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Christopher C. Pepperd, Founder of the city of Wilmore, Kansas.
COMANCHE COUNTY, KANSAS: HISTORY & GENEALOGY
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Also see: A Chronology of the Life & Times of Christopher Carson Pepperd

Coal Fever in Comanche County, Kansas


Following is a collection of newspaper articles from 1884 through 1888 pertaining to "discoveries" of coal and salt deposits in Comanche County and surrounding counties.

For an excellent history on this topic, see: "Coal Fever: Fuel Scarcity in Early Southwestern Kansas" by C. Robert Haywood, Spring 1980 Kansas History", Spring 1980, Vol.3, No. 1.

Thanks to Evelyn Reed for the reference to Haywood's article and to Shirley Brier for finding, transcribing and sending the news articles.


The Western Star, November 15, 1884.

The Clark County "Clipper" of recent date contained the following: "John A. Edwards, from the Eastern part of this county, was in the city Monday, and informed us that coal had been discovered near the Clark and Comanche county line. He saw samples of the coal and the man who discovered it. It is reported of good quality and lying in a vein of 36 inches thick. Should this deposit prove extensive the results would prove of incalculable benefit to this section. The present unparalleled immigration would receive a new impetus. The question of cheap fuel would be speedily solved. Persons who have always had all the timber and coal they could destroy would not hesitate to locate, capitalists would be attracted to the county; manufactories in due time would spring up, and railroads could not afford to ignore the locality.


The Western Star, March 21, 1885.

It is reported a vein of coal has been discovered in Meade county, near the new town of Carthage. There is doubtless plenty of coal in this county, but it needs to be discovered.


The Republican, October 22, 1885

Capt. Pepperd was circulating among friends in this district the 18th Inst.


Nescatunga Enterprise, May 4, 1886.

Prospecting for coal is all the rage just now, At Sun City they are preparing to drill for coal. Parties at Greensburg have organized a joint stock company for the purpose of prospecting for coal on the Medicine river in the south part if Kiowa county, and the Avilla folks have been prospecting for coal for Lo, these many weeks. They now claim that they have struck a vein of coal four feet thick. We hope the boys are not mistaken, as that means cheap coal for Comanche county, but we can not help feeling a little skeptical concerning the matter, as coal excitements have been stirred up, down in that section of country, two or three times previous to this, which only proved to be advertising dodges.


28 October 1887

EUREKA!
Comanche County's Coal
Find

A MINE OF WEALTH UNCOV-
ERED

The Black Diamonds Show Up
In Superior Quality on the
Ranch of Capt. Pepperd
Near Wilmore.

Wednesday last word was received at the REVIEW office that Capt. C. C. Pepperd, of Wilmore, ten miles east of Coldwater, had struck a vein of superior coal with a drill, seventy-five feet below the surface.

Yesterday morning a REVIEW reporter, in company with Glave Goddard, of the Greensburg Rustler, drove out to Wilmore for the purpose of satisfying themselves in regard to the truth of the report. We found Messrs. Hazlett and Miller, owners of the drill, hard at work, and raising superior looking coal. Mr. Hazlett informed our reporter that at twenty feet below the surface the drill encountered and passed through a body of iron eight feet in thickness, then into a kind of clay, then several feet through a kind of sand rock, which lays immediately above the coal. At the time our reporter left the find, yesterday at 1 o'clock p.m., the drill had gone through forty-six inches of very superior coal and yet in it. The thickness of the vein is as yet unknown, but should there not be another inch of coal the find is a valuable one and will be of untold value to this section of Kansas.

Capt. Pepperd owns a large body of land in the vicinity of the find, and the REVIEW extends the Capt. its hearty congratulations, not only on the intrinsic value of the find, but upon his courage in pushing his investigations where scientists said no coal existed. The eight and a half feet of iron was of itself a valuable discovery, but now, connected as it is with this fine body of coal, who can predict the future of the thriving town of Wilmore or of Comanche county.

Old coal miners pronounce the Wilmore coal to be fully equal if not superior to the famous Canon City coal. Several Coldwater capitalists, including John P. Jones and H. H. Rich, were on the ground, yesterday and are deeply impressed with the importance of the coal. Capt. Pepperd will at once make arrangements for a plant of machinery and will work the mine for all it is worth.

-- The Coldwater Review, October 28, 1887. (SB)



The Coldwater Review, October 28, 1887

Capt. C. C. Pepperd, one of the oldest cattle kings of this country, came in on Saturday's train from his Comanche county ranch. - Ashland Clipper


The discovery of so large a vein of coal as that at Wilmore, is a bonanza for Comanche county. With our abundance of coal, iron, salt, water and a naturally rich and productive soil Comanche will become one of the wealthiest counties in our great commonwealth.


The coal find at Wilmore demonstrates the fact that coal exists in many places in Comanche. It has already been claimed that coal and gas in inexhaustible quantities underlies the city of Coldwater, and the opinion is becoming so strong that a company will, in the near future, be organized to test the matter. Mark the prediction - Coldwater will be using natural gas for lights and fuel before another year shall have passed.


The Coldwater Review, November 4, 1887

The Coal Find. The coal excitement on Mule creek is increasing from day to day as the importance of the find becomes known. A REVIEW reporter visited the scene of boring Sunday where he found a large crowd of enthusiastic spectators, all jubilant over the find. In conversation with Mr. Hazlett, the prospector, he expressed himself as being thoroughly satisfied that coal existed in different parts of the county in bounteous quantities. So confident is he as the success of his project that on last Monday he put to work on the four acres deeded by C. C. Pepperd last week a force of men to sink a shaft preparatory to bringing to the surface the desired article -- Comanche county coal. On the same day Mr. Hazlett had another force busy at work sinking a shaft on John Pyle's place. Capt. Pepperd will make no definite arrangements as to working the vein on his place until his brother-in-law, a wealthy capitalist arrives from Dallas, Tex. The Grant brothers and a number others are prospecting for coal with a very flattering outlook for success. Tell your neighbors of this great find. Tell your children that they may share your enthusiasm and happiness; that they may learn to appreciate the wild, weirdly sweet, swelling strains of the song "Prosperity." Tell your sisters and your cousins and your aunts back in "Illenoy," "Missory" and Injeanny," that you have spent your last winter with your "wife's folks;" that the Comanche county coal find has tripled the value of your property and made you able to send a gilt-edged invitation to your "wife's folks" to spend the winter with you. Write articles to your old home papers that all your friends may know of our splendid coal find. Do all this, for it is true that Comanche county and Coldwater are destined to be the inevitable magnets of the great southwest.


Comanche county coal fields are already attracting attention, and as the mines are properly worked, will give us a boom that will be something more than a boomlet.


The Coldwater Review, November 11, 1887

A rich vein of coal has just been discovered near Wilmore, Comanche county on the stock ranch of Col. (sic) Pepperd. A Coldwater REVIEW reporter visited the mine last Thursday morning and said the drill had went forty-six inches in a vein of coal and was not yet out of it. Before reaching coal the drill passed through a bed of iron eight feet thick. The coal is only seventy feet below the surface. This is a valuable find, not only for Comanche county, but for southwest Kansas -- Ashland Hearld.


Last Saturday we met a man from Wilmore, the first station east of Coldwater. He showed us a lump of coal taken from 4 ft. vein found at that place, only 100 feet below the surface. This is the best find of the "black diamond" ever reported in southern Kansas. If the coal exists there, as this discovery indicates, the people of Clearwater will find the C. K. & W. a very important road. -- Clearwater Independent. You bet she exists, Bro. Independent, and only 70 feet below the surface.


The coal find near Wilmore, Comanche county, that we reported last week, is a dead sure thing, and the coal is of a superior quality -- much finer than the Canon City coal. --Lexington header.


Being in Coldwater last Wednesday and hearing the interesting rumors of a coal find on Capt. C. C. Pepperd's ranch, we accepted an invitation from our friend, John A. Templeman, to take a whirl out to Wilmore behind his handsome team of Kentucky bred flyers. One hour's drive brought us in sight of an unfurled flag, and its floating folds, combined with the wild veils of excited men, brought to mind vivid picture of the Leadville find of a few years ago. There, in the heart of a beautiful grove of winter coated cotton wood, close to the water's edge of that clear, bright little stream Mule creek, was an eager anxious crowd, among whom we noticed Capt. C. C. Pepperd, owner of the ranch; H. H. Rich, mayor of Coldwater and vice president of the First National Bank of that place; John P. Jones, cashier of the same institution; John P. Kern, the jovial merchant tailor, and quite a large number of strangers.

On examination we found what is pronounced by old miners the finest bank of fire clay in America. The next material they went through was eight or ten feet of sulfur and iron. The coal was struck at about 52 feet from the surface and found to be three feet and ten inches in thickness. We are led to believe this is the strongest vein of coal in the state. Experts pronounce it superior to either Trinidad or Canon City.

The shaft is located on section 27, township 31, range 17, west, on the land of Capt. Pepperd. It is about two miles east of Wilmore, the first station east of Coldwater on the Mulvane extension, and is 18 miles south and 6 miles east of Greensburg. After satisfying ourselves as to the truth of all reports we accepted Capt. and Mrs. Pepperd's cordial invitation to dinner, thereby teaching the genial Capt. that newspaper men knew better how to appreciate a good dinner than a coal find. -- Greensburg Rustler.

(This Kansas Geological Survey map identifies the geology in Section 17 as "Tertiary - Ogalla Formation and undiff. overlaying Quaternary alluvium".)


Coldwater Review, November 25, 1887.

Capt. Cicles has returned to his home in Texas, but not without making arrangements for mining Wilmore coal.


Coldwater Echo, December 1, 1887.

The coal discovery has set in motion the people in diligent search over the entire country. Shafts are being sunk in many places and each day glad tidings continue to pour in upon us. The mineral resources of Comanche are as yet undeveloped and what with capital and labor engaged, the future will unfold a tale, marvelous and rich. Let every hamlet, every neighborhood turn its attention to the development of youthful Comanche.


John P. Jones, cashier of the First National, at Coldwater, in in the city on business. He reports the coal find in Comanche county a bonanza. The vein is three feet in thickness and only fifty-five feet below the surface. (King Leader)


Comanche City News, December 2, 1887.

COAL AND SALT

Wichita Daily Beacon: "Mr. Broadwell, of Coldwater, Comanche county, is in the city, with the intention of, if possible, forming a company for the development of the salt beds discovered near that point. Mr. Broadwell brings with him a box full of salt, which he says, was shoveled off the ground in the state in which it is now to be seen. No analysis has yet been made, but the sample appears to be very pure. This salt was found in the Indian Territory, adjoining Comanche county, and there is said to be a limitless quantity of it lying on the surface, the bed being from four to eight inches thick. Mr. Broadwell has also with him a sample of coal taken from a 12 inch vein near Coldwater. From the information obtained the find would seem to be very valuable especially so to Wichita, if a company can be organized to keep them within our control.

COAL. We sell the best Osage Shaft Coal at $7.00 per ton. Foy & Sabin, Protection, Kans.


J. R. Duncan, who resides about six miles north of Cash City, Clark county, brought us this morning a piece of lean coal taken from a vein lying about 12 feet below the surface. It is not a good quality of coal, it is true, but it is more than shale rock as it will burn to some extent when placed in a fire already kindled. - Cashier.


The Nescatunga Enterprise, December 2, 1887.

The coal famine still rages. We went to the hub Thursday for a load of coal, we got two hundred pounds, all the dealer could possibly let us have. We hope Capt. Pepperd will develop his coal mine in a short time so that we will not be compelled to depend upon a railroad to bring in our supply of coal.


The Coldwater Review, December 2, 1887

Capt. Pepperd of Wilmore, was on our streets today smiling on his many Coldwater friends.


Capt. Pepperd is as enthusiastic as ever over his coal fields. He says he will in a few weeks be supplying our market with a superior quality of coal.


A train of fifteen cars was loaded at Wilmore yesterday. The cattle were owned by Messrs. Pepperd, Flato and Powell, and consigned by Kansas City.


The Western Star, December 3, 1887.

COAL IN COMANCHE

Larned Chronoscope:

With a profound satisfaction with the fact that Kansas is coming to the front point of natural advantages in a most gratifying manner, we chronicle today the finding of a large vein of coal 50 miles west from Larned. If you don't believe this statement we can't help it, but will give our authority. The discovery was made on Mule Creek, in the north part of Comanche county, and on the ranch owned by Pepperd. The coal is only 57 feet from the surface and is said to be an excellent quality. The first intimation that the Chronoscope had of the land was from N. Barber, who returned from that section only a few days ago. He stated that the report was when he left that coal had been found, but he had not seen the vein, hence could, not state positively as to the correctness of the report. He had seen a sample of the coal, bored out with a two inch auger, which appeared to be of an excellent character.

The facts above stated were corroborated this afternoon by J. A. Childers who is just from there and who saw the vein with his own eyes. He says it is in the north part of Comanche county on Pepperd's ranch and is about 17 miles southeast from Greensburg. The stratum is 4 feet 10 inches thick, and is of an excellent quality of soft coal.

The water ties to the surface of the ground, forming a miniature artesian well. The bed is only 57 feet from the surface and can be worked to great advantage. As a matter of course the new discovery has produced universal joy throughout that section, and preparations are being made by Mr. Pepperd to begin working the mine at once. The fact that he is a man of considerable wealth is a sufficient guarantee that no time will be lost in getting that coal ready for market.

If the coal is what it promises to be a greater boon to Western Kansas never existed than this. It will annihilate that dreadful state of affairs, a coal famine, will keep untold millions of money in the state that now go out and will reduce the expense of fuel. Kansas money will build up towns in the neighborhoods of the mines instead of in Colorado, Missouri and the Indian Territory. It will enable manufactories to be built in Kansas that cannot now exist owing to the high price of coal.

The indirect advantage to Larned will be the same as to every other Kansas town. The bed is so near here that we will be benefited directly as much as any other town in the state. This is not an age of stone or of brass, but one prepared expressly for mineral discovery in Kansas.


Capt. Pepperd was in the city yesterday from his coal mine, and gave us some cheerful reports concerning his prospects for an abundance of coal.


We learn from the Coldwater "Echo" and Kingman "News" that Jno. P. Jones has "recently discovered one of the most extensive salt beds in the known world, lying adjacent to Coldwater."


A move is on foot at Medicine Lodge to organize a mining company to prospect for coal, gas, oil, or whatever a hole in the ground may discover.


Coldwater Review, December 8, 1887.

Capt. Pepperd is as enthusiastic as ever over his coal fields. He says he will in a few weeks be supplying our market with a superior quality of coal.


Coldwater Review, December 9, 1887.

Our Coal Find Attracting Attention.

The Review is in receipt of many letters of inquiry in regard to Comanche county coal. We can not furnish back numbers of the Review giving an account of the several finds of coal in this county, but will say in brief that coal has been discovered ten miles northeast of Coldwater, eleven miles southwest and twelve northwest of Coldwater, and with the prospecting going on in many places we have no doubt that other localities will show up coal. The coal at Wilmore, ten miles east, has been tested and pronounced excellent, and the vein is said to be forty two inches thick and found about seventy feet below surface.

We herewith append a few inquiries to which the above is a brief answer. The foreign demand for the REVIEW has been unusually large and we have not a single back number except our file.

MINDES MINES, Mo., Dec. 4
Ed, Review:-
I write a line of inquiry as to the coal find ten miles east of Coldwater. If you can give me any information as to the facts of it --thickness of vein and depth from surface--please do so. If you have an old copy of the REVIEW with these facts in it, it will answer the purpose.
Yours truly,
R. A. Gilchrist.
LITCHFIELD, KANS., Dec 1.
Dear Sir:-
Can you inform me whether or not coal has been found in your vicinity? I have been informed there has been, and please inform me by return mail, and if you have an issue of your paper which contains an account of it, kindly send me same and oblige.
Wm. Dennison.


The Coldwater Echo, December 15, 1887.

COAL FIND - The discovery of coal in Comanche county is of considerable importance to many of our citizens who have property in that county. Adam Schriver already feels like a Coldwater bonanza king, for the discovery was made on a farm adjoining one he owns there. We hope that the find will be a big one and that the vein will last. (Harper Sentinel)


Coldwater Review, December 16, 1887.

Wilmore Notes

Capt. Pepperd has received his iron tubing from Kansas City and it is being driven as fast as possible.


Ed Patterson, of Texas, is here. He is a son-in-law of Capt. Pepperd, and likes Kansas very well, but can not appreciate the refreshing breeze.


Capt. Pepperd has shipped one hundred pounds of his fire clay to Wichita to be tested. If it proves to be a good quality of clay there will be a mill here next spring to work the large clay banks on his place.


Ed Patterson is having a well drilled on his place, and he purposes to go to coal or china.


Capt. Pepperd struck coal in the second shaft on his place this week. By an agreement with certain railroad men, he was to stop work as soon as coal was reached and notify them of the fact, when they were to take the matter in hand and work through the coal, satisfying themselves that coal existed as claimed by Capt. Pepperd. There is no fraud about these coal beds as any interested parties can now discover.


Comanche City News, December 23, 1887.

The numerous coal discoveries which have been made in various parts of Comanche county within the past month would indicate that the coal field is extensive and, when worked, will yield an abundance of coal. The latest discovery is that made by Grant Bros., about ten miles north of this city, and consists of a large vein of what seems to be a good quality of coal.

MORE SALT

Wichita Eagle. Central Kansas bids fair to be able to supply the world, at least the western world, with salt. Wichita is putting down three different drill holes, has in each instance struck inexhaustible supplies of salt water, of such specific gravity as to bear up an egg. In one instance the water came up to within a few feet of the surface and of such strength as would hold no more salt in solution. Ellsworth, Hutchinson and Kingman each have struck salt supplies. Down in Comanche county they have a surface deposit where they shovel it up by the cart load. Now comes a special dispatch to the Eagle from Lyons, with the announcement that in boring for gas up there a salt vein of finest quality seventy-five feet in thickness has just been struck, with the drill still in salt.


Coldwater Review, January 6, 1888.

Mr. Ed Patterson has returned to his home in Texas. He went south just ahead of the storm.


Capt. Pepperd of Wilmore, dined at the Merchants yesterday. He reports everything lovely in his section.


Coal in Comanche. (Wichita Eagle.)

That coal has just been discovered in Comanche county there is no longer any doubt. As to its extent that is to be determined. Mr. J. R. Grant, of Coldwater, who is in the city on business connected with the new find, and as director of the new company which has been incorporated, informs us that the coal croppings are about fourteen miles northwest of Coldwater on a branch of the Kiowa creek, and about ten or eleven miles south of the Rock Island road. Thirteen well defined veins of from one to three inches crop out within a four foot pacing. Specimens of the coal lie on our table. Blacksmiths who have tested it pronounce it superior for heating purposes and more lasting than any now shipped into that section. A tunnel three by six feet has been started and is being pushed several feet each day, and which follows the veins. The rock formations of the vicinity are sandstone and slate. Experienced miners say that the indications are that a good workable vein of coal will be struck if the croppings are followed far enough into the hill. A good coal mine in Comanche county would be equal to a good gold mine.

Mr. Grant, who is up for the purpose of having stock certificates printed, informs us that a coal company composed of reliable men has been incorporated under the name of "The Eagle Coal and Mining Co.," with a strong board of directors. The following named gentlemen compose the officers. President, Vernon Miller; vice president, Jos. Grant; sec.; J. W.. Grant; treas., A. Darroch.

The Eagle will keep its readers posted upon this new find, as the work is to be presented vigorously.


Comanche City News, January 13, 1888.

Coal In Comanche.

That coal has been discovered in Comanche county there is no longer any doubt. As to its extent that is to be determined. Mr. J. R. Grant, of Coldwater who is in this city, on business connected with the new find, and as director of the company which has been incorporated, informs us that the coal croppings are about fourteen miles northwest of Coldwater on a branch of Kiowa Creek, and about ten to eleven miles south of the Rock Island road. Thirteen well defined veins of from one to three inches crops out within a four foot pacing. Specimens of the coal lie on our table. Blacksmiths who have tested it pronounce it superior for heating purposes and more lasting than any now shipped into that section. A tunnel three by six feet has been started and is now being pushed several feet each day, and which follows the veins. The rock formations of the vicinity are sandstone and slate. Experienced miners say that the indications are, that a good workable vein of coal will be struck if the croppings are followed far enough into the hill. A good coal mine in Comanche would be as good as a gold mine.

Mr. Grant who is up for the purpose of having stock certificates printed, informs us that a coal company composed of reliable men has been incorporated under the name of "The Eagle Coal and Mining Company," with a strong board of directors. The following gentlemen compose the officers President, Vernon J. Miller, vice president, Joseph Grant, secretary, J. W. Grant, treasurer, A. Darroch. - Daily Eagle.


Coldwater Review, January 18, 1888.

Capt. Pepperd will, in a few days make public a few revelations that will set Wilmore sailing with a full sail and a stiff breeze.


Workmen on the Patterson shaft are laying off, having been disappointed in getting their drill.


The Coldwater Echo, January 19, 1888.

The coal vein struck in the northeast corner of Clark and northwest corner of Comanche county promise well and will be opened soon by a company organized recently at Coldwater. (Cashier)


Coldwater Review, January 20, 1888.

Quite a surprise was tendered Mrs. C. C. Pepperd one night last week, by her many friends coming in and taking possession. A nice time was spent till the clock chimed two when they returned to their homes.

Capt. Pepperd made a business trip to Greensburg and Kinsley last week.


Coldwater Review, January 27, 1888.

Capt. Pepperd, of Wilmore, and A. Howard, of Howard's ranch, placed their autographs on the register at the Merchants Tuesday.

Captain Pepperd, of Comanche county, spent the last day or two in this city. The Captain has recently discovered a thirty-two inch vein of coal on his ranch and is, of course, happy. He purposes to work the vein himself and to keep the control of it in his own hands, although he has had some very advantageous offers from the railroad companies operating in that part of the state. -Kinsley Mercury


Coldwater Review, February 3, 1888.

Miller and Brown passed through a six inch vein of coal in the shaft they are sinking for Capt. Pepperd, at the depth of 46 feet. there is good indication for striking a larger vein in the shaft than the four foot vein that was struck in the first hole. Comanche county should be very grateful to Capt. Pepperd, for he has done more than any other man in the county toward developing our coal beds.


Coldwater Review, February 10, 1888.

Capt. Pepperd felled the champion tree of this county one day last week. It made twenty five cords of stove wood. Who can beat that?

The wolves killed a fine cow for Capt. Pepperd one day last week.


Coldwater Review, February 24, 1888.

Capt. Pepperd made a business trip to Greensburg Wednesday.


Coldwater Review, March 2, 1888.

A few days since a couple of REVIEW pencil pushers drove out to the flourishing little town of Wilmore, ten miles east of Coldwater, on the C. K. & W. railroad.

We were kindly received and hospitably entertained by T. W. Porter, proprietor of the Wilmore House, and after partaking of an excellent dinner, we spent some time among the various places where coal drills had been or were at work. Nearly all those places had been abandoned by the drillers on account of quicksand that was found in such quantities that the sand pumps failed to be of any use, and put a stop to further development by the ordinary prospect drill. Capt. Pepperd has abandoned the drills and is now sinking a shaft on the creek below the place of original discovery with every prospect of success.

Capt. Pepperd says he is making no talk about his coal discoveries, but when the time comes he will be heard from. The Capt.. has labored under many discouragement's, but is undismayed and is presenting his investigations with commendable zeal.


Coldwater Review, March 9, 1888.

The railroad officials of the Rock Island and Santa Fe companies are here this week testing the coal.

Developments of the Coal Find.

Eds. REVIEW: - Have drilled twenty-one inches into solid coal and are not through it yet. A Rock Island and also a Santa Fe expert were here and did the work, and they are satisfied with the find. They have gone back after other machinery and will return in a few days to finish drilling through the coal.
Respectfully,
R. E. PEPPERD.
Wilmore, Kans., March 8.

The REVIEW is much gratified to hear the above. The gentlemen present remained long enough to be thoroughly satisfied with the genuineness of the find. Mr. Pepperd can now make satisfactory arrangements with capitalists to open the mine.


Coldwater Review, March 16, 1888.

R. E. Pepperd and J. B. Beely have received the furniture for their real estate office. We wish the gentlemen unbounded success.

Capt. C. C. Pepperd, of Wilmore, was an entertaining caller Tuesday and gave us some valuable information in regard to the coal recently discovered on his ranch. The Capt. is on high spirits and will soon be in position to open up the rich deposit. He thinks the chances good to get the division of the C. K. & W. at Wilmore, and should he succeed in doing so Wilmore will fly.


Coldwater Review, March 23, 1888.

R. E. and Capt. Pepperd made a business trip to Kinsley last Saturday.


Coldwater Review, June 15, 1888.

R. E. Pepperd made a trip to the I. T. last week.


Coldwater Review, June 22, 1888.

Capt. C. C. Pepperd and A. M. Anderson, of Wilmore, were among the enthusiastic democrats at the meeting.


Related Histories:

C.C. Pepperd Christopher Carson "Cap" Pepperd
Born in Ireland, C.C. Pepperd was a Confederate Civil War veteran, Cowboy, Bronc Buster, Trail Driver, early (1874) Comanche County rancher and the founder of Wilmore, Kansas. He lost his fortune, at least partially, due to the 1887-1888 Coal Mining Fever in Comanche county.

* A Chronology of the Life & Times of Christopher Carson Pepperd
* State of Kansas vs. C.C. Pepperd, 1876 (Shooting in the Saratoga Saloon, Dodge City, Ks)
* Testimony of C.C. Pepperd: State of Kansas vs. William Thompson, 1873
* 1887-1888 Coal Mining Fever in Comanche County, Kansas
* Confederate Pension Application #16216: C.C. Pepperd, Palo Pinto Co., Mineral Wells, Tx
* The Death Certificate of C.C. Pepperd, #23678, Texas State Board of Health
* Probate of the Estate of C.C. Pepperd, File#7336, Tarrant County, Texas
* The Gravestone & Burial of C.C. Pepperd, Greenwood Memorial Park, Fort Worth, Texas

Also see:

Hell's Half Acre - Comanche County, Kansas.

Mineral Resources of Comanche County - The Western Star, February 18, 1938.

Gas At The Watchorn Test Well   & other 1925 & 1926 news articles about the well.

The following off-site links will open in a new browser window:

Photos from Comanche County, Kansas - Kansas Geological Survey.

Data from Comanche County - Kansas Geological Survey

For an entertaining and informative introduction to geological time and processes, see Genesis V2.0 - God's Grand Work Week by Bob Keller.


Thanks to Shirley Brier for finding, transcribing and contributing the above news articles to this web site!

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