Tribes & Territories of Mumhan
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Munster - Muma, Mumha, Mumu, Muinhneach, Mumhain, Mumhan.

The modern province of Munster contains the counties of Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford. Prior to the establishment of the county system between the 13th and 16th centuries, each county comprised a variety of "tuaths", or clan territories. The Leabhar na gCeart tells us the 22 stipendiary princes of Muma were the Kings of Dál Cais, Gabhrán, of Eoganacht (when not King of Cashel), the Deise, Ui Liathain, Raithleann, Muscraighe, Dairfhine, Dairfhine of the mt., of L. Léin, Ciarraighe Lúachra, Corca Bhaiscinn and Léim na Con, Ui Chonaill Gabhra, Ui Chairbre, Cliu, Uaithne, Eile, Glenn Amhnach, Corcu Luigde, Corcu Duibne, Boirenn, and Sechtmodh.
Ancient divisions of Munster listed in the Irish annals included:
Érna Muman, or Ernaibh Muman - ancient land of the Ernai tribe.
Desmhuman, or Desmumu - Desmond, or south Muinster.
Tuadhmhuman - Thomond, or north Munster.
Urhmumhan, or Urmumu - Ormond, or east Munster.
Iarmumhan - west Munster.
Deissi Muman - Deisi, or the county Waterford area.

County Clare was the ancient dynastic home of the Corco Baiscind, Corco Mruadh and the 'in Deis Tuascirt', among others. In the 12th century the modern county Clare area was part of Tuadhmhuman (Thomond, north Munster) and according to a later description by Samuel Lewis included the territories of Hy Lochlean (or Burren), Corcu Mruadh (Corcomroe), Ibh Caisin, Hy Garman (Moyarta), Clan Cuilean (Clonderlaw) and Dal gCais (Inchiquin, Bunratty, and Tulla).

County Cork was the ancient home of the tribes of Erainn, Maritine, Corca Loigde, Muscraige, Uí Liathain, as well as the Éoganacht septs of the Raithlenn and Glendamnacht regions. The Viking settlement of Cork was started around the 9th and 10th centuries. In the 12th century the modern county Cork area was part of the kingdom of Desmhuman and included the territories of Ivelaugh, Beara, Dubh Alla, Insovenagh, Muskerry and Fearmuigh, among others.

County Kerry was the ancient home of the Ciarraige, Corco Duibne, Uí Cairpri Luachra and Éoganacht Locha Lein tribes. At the arrival of the Cambro-Normans in the late 12th century, the O'Connor Kerry held the north of the county, the O'Moriartys held the middle parts, the southern portion was occupied by the O'Sullivans, O'Donoghues and O'Mahonies, while the western peninsulas were home to the O'Falvays and O'Sheas of Iveragh and Dingle. Mediveval cantreds of the 13th century included Altry (named for the Altraige) and Akunkerry.

County Limerick was the ancient home of the Uí Fidgeinte, Uaithne, Corca Oiche, Orbraige, Uí Cairbre Eaodhe, Uí Conaill Gabra, Muscraige Luachra, and Eoghanacht Aine. The Viking settlement of Limerick was formed during the 9th and 10th centuries. Some of the cantreds that existed about the time of the Norman arrival included Carrigoginniol, Uaithne, Cairbre Aobhdha, Uí Conaill Gabhra, and Connalla.

County Tipperary was the ancient home of Eile, Deisi Thuasgeart, Muscraige Tire, Dal Cairpri Araide (?), and Éoganacht Caissil. Territorial names in the 12th century included Ely and Hy Fogarta (Ormond), Muscraige Cuirc, Aradh Cliach, Hy Kerrin, Uaithni Tire and North Decies.

County Waterford was the ancient home of Deisi Mumhan, Magh Femin, Uí Liathain and Coscraidh. The Viking settlement of Waterford city was founded in the 9th and 10th centuries. By the 13th century territorial names included the Decies, Gal-tir, Hy Fodhladha, and Uactar Tire.

Click here for a physical map of the Munster region.


Ancient Beginnings

Sons of Ailill Aulomm (Oilliol Olum), ancient king of Munster, included:
Éogan Mór, a quo (from whom descend the) Éoganachta (of Munster);
Cian, a quo Ciannachta of Eile (in Tipperary/Offaly), Breagh (in Meath) and Glinne Gemhin (in Derry);
Cormac Cas, a quo Dál gCais in Déis Tuascirt (in Clare).
Tigernach, a quo Cenel Cerdraige.

Sons of Éogan Mór included Fiacha Mullethan (or Fiacha Fer Dá Liach).
Sons of Fiachu Mullethan included Ailill Flann Bec (son of Ailill Flann Mór ?)

Legendary descendants of Dáre Cerbba and/or Maine Munchaín, son(s) of Ailill Flann Bec included:
Fiachu Fidgenid, a quo Úi Fidgeinti, Ua Cairpri, Uí Chonaill Gabra, Uí Laegaire and Uí Setnai.
Eochu Liathán, a quo Úi Liatháin.
Fidach, a quo Crimthann Már (son of Fidaig, king of Ireland and Scotland).
Dedad, a quo Úi Dedaid (Úi Braccáin & Úi Ailella of Airthir Éoganachta Caisil).
Daui Cliach, a quo Úi Duach.

Legendary descendants of Lugaid, son of Ailill Flann Bec included:
Lugaid, a quo Úi Luigdech Éile.
Cathbad, a quo Úi Cathbad Chuille [Éoganacht Ua Cathbach].
[Conall] Corc, a quo Eóghanachta, Uí Echach Mumhan and Uí Cairpri Luachra.

The three sons of Medba fri Fergus (dar cenn n-Ailella) included: Ciar, Corcc, Conmac.
Ciar, a quo Ciarraige Luachra & Ciarraige Chuirchi & Ciarraige Áe & Ciarraige Choinnenn.
Corcc, a quo Corco Mo Druad.
Conmac, a quo Conmaicne.

The descendants of Conaire Mor ( c. A.D. 165) included:
Cairpre Musc, a quo Muscraige and Corco Duibne.
Cairpre Baschain, a quo Corco Baiscinn.
Cairpre Riata, a quo Dal Riata of Ulster and Scotland.

The descendants of Dáire [Doimtig] Sírchréchtach included:
Lugaid Lóegdi, a quo Corcco Lóegdi.
Lugaid Cál, a quo Callraige.
Lugaid Oircthi, a quo Corco Oirgthi.
Lugaid Láechfes, a quo Láechfhes Laigen.
Lugaid Corp, a quo Dál Mis Corb Laigen.
Lugaid Coscaire, a quo Coscraige lasna Déisse.

From Fiachach Suigde, son of Feideilmid Rechtada, (of Meath) descended the Deisi Mumhan.

From Fer Cíchech, son of Fergusa, a quo Orbraige.
From Eithlenn, son of Fergusa, a quo sunt Orbraige & Bentraige.

Uaithne - Four Tribes of Owney.
Glasraige - of Magh Femin.

From Laiginian (Leinster) origins descended the Dal Cairpri Arad, and the Osraighe.


Genealogy and Folklore of the Dynasts of Mumhan

Eóghanachta

Ancient tribes who were said to be conquered by the Eoganacht included the Erainn and the Mairtine. The Erainn was a name applied to a variety of tribal groups across Ireland, including the Ulaid in the north, and the Corco Loigde in Munster. The Mairtine have been described as a Firbolg (aka Erainn?) tribe round Emly in the southwest of modern co. Tipperary. Locations of Tuath Mairtine are described by various texts in Muscraige Mittine (about the barony of East Muskerry), Airther Feimhin (about Clonmel), Liacc Tuill, Tír Aedha Breoguin, and in Ui Cairpre (about the baronies of Carbery).

The Éoganacht were a federation of tribes claiming a common lineage and spread throughout Munster. They were noted as kings of Munster from an early period until the rise of the Dal gCais in the 10th century.


Eóghanacht Áine (Knockainy parish, Co. Limerick)
Eóghanacht Airthir Chliach (Tipperary town district)
Eóghanacht Chaisil [Cashel] - MacCarthy, O'Sullivan, O'Callaghan
Eóghanacht Glendamnacht [Glanworth, co. Cork] - O'Keefe
Eóghanacht Locha Lein (Killarney, alias Eóghanacht Ui Donnchadha) - O'Donoghue Mór and O'Moriarity
Eóghanacht Raithlind (in mid-southern County Cork)
Éoganacht Árann (Aran Islands)
Éoganacht Rois Argait (in or near the barony of Upper Ormond, Co. Tipperary; the Sil Mailedúin one of its clanns)
Éoganacht Maigi Dergind (Magh Geirginn, Kincardine in Scotland)
Éoganacht Ua Cathbach (Co. Tipperary)
Éoganacht Cliach (divided into Eoghanacht Oirthir Cliach and Eoghanacht Iarthair Cliach)
Eóghanacht Durluis (in or near Thurles, co. Tipperary)
Éoganacht Durlais (in Airther Chliach, perhaps in or near the barony of Lower Ormond, co. Tipp.)
Éoganacht Tuaiscirt Cliach (on the east of Galway Bay)
Éoganacht Aradh (of Ara) (perhaps included Eoganacht Araidh Cliach in the barony of Coonagh)
Éoganacht Beag Chaisil (Eoganacht Caille na Manach, in the barony of Kilnamanagh, co. Tipperary)
Éoganacht Bheag (East of Shannon; alias Condae Bheag Luimnigh)
Éoganacht Mhór Muman (about Knockraffon, b. Middlethird, co. Tipperary)
Éoganacht Guirt Gabhra (barony of Connello, co. Limerick)
Éoganacht Iar-Luchair (O'Moriarity, who dwelt west of Sliab Luachra, co. Kerry)

Septs included Ua Ceallacháin (O'Callaghan), Mac Carthaigh (MacCarthy), Ua Donnchadh (O'Donohue), Mac Giolla Mochuda (MacGillycuddy), Ua Caoimh (O'Keefe), Ua Muircheartaigh (O'Moriarity), Ua Suilleabhain (O'Sullivan), among others.

Eóghanacht, branching out of the Race of Eoghan Mor, son of Oilill Olum (Ailell Aulum).
Eoghanacht of Cashel, branching out from Nad Fróech, son of [Conall] Corc
Eoghanacht of Glanworth, branching out from Nad Fróech, son of [Conall] Corc
Eoghanacht of Aine, branching out from Nad Fróech, son of [Conall] Corc
Eoghanacht of Airthir Cliach, branching out from Nad Fróech, son of [Conall] Corc
Eoghanacht Raithlenn and Uí Eachach Mumhan, branching out from Cas, son of [Conall] Corc
Eoghanacht of Loch Lein and Uí Cairbre Luachra, branching out from Cairbre Luachra, son of [Conall] Corc
Eoghanacht of Magh Geirginn, branching out from Cairbre Cruithneachan, son of [Conall] Corc


Éoganacht Caisil

Caissil, or Caisel, is an reference for Cashel, in County Tipperary. The Mac Carthaigh (Mac Carthy) family was a chief sept of the Éoganachta Caisil. Other septs of the Ui Aongusa an Deisceirt, descended from Aengus mac Nadfraich, included O'Callaghan, O'Sullivan, and O'Keeffe. The chief families spread into counties Cork and Kerry with the rise of the Dal gCais dynasty and the arrival of Normans.

MacCarthy (Mac Cárthaigh) - a name derived from Carthach, son of Saerbhrethach, a king of Eoghanacht-Caisil who died in 1045. After being driven from their homeland around Cashel, the MaCarthy chiefs moved into Desmond, where they eventually split into four noted septs: the MacCarthy Mór (Great MacCarthy), nominal head of all the MacCarthys, who ruled over much of south Kerry; the Duhallow MacCarthys, who controlled northwest Cork; MacCarthy Riabhach or Reagh ('grey') based in Carbery in southwest Cork; and MacCarthy Muskerry, on the Cork / Kerry border. The MacCarthys controlled much of Desmond until the turn of the 15th century.

The O'Sullivans (Ó Súilleabháin) - Ó Súilleabháin, chiefs of Cenél Finghín (from Finghin of Feimhin), perhaps originally in Tipperary. The Anglo-Norman invasion of the twelfth century pushed the family further south into the areas where they multiplied and divided. The two most important branches were O'Sullivan Mór possessed the barony of Dunkerron near the river Kenmare, and their chief seat was the castle of Dunkerron on Kenmare Bay, and O'Sullivan Beare whose territories included the baronies of Beare and Bantry. The O’Sullivan of Croc Raffan were chiefs of Knockgraffan in Tipperary and the territory they possessed in Tipperary was situated in the barony of Middlethird, between Cashel and Cahir.

The O'Callaghans (Ó Ceallacháin), originally cited of the Cineal Aodha of Ui Eachach Mumhan in south co. Cork, later claimed descent from Ceallachan, an Éoganacht Caissil king of Munster in the mid 10th century. By the end of the thirteenth century the O'Callaghans took possession of that part of Co Cork which came to be known as Pobal Uí Cheallachain, O'Callaghans Country. This was a very large area on both sides of the river Blackwater west of the modern town of Mallow.

an early Éoganacht Caissil genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Dúngal m. Máel Fathardaig m. Flaind m. Donnchada m. Máel Fathardaich m. Bróen m. Móenaich m. Indrechtaich m. Flaind m. Rechtabrat m. Sechnassaich m. Fíngin m. Áeda m. Crimthaind m. Feideilmid m. Óengusa m. Nad Fróech m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit (Éogan Taídlech).

an early Éoganacht Caissil .i. Clann Faílbe [MacCarthy & O'Callaghan] genealogy:   (Rawlinson) Cellachán m. Buadacháin m. Lachtnai m. Artgaili m. Snédgusa m. Donngaile m. Fáelgusa m. Nad Fraích m. Colgan m. Faílbe Flaind m. Áeda m. Crimthaind m. Feidelmid m. Óengusa m. Nad Fróech m. Cuircc.

an early Éoganacht Caissil .i. Cenél Fíngin [O'Sullivan] genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Súildubán m. Máel Augrai m. Echthigirn m. Murchada m. Duib Indrecht m. Flaind m. Fiachrach m. Sechnassaich m. Fíngin m. Áeda Duib m. Crimthaind m. Feideilmid m. Óengusa m. Nad Fraích.

The Annals cite for the term Caisel:

Éoganacht Locha Lein and Uí Cairpri Luachra

Luachair (Lúachra) is the old name of a large district on the borders of Co Cork, Kerry and Limerick. Cairbre of Sliobh Luachra was on the Cork-Kerry border (Book of Munster). Éoganacht Locha Lein is described, by John O'Donovan, around the Lakes of Killarney, in and near the barony of Magunihy, in county Kerry.
Early ruling septs of Éoganacht Locha Lein included Úa Cathail (O'Cahill), Úa Flainn, Úa Muircheartaigh (O'Moriarity), and Úa Cerbaill (O'Carroll). By the 12th century the Úa Donnchadha (O'Donoghues of Cenél Laegaire), driven north out of Cork, had conquered and settled Éoganacht Locha Lein. The O'Donoghues had also driven out the Ua Congaile (O'Connell) chiefs, who were also noted by various authorities as chiefs in the region of the barony of Magunihy.
Uí Cairpri Luachra derives its name from an ancestor named Cairbre Luachra. The Annals of Inisfallen tell is that from Cairbre Luachra descend Aos Isti (tribe-name of the O'Moriartys?), Aos Alla (Duhallow, Co. Cork) and Aos Gréine (Pallasgreen, Co. Limerick).

Note: The Uí Chairpri Aebhdha, of Ui Fidghente origin, is also noted in county Limerick.

an early Uí Cairpri Luachra (and Éoganacht Locha Lein) genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Muircheartach m. Murchadha m. Cathain m. Cobhthaich m. Máel Dúin m. Áeda m. Conaic m. Cummíne m. Áeda Bennáin m. Crimthaind m. Cobthaich m. Duach Iarlaithi m. Maine m. Cairpri Luachra m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat (Éogan Taídlech).

The Annals cite:

Éoganacht Maigi Dergind - inhabited a district in northeast Scotland between the Tay and the Dee. Their early ancestry mirrors that of the Uí Cairpri Luachra (above). Their ancestor Cairpre Cruithnechán, son of Conall Corc, is claimed as a brother of Cairpre Luachra, son of Conall Corc. Some say these two Cairbres were one and the same.

an early Éoganacht Maigi Dergind [Magh Geirginn in Scotland] genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Cairpre Cruithnechán m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.



Uí Echach Mumhan and Éoganacht Raithleann

Uí Echach was described, in early texts, within the ancient principality of Muskerry, in mid County Cork, to the west and southwest of the town of Cork. Raithlinn or Raithleann is described (Onomasticon Goedelicum) around the area of Bandon, in the same area. Archaeologists believe that Garranes Ringfort in Templemartin parish, near Bandon, County Cork may have been Rath Raithleann, the royal seat of the Éoganacht Raithleann.
As early as perhaps the 6th century the Uí Echach Mumhan split into two major groups; the Cenél Láegaire and the Cenel nÁeda. The Cenel nÁeda gave their name to the barony of Kinalea in southern co. Cork. An important sub-sept of the Cenel nÁeda (of Ui Echach Muman) were the Cénel mBéicce (e.g. O Mathghamhna or O'Mahony), who gave their tribal name to the barony of Kinelmeaky. The Cenél Láegaire expanded westward toward Bantry as early as the 8th century, and were later represented by Ua Donnchadha, or O'Donoghue, a sept whose chiefs later settled in county Kerry. In the 12th century the formation of the diocese of Cork is said to outline the extent of the territory of Uí Echach Mumhan and Éoganacht Raithlind at that time, the eastern portion of the diocese perhaps reflecting the territory's ancient beginnings.

Various septs, according to the Book of Munster (Eugene O'Keeffe, 1703), included O'Mahony and O'Donoghue, O'Duggan, O'Long, O'Feehin, O'Leary, O'Donnell, O'Connell, Lynch, the Benntraighe (Bantry), O'Hea, O'Cahalane, O'Coughlan, O'Cannifee, O'Bogue, O'Cronin, O'Flynn, O'Flahiffe, Connelly.

An early Ua nEchach (Cenel Láegaire of Munster) genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Fergal m. Éladaich m. Duind Sláine Bricc m. Clárenich m. Carpri Riastrain m. Áeda Osrige m. Láegaire m. Crimthaind m. Echach m. Cais m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic [m. Ailella Flaind Móir?] m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

An early Ua nEchach (Cenel Áeda of Munster) genealogy:   (Rawlinson) Fergus m. Ailella m. Conath m. Artgaile m. Béicce m. Fergusa m. Cind Fáelad m. Feideilmthi [cuius frater fuit Scandal m. Sodalbi m. Dercco Birn hinc Genus (Sod)albe] m. Tigernaich m. Áeda Aurgairb. m. Crimthaind m. Echach m. Mac Cais m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

An early Ua nEchach Muman (Regum Muminensium) genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Domnall m. Duib Dá Bairenn m. Domnaill m. Duib Dá Bairenn m. Óengusa m. Flaithniad m. Anilte m. Dúnlaing m. Élódaich m. Selbaich m. Cláirenich m. Cairpri Riastrain m. Aeda Osrige m. Láegaire [m. Crimthaind?] m. Echdach m. Caiss m. Cuircc m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimb m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

An early Éoganacht Raithlind genealogy:   (derived from Rawlinson)
Dúngal m. Clárenich m. Cairpri m. Cináed m. Láegaire m. Crimthaind m. Echach m. Mac Cais m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

The Annals cite:

Éoganacht Áine

O'Ciarmaic (O'Kirwick and Kirby) served as chiefs of Eoghanacht Áine (Áine Cliach) at the time of the Norman invasion, and were centered in the parish of Knockainy, barony of Small County, in east Co. Limerick.

Additional chiefs and territories in the barony of Small County are mentioned by O'Hart (Pedigrees). These included O'Muldoon, also a chief of Eoganacht Aine, same as O'Kerwick. O'Kenealy, chief of Eoganacht Grian Guara, a district comprising parts of the baronies of Coshma and Small County in Limerick. O'Gunning, chief of Crioch Saingil and Aosgreine: Crioch Saingil, according to O'Halloran, is now "Single Land," and is situated near Limerick; and both the territories here mentioned are, according to O'Brien, comprised in the barony of Small County, in Limerick.

an early Éoganacht Áine genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Amalgaid m. Endai m. Cremthainn m. Ailella m. Nad Fróech m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat.

an early Ua nÉnna (Ui Ciarmiac) genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Conchobor m. Gillai Ailbe m. Meic Maras m. Ciarmaicc m. Máel Guaile m. Rind m. Find Sláine m. Cerbaill m. Coirne m. Ólchobuir m. Duib Indrecht m. Cathassaich m. h-Uisnich m. Máel h-Umae m. Cúáin m. Amalgada m. Énnai m. Crimthaind m. Ailella m. Nad Fraích m. Cuircc

The Annals cite:

Éoganacht Airthir Cliach

Centered in or near the baronies of Kilnamanagh in co. Tipperary, and the neighboring barony of Coonagh in Co. Limerick. The Eoganacht Caille na Manach (aka Eoganacht Beag Chaisil) were centered in the barony of Kilnamanagh in west co. Tipperary. The Eoganacht of Durlas Airthir Cliach were said to be centered near Thurles, co. Tipperary, just east of the northern Kilnamanagh region. The Eoganacht Mhór Mumhan were cited in the barony of Middlethird, co. Tipperary, just east of he southern Kilnamanagh region. Another location is cited south of Kilnamanagh, in the barony of Clanwilliam, co. Tipperary.

The Ó Dubhuidhir (Ó Duibhir or O'Dwyer) were noted as chiefs in in the barony of Kilnamanagh, County Tipperary. Keating (History) note the O Duibhidhir of Coill na Manach (Kilnamanagh) and Mag Cormain were the O'Brien's marshals of the hosts. In O'Clerys genealogies the O'Dwyers are listed under the lineage of the Osraighe.

Their near neighbors included: The O'Cuirc (O'Quirke) who ruled over a considerable territory in Clanwilliam prior to the Norman settlement, with their territory then known as Muscraighe Cuirc (aka Múscraige Breogain). O'Cuillen (O'Cullen) were cited as chiefs of Eoghanacht Aradh in the barony of Owney and Arad. Mac Ui Bhrian (Mac I Brien), a Dalcassian sept, were lords of Owney and Arra, their territory anciently referred to as Aradh Cliach and acquired from the O'Donegans around 1300.

an early Éoganacht Airthir Cliach (and Éoghanacht Leag in Arad Cliach) genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Cormac m. Maíli Otraig m. Éogain m. Áeda Beccáin m. Cormaic m. Crimthain Airthir Cliach m. Echach m. Óengusa m. Nad Fróech m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat.

The Annals cite :

Éoganacht Glendamnacht

Septs of the Éoganachta Glendamnacht (Glennamnach, Glendamain, now Glanworth) included Ó Caiomh (O'Keeffe). The eponymous ancestor of the O'Keeffes was Art Caemh, whose great-grandfather was Artrí mac Cathail, King of Munster in the early 9th century. The O'Keeffe's held the southern half of Feara Muighe (barony of Fermoy) in east county Cork prior to the Norman invasion, and later became lords of Dromagh, north of the Blackwater river in northern county Cork.

an early Éoganacht Glendamnacht genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Artrí m. Cathail m. Finguine m. Con Cen Máthair m. Cathail m. Áeda [m. Flaind Cathrach] m. Cairpri [Crom] m. Crimthaind Sreim m. Echach m. Óengusa m. Nad Fróech m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

The Annals cite:

Éoganacht Ua Cathbach

Cathbach, or Cathfadh, from whom were the Ui Cathfhaid Cuile (these were scattered about N.W. Tipperary). The Uí Chathbad Chuille were a dynasty descended from Ailill mac Cathbad, nephew of Conall Corc, and later displaced by the Eóganacht Airthir Chliach. The territory of Ua Cathbaidh Thire is described in the Book of Ballymote from Firt Moraind to Sliabh nEblinne (the mountains about Cashel and Nenagh, in co. Tipperary).

an early Éoganacht Ua Cathbach genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Conaic m. Lárchada m. Duib Rubai m. Fiangalaich m. Colmáin m. Aurgnaid m. Thuircc m. Ailella m. Cathbath m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flainn Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat.



More Éoghanacht genealogies

an early Clann Donngaile of Clann Failbe genealogy (McCarthy and O'Callaghan):   (Rawlinson)
Cellachán Caisil (42nd Christian king of Munster) m. Buadacháin m. Lachtnai m. Artgaili m. Snédgusa m. Donngaile m. Fáelgusa m. Nad Fraích m. Colgan m. Faílbe Flaind m. Áeda m. Crimthaind m. Feidelmid m. Óengusa m. Nad Fróech m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

an alternate Clann Donngaile genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Donnchad m. Carthaich m. Saírbrethaich m. Cellacháin m. Buadacháin m. Lachtnae m. Arttgaile m. Snéidgaile m. Donngaile m. Fáelgusa m. Óengusa m. Nad Fróech m. Colgan m. Faílbe [m. Flaind] mc Áeda m. Fíngin m. Áeda m. Crimthaind m. Feideilmid m. Óengusa m. Nad Fróech m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

an early Cenel Conaill of Munster genealogy (e.g. O'Hegarty and O'Carroll):   (Rawlinson)
Lorccán m. Condlígáin m. Corcráin m. Cuircc m. Arttgaile m. Domnaill m. Conaill m. Snéidgusa m. Nad Fraích m. Colgan m. Faílbe Flaind m. Áeda m. Crimthaind m. Feidelmid m. Óengusa m. Nad Fróech m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat.

an early Cenel Cormaic of Munster genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Cú Druine m. Concertaich m. Rónáin m. Cormaic m. Causáin m. Feradaich m. Nath Í m. Óengusa m. Nad Fráech m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat.

an early Cenel Ua Muiredaig genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Fogartach mc Fiannamla m. Gascedaich m. Máel Anfaid m. Duib Torráin m. Thuatháin m. Colmáin m. Crimthain m. Nad Sluaig m. Muiredaich m. Meic Tháil m. Dega m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat.

an early Cenel Gabraige genealogy :   (Rawlinson)
Fáelchú m. Airmedaich m. Máel Anfaid m. Díma m. Dícolla m. Gubbi m. Cormaic m. Cáirthind m. Óengusa m. Nad Fraích m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat.

The Annals cite for the Éoganachta:

Dál gCais

Dál gCais, branching out of the Race of Cas, son of Oilill Olum. See Thomond for further information.


Uí Fidgeinti, Uí Chonaill Gabra, and Uí Chairpri Eabha
Uí Fidgeinte, et al, branching from the race of Fiacha Fidhgheinte. See Thomond for further information.


Cenel Cerdraige - referred in the descent from Tigernach mac Ailella Auluimm, the Cerdraige Tuilche Gossa are noted in the Books of Leinster, Lecan and Ballymote. The name is also applied in the Cerdraigi Beirri, from the race of Dairfhine Cerda, at Temair in county Kerry; the Cerdraige Temrach.

an early Cenel Cerdraige (tulchi Gossa) genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Mo Themneóc .i. Temneán m. Corbbáin m. Lugeda m. Themin m. Themneáin m. Senaich m. Cerddáin m. Cerdda Bice m. Cerdraige m. Tigernaich m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat.


Ua Liathain

Úi Liatháin, branching out of the Race of Eochu Liathán, son of Dáre Cerbba. Septs included Ua Liatháin (O'Lehane) and Ua hAnmchada of southeast Co. Cork, centered about the baronies of Barrymore and Kinnataloon. Carn Tasaigh is noted by O'Donovan (Fragments of Irish Annals by MacFirbis) as a seat of the chief of Ui Liathain in the barony of Barrymore, county Cork. The Uí Maic Caille, namesake of the barony of Imokilly, were also of the Úi Liatháin region.

Of this region O'Hart (Pedigrees) notes O'Lehan (Lynis, or Lyons) as lord of Hy-Lehan and Hy-Namcha, afterwards called the barony of Barrymore, from the family of the [Cambro-Norman] Barrys, who became its possessors. Castle Lehan, now Castlelyons, was the chief seat of this family.

an early Ua Liathain genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Eochaid Liathán m. Maine Cherbba m. Cirbb m. Ailella Flaind Bicc m. Fiachach Fir Dá Liach m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

an alternate Ua Liathain genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Anmchaid m. Dúnchada m. Rónáin m. Dícolla m. Fergusa Tuile m. Feradaig Dornmáir m. Cailléni Duib mc Meic Caille m. Meic Brócc m. Dáre Cherbba m. Maine Munchaín m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit.

Tha Annals Cite:

Uí Maic Caille
A sept of Ui Liathain, they gave their name to the barony of Imokilly, county Cork. The sept of Ó Mic Thíre (anglicized as Wolfe) are noted in the annals of the 12th and 13th century as chiefs of Uí Mac Caille, and also as chief of Uí Ghlaisín at the time of the Anglo-Norman arrival. Other chiefs noted in the Annals included Ua Carrain and Ua hAnmchadha. O'Hart (Pedigrees) give the chiefs of Hy-Mac-Caille as O'Breoghan (this name "Breoghan" is considered the root of Brown), O'Glaisin (Glashan, or Gleeson), O'Mictyre and O'Keely.

an early Uí Maic Caille genealogy   (Rawlinson)
Ailchú mc Suibne m. Fáeláin m. Colmáin m. Fergnae m. Nath Í m. Meic Caille m. Meic Brócc m. Echach Liatháin.

The Annals Cite:

Uí Duach

An Uí Duach sept was located in northern Osraighe (Ossory). The O'Brennans were later chiefs. The origins of this dynasty may be held in the annals for 582, which states: Fearadhach, son of Duach, Lord of Osraighe, was slain by his own people.
Note: Not to be confused with Cenél Duach of Cenél Conaill, in Ulster.

an early Uí Duach genealogy (Fiachrach Oele):   (Rawlinson)
Úi Duach Argetrois, branching out of the Race of Daui, son of Dáre Cerbba (or Maine Munchaín?).
Laidgneán m. Suibne m. Doinennaich m. Suibne m. Áeda m. Óengusa Conath m. Concrath m. Duach Cliach m. Maine Munchaín m. Cairpri m. Cuircc m. Luigdech m. Ailella Flaind Bic m. Ailella Flaind Móir m. Fiachach Mullethain m. Éogain Máir m. Ailella Auluimm m. Moga Nuadat m. Moga Néit

The Annals cite for the general term Duach:

Déisi

The Déisi Mumhan were of Co. Waterford and southern County Tipperary. Septs included Ua Bric (O'Brick), Ua Faeláin (Phelan/Whelan). The earlier origins of the Déisi are stated to be on the plains of the River Boyne, where the tribes of the Déisi Brega continued to flourish in early medieval times. An ancient genealogy has the Ua Fáeláin of Déisi in descent from Fiacha Suidhe, a brother of Conn Ceadchathach (of the Hundred Battles).

an early Deisi Mumhan genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Gilla Pátric m. Máel Sechnaill m. Gillai Brigte m. Domnaill m. Fáeláin m. Cormaic m. Mothla m. Ruadrach m. Donnchada m. Dúnchada m. Éogain m. Bregduilb m. Cumascaich m. Cobthaich m. Áeda m. Fintain m. Cláire m. Cainnich m. Ernbraind m. Niad m. Briúin m. Éogain Bricc m. Airtt Chirp m. Cairpri Rigronn m. Fiachach Suigde m. Feideilmid Rechtada, son of Tuathal Teachtmhar.

The Annals cite:

Déise Becc

The Déise Becc (Déisi Bicce) were noted about the baronies of Small County and Coshlea in southeast county Limerick. The parish of Athneasy, alias Áth na nDéise, is said to derive its name from the Déise Becc. They are sometimes referred to as 'In Déis Deiscirt' to distinguish them from their northern neighbors, the 'In Déis Tuaiscirt' who are represented in the Dal gCais. However the terms déisi tuaiscirt and déise deiscirt were also applied to the O'Felans and O'Brics of north and south Decies (Dési Muman), respectively.


Mag Femin

Mag Femin, or Magh Feimin, is described as the plain in the locality of Clonmel, barony of Iffa and Offa East, modern co. Tipperary, extending north to Cashel, Cahir and Knockgraffan. The historians O'Donovan, Hennessy and McCarthy equate Femin with the baronies of Iffa and Offa in county Tipperary. The Déise are noted of Mag Feimin at an early date (5th century), and part of the region became known as Déise Tuaiscirt. An early patrimony of the Eoganacht Caisil is also suggested in Mag Femin.
The Book of Lecan mentions a Glasraige tribe in Mag Femin. The Glasraighe were also noted in the midland region. The Book of Leinster mentions the territory of Muscraige Airthir Femin.

The Annals cite:


Ciarraige Luachra (co. Kerry)

The territory of Ciarraige Luachra was said to comprise the northern half of county Kerry including the baronies of Trughenacmy, Clanmorris, and Irachticonnor. Septs of the Ciarraige (Clan na Rory) of County Kerry included Ua Conchobuir Ciarraige (O'Conor Kerry), Ua Muiredaig (O'Murtagh), Ua Neide (O'Neide), among others.
Various groups of the Ciarriage, descendants of Ciar, are noted in Western Ireland including those in Connacht.

From Mug Tóeth (Mug Dóit or Mug Tuath), son of Fergusa, descend the Ciarraige, Conmaicne and Bibraige. From Eithlenn, son of Fergusa, descend the Orbraige & Bentraige. From Fer Deoda (Fer Dea), son of Fergusa, descend the Corcco M' Druad.

Trí maic Medba ri Fergus tar cend Ailella .i. Ciar, Corc, Conmac.
Ciar, a quo Ciarraige Luachra & Ciarraige Chuirchi & Ciarraige Áe & Ciarraige Choinnenn
Corcc, a quo Corcco Mo Druad
Conmac, a quo Conmacne Réin & Conmacne Mara & Conmacne Cúili Talad & Conmacne Chúle & Conmacne Ceníuil Dubáin.
Note: The territory of Ciarraige Chuirchi was cited in or near the barony of Kerrycurrihy, close to Cork city. The territory of Ciarraige Áe is given in eastern co. Mayo, and probably included the Ciarraige of Airteach of northern co. Roscommon.

an early Ciarraige [Luachra] genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Mac Raith m. Meicc Bethad m. Conchobuir m. Cathail m. Conchobuir m. Muiredaich m. Diarmata m. Indrechtaich m. Cormaic m. Cobthaich m. Máel Coba m. Flaind Féornae m. Colmáin m. Rechtabrat m. Máel Tule m. Áedloga m. Daurthecht m. Senaich m. Rethaich m. Ferbba m.Imchada m. Ambrit m. Mochon m. Saulim m. Messe Chon m. Saulo m. Mogo Airtt m. Orbbsa m. Fiachna m. Aithre m. Ailte m. Ochomon m. Fidchuire m. Delbnae m. Einne m. h-Uillriuch m. Astomuin m. Moga Tuath m. Fergusa m. Rosa m. Rudraige.

an earlier Ciarraige [Luachra] genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Flann Feórna m. Colmáin (cuius frater Máel Cáich dá mc Rechtabrat) m. Maíle Tuile m. Áedloga m. Daurthacht m. Senaich m. Rethech m. Ferbba m. Imchada m. Ambrit m. Mechon nó ita Ambrit m. Conath m. Cuilind m. Ma Saulim m. Mese Chon m. Saula m. Moga Airtt (qui dicitur Ciar) m. Foirbsen Máir m. Echdon m. Aithria m. Alta m. Ochomuin m. Fidchuire m. Delmne m. Éoin m. Sinéoin m. Óinne m. Ullsaich m. Astomuin m. Moga Tuath m. Fergusa m. Roaich m. Echach m. Cairpri (hinc conueniunt fri Corc' Óche nó Óche .i. im Chairpre) m. Luigdech m. Lugair m. Eithnenn m. Danann m. Brátha m. Condath m. Deátha m. Erccada m. Ceu m. Celebair m. Buais m. Anbuais m. Ébir m. Feithiul m. Óirne Chúilbennaich (i sunn condrecat is Fir Maige Féine) m. Fidbi Fáeburdeirg m. Muinremair m. Condnaich m. Allóiti m. h-Érech Febria m. Míled Espáin (is é side in dara ócthigern déc ro gab h-Érinn) m. Nóendi, (im Nóende condrecat fri Síl n- Amargin n-Glúngil .i. Corcco Acrad Éile & na h-Orbraige uile & Corcco Artbi).

The Annals cite:

Ciarraige Cuirche (co. Cork)

The Ciarraige Cuirche, or Chuirchi, gave their name to the barony of Kerrycurrihy located south of the city of Cork. Their origins are the same as the Ciarraige Luachra, i.e. descended from an ancient ancestor referred to as Cíar, son of Medb and Fergus. The Ui Torna are noted of Kerricurrihy barony, Co Cork, e.g. Mainistir O dTórna.

The Annals cite:

Corca Oiche (Oircthi?)

Corca Oiche (Oche, Oidhce) was located near the Abbeyfeale district of County Limerick. O'Macasa (e.g. MacKessy and Maxey) are cited as a chief of Corca Oiche. St Molua was born in Ardagh of the ruling sept of Corca Oice in 554 A.D. MacFirbis cites a genealogy from the mythic Fionn Mac Cumhaill, son of Baoisgne, son of Oiche (of Corca Oiche ua fFidhgente).

Note: Corco Oichi is also noted as a name for midland and nothern tribal groups, e.g. the Corco Oichi of Chula Breag in Mugdorna (Ulster); the Corco hOiche of Fearnmagh, and of Sliabh Mondairn; and the Corco Oche Cúile Chontund, on borders of Meath and Cavan.

The annals cite:

Orbraige (and Benntraige)

Eithlenn, in descent from Fergusa mc Rosa, from whom descend the Orbraige (of Munster) and Bentraige. The territory of Orbraige, in Munster, was located in or near the barony of Orrery (and Kilmore) in northern Co. Cork and possibly into southern co. Limerick.

A territory referred to as Benntraige (Bantry) was in west Co. Cork near Bantry Bay, and in Corco Luachra according to Onomasticon Goedelicum. O'Hart (Pedigrees) mentions the sept of O'Beice or Beeky as chief of Beanthraidhe, now the barony of Bantry.
(note: another Benntraige was located in west Co. Wexford).

An early Orbraige genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Fer Cíchech m. Fergusa, a quo Orbraige na h-Aille & Orbraigi Irruis.

The Annals cite:

Corco Láigde (Láoighe, Lóegdi or Luighe)

Descended from Lughaidh Laidhe (Loígde). This tribal or group name was applied to that part of southwest Co. Cork embraced by the diocese of Ross (formed in the 12th century). It included the baronies of Carbery, Beare and Bantry. It at one time extended from Beann Finn westward to Tragumina and Lough Ine and from Beal Atha Buidhe to Tragh Claen.

Septs in the region included Ua Cobhthaigh (O'Cowhig, O'Coffey), Ua Dubhchonna (ODowney), Ua h-Etersceóil (O'Driscoll), Ua Fitheligh (O'Fehilly, O'Fealy), Ua Floinn (O'Flainn, O'Flynn), Ua h-Aonghasa (O'Hennessy), Ua Laochdha (Leahy), Ua Laoghaire (O'Leary), Ua Longáin (O'Longan), O'Doheny, O'Doughan, O'Dunlea, O'Hea, O'Baire, O'Henegan, Kevane. In another source Corco Láigde was siad to be possessed by the O Driscolls, O Baires, O Learys, O Henegans, O Flains, O Cowhig, O Fihilla, O Deada, O Hea, O Kiervic, &c.

The name Dairfhinne, aka Fir Erainn, was applied to a a powerful people in Munster in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th centuries, not considered to be of Milesian descent. Their power was much crippled by the race of Olioll Olum in later times; after the establishment of surnames in Ireland the principal families of this race were - O'Driscol, O'Coffey, O'Curnin, O'Flyn Arda, O'Baire of Munter-Bhaire, O'Leary of Rosscarbery, and O'Trevor of Kilfergus, all in Munster.

O'Hart (Pedigrees) cites O'Flynn as chief of Arda (a territory in the barony of Carbery), and Hy-Baghamna, now the barony of "Ibane" and Barryroe, adjoining Carbery. The castle of Macroom was built by the O'Flynns. O'Hart also notes the sept of O'Baire, anglicised O'Barry, chief of Muintir Baire, part of ancient Carbery in the county Cork and also chief of Aron. This family was of the Ithian or Lugadian race. O'Hart goes on to state that O'Hea and O'Dea are mentioned among the families of Thomond; they were also chiefs of Carbery, county Cork. Also noted by O'Hart (Pedigrees) were the O'Donovans, also mentioned in Thomond, settled in Cork, and were chiefs of Clan Cathail, in West Carbery.

an early Corco Láigde (Úa mBuilc Nunc) genealogy:   (Rawlinson)
Dub Dúin m. Flannáin m. Coibdenaich m. Colmáin m. Flannáin m. Brannuib m. Etarscéle m. Nath Í m. Óengusa Builg m. Luigdech m. Maicniod m. Meic Con m. Luigdech Loígde m. Dáiri Doimtig nó Sírchréchtaig m. Sidebuilg m. Fir Suilne m. Tecmanrach m. Loga m. Eithlenn m. Luigdech m. Bregaind.

Note: The descendants of Dáire [Doimtig] Sírchréchtach included:
Lugaid Lóegdi, a quo Corcco Lóegdi.
Lugaid Cál, a quo Callraige.
Lugaid Oircthi, a quo Corco Oirgthi.
Lugaid Láechfes, a quo Láechfhes Laigen.
Lugaid Corp, a quo Dál Mis Corb Laigen.
Lugaid Coscaire, a quo Coscraige lasna Déisse.

The Annals cite:


Muscraige, Corco Duibne, Corco Baiscind and Dal Riata, who descend from three sons of Conaire Mor ( c. A.D. 165), named Cairpre Musc, Cairpre Baschain and Cairpre Riata. These four septs of the Erainn are claimed to have anciently migrated from Breg in the north of Ireland to Munster in the south. The Dal Riata migrated to the northeast corner of Ireland at a very early time, eventually founding a dynasty in Scotland.

Muscraige, anglicized Muskerry, was the name for various groups and regions in Munster. O'Hart (Pedigrees) mentions some of the chiefs of Múscraige Tíre, centered in north county Tipperary, as O'Donegan (or O'Dongan) prince of Aradh, styled princes of Muiscrith Tire, O'Donnelly (or O'Dongally), and O'Fuirig (or O'Furey). The Annals note the sept of Ua Cuirc (e.g. O Quirke) as kings of Múscraige Breogain, also known as Múscraige Cuirc. The Annals also note the sept of Ua hAeda as kings of Múscraige, perhaps alluding to the region known Muscraige Aodha. O'Hart (Pedigrees) calls this family O'Hea, chief of Muscry Luachra, a territory lying between Kilmallock and Ardpatrick, in the barony of Coshlea, in the county Limerick. O'Hart also mentions the sept of O'Mulbhehan as chief of Muscry Trehirne (Tretherne).

Ua Donnocáin (e.g. O'Donegan) is cited in the Annals as a king of Múscraige Mittaine in the late 11th century, and MacLysaght (More Irish Families) notes that O'Donegan's country was the alias for Múscraige Tri Maighe. MacLysaght goes on to note that the territory of the O'Donegans of Tri Maighe passed into the possession of the Norman Barry family in the 13th century; the O'Donegans of Aradh (Ara) in Múscraige Tíre became dispersed by the O'Briens whose chief there became Mac I Brien Ara; and the O'Donegans in south-west Cork (perhaps Múscraighe Mittaine) became tributary to O'Sullivan Beare. The various Ua Donnocáins in Munster,and elsewhere, may have translated into later surnames such as Donegan, Dunnigan, Dunagan, Dunegan, Dungan, etc.

Ua Fuirg is a sept noted as lords of Ui-Furgo (Uí Forgo or Cenél Forgo) in the Annals. O'Hart (Pedigrees) anglicizes Ua Fuirg, or O'Fuirig, as O'Furey. John O'Donovan places the Uí Forgo near the eastern border of Lough Derg in Múscraige Tíre. This area (Ardcrony) was (later?) the seat of the chief of the dalcassian O Hogans, i.e. Ó hOgáin, claiming descent from Ógán who was descended from the uncle of Brian Boru.

Muscraige

The Muscraige and Corco Duibne descend form Corc, a son of Cairbre Musc.
Múscraige Tíre - northern Tipperary, barony of Lower Ormond - Ua Donnghaile (O'Donnelly), Ua Dúnlaing (O'Dowling), Cenél Forgo.
Múscraige Tri Maighe [Muskerry of the Three Plains] - in Orrery and part Duhallow, Co. Cork - Ua Donnocáin (O'Donegan), O'Cullenane
Múscraighe Mittaine - present baronies of east and west Muskerry and Barrett's in Co. Cork - O'Donegan (see Múscraige Tri Maighe).
Muscraige Uí Fhloinn [Muskerrylinn] - between Ballyvourney and Blarney, in south of Múscraighe Mittaine - O Floinn (O'Flynn).
Múscraige Breógain (or Cuirc, or Iarthair Feimhin, or Treithirne) - barony of Clanwilliam, co. Tipperary - Ua Chuirc (O'Quirke).
Muscraige Aodha - alias Muscry Luachra, on both sides of the Blackwater, near its source, in NW Cork. - Ua Aedha (O'Hea)

The Annals cite:
Corco Baiscind - see Thomond.


Corco Duibne

The territories of Corco Duibne were anciently said to include the baronies of Corkaguiny (Ua Failbhe, or O'Falvey), Iveragh (Ua Séghdha, or O'Shea), Magunihy (e.g. Ua Congaile, or O'Connell), and part of Dunkerron. Ua Failbhe and Ua Séghdha were noted in the Annals as chiefs of Corco Duibne. Ua Séghdha and Ua Congaile were noted as chiefs of Magh gCoinchinne. Ua Congaile (O'Connell) were originally chiefs in the barony of Magunihy in county Kerry, and about the middle of the 11th century they were driven into Iveragh by the Ui Donnchadha. The chief of Ua Séghdha was ousted by the MacCarthys in the early 12th century. Following the English Invasion the Ui Suilleabhain (O'Sullivans) and MacCarthaigh (MacCathys) were driven into west Kerry, and ousted the original occupiers (Hogan, On. Goed.).
The legendary origins of the Corco Duibne include descent from Cairbre Musc, a quo Muscraige and Corco Duibne.

An early Corco Duibne genealogy:   (MacFirbish)
Longbardain m. Floinn m. Olcobhair m. Tiobraide m. Cathra m. Fir-Fedha m. Muinecháin m. Failbhe m. Ciarain m. Nadsaighlenn m. Braccain m. Nuidin m. Morcuinn m. Cormac Finn m. Cuirc Dhuibhne m. Cairbre Musg m. Conaire.

The Annals cite:

Osraighe (Ossory)

A chief sept included Fitzpatrick. Osraige was part of Munster province during early Medieval times.

Genealogy of Osraighe (Ossory):   (Rawlinson)
Domnall mc Donnchada m. Gillai Pátraic m. Donnchada m. Cellaig m. Cerbaill (cuius filius Diarmait) m. Dúngaile m. Fergaile m. Anmchada m. Con Cercca m. Fáeláin m. Crunnmaíl m. Rónáin Rígflatha m. Colmáin cuius filius Scandlán m. Bicne Cáech m. Laignich Fáelad m. Rumaind Duach cuius filius Feradach m. Conaill m. Coirpre m. Nio Cuirp m. Buain m. Echach Lámdóit m. Amalgada m. Lóegaire Birn Buadaig m. Óengusa Osfríthe m. Crimthaind Máir m. Iair m. Sétnai m. Ailella m. Lugdach m. Labrada m. Carthaich m. Nuadat m. Condlai m. Bresail Bricc.

Further reference on: Ossory

The Annals cite:

Fir Maige Féne - a non-Eoghanacht tribe centered at Fermoy (Feara Maigh), co. Cork. Maige Féine included parts of the baronies of Fermony, Condons and Clangibbon, and perhaps Duhallow. An early genealogy cites Mug Roith m. Fergusa, a quo Fir Maigi Féine, placing them with ancient Ulster origins, and/or kinsmen to the Muscraighe. Úi Némáin m. Lonáin (do Feraib Maigi Féne).

The territory of Mag Féne is described as an extensive district in the north of Co. Cork, extending from the Nagles Mountains northwards to the Ballyhoura hills. In early historical times, and down to the Anglo-Norman invasion, part of this territory is occupied by a branch of the Eóganacht (known as Eóganacht Glennamnach); the remainder by the Ui Dhubhagáin and other families who claimed descent from Mug Ruith (source: O'Rahilly).
O'Hart (Pedigrees) notes that in ancient times the O'Keeffes, the O'Dugans, and O'Cosgraves, were chiefs in Fearmuighe Fein‚, now the barony of Fermoy; which was afterwards possessed by the family of Roche, viscounts of Fermoy, and called "Roche's Country." The O'Keeffes at one time were marshals and military leaders in Desmond, and were styled princes of Fermoy.

Mentioned in connection to the Fermoy area was also Tuath Muighe Finne, which included Ui Béce Uachtarach, Úi Bece Abha, Úi Congairb.   Also mentioned in the Fermoy area was Ui Maille Machaire, in the Triacha of Caoille, whihc extended north from town of Fermoy to the river Fuinshion (O'Longan, Book of Lismore).

Note: Not to be confused with Fernmag, or Fernmaighe, in county Monaghan.

The Annals cite:

Aes Ealla - or simply Ealla, was an early reference to the region about the barony of Duhallow in northwestern county Cork. O'Heerin (Poems) mentions that the ancient tribe of Aes Ealla dwelt between Newmarket, county Cork, and the confines of Kerry and Limerick. O'Heerin also notes that Dún Durlais in the plain of Ella (alias Magh Ealla) was inhabited by the Aes Ealla. The barony of Duhallow derives its name from Duthaidh Ealla, alias Crích Ealla (Tribes of Ui Fiachrach, ed. O'Donovan). The river Allow derives its name from Ealla or Aella. Mallow is said to derive its name from Magh Ealla, the plain of Ealla.

O'Hart (Pedigrees) mentions the MacDonoghs as chiefs of Duhalla, now the barony of Duhallow. The MacDonoghs of Munster were a branch of the MacCarthys, and were styled princes of Duhallow; their chief residence was the magnificent castle of Kanturk. O'Hart also cites MacAullife [of Clann Amhlaibh] as chief of Glean Omra, in the barony of Duhallow, and a branch of the MacCarthys. Their chief seat was Castle MacAuliffe, near Newmarket. O'Tedgamna was another ancient chief of this territory. O'Hart goes on to note the sept of O'Nunan or Noonan as chief of Tullaleis and Castlelissen, now the parish of Tullilease, in the barony of Duhallow, county Cork.

The Annals cite:

Further notes on Munster Septs and Tribes

Before the establishment of the county system, the area of the present County Cork was divided between the territories of Desmond, Muskerry, and Corca Laoidhe. The major Gaelic families in the county were McCarthy, O'Keefe, Murphy, O'Mahony, O'Callaghan, O'Donovan, O'Driscoll, and O'Riordan.

Prior to the Anglo-Norman invasion, the O'Keeffe family held the southern half of the territory of Fermoy (Gaelic: Feara Muighe). They were driven from this area by the Normans and settled in western Co.Cork in the district later known as Pobal Uí Chaoimh ("O'Keeffe's Country"), situated just north of the Blackwater River.

The races of the Corca Laiodhe had been gradually pushed south of the Bandon river by the Eoghanachta of which the ruling families were the O'Mahony's and the O'Donoghues. The Anglo-Normans drove the O'Sullivans out of Tipperary and the O'Donovans, Collinses and Connollys out of West Limerick, and they retreating southward circumscribing the Corca Laiodhe.

O'Quinn were chiefs of Muintir Ifernain, a territory about Corofin in the county Clare. The O'Heffernans were the tribe who possessed this territory, and very early established themselves in eastern Limerick as chiefs of Owneybeg before being displaced by the Ryans. These O'Quinns also had possessions in Limerick, where they became earls of Dunraven.

The O'Connells were noted as chiefe of Magh O g-Coinchinn, now the barony of "Magonihy," in Kerry. These O'Connells were a branch of the O'Connells of Thomond; descended from Conaire the Second, the 111th Monarch of Ireland. Their descent in the Book of Munster is given from Connall (from whom Ui Chonaill), son of Donnghal, son of Flann Lua (or Laoi), son of Laoghaire, son of Criomthann, son of Eochu, son of Cas, son of Corc.



Further Munster Reference: Mumhan * Thomond * Kings of Munster * Annals for Munster

Further Province Reference: Index * Connacht * Leinster * Mide * Munster * Ulster


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