
  • For 1200, Cathal Crovderg O'Conor went into Munster, to the son of Mac Carthy and William Burke to solicit their aid.
  • For 1203, A victory was gained by Donnell, the son of Mac Carthy, and the people of Desmond, over the English; in the conflict one hundred and sixty persons, or more, were slain.
  • For 1205, The son of Guill-bhealach O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, was slain by the English.
  • For 1205, Donnell O'Faelain (Phelan), Lord of the Desies of Munster died.
  • for 1205, Meyler, the son of Meyler, took possession of Limerick by force.
  • For 1207, A great war broke out among the English of Leinster; i.e. between Meyler, Geoffrey, Mares, and William Mareschal. Leinster and Munster suffered severely from them.
  • For 1207, Meyler Oge, Murtough O'Brien, and Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, made a predatory incursion into Tir-Fachrach Aidhne, and plundered fifteen ballys (townlands).
  • For 1208, Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, was taken prisoner by the English of Limerick, in violation of the guarantee of three bishops, and by order of his own brother, Donough Cairbreach.
  • For 1224, Mahon, the son of Kehernagh O'Kerrin, Lord of Kerry of Lough-na-narney, died.
  • For 1224, A monastery was erected by Maurice Fitzgerald, from whom the Fitzgeralds of Kildare and Desmond are descended, at Youghal, in the diocese of Cloyne, in Munster, for Franciscan friary.
  • For 1229, The monastery of St. Francis, at Cork, was founded by Mac Carthy More (Dermot). Dermot Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, died the same year.
  • For 1239, Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Brien, died.
  • For 1240, The Monastery of Timoleague, in Carbery, in Munster, in the diocese of Ross, was founded for Franciscan Friars, by Mac Carthy Reagh, Lord of Carbery, and his own tomb was erected in the choir of the Friars. In this monastery also Barry More, O'Mahony of Carbery, and the Baron Courcy, are interred.
  • For 1242, Donough Cairbreach O'Brien, Lord of the Dalcassians, tower of the splendour and greatness of the south of Ireland, and his son Turlough, died. Connor O'Brien assumed the lordship of Thomond.
  • For 1247, The monastery of Ennis, in Thomond, in the diocese of Killaloe, was founded by O'Brien, and in this monastery is the burial-place of the race of Brian.
  • For 1249, Fineen Mac Carthy made a great war on the English of Desmond, and inflicted many evils upon them.
  • For 1250, Fineen Mac Carthy was slain by the English of Desmond.
  • For 1251, A monastery was founded at Kilnamullagh, in the diocese of Cork, by Barry, who chose a burial place for his family in it.
  • For 1257, A great war between Conor O'Brien and the English of Munster; and the English were slaughtered by him. Teige O'Brien also committed great depredations upon them.
  • For 1258, A great war broke out between the English and Conor O'Brien, during which were burned Ardrahen, Kilcolgan, and many street-towns, and much corn.
  • For 1260, An army was led by Mac Maurice into Thomond, to attack Conor O'Brien. O'Brien, attended by the chiefs of his people, met him at Coill-Bearain; and the English were defeated at once, with the loss of David Prendergast, a most puissant knight; the Failgeach; the parson of Ardrahin, Thomas Barrott; and others not mentioned.
  • For 1261, A great war was waged, and many injuries were inflicted, by Fineen Mac Carthy, son of Donnell Mac Carthy, and his brothers, on the English.
  • For 1261, A great army was marched by the Clann-Gerald (Geraldines) into Desmond, to attack Mac Carthy, i.e. Fineen. Mac Carthy attacked and defeated them; and in this contest were slain eight barons and five knights, besides others of the English nobles, as also John Fitz Thomas and Barry More. Countless numbers of the English common soldiers were also killed in the aforesaid battle. Fineen Mac Carthy was afterwards killed by the English, and the lordship of Desmond was assumed by his brother, the Aithcleireach Mac Carthy. Brian Roe O'Brien burned and demolished Caislein ui Chonaing (Castle Connell), and killed all that were in it.
  • For 1262, An army was led by Mac William Burke and the English of Ireland into Desmond, against Mac Carthy, and arrived at Mangartagh, of Lough Leane. Here Gerald Roche, who was said to be the third best knight of his time in Ireland, was slain by Mac Carthy. This was a triumph without joy to Desmond, for Cormac, son of Donnell God (the Stammering) Mac Carthy, was slain in this battle. Indeed, both the English and the Irish suffered great losses about the Mangartagh mountain on that day.
  • For 1263, A great depredation was committed by Hugh, son of Felim, [son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor] on the English of Sliabh Lugha, and in Ciarraighe: great numbers of the English were killed by him, and he carried off many cows from them.
  • For 1268, Conor Roe O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, Seoinin, his son, his daughter, his daughter's son, i.e. the son of Rory O'Grady, Duvloughlin O'Loughlin, Thomas O'Beollan, and a number of others, were slain by Dermot, the son of Murtough O'Brien, for which he himself was afterwards killed; and Brian, the son of Conor O'Brien, then assumed the lordship of Thomond.
  • For 1270, Brian Roe O'Brien turned against the English, and committed great depredations upon them; and the castle of Clar-Atha-da-charadh was taken by him.
  • For 1273, A great army was led by Mac Maurice Fitzgerald into Thomond, where he took hostages, and obtained sway over O'Brien.
  • for 1277, Brian Roe O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, was treacherously taken by the son of the Earl of Clare, and afterwards drawn between horses, and this after both had entered into gossipred with each other, and taken vows by bells and relics to retain mutual friendship.
  • for 1284, Donough O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, was slain by Turlough O'Brien.
  • For 1300, Felim Mac Carthy, heir-apparent to the lordship of Desmond, died.
  • For 1302, Donnell Roe Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, died.
  • For 1303, Donnell Oge Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, died.
  • For 1306, Turlough O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, a man the most illustrious, most pious, most humanely charitable, most prosperous, and most expert at arms, that was in Ireland in his time, died; and his son Donough was elected in his place.
  • For 1301, Conor O'Brien, the best roydamna of his time, was treacherously slain by the black English.
  • For 1311, A great army was led by William Burke into Munster, against De Clare, and a battle was fought, in which De Clare was defeated.
  • For 1311, A great war broke out in Thomond. Donough Mac Namara and his adherents (i.e. the inhabitants of the cantred of Hy-Caisin) gave battle to O'Brien and the men of Munster; but Mac Namara was defeated, and he himself and Donnell O'Grady, Lord of Kinel-Dungaile, were slain on the battle field; and both armies suffered immense slaughter.
  • For 1311, Donough O'Brien, King of Munster, and a materies for a monarch of Ireland for his hospitality and achievements, was treacherously slain by Murrough, son of Mahon O'Brien; and Murtough was elected in his place. Loughlin Reagh O'Dea was slain by Mahon, the son of Donnell Connaghtagh O'Brien.
  • For 1316, A very great army was mustered by Felim O'Conor and the chiefs of the province of Connaught. Among these chiefs were Donough O'Brien, with the chiefs of Munster, among many others. The the Irish were defeated at Athenry and Felim was slain.
  • For 1317, Donough O'Brien, king of Munster, was slain.
  • For 1318, A great victory was gained over the English in Ely, by O'Carroll; and Adam Mares and many other Englishmen were slain.
  • For 1320, Mahon, son of Donnell Connaghtagh O'Brien, Tanist of Munster, was slain by the Clann-Cuilein.
  • For 1325, A victory was gained by the sons of Turlough O'Brien, over the sons of Brian Roe O'Brien; and Brian, the son of Mahon O'Brien, and many others, were slain.
  • For 1326, A victory was gained by Donnell Cairbreach Mac Carthy over Mac Thomas and the English of Munster. Many knights were slain.
  • For 1328, A great army was led by the Earl of Ulster, Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, and Murtough O'Brien, King of Munster, against Brian Bane O'Brien; but they were defeated by Brian Bane. Conor O'Brien, a good materies for a King of Ireland, by reason of his personal shape, wisdom, hospitality, and renown, was slain on this occasion, as were also eighty persons, including chieftains and plebeians.
  • For 1328, Another army was led by Murtough O'Brien and the Clann-Cuilein (the Mac Namaras) against Brian; but Murtough was defeated, and Conor O'Brien, Donnell of the Donnells, the son of Cumara Mac Namara, with many others, were slain.
  • For 1334, A great army, both of English and Irish, was led by the Connacians into Munster against Mac Namara; and they took hostages from him, and obtained sway over him.
  • For 1337, A peace was concluded between William, son of the Earl of Ulster, and Brian Bún (the Fair) O'Brien; and the lands which O'Brien had taken from the son of the Earl were given back to him at their former rent.
  • For 1340, The monastery of Oirbhealach at Carraig-an-chiuil, at the eastern end of Loch Lein, in the diocese of Ardfert, in Munster, was founded for Franciscan Friars by Mac Carthy More, Prince of Desmond (Donnell, the son of Teige); and the chiefs of the country selected burial places for themselves in this monastery. Among these were O'Sullivan More and the two O'Donohoes.
  • For 1343, Murtough O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, died; and Dermot O'Brien assumed the lordship, but he was banished from his chieftainship by Brian O'Brien; and the chieftains of Thomond then submitted to Brian.
  • For 1345, Manus O'Flynn Line i.e. of Moylinny, was slain by Donnell Donn and Brian O'Neill.
  • For 1350, Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Brian Roe O'Brien, was treacherously slain by the sons of Lorcan Mac Lorcan. Turlough Oge O'Brien killed sixteen of the Clann-Keogh in revenge of this evil deed, and despoiled them, besides, of their lands and cattle.
  • for 1356, Donough Mac Namara, the best son of a chieftain in Leth-Mogha in his time, was slain by the O'Briens.
  • For 1359, Cormac Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, and Donnell, the son of Teige O'Mahony, died.
  • For 1359, Murrough Oge Mac Mahon, heir apparent to the lordship of Corco-Baskin. was slain by the O'Briens. For 1361, Donough O'Loughlin, Lord of Corcomroe (Corco Mruad), died.
  • For 1362, Teige, son of Conor, son of Turlough O'Brien, was slain by the Clann-Coilen.
  • For 1364, Dermot O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, died.
  • For 1265, Felim an-einigh, son of Donnell O'Conor, Lord of Corcomroe, died.
  • For 1366, Cormac Don Mac Carthy, Lord of Carbery, and of Ivahagh of Munster, was treacherously slain by his relative, the son of Donnell na-n-Domhnall.
  • For 1366, Conor O'Conor, Lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, was slain by the Branaghs.
  • For 1368, Dermot, the son of Cormac Donn Mac Carthy, was taken prisoner by Mac Carthy, of Carbery, and by him delivered up to the English, who afterwards put him to death.
  • for 1369, Mahon Moinmoy O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, the best and most illustrious of the Irish, died in his own fortress, after the victory of penance. Brian O'Brien assumed the lordship of Thomond after Mahon.
  • For 1369, A great defeat was given by Brian O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, to the English of Munster. Garrett, Earl of Desmond, and many of the chiefs of the English, were taken prisoners by him, and the remainder cut off with indescribable slaughter. Limerick was burned on this occasion by the Thomonians and the Clann-Culein, upon which the inhabitants of the town capitulated with O'Brien. Sheeda Cam Mac Namara, son of the daughter of O'Dwyre, assumed the wardenship of the town; but the English who were in the town acted treacherously towards him, and killed him. This was a lamentable treatment of the son of a chieftain.
  • For 1371, Brian O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, was treacherously slain by the English.
  • For 1373, John Mac Namara, Head Chieftain of Clann-Cuilein in Thomond, and Teige O'Duirnin, died.
  • For 1375, Brian O'Brian, Lord of Thomond, was banished by Turlough, son of Murtough O'Brien, and by the Clann-Rickard.
  • For 1377, An army was led by Richard Burke into Clann-Cuilein. The Clann-Cuilein assembled around Mac Namara (i.e. the son of O'Daly's daughter), gave battle to the Clann-Richard, and defeated them. Theobald, son of Ulick, head of the kerns, the three sons of O'Heyne, and many others of the chiefs of Clann- Rickard, were slain.
  • For 1379, Cumara Gearr i.e. the Mac Namara, was treacherously slain by his own kinsmen.
  • Fro 1380, Teige, son of Murtough O'Brien, was slain by Brian Sreamach O'Brien.
  • For 1381, Dermot Mac Carthy, heir to the lordship of Desmond, was slain by O'Mahony.
  • For 1381, Philip O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, and his wife, Aine, the daughter of Mac Namara, died.
  • For 1382, A plundering army was led by Murrough O'Brien into Desmond, and totally devastated it.
  • For 1382, Murtough, the son of Mahon Moinmoy O'Brien, died in the prison of Trim.
  • For 1382, Donnell O'Brien; Turlough, the son of Dermot O'Brien; and Brian, the son of Dermot O'Brien, of the race of Brian Roe, died.
  • For 1383, Murrough na-Raithnighe O'Brien, More, the daughter of Murrough O'Madden, and wife of Mac William of Clanrickard (Richard); and Joanna, the daughter of the Earl of Ormond, and wife of Teige O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, died of it the plague. Murrough, son of Brian O'Kennedy; Donough an-Chuil Mac Mahon, Lord of Corco-Baiscin, died. Donough O'Conor, Lord of Kerry-Luachra, died.
  • For 1389, Melaghlin Cam O'Loughlin, Lord of Corcomroe, was treacherously slain by his own brother.
  • For 1391, Donnell Oge Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, died; and his son, Teige, assumed the lordship after him.
  • For 1394, Turlough, the son of Murrough na-Raithnighe O'Brien, of the race of Brian Roe, waged war with the people of the King of England in Munster and Leinster, and burned and plundered the county of Limerick.
  • For 1395, Niall Oge, the son of Niall, son of Hugh O'Neill, and O'Brien, i.e. Brian, the son of Mahon, went into the King of England's houses. The King of England departed from Ireland in May, after a great number of the English and Irish chiefs of Ireland had gone into his house; and Mortimer was left by the King in Ireland as his representative.
  • For 1396, O'Conor Kerry was treacherously slain by his own tribe. O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, died. Irial O'Loughlin, Lord of Corcomroe, was slain by Mac Girr-an-adhastair, one of his own tribe, in revenge of his foster-brother Melaghlin, whom he Irial had killed some time before.
  • For 1398, Garrett, Earl of Desmond, a cheerful and courteous man, who excelled all the English, and many of the Irish, in the knowledge of the Irish language, poetry, and history, and of other learning, died, after the victory of penance.
  • For 1399, Brian O'Brien (i.e. the son of Mahon), Lord of Thomond, died.
  • For 1399, Hugh O'Donoghoe, Lord of Eoghanaght of Lough Leane, died.
  • For 1402, A war broke out between the Earl of Ormond and the Earl of Desmond; and the two Mac Williams went to assist the Earl of Ormond.
  • For 1404, Cormac Mac Dermot was slain upon an incursion into Clanrickard, in a conflict with the cavalry of Clanrickard and Thomond.
  • For 1404, The Earl of Ormond, head of the prowess of the English of Ireland, died.
  • For 1404, A war broke out between Mac Carthy and O'Sullivan Boy. Turlough Meith Mac Mahon, who was at this time Mac Carthy's chief maritime officer, came up at sea with O'Sullivan and the sons of Dermot Mac Carthy, who were aiding O'Sullivan against Mac Carthy; and he drowned O'Sulllivan, and made a prisoner of Donnell, the son of Dermot Mac Carthy, on this occasion.
  • For 1405, O'Conor Kerry (Dermot, the son of Donough) was slain by Mac Maurice of Kerry.
  • for 1407, A battle was gained by the English over the Irish of Munster, in which O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, general patron of the literati of Ireland, was killed.
  • For 1408, Teige O'Grady, Chief of Kinel-Dunghaile, died.
  • For 1409, A great war broke out between O'Brien and his sons and the sons of Brian O'Brien. They came to an engagement, and O'Brien was defeated; and the son of the Earl of Kildare, who happened to be along with him, was taken prisoner, as was also Dermot O'Brien; and O'Brien was banished from the province of Munster by the sons of Brian O'Brien.
  • For 1410, O'Brien returned to Thomond, after having made peace with his kinsmen, the sons of Brian O'Brien.
  • For 1411, Donnell, the son of Conor O'Brien, Tanist of Thomond, was slain by Barry More.
  • For 1411, Thomas, the son of John, Earl of Desmond, was banished from Ireland by James, the son of Garrett.
  • For 1414, The Earl of Desmond came to Ireland, bringing with him many of the Saxons, to devastate Munster.
  • For 1418, The Bishop O'Driscoll, Maccon O'Driscoll (his brother), Lord of Corca- Laighe, and Dermot Mac Carthy Cluasach, Tanist of Hy-Cairbre, died.
  • For 1421, Cormac na Coille Mac Carthy of Carbery, the best son of a lord of the Momonians in his time, was slain hy the sons of Owen Mac Carthy.
  • For 1422, Rory O'Conor (i.e. the son of Conor), Lord of Corcomroe, was slain in his own town of Caislen-na-Dumhcha, by his own kinsmen, the sons of Felim O'Conor.
  • For 1426, Conor Brian, Lord of Thomond, died, at an advanced age, on Easter Saturday, and Teige, son of Brian O'Brien, was inaugurated in his place
  • For 1426, Turlough Mac Mahon Bodhar, Lord of Corca-Baiscinn, was killed and burned, at an advanced age, in a nocturnal assault, by his own kinsmen.
  • For 1427, Dermot O'Mahony, Lord of Fonn Iartharach (barony of Kinelmeaky in Cork?), a truly hospitable man, who never refused to give any thing to any one, died, after the victory of penance.
  • For 1432, A great war broke out between O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, and the Earl of Ormond; and the Earl marched at the head of a great army into Ely, ravaged the country, and demolished O'Carroll's two castles.
  • For 1438, O'Brien, i.e. Teige, the son of Brian O'Brien, was deposed by his brother Mahon, who was thereupon styled the O'Brien.
  • For 1442, Mac Carthy Reagh, Lord of Ivahagh in Munster, died. O'Driscoll More (Mac Con), Lord of Corca-Laoighe, died.


    Further Munster Reference: Mumhan * Thomond * Kings of Munster

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