Barber County, Kansas.  

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Reverend George & Dorothy (Green) Robinson

Reverend George Robinson and his grandson, George Franklin Forney, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.

CLICK HERE to view a larger, uncropped version of the original photograph in a new browser window.
Reverend George Robinson and his grandson, George Franklin Forney.
Photo courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.
View larger, uncropped version of this photograph in a new browser window.

Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson, Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.
Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson
Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.
Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.


The Barber County Index, December 29, 1920.

AGED MINISTER
IS CALLED TO HIS FINAL REWARD

On Saturday afternoon December 18, 1920 the soul of Rev. George Robinson passed into the tender keeping of Him who gave it, and as the gates of a new day were unlocked and the home swung open, he in perfect peace and submission, crossed the bar, and met his pilot face to face and into His hands committed the record of his life, pure, stainless and without a blemish.

Since early childhood Grandpa Robino, as he was known to all, devoted his life to the upliftment of mankind, guiding them toward that nobler life which is final reward.

George Robinson was born on Thursday, November 23, 1837 at the village of South Charlton, in the county of Northumberland, England, and passed away at his home in Sharon, Kans. at the age of 87 years and 25 days old. He entered school at 4 years of age, was converted at the age of 9 and began conducting prayer meetings at the age of 12.

On November 27, 1857 he was married to Miss Dorothy Green at Workworth, England and this union was blessed with 13 children, 10 sons and 3 daughters, 29 grandchildren and 23 great-grand-children. Regarding this family the following is taken from the unpublished experiences and reminiscences of his life written a short time ago. "And down to the ripe old age of nearly 83 years, my dear wife entered into rest four years ago, at the age of 83 years and a few days. Nine of the children have left the home to take possession of our future inheritance, over yonder, five of them all witnessed that Heaven was their home through Jesus their Savior, the little ones Jesus said of such is the Kingdom. Four boys remain, of which I hope to meet in Heaven, but I want them to understand that there is no other name given under heaven whereby they can be saved only thru Jesus, the Christ of God. My only hope thou art, strength of my failing flesh and heart."

Rev. Robinson was licensed to preach at the age of 16. He was ordained by the Wichita Presbytery of the C. P. church in the spring of 1891.

Funeral services were conducted at the Christian church Sunday, December 19 by the Rev. Claude Davis, pastor of the Presbyterian church at Harper, Kansas, at which three of the four sons were present, Wm. Robinson of Wichita, J. E. Robinson of Topeka, and J. G. Robinson of Sharon. George Robinson whose home is in Canada was unable to attend.

Grandpa Robinson has lived here for several years and everyone was his friend. For a person of his age he was very active. He preached a sermon at the Christian church, Thanksgiving Day. His sickness was short, having become ill on Wednesday, peacefully passing away on the following Saturday.

His friends from far and near were present at the funeral and accompanied the remains to its resting place in the Sharon cemetery.

To the bereaved ones we extend sympathy. - Sharon Valley Times.


The Barber County Index, December 6, 1916.

Mrs. Geo. Robinson Dead

Mrs. Geo. Robinson, wife of Rev. Geo. Robinson, passed away at her home in Sharon, Sunday night, December 3, 1916, after a long illness. She was perhaps one of the best known women in the Sharon Valley. She was a Christian woman in the truest sense of the word. Always anxious to help and comfort the erring and never condemning a wayward soul. The young as well as old found solace in her counsel and advice. She has lived in Sharon for many years and during that time she has been a ceaseless worker in the Presbyterian church. She has ministered to the sick and contributed to the poor and to her bereaved relatives comes the heritage of a beautiful example of right living which should in a measure lighten the burden of the saddened hearts, for hers was indeed a life of Christian usefulness and unselfishness. The memory of her good name shall always be held as sacred in the hearts of her many friends who so dearly loved and respected her.

The following obituary was written by a lifelong friend of the deceased:

OBITUARY

Dorothy Robinson was born in England, August 27th, 1833; died at her home in Sharon, Kansas, December 3rd, 1916, aged 83 years, 3 months and 6 days. She was married to George Robinson November 28th, 1857. To this union were born thirteen children, 3 daughters and 10 sons. Nine children have passed on to the other home. Four boys and a loving husband remain to mourn the loss of a most affectionate mother and wife. Her dying message to her boys left behind was to love God and be good; "And that as one, who his mother comforteth, so will I comfort thee, saith the Lord." She was converted at the age of 15 years and united with the Methodist church, of which she was a member until she came to America in 1882. She has been a member of the Presbyterian church for 25 years. She loved her church dearly and loved all with whom she came in contact, especially her neighbors, both young and old. By often repeating the Savior's words: "by this shall all men know, that ye are My Disciples, If ye love one another ." The last four weeks of her life were days and nights of suffering, borne with Christian fortitude, but as the end drew near, peaceful rest came and she quietly passed over the river to join the loved ones gone before. On the 28th of November, she remembered that it was her 50th wedding anniversary, and requested her life-time companion to stay by her side, which he did to the end. Expressing continually her gratitude to the kind neighbors for their unceasing efforts to comfort her to the end, she passed peacefully into the great beyond.

The funeral services were held yesterday morning in the Christian church in Sharon conducted by Rev. T. R. Mordy, pastor of the Presbyterian church of this city.


Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Wichita, Kansas,
to his son and daughter-in-law,
Mr & Mrs. James Douglas Robinson,
in England, 2 December 1889


322 River View Avenue
Wichita
Sedgwick County
Kansas
U.S.America

December 2nd 89

Dear Son and Daughter,

You will think us very neglectful in not writing to you sooner. I was about to do so 41/2 months ago when your sister happened a bad accident. She was driving one of our ponies into the city in a light carriage and when crossing a railway, which runs through the city, the pony took fright and before she could pull her up, the conveyance struck against a fence post and threw her out, injuring her severely internally which I am sorry to say terminated in her death on the 18th of November. We had three doctors attending her but none of them could help her. Her suffering and pain were great but borne with Christian patience. During all that time your mother and I never knew a nights rest, and now our sky seems dark, but when I think of the conversation with me shortly before she left us it bears me up and away before the present to that time when we will meet again. She asked me to read that old hymn to her and repeated part of it "If thou should call me to resign what most I prize, it nee'r was mine, I only yield thee what is thine. Thy will be done" She said she only desired to live that she might be a comfort to your mother and I but this gentle wisdom was denied.

More than half our family has taken possession of our future home. Among Annies last sayings were this, that if spirits were permitted to come near to this earth, she would often be near to father and mother, this she said with an arm around each of our necks. She had been living with a lady and gentleman in the city, they had no family of their own and thought lots of Annie , she had been with them 3 years at the time of the accident. They were travelling in the mountains of Colorado for a few weeks, Annie had locked up the house and was staying at our house, which is on the outskirts of the city about 3 miles and Annie was in the habit of driving down every two or three days to see that the house was alright and get her letters. She was beloved by all who knew her and her sad end lamented by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. She sent you word when Bessie was married last February 4th. Bessie's husband has been farming my land at Sharon in Barber County. We will move back to it again in February if spared. We took Annie's remains back to Sharon again for burial it was nearly 100 miles from here, and a large number of friends met us at the station. From there we went to the church where service was held by the United Brethren Minister, from thence to the cemetery. We then went to our own home with Bessie and her husband. He is a nice fellow, I will send you his picture next time I write. They have raised a good crop. This October Bessie came up here and stayed a month with Annie before she died, it was sad for them to part. Annie might have married many times to well to do gentlemen, but somehow she never chose to leave us. George was along way from home and Edd and Nellie but I telegraphed them all and they were all at the funeral except yourselves and I wish it could have been possible you could have been here just now. I am wondering who will be the next.

I received a letter the other day for Annie from Uncle John's oldest daughter, it appears she is just married and lives in Staffordshire. Annie and her corresponded; enclosed was a flower off her bridal cake and a piece of her wedding dress. I read it with a sad heart but then she is at rest.

I hope this will find you and your family well. How have you been doing this year, are you at Hetton Colliery? I want to know if you attend any place of worship and where? I was pleased with all the particulars in your last letter, although very sorry to hear of poor William Smith's condition. I feared the outcome would be that, how does his wife and family do? Is Mrs Abbot living? If so go and see her for my sake and remember us kindly to her and Alice. Is Frank Platt still in the lane? And Jos Dixon, tell him I often think of him and not to be surprised if I drop in some day to have my dinner with him. I calculate making at least one more visit to the old home and it may not be so long either. The boys are all well. George is pretty stout, Joe is at home with me, farming in the summer and attending school in the wintertime, although this winter he is not because of the trouble we have had.

I want you to write a long letter full of Lane news and write so we will get it the first week of January as we might move sometime in January if the weather is fine. Look out some papers and send us a Durham Chronicle and Gibson's address.

For this time I will finish but remain your affectionate father.

George Robinson


Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Wichita, Kansas, to his son and daughter-in-law, Mr & Mrs. James Douglas Robinson, in England, dated 2 December 1889, page 1 at right, page 4 at left.

Letter courtesy of Ernie Middleton. Transcription by Betty Hotchkiss.
Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Wichita, Kansas, to his son and daughter-in-law, Mr & Mrs. James Douglas Robinson,
in England, dated 2 December 1889, page 1 at right, page 4 at left.

Letter courtesy of Ernie Middleton. Transcription by Betty Hotchkiss.

Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Wichita, Kansas, to his son and daughter-in-law, Mr & Mrs. James Douglas Robinson, in England, dated 2 December 1889, page 2 at left, page 3 at right.

Letter courtesy of Ernie Middleton. 

Transcription by Betty Hotchkiss.
Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Wichita, Kansas, to his son and daughter-in-law, Mr & Mrs. James Douglas Robinson,
in England, dated 2 December 1889, page 2 at left, page 3 at right.

Letter courtesy of Ernie Middleton. Transcription by Betty Hotchkiss.


Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson, Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.
Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson
The tall stone at left in the photo is for Annie Robinson. The tall stone to the right is for Bessie (Robinson) Forney.
View looking west. The plot is located to the right of the main gate near the north middle edge of the cemetery.
Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.
Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.

Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson, Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.
Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson
Left to right: small stone for Arthur Forney, large Elizabeth Forney stone, small stone for Raymond Forney.
The stone for Rev. & Dorothy Robinson is behind Raymond Forney's stone.
Annie Robinson's gravestone is at right in the photo.
View looking east. Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.
Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.

Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson, Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.
Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson
Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.
Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.

Rev Geo. Robinson
Nov. 23, 1837
Dec 18, 1920
His Beloved Wife
Dorothy
Aug. 27, 1833
Dec. 3, 1916

Ye Now Therefore have sorrow
But I will see you again and your
Heart shall rejoice JOHN 16-22

Gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson, Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.
The "cross and crown" and star designs on the gravestone for Reverend George Robinson and Dorothy (Green) Robinson
Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.
"We could not tell what the symbols were in the engraved star.
To us, it looked like the crown and cross and the star as well as the bottom scripture was added at a later date.
They were lightly engraved. They were more scratched in than engraved."
Photo and comment by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.

Gravestone for Annie Robinson, Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.
Gravestone for Annie Robinson
Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.
Photo and gravestone transcription by Ed Rucker, 17 March 2007.

At Rest
In memory of
Annie
Dau. Of G. & D.
Robinson
Who died
Nov. 18, 1889
Aged 26 years

Asleep in Jesus
Blessed sleep
From which now
Ever wakes to weep.

Thy will be done.

Robinson


From the site guestbook

Name: Ernie Middleton
E-mail: e.middleton97@ntlworld.com
Date: 2007-03-04
Comments: I have found this site fasinating in its short but intensely interesting history . It is of particular interest to me as my G.G. Grandfather The Rev. George Robinson lived in Sharon from 1882 til his death in 1922. I have a letter he wrote to his son my G. Grandfather dated Dec. 2rd 1889. Regards Ernie Middleton


When I read Mr. Middleton's posting in the site guestbook, searched the site and found that the only article which mentioned Rev. George Robinson was the obituary for his daughter, Mrs. L.E. Forney, who died of malaria on 13 December 1900 and is buried in the Sharon Cemetery. Her obituary was published in Barber County Index on December 26th, 1900.

I then wrote to Mr. Middleton to offer to make a page on this site in honor of his great great grandfather, the Reverend George Robinson of Sharon, Kansas. The next day I received the following reply from him:


Hi Jerry,

Thank you for your interest. I will send you a copy of the letter I have which I am sure you will find most interesting.

In brief I will tell you that I live in Washington in the North East of England, the ancestral home of the first president of the United States of America.

The writer of the 1889 letter, George Robinson, was born in the County of Northumberland England in 1838. He was a cartwright & joiner by trade. He left for America around 1882, his wife was named Dorothy (nee Green) and with them were their six children aged between 9 & 18. They settled in Sharon, Barber County, Kansas. They left behind in England their eldest child, James Douglas Robinson, who was at the time married with 2 children, one of whom was my grandfather.

He wrote to his son in England and one of those letters survived. It is a sad tale of the fatal accident of his eldest daughter in Wichita, and of his place in Sharon.

I myself am 67 years old and can remember my Grandfather speaking of his Grandfather in Kansas. My G. G. Grandfather was known as The Rev. George Robinson. As to the church he served, the letter mentions his daughter's service was held by a United Brethren Minister.

Give me a day or two and I will send whatever you want. It is a great pleasure for me to share a little piece of history that truly belongs to both of us.

I wish you well

Kind regards,

Ernie Middleton


Birth and death dates:

Elizabeth "Bessie" (Robinson) Forney. Born Jun. 18, 1867. Died: Dec. 13, 1900.

Annie Robinson, daughter of G. & D. Robinson. Born: 1863. Died: Nov. 8, 1889.

Dorothy (Green) Robinson. Born: Aug. 27, 1838. Died: Dec. 8, 1916.

Reverend George Robinson. Born: Nov. 23, 1837. Died: Dec. 18, 1920.

Each of the above people are buried in Sharon Cemetery, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.


1881 England Census

Name:   George Robinson
Age:   43
Estimated birth year:   abt. 1838
Relation:   Head (of household)
Spouse's name:   Dorothy
Gender:   Male
Where born:   Charlton, Northumberland, England
Civil parish:   Hetton Le Hole
County/Island:   Durham
Country:   England
Street address:   Easington Lane
Condition as to marriage:   Married
Education:   (blank)
Employment status:   (blank)
Occupation:   Cartwright
Registration district:   Houghton Le Spring
Sub-registration district:   Hetton le Hole
ED, institution, or vessel:   7
Neighbors:   (blank)
Household members:
Dorothy Robinson, age 45
George Robinson, age 43
George Forrest (Twin) Robinson, age 17
Ann (Twin) Robinson, age 17
Elizabeth (Twin) Robinson, age 13
William (Twin) Robinson, age 13
John Edmund Robinson, age 12
Joseph Green Robinson, age 8


"I thought this would be of interest. It is from the 1881 census of England. This is the Robinson family that left for America shortly after this census was taken. Anne, aged 17, went by the name of Annie. Elizabeth, aged 13, went by the name of Bessie. George Forrest, aged 17, was described in the letter as the stout one. Joseph, aged 8, was the little boy who only got to school in winter. Mentioned also Will (William). Only the married son James was left behind in England. Rev. George addressed his letter "Dear Son and Daughter", which was his son and son's wife." - E-mail from Ernie Middleton to Jerry Ferrin, 5 March 2007.


Elizabeth Anne Robinson of England, wife of James Douglas Robison, daughter-in-law of Rev. George Robinson, great grandmother of Ernie Middleton.

Photo courtesy of Ernie Middleton.
Elizabeth Anne Robinson of England
Daughter-in-law of Rev. George Robinson
"She and her husband James received the letter from America in 1889.
She was a stern old lady who smoked a clay pipe. She died in 1950, aged 93."
Photo & comment courtesy of her great grandson, Ernie Middleton.


Death Notices from the Wichita, Kansas, area

(It is unknown to Shirley Brier or Jerry Ferrin if any of the following people were related to Rev. George Robinson.)

1888 - 149   Robinson, A.C.
1906 - 132   Robinson, A.C.
1908 - 275   Robinson, Benjamin
1899 - 15     Robinson, C.S.
1893 - 320   Robinson, Chester (Mrs.)
1900 - 309   Robinson, Eliza
1909 - 328   Robinson, Elmer Dale
1896 - 182   Robinson, Eunice Leona
1903 - 486   Robinson, Fannie
1899 - 49     Robinson, Flora L.
1900 - 362   Robinson, Frank P.
1909 - 458   Robinson, Hugh
1904 - 147   Robinson, Infant of Lizzie
1897 - 182   Robinson, Jennie
1906 - 351   Robinson, Jesse L.
1910 - 731   Robinson, John H.
1899 - 152   Robinson, Joseph T.
1896 - 98     Robinson, Joshua
1901 - 81     Robinson, Martha C.
1906 - 554   Robinson, Mary (Sister) Dominic
1897 - 183   Robinson, Morgan E.
1894 - 101   Robinson, N.H.
1894 - 101   Robinson, Newton H.
1895 - 169   Robinson, Robbie
1904 - 491   Robinson, Robert
1907 - 528   Robinson, Rosina A.
1904 - 158   Robinson, Sadie K.
1893 - 320   Robinson, Sallie
1892 - 220   Robinson, T.T.
1899 - 19     Robinson, Wilhelmina L.
1898 - 272   Robinson, William J.
1892 - 146   Robinson, Zella Iva


E-mail to Ernie Middleton from LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker,
2 August 2008:
A Shared G.G. Grandfather

Dear Mr. Middleton,

It was with great delight that I read the letter you have from the Rev. George Robinson of Sharon, KS on the Barber, Co. website. He was my G.G. Grandfather as well. The "nice fellow" that Bessie had married in the letter you have was my G. Grandfather, Leander Edmund (L.E.) Forney. Elizabeth (Bessie) and Leander had 5 children, 3 of whom survived (Arthur & Raymond are buried with her in the Sharon, KS cemetery). The youngest, George Franklin Forney, Sr., was my grandfather.

Our family lore reports that Bessie died from childbirth fever with my grandfather. Leander and Bessie were living on the homestead they claimed in the Oklahoma land run of 1893 near Cherokee, Oklahoma. When Bessie died, her parents, George and Dorothy Robinson, came down from Sharon, KS with a wagon. They took the 2-week old baby back with them, along with a milk cow tied to the wagon. They raised him until he was six years old, then returned him to Leander who had remarried a woman named Jenny Dickson. Jenny was called "Mother" by all three of Leander and Bessie's children - Daisy, Gilbert, and George. On all accounts they loved her very much as she respected their mother's memory, yet mothered them with care. Daisy, however, told of how when the Robinsons returned George to Oklahoma, he'd stand out by the fence and scuff his toe saying he just wanted to "go home." My father recalls that throughout my grandfather's life, he would return periodically to mow the grass and care for the Robinson stones in the Sharon, KS cemetery.

I am attaching a photograph of the Rev. George Robinson with my grandfather, George Franklin Forney, in his lap. That the Robinsons took the time and care to have the portrait made seems to speak of the affection they had for their daughter's baby. My grandfather loved this picture and had it reproduced for my sisters and me so we, too, could cherish it.


Reverend George Robinson and his grandson, George Franklin Forney, Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.

CLICK HERE to view a larger version of the original photograph in a new browser window.
Reverend George Robinson and his grandson, George Franklin Forney.
Photo courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.
View larger version of this photograph in a new browser window.


We also, like you, possess a single letter written by George Robinson which I believe you will find very interesting as it has your father (I think he was Thomas?) mentioned. Gilbert Forney, Bessie & Leander's eldest son, was serving in the U.S. army during W.W. I. Rev. Robinson wrote this lively and caring letter to him before he shipped out to Europe. Particularly endearing is the part where he advises that if Gilbert becomes injured, he should seek out his cousins in Durham, England where he would be well-cared for. He includes their addresses.

I am attaching a copy of this letter and a transcription for you as well. There is also a picture of Gilbert in WWI as he was when he received this letter. And I'll include one of my grandfather, George Franklin Forney, as an adult. My own special father is his son, George Franklin Forney, Jr. I have been collecting family history and would be glad to share what I have.

I hope this letter finds you well,

Sincerely,

LeAnne Forney Brubaker

 


Gilbert Forney, American Expeditionary Force, World War I.

Photo courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.

CLICK HERE to view a larger version of this image in a new browser window.
Gilbert Forney, American Expeditionary Force, World War I.
Eldest son of L.E. and Elizabeth "Bessie" (Robinson) Forney
Brother of George Franklin Forney
Photo courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.
View larger image in a new browser window


Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Sharon, Kansas, to his grandson, Gilbert Forney, serving in WWI,  dated 28 Sept 1918.

Letter courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.
Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Sharon, Kansas, to his grandson, Gilbert Forney, serving in WWI, dated 28 Sept 1918, page 1.
Letter courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.

Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Sharon, Kansas, to his grandson, Gilbert Forney, serving in WWI,  dated 28 Sept 1918.

Letter courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.
Letter from Rev. George Robinson in Sharon, Kansas, to his grandson, Gilbert Forney, serving in WWI, dated 28 Sept 1918, page 2.
Letter courtesy of LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker.


Transcription by LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker
of letter from Rev. George Robinson in Sharon, Kansas,
to his grandson, Gilbert Forney, serving in WWI,
dated 28 Sept 1918.

Sharon, Kansas. Sep 28th 1918

Dear Gilbert,

I have just received a postal from Mother stating you expected to move camp on Oct 5th and may be you may move across the ocean soon. I wish I had been going with you but the trouble with me is I was born too soon and Unkle Sam donít need us young fellows. Maybe he thinks we donít know much. I still think that at 81 yrs I could get a few Huns. I shave twice a week myself with the old fashioned blade and never used my spectacles, and seldom a Rabbit ever gets away from my old gun if I get to see him. I am sending you your cousin Geo. Robinsonís Adress in France, and also his brotherís home address in The North of England. I expect you will go by the South of England, possibly by London and may be in training there but I do not know. You might eventually get wounded and be sent to hospital in England, and as soon as you were able you could have them send you on to your cousins in the County of Durham where you would be cared for til able to join your colors again. I am anxious to hear from George from France. I hope you will be lucky Ė never forget I am praying for you and hope you will come out all right. America leans on all her sons to do there duty for Righteousness and Justice in the World. Daisy has had quite a time of it but is now doing well and will soon be strong. It was too hard on both Floyd and her to have to lose little Jak, but our good Father knows best. Hope you are getting hardened to drill work - make up your mind to enjoy yourself on your trip it will be the trip of your life. Be brave and aim high.

I hope I will live till to see this war ended and a world peace established. I am writing so you will receive this before you move. If you have time write me Ĺ dozen lines and anytime in future. I will be pleased to hear from you. Oh yes, I also canít for get to say I got acquainted with that little girl Mary and she is surely fine. Well I will close my letter hoping it finds you all OK.

Your Loving Grandpa

Geo. Robinson


Lance Corporal
George Robinson
French Mortar School
5th Army British Expeditionary Force
France


Thomas D. Robinson
No. 8 Grey Horse Lane
Houghton-Le-Spring
County of Durham
England

Three girl cousins
And families live here


E-mail from Ernie Middleton to Jerry Ferrin,
16 August 2008.

George Robinson of England, at left, with an unidentified friend. Both men were in the WWI British army circa 1916/1917. George Robinson was a grandson of the Rev. George Robinson of Sharon, Kansas.

Photo from the collection of Ernie Middleton.

CLICK HERE to view larger image in a new browser window. Dear Jerry,

This photograph was taken around 1916 or 17. The person sitting is my grandfather George Robinson, grandson of the Rev. George Robinson and full cousin of Gilbert Forney. It is remarkable that he is mentioned in the Reverend's letter to Gilbert. At the time this photograph was taken my grandfather George would be around 33 years of age, he was married with wife and six children at home. I do not know of the gentleman standing.

I do not think George and Gilbert ever met during this period. And there are no family tales of Gilbert ever making it to the Northeast England to visit his cousins. I do know that the Rev George Robinson was a prolific writer of letters, and corresponded with all his family including my grandfather, during his WW1 adventures. I say adventure because to him it would be. I know this well . My grandfather George Robinson was a swashbuckler of a man, who started work down a coal mine at 13 years old. Told lies about his age and volunteered for the army at 16 to fight in the Boer War in South Africa.

George Robinson of England, WWI British army circa 1916/1917. George Robinson was a grandson of the Rev. George Robinson of Sharon, Kansas.

Photo from the collection of Ernie Middleton.

CLICK HERE to view larger image of the uncropped photograph in a new browser window. During the conflict 1914-18 he need not have gone to France but again he volunteered. After that war he returned to his family and spent the rest of his working life working down the mines, where he was promoted to Overman which put him in charge of underground working. I don't think he was of the same nature as his grandfather in Kansas whom he would talk about with pride, but I loved his character. He died in 1967 aged 84.

My mother, maiden name Emily Robinson born 1914 would tell me many tales of old George and of her G Grandfather The Rev George Robinson and how he was out there in the state of Kansas making a new life.

The eldest of the Rev.Robinson and his wife Dorothy was left behind in England. "James Douglas Robinson." It could have been his situation, having a wife and two children and a child on the way. Or it could have been for other reasons. I have no answer on this.

I have a tale to tell going back to around 1800, regarding Rev. George and Dorothy which I will put together in my next communication together with more photographs which will include myself.

Kind Regards, Jerry, and a big thankyou to all your associates for all the work you are doing.

Ernie


View large image of the original photograph of George Robinson and his friend in a new browser window


E-mail from Ernie Middleton to Jerry Ferrin, 17 August 2008.

Dear Jerry,

These three photographs are of descendants of the Reverend George Robinson. The group of young men about to go to war was taken around 1916. The soldier standing is the brother of my grandfather and grandson of Rev. George Robinson. His name, I was told, was Robert Robinson and he was lost in action. He has on his cap the badge of the Durham Light Infantry. As was the custom at that time young men from the same area were trained and fought together. As a result some families would lose all their sons.

British soldiers in the Durham Light Infantry about 1916 just before they went to fight in World War I.

Robert Robinson, the soldier standing,  was lost in action in WWI. He was the brother of George Robinson and the grandson of Rev. George Robinson of Sharon, Kansas, USA. 

Photo courtesy of Ernie Middleton.

CLICK HERE to view a larger copy of this image in a new browser window.
Robert Robinson and other members of the Durham Light Infantry, circa 1916.
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Robert Robinson of the Durham Light Infantry circa 1916 just before he went to fight in WWI. He was lost in action.

 He was the brother of George Robinson and the grandson of Rev. George Robinson of Sharon, Kansas, USA. 

Photo courtesy of Ernie Middleton.
Robert Robinson of the Durham Light Infantry, circa 1916.

The lovely lady is my mother, maiden name Emily Robinson, great granddaughter of Rev. George Robinson. This photograph was taken around 1945. My mother died in 1999 aged 84.

Emily (Robinson) Middleton, photo taken about 1945.

Mother of Ernie Middleton, great grand daughter of Rev. George Robinson of Sharon, Barber County, Kansas.

Photo courtesy of Ernie Middleton.

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Emily (Robinson) Middleton, photo taken about 1945.
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The area of England the Robinsons came from sits around 25 miles south of the Scotish border. The Rev. George Robinson's father was named James, he was born in the year 1796. He was a joiner by trade. I have no information on George's mother. The small Hamlet they lived in was called "South Charlton" where a small collection of farm buildings still exists today. This whole area of the county of Northumberland was taken up by farming and cattle raising. The Robinson's employment was farming. George Robinson was born in Charlton in 1838. He would be educated on strong christian views. George would as a young man follow the trade of his father as a joiner and waggon wright, he would in those days be in big demand.

Five miles south of Charlton we have the Market town of Alnwick. This was the main town in the area and it would, I am sure, be the place where George would meet a young lady by the name of Dorothy Green. Dorothy was the daughter of Joseph and Mary Green. Like the Robinson family they were also employed in farming.

To the south of Alnwick there is a beautiful little village by the name of Warkworth. In this place with its ancient castle and ancient church George Robinson and Dorothy Green were married on November 28th, 1857. George aged 20, employment Millwright, and Dorothy 23, employment Domestic Servant. They would go on to spend their married life living in the town of Alnwick. By the year 1869 they would have six children, three of these born in Alnwick; Robinson children born in Alnwick: James Douglas; 1858, and twins George Forrest, 1864, and Anne (Annie),1864. Those born in Warkworth were twins Elizabeth and William; and Edmond John.

It was around the time of 1870 that George and Dorothy would leave the county of Northumberland and move 50 miles south to the county of Durham and the mining village of Easington Lane. I have no information on why they made this move, but employment may have been the reason. The Robinson family would spend around 11 years in this town. Coal mining and farming were the main occupations. In the 1881 census we have Rev. George Robinson, 43, employment Cartwright.: George Forrest Robinson, 17, employment Miner; Anne, 17, employment Dressmaker; William, 13, employment Miner; Elizabeth, 13; Edmond, 12 and William, 8; scholars. Dorothy at this time is 45. The eldest son, James Douglas Robinson, at this time is married with two children.

It was not long after this census that the Rev. George Robinson and all of this family would move again but this time in a big way . He would, like many folk from these Islands, head out across the "big pond" to North America. It was a time of mass movement to Australia, New Zealand and America . He would make his home in the town of Sharon, Barber county, Kansas. Rev. George never lost contact with the family of the son he left behind or his grandchildren. He was by all accounts a good man and Dorothy a good women , and knowing that makes me proud.

Ernie Middleton, G. G. Grandson of George and Dorothy Robinson.

Ernie Middleton in July of 2008 while he and his wife, Eileen, were visiting relatives in Manitoba Canada.

Photo courtesy of Ernie Middleton.
Ernie Middleton while visiting Manitoba Canada in July of 2008.
Photo courtesy of Ernie Middleton.


British soldiers in the Durham Light Infantry about 1916 just before they went to fight in World War I.

Robert Robinson, the soldier standing,  was lost in action in WWI. He was the brother of George Robinson and the grandson of Rev. George Robinson of Sharon, Kansas, USA. 

Photo courtesy of Ernie Middleton.

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British soldiers in the Durham Light Infantry about 1916 just before they went to fight in World War I.
Robert Robinson, the soldier standing, was lost in action in WWI.
He was the brother of George Robinson and the grandson of Rev. George Robinson of Sharon, Kansas, USA.
Photo & comment courtesy of Ernie Middleton.
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Search Results: R. Robinson, WWI Casualties from the United Kingdom The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lists three men named R. Robinson from the Durham Light Infantry and their burial places. Their death dates were 27 June 1918, 9 Oct 1916 and 4 Dec 1915.


The following off-site links will open in a new browser window:

Robinson Surname Message Board at RootsWeb

Robinson Family Genealogy Forum at GenForum


Thanks to Shirley Brier for finding, transcribing and contributing the above obituaries and list of Robinson death notices to this web site, to Ernie Middleton for the copy of the letter from his great great grandfather Rev. George Robinson to Ernie's great grandfather James Douglas Robinson the photo of his great grandmother Elizabeth Anne Robinson and the 1881 England census information, and to Betty Hotchkiss for transcribing the letter.

Shirley Brier noted: "I didn't find any mention of Annie's death in the Barber County Index, and unfortunately the Sharon papers at the Kansas State Historical Society don't cover that time period."

Thanks to LeAnne (Forney) Brubaker for the photographs and the letter by Rev. Robinson which she sent for publication on this web site. I had hoped when I originally put this web page online that a descendant of Rev. Robinson would find it and provide a photo of him for publication on this page. Once again, RootsWeb has enabled family members to make connections and share information and images!

This RootsWeb website is being created by Jerry Ferrin with the able assistance of many Contributors. Your comments, suggestions and contributions of historical information and photographs to this site are welcome. Please sign the Guest Book. This page was created 04 March 2007 and was last updated 16 August 2008.


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