Barber County, Kansas.  

Hosted by RootsWeb, the oldest & largest FREE genealogical site. Click here to visit RootsWeb.
BARBER COUNTY, KANSAS: HISTORY & GENEALOGY
Bibliography     Biography     Cemeteries     Churches    Cities & Towns     Contributors     Ephemera    Genealogy     Guest Book - Sign     Guest Book - View     Heritage Center     History     Links     Maps     News Articles     Newspapers     Photos     Queries     Records     Resources    Rodeo     Schools     Search     Veterans     HOME


Hope Cemetery

also known as Cornish-Harrington Cemetery

Gravestone of John and Susan Bullock, Hope Cemetery (also known as the Cornish-Harrington Cemetery, Turkey Creek Township, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.
Gravestone of John and Susan Bullock, Hope Cemetery, Turkey Creek Township, Barber County, Kansas
Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.


Hope Cemetery History

Contributed by Nathan Lee, Coats, KS, July, 2006

The Hope Cemetery, one of the pioneer cemeteries near Turkey Creek in Barber County, is located along the south-central border of Section 25, Turkey Creek Township. This is about 1.25 miles due north of present-day Sun City, KS. GPS coordinates of the Bullock grave (the most prominent) are N 37-23-56, W 98-54-47 (degrees-minutes-seconds). This property was originally known as the Cornish Ranch, later the Harrington Ranch, and is now owned by Frances Bissantz. The Cornish-Harrington descendants are buried in the Lake City Cemetery. The cemetery is located along the "old freight trail" from Hutchinson, KS, before the current Sun City road was built around 1927.

As of July, 2006, there are only 5 clearly marked graves in the Hope Cemetery. Strangely, there is "gap" of around 20 years (early 1890s to 1911) in which the settlers around Sun City were not buried near the town at all. Indeed, the earliest grave in the current Sunnyside Cemetery at Sun City is the baby McGee grave of 1912. The deceased of that era were buried at the Lake City Cemetery, some 5 miles south-east of the area.

Grave 1 and 2: Located within a relatively fancy steel fence and filled with iris plants and aromatic sumac (buckbrush).

John Bullock
Nov. 24, 1837
Oct. 23, 1911

Susan E. Bullock
June 27, 1838
Feb. 2, 1912

Grave 3: Located about 20 paces due east of Bullock grave in deep grass.

Sylvie E.
Dau. Of Wm. & C.R. Ward
Born Sept. 22, 1892
Died May 10, 1894
Gone but not forgotten

Grave 4: Located about 40 paces south-east of Bullock grave, partially disturbed by large cedar tree with various other pieces of stone. Distinct foot-stone intact.

Infant
Son of J.G. & A.
Johnston
Born Oct. 12, 1890
Died Oct. 23, 1890
A bud plucked by God to bloom in Heaven

Grave 5: Located about 50 paces south-west of Bullock grave, fallen from old concrete setting, foot-stone intact. Headstone turned over in 2006 to protect deteriorating face.

Baby
G.A. Taul
(no other dates or marks)


Gravestone of John and Susan Bullock, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.
Gravestone of John and Susan Bullock, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.
John Bullock   Nov. 24, 1837 - Oct. 23, 1911
Susan E. Bullock   June 27, 1838 - Feb. 2, 1912
Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.

Gravestone of Sylvie E. Ward, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.
Gravestone of Sylvie E. Ward, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.
Sylvie E.
Dau. Of Wm. & C.R. Ward
Born Sept. 22, 1892
Died May 10, 1894
Gone but not forgotten
Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.

Gravestone of Johnson infant, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas..

Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.
Gravestone of Johnson Infant Son, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.
Infant
Son of J.G. & A.
Johnston
Born Oct. 12, 1890
Died Oct. 23, 1890
A bud plucked by God to bloom in Heaven
Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.

Gravestone of Johnson infant, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas..

Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.
Gravestone of Johnson Infant Son, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.
"This gravestone is partially disturbed by large cedar tree with various other pieces of stone. The distinct foot-stone is intact."
Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.

Baby G.A. Taul.

Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.
Gravestone of Baby G.A. Taul, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.
Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.

Baby G.A. Taul.

Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.
Gravestone of Baby G.A. Taul, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.
Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.

Detail of the inscription on the gravestone of Baby G.A. Taul, Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.
Detail of the inscription on the gravestone of Baby G.A. Taul
Hope Cemetery, Barber County, Kansas.
(The article about George Ralph Walker in Chosen Land mentions a Levi Taul.)
Photo by Nathan Lee, 30 July 2006.


The Union, March 16, 1888. (Sun City)

Died: Saturday, March 10th, the infant son of B.L. and Rachel Taul, age 1 year, two months and ten days. Our heart beats with sympathy for the bereaved parents whose only consolation is given in these words: "Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." Or ask, "Where is they spirit flown? I gaze above - thy look is imaged there; I listen - and thy gentle tone is on the air."

(As the stone is undated, we can't be sure that the above death notice is for Baby G.A. Taul, however, he did die near Sun City at a time when the Hope Cemetery was being used.)


HOPE CEMETERY is also north of Sun City, on land owned by the late George Cornish and Frank Harrington. It is located on the old freight route from Hutchinson. M.J. Daugherty (female) donated the land; John V. Fishburn witnessed the deed, March 17, 1886. Although never incorporated, it was called Hope Cemetery Association. Jane Daugherty is buried in Lake City Cemetery (March 2, 1845 - November 23, 1912). The oldest remaining stone in this cemetery has the date April 22, 1879. The stone is broken and no name is available, only the age - 70 years, 5 months, 16 days. Several bodies have been removed to Lake City Cemetery.

-- The Chosen Land: Barber County, Kansas


The Union, March 9, 1888

Editor Union.

It appears to be the impression of some of the people in the vicinity of Lake City, that Capt. B.P. Ayers should have been buried in the Lake City Cemetery, as it was his wish according to their ideas.

If it had ever been his wish he certainly had changed his mind for, last fall, at a meeting of the Sun City Post No. 372 G.A.R., he insisted that the Post buy a lot in Hope Cemetery for the G..A. R. boys, stating that it was a necessity as he, as well as some other members of the Post, wanted to know where they would be buried, and he said he wanted to be laid where some of his comrades would be placed by his side.

The lot was bought by the Quarter-master of the Post and he is now laid away in it according to his own wishes stated in open meeting of Sun City Post No. 372 G.A.R.

Hoping this will satisfy all parties, we are yours &c.

L. Lockert, Post Com.
H.E. Van Trees, Adjt.

(Note: G.A.R. means Grand Army of the Republic, an organization of Civil War veterans.)


At a later date an effort was made to locate the cemetery a mile and a half north of Sun City, on the ranch of Mr. Cornish, just across the fence from Mr. Hoaglandís pasture. There are several graves in this spot but with the exception of a lone grave which has an iron fence around it, all of them are melting away and will soon be forgotten.

This cemetery was too hard to get to so another cemetery the new and one used today, was located a mile east of Sun City, with half of it on Mr. Hoaglandís land and the other half-acre on the land of Mr. Hastings. -- (excerpt) Four Cemeteries (near Sun City), Barber County Index, November 24, 1927.


This is to let you know that I worked on this ranch from 1950 to 1953 and, yes, this cemetery was there with a wire fence around it and possibly eight to ten graves in it. Mr Frank Harrington, Mr. Cornish's stepson kept the fence up and we went there several times. Southwest of this cemetery a short distance was an old sod house with still part of the walls standing. Also the side of a sloping hill was dug out for the inside of this house.

Northeast of this cemetery maybe 3/4 to one mile was a mound of dirt built up in a circle about three feet high and 25 to 30 feet across it. This area of ground was covered with old broken Indian artifact. Broken arrowheads, beads of different types and pieces of chipped stones we supposed were parts of tools they used. Frank said he figured that this was an Indian gathering place for their ceremonies.

For the cemetery one would have to take the road across from the ranch house of Frank's and go up over the hill to the East and then on top of the hill would have to turn back south. No, one cannot see the road from the cemetery. It is possibly a half to three quarters of a mile from the blacktop road.

Frank's daughter was the owner of the ranch back three years ago when I was in Sun City.Her name is LaVon, spelling might be wrong. We always called her Vonnie. She married a Sun City man by the name of George Bissantz. George's dad had a grocery store there on the corner of Main Street, south of the school.

I finished High School in May 1953 and soon left the area to only go back a couple of time to see Frank and his wife. Three years ago was the first time for me being back in that area since 1966. - Norris Hayes 8/2005


"As I remember the cemetery, Kim, over 50 years ago: The few head stones, possibly only three or four, that were there looked like they were made out of gyp rock and were melting away. Could not read any writing on them. Then there were maybe five or six little piles of rock on top of what one would think were graves. I don't believe there could have been ten or maybe just 7 or 8 graves there, but after 50 years and if the fence got tore down by cattle and walked on, it probably would be impossible to even tell where these graves are.

If you ever get the chance to go up on top of the hill, just turn right and go back south toward Sun City and if any of it is still there one could probably find it." - Norris Hayes 8/14/2005


We've been to the cemetery several times, Dave is more familiar with it than I am. Dad and Uncle Ray had the pasture leased for awhile and we herded cattle around it. We drove up to it one time I think through Homer Hoagland's pasture. Not too much up there. George Bissantz was in my class and LaVon two years behind, I visited them in Wichita a couple of years ago. - Nate Massey 8/2005.


I was only up there 2 or 3 times and the last time there wasn't much left. Lyle Bullock used to decorate some graves there. - David Massey, 8/2005.


Nathan,

Thanks for going to the Hope Cemetery and getting this information. John & Susan Bullock were the parents of Eugene Bullock and grandparents of Lyle Bullock. Lyle was a 1st cousin to my greatgrandfather, Cliff Hoagland.

Kim

-- Email from Kim Fowles to Nathan Lee, 31 July 2006.


Thanks to Kim Fowles, Norris Hayes, Ellen Knowles, Nathan Lee & Nate Massey for providing information for this page.

This RootsWeb website is being created by Jerry Ferrin with the able assistance of many Contributors. Your comments, suggestions and contributions of historical information and photographs to this site are welcome. Please sign the Guest Book. This page was created 13 August 2005 and last updated 12 October 2006.