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COMANCHE COUNTY, KANSAS: HISTORY & GENEALOGY
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Civil War Veterans of Comanche County, Kansas


Play a song popular on the Union side during the Civil War:   When Johnny Comes Marching Home

So far as I know, no comprehensive listing exists of Civil War Veterans who lived in Comanche County, Kansas, after the war. This webpage will feature information on these men as it becomes available. The Comanche County Obituaries transcribed by Shirley Brier mention many veterans of the war and many references to them are also found in Comanche County History.

Kansas Adjutant General Roll, Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865. The lists give the soldier's name, rank, residence, enlistment date, muster date and unit information. Remember, though, that Comanche County, Kansas, had not been formed at the time of the Civil War. Thus, any veterans who lived in the county in the years after it was formed would not be listed as having joined from the county. The information from this report is also available online at Ancestry.com by subscription.

According to a list of the Grand Army of the Republic Posts in the State of Kansas, Post# 427, the J. H. McWilliams Post, was located in Nescatunga; Post# 398, The Scott Post, was located in Coldwater; no posts were listed for Buttermilk, Protection or Wilmore.

A list of the Charter Members: Grand Army of the Republic Post at Nescatunga was published in the Nescatunga Enterprise on March 12, 1887.

Grand Army of the Republic   Open letter from Capt. B.M. Veatch of the Scott Post, Coldwater, Kansas, dated May 8, 1894.

An article about the Protection American Legion, Post 167, which was named after Private Edward Burghardt, states that in 1980 there were 22 Civil War veterans buried in Comanche County. -- Comanche County History, page 195.

Be sure to see THE REUNION: Three Days of Patriotic Exercises and Solid Enjoyment.
EX-SOLDIERS AND CITIZENS FROM FOUR COUNTIES MEET AT WILMORE THIS WEEK.

-- The Western Star, 08 October 1898. Article transcribed and contributed to this site by Shirley Brier.

Memorial Day, The Western Star, June 2, 1905.

Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans
Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919
--The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.

E.A. Dickinson: An account of life in Missouri during the Civil War. -- The Western Star, April 15, 1921.

Their Ranks Are Rapidly Thinning, The Western Star, June 19, 1925.

Please send references to Civil War veterans to me and I'll promptly add them to this page. -- Jerry Ferrin


Gravestone of Rev. J.J. Bagsley, Civil War Veteran, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck.


Photo at left: Gravestone of Rev. J.J. Bagsley, Civil War Veteran, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas. Photograph and history courtesy of Bobbi (Hackney) Huck.

J.J. Bagsley, druggist, was born in Canada West, April 30, 1837. At the age of nineteen years he came to the United States and located in Grinnell, Iowa, where he attended school for three years. A part of the time was at the Iowa College. In September 1861, he enlisted in Company E, of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry. He served until August, 1865, and was mustered out by reason of the expiration of term of service. He then returned to Iowa and began business as a merchant in general store ar Linn Grove, Jasper County. In 1870, he sold out and came to Kansas, locating in Louisberg Township, Montgomery County, on a farm. In 1877, he moved to Elk City and opened a general store. He sold it in 1879 and bought a drug store, and in the spring of 1883, Mr. John Wright became a partner in the business. They carry a good stock of drugs, proprietary medicenes, and sundries, under the firm name of Bagsley & Wright. He is a member of the K. of H. Was married April 10, 1861, in Powesheik County, Iowa to Miss Ruth A. Carlson. They have five children: Eben J., Cora A., Orilla J., Etta L., and Ruth Myrtle. -- William G. Cutler's "History of the State of Kansas".

J.J. Bagsley later came to Comanche County, Kansas. By 1908 he was a minister at the Presbyterian Church. His daughter Ruth Myrtle married George Hearldson.


Gravestone of Mansel Barnes, Civil War Veteran, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck. BARNES, Mansel : November 1843*-May 9, 1913

Mansel Barnes married Mrs. Elizabeth (Downs) Steadman. He enlisted in the Union Army in 1861, and was discharged in 1863 when his age was discovered. Mansel was born in Wisconsin, and was an orphan. He and his wife came to Comanche County in 1891.

CIVIL WAR : CO. G. 16 WIS. INF Union Army.

1900 Census has 1845*, History Book has 1848*.

Comanche County History p. 236, 1900 Census Coldwater Twp.; Obituary; OHCC Star Deaths (Aug 1923)

Lot 28, Block 17E, Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.


Wm. H. Beal
Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918.


C. M. Belcher
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


Charles Daniel Bickford

Gravestone of Charles Daniel Bickford, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck. Charles Daniel Bickford
      1861: Civil War Service, from military records: Charles Bickford, Residence not listed; 19 years old. Enlisted on 4/24/1861 at Coldwater (Michigan) as a Private. On 5/1/1861 he mustered into "C" Co. MI 1st Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 8/7/1861 at Detroit, MI
      1865: Civil War Service, from military records: Charles D. Bickford, Residence not listed, 22 years old. Enlisted on 2/15/1865 at Coldwater, MI, as a Private. On 2/16/1865 he mustered into "I" Co., MI 1st SharpShooters. He was Mustered Out on 7/28/1865 at Delaney House, DC.
Above photo: "C.D. Bickford, Company I, 1st Mich., S.S." The Crown Hill Cemetery gravestone of Charles Daniel Bickford, the man who named Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas. Photo by Bobbi Huck.


E. D. Bradley
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


BURDITT, John Forest.

John Forest Burditt's Obituary, The Western Star, April 28, 1905:

"Deceased was a man of kind impulse, industrious habits and unimpeachable character. He served the Union during the War of the Rebellion, enlisting in Co. K., Sixth Iowa Infantry. After 11 months' service he was compelled to return home on account of sickness. Recovering, he re-enlisted, entering Co. K., Nineteenth Iowa Infantry and served therein until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Prairie Grove and Shiloh and in the siege of Vicksburg. His company fought Marmaduke in Missouri and also saw service in Arkansas and in Louisiana. For 11 months Mr. Burditt was a prisoner in Libby Prison. His war record was one of which he never had cause to be ashamed." He is buried in Crown Hill Cemetery.


Captain Charles Warren Burt: February 22, 1845 - May 31, 1925

Gravestone of Captain Charles Warren Burt, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck.


At left: Gravestone of Captain Charles Warren Burt, Lot 27, Block 22E, Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck.

Son of Washington and Georgianna (Fisk) Burt. Charles married Miss Ada Richmond. He drove cattle for many years from Texas to Wichita.

"He exemplified his patriotic spirit in his very tender years, enlisting first in the service of his country in 1861, when only 16 years of age, in the 52nd Ohio Volunteers, 14th Army Corps. On August 5, 1863, he was transferred to the United States Navy at Louisville, Ky., serving on the U. S. Gunboat "Moose," No. 34, 8th District, Mississippi Squadron, under Commodore Porter's command. He was wounded at the retaking of Ft. Pillow, Tenn. He was honorably discharged in 1864. He moved to Kansas in 1867, and enlisted in the 18th Kansas Cavalry in July, 1867, at Fort Riley, under General Custer's command. He was mustered out at Fort Riley in the same year. He then made many trips back and forth from Texas, transferring large herds of cattle. In 1874 he went out from Fort Worth, Texas, as captain of Company D., Texas Frontier battalion, and served through the last Comanche war. He received in all six arrow and gunshot wounds, resigning his command in 1875. After numerous engagements on the Mexican border he again engaged in the cattle business, transferring herds to his ranches in Kansas and Oklahoma." -- Obituary: Charles Warren Burt, The Western Star, June 5, 1925.

Also see: Comanche County History, p. 294.


Rod Cameron

Listed in Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919 --The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.

"Uncle Rod Cameron Dies, The Protection Post, November 18, 1920.


CAMPBELL, John M. -- died June 19, 1907

According to his obituary in The Western Star, June 21, 1907, John M. Campbell was a veteran of an Civil War Illinois regiment who served "in some of the hottest campaigns". Early in youth he moved from his native Missouri to Pike county, Illinois, where he married Sarah Glascow. After serving as a Union soldier, he and Sarah moved to Republic County, Illinois. They moved to Comanche County, Ks, in early 1900. Sarah and their two sons and three daughters survived him when he died 19 June 1907 at home of "an attack similiar to sunstroke." a few miles north of Coldwater, Kansas. His body was taken to Wayne, Republican County, Kansas, for burial beside his mother and a sister.


Richard Carney
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


Joseph Henry Carter II
B: 29 Mar 1842 at Harrisonville, Missouri.
D: 18 Sept 1913 near Protection, KS.
M: Emma _____
Buried: Protection Cemetery, Comanche County, KS.
Obituary: The Protection Post, 25 Sept 1913.
He was "a well-known and picturesque character of the west. He was educated in the public schools (in Missouri) with Cole and Bob Younger and was well acquainted with the James Brothers. His lifelong occupation was that of printer, publisher, and editor. He served with a Confederate Regiment during the Civil War, spending some time in Mexico."
Comanche County History, pages 305 & 306.


COLE, David : Died February 13, 1893

Note: Brother of T.A. Cole. Age 50 years old.

CIVIL WAR Co. E 118th Illinois Infantry.
Member of the Scott Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Coldwater, Kansas.

Obituary, The Western Star, 18 February 1893.

Lot 26, Block 14E, Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.


Owen Connaughton
"At the out break of the Civil War he enlisted in the 60th Indiana and on expiration of enlistment re-enlisted in the 160 Indiana Infantry. After the Civil War he came west and worked with an Engineer Corps, then engaged in building the Santa Fe through Kansas and on into New Mexico." -- Obituary of Owen Connaughton: The Protection Post, 1 Aug 1918.
He is buried in the Protection Cemetery.


Jesse Cook
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


Eli Crites, 65th Volunteer Infantry

The Western Star, June 27, 1902.
DIED.

Crites - Near Coldwater, Kansas, on Sunday, June 22, 1902, Eli Crites, aged 80 years, 3 months and 7 days.

Deceased was born in Wayne Co., Ohio, on March 15, 1822. While he was yet a young man his parents moved to Illinois. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Mr. Crites became a member of the Sixty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and served his country bravely and well, the entire term of his service being 3 years and 9 months. After the war Mr. Crites moved to Kansas and continued to make this state his home. A wife and five children survive the deceased husband and father, and to them comes, at this time, the consciousness that, although the earthly life of the husband and father is ended, he lived an honest life and died a peaceful death. For many years he had been a member of the M. E. church and had lived at peace with God and with his fellowmen. Funeral services were held at the home of Geo. Crites, where the deceased had been making his home. Rev. J. C. Fisher, of the M. E. church, had charge of the services. Burial took place in the Coldwater cemetery at 2 p.m. on Monday. A large number of the neighbors and friends of the deceased followed the remains to the cemetery and thus expressed, as best they could, their respect for the dead and their sympathy for the living who are in sorrow and bereavement at this time. (Thanks to Shirley Brier for this obituary.)


D. B. Denney
David B. Denney was born to Dawson and Rebecca (McNealy) Denney May 15, 1847, in Monroe County, Indiana - the sixth of twelve children. September 11th, 1863 at the age of sixteen, he enlisted in Company H, 9th Iowa Cavalry. Discharged in 1866 he married Mary Christina Davenport on September 11, 1875 and established a Christian home at Woodburn, Iowa. In 1885 the family came to Comanche County settling on their claim six miles northwest of Protection was to be; Lexington Post Office, six miles west was the weekly meeting place as mail came only once a week." -- Comanche County History, page 342.

"When the dark clouds of the Civil War obscured the rising sun of this young Republic of America, at the early age of 16, he enlisted in the Volunteer Calvary of Iowa and served with distinction in the ranks in the border and guerilla warfare that raged in Arkansas and Missouri. Though never wounded, he narrowly escaped and in one engagement, his horse was shot from under him in an encounter with a bushwhacker. -- Obituary for David B. Denney: The Protection Post, 17 Dec 1925.

"On December 11, 1863, when young Denney was but 16 years old, he responded to the call of his country and volunteered his services as a member of Company H, 9th Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Cavalry. He took part in the border patrol by the Union forces in Arkansas and southern Missouri. His record as a soldier was one of which any soldier should be proud. He was discharged from the service in February, 1866." -- -- Obituary for D.B. Denney: The Western Star, 25 Dec 1925.

He was listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918, and in Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919 --The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


E. M. Dixon
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


J. P. Duvall
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


David Frankford Edmonds David Frankford Edmonds
Born in Albia, Monroe County, Iowa on June 24, 1842; moved with his family to near Leavenworth, Kansas, at an early age; worked as a freighter; joined Company E, 2nd Missouri Cavalry and served in the Army for eighteen months, mostly in Missouri in battles near Springfield, Rose Hill, Cape Girardeau and in Memphis, Tennessee. After the war he returned to Kansas; married Miss Lois Dunlop 12 June 1865 in Chase County, Ks; in the fall of 1868 he took up a land claim in what was to become Comanche County, Ks, an area he was familiar with from passing through in his freighting days. -- Comanche County History, page 355. Both he and his wife, are buried in Crown Hill Cemetery.

"From Butler-co. Mr. Edmonds moved to near Valley Center in Sedgwick-co., where he secured a claim. Later he went to near Cottonwood Falls, and from there back to Missouri, where he made a visit with his parents. That was in the spring of 1861. The Civil War had broken out, and, quite naturally, young Edmonds was not content, until he had volunteered and got into the uniform of a Union soldier. He joined Co. E. 2d Missouri Cavalry, and spent about 18 months in the service, principally in the state of Missouri. His company took part in engagements near Springfield, Rose Hill, Cape Girardeau and Memphis, in that state. He was mustered out of the service at Mexico, Mo. He spent several months at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, while in training." -- Life Sketch of David Frankford Edmonds, The Western Star, January 25, 1924.

Note from page 58 of the Diamond Jubilee booklet: "Mr. Edmonds died in Coldwater, May 21, 1930, and with his death passed the last Civil War veteran in this county."


Conrad Emery
"Mr. Emery was a Civil War veteran . He was a member of the Third Iowa Cavalry and was a good soldier." -- Obituary: Conrad Emery, The Western Star, February 24, 1922.

He died in Wilmore and is buried in Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Kansas.


W. E. Fisher
FISHER, William E.: From his obituary: "Mr. Fisher was one of the pioneer settlers of this county. It was about 35 years ago that he migrated to this part of the state and settled on a claim a few miles northwest of where Wilmore now stands. There he and his family continued to make their home until a few years ago when Mr. Fisher took up residence for most of the time with his daughter, Mrs. Geo. Behler, and family, in Wilmore. Mr. Fisher was well known to a large number of the people of Comanche, Kiowa and Pratt-co's., and was held in high esteem by all. He had, through his long residence here, proven himself to be an upright, honorable and law-abiding citizen and a faithful and devoted husband and father. He was a veteran of the Civil War, his record as a Union soldier being one of pronounced loyalty and unquestioned bravery. On March 13, 1862, he enlisted as a member of the Seventeenth Indiana Light Artillery and remained in the service until July 8, 1865, thus seeing three years and four months of army service."

See: Comanche County History, p. 376
He is buried in Lot #102, Powell Township Cemetery, Wilmore, Comanche County, Kansas.

"William and Nancy Fisher came to Kiowa County from Indiana about 1890. Their family consisted of two girls, Lizzie Fisher Newlin and India Fisher Behler, and three sons, George, Dan and Barney. William and Nancy purchased the S1/2 34-30-18 in Reeder Township." --Comanche County History, page 376. W.E. Fisher is mentioned as a Civil War veteran in Oliver Snare's obituary, The Wilmore News, April 25, 1918. According to his wife's obituary, they married 28 November 1871 (possibly in Hamilton County, Indiana, where she was born 11 Jan 1852).


Captain Henry Fretz "Julia Agnes was born at Peoria Ill., July 7, 1844, died at the home of her daughter in Comanche county on July 7, 1919, aged just 75 years to the day. She was married to Capt. Henry Fretz, a veteran of the Civil war, on April 26, 1866, and with him moved to Iowa that year. Twenty years later - in 1886 - they moved to Kansas and the deceased had resided there ever since. Two children were born to this union, Mrs. Alta Shimer, whose home is in Michigan, and Mrs. S. A. DeLair of this county. Captain Fretz died on November 11, 1901." - Obituary of Julia Connaughton, The Protection Post, July 24, 1919.

John G. Fulton
Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918.

Fulton, John G.
B: 11 Oct 1836
D: 13 Nov 1918 at the home of his daughter, Ethel Fulton, in Chicago, IL.
M: 26 May 1858 to Sarah Elizabeth Hamilton, probably at Pinkneyville, IL.
Obituary: The Protection Post, 14 Nov 1918.
He is buried in the Protection Cemetery, Protection, Ks.


M. B. Greenwood
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


Dr. John S. Halliday Dr. John S. Halliday
"Among the stalwart, ambitious young men from the more eastern states who back in the early 80s, turned their steps toward Kansas as a permanent location, was Dr. J. S. Halliday, now of Muskogee, Okla., whom every old-timer in Comanche-co. knows as one of the real pioneers and as one of the builders of Coldwater and Comanche-co. He was a native of Meigs-co., Ohio, having been born in that county on July 6, 1843. A little calculation will reveal the fact that when the Civil War broke out in 1861, young Halliday was not quite 18 years of age, and, like thousands of other young men from Ohio and other northern states he volunteered his services in defense of the Union, and in many a battle he proved himself to be of that invincible, courageous type of men for which Ohio was noted. As a member of the 36th Ohio Infantry, he won distinction on numerous occasions for bravery and good judgment in time of battle. He spent seven months in southern prisons." -- Dr. John S. HALLIDAY, The Western Star, November 9, 1923.


Jacob Hand
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


E. H. Hardy
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


A. J. Harmon
Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918.
Daniel Hase

Gravestone of John Daniel Hase, Civil War Veteran, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck. DAN'L HASE
U.S. MARINE CORPS
Grand Army of the Republic grave medallion

John Daniel Haase, October 19, 1839 - January 8, 1921, was born in Hesse Castle, Germany. He married Anna (Soboslav) Rickstine. They had three children: Mrs. Harvey Marley, Fred C. Hase and Clara (Mrs. Walter) Thompson. There are 2 stones for Daniel, a family stone and a military stone. Daniel's tombstone says U.S. Marine Corps. His obituary says he was in the U.S. NAVY.

Obituary, The Western Star, 14 January 1921.

Comanche County History p. 423; listed 1900 Census Coldwater Twp.(Marley)(Hase)

Buried: Lot 2, Block 19E, Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.


George W. Herron
According to his obituary published in The Western Star on June 17, 1910, Geo. W. Herron died in Coldwater that same day at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harrison Fisher. "He served for time in the Civil war and seen much of the history-making of this country during his long life." He was born on April 28, 1826 at Baltimore, Maryland. He was buried in the Willow Creek Cemetery in Harper, Oklahoma.
W.P. Holbert
Born 16 Dec 1833 in Washington County, Pennsylvania; died 15 January 1908 in Protection township, Comanche County, Kansas. In 1877 he moved to Comanche County. His obituary in The Western Star, January 17, 1908, states: "Mr. Holbert was a brave Union soldier, having served during the Civil War as a member of Co. K. Fifty first Illinois Volunteers." He is buried in the Protection Cemetery.
Francis Marion Howell : April 26, 1832 - July 27, 1906

Francis M. Howell married Miss Amanda E. Powell on June 22, 1870. Came to Comanche County in 1896. They had seven children: C. A. Howell, L. W. Howell, O. B. Howell, O. D. Howell, E. F. Howell, Mrs. Zilla Winthrow and Pearl Howell.

CIVIL WAR 49th Missouri Cavalry

Obituary, The Western Star, 03 August 1906. Other sources: 1900 Census Coldwater City; Ollie Hackney Clipping Collection: The Western Star Deaths (Aug 1923).

Buried: Lot 24, Block 16E, Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.


John Hullet
"Mr. Hullet was a native of Illinois, having been born in Macoupin-co., that state, on February 1, 1847. At the age of 17 he volunteered his services in the defense of the Union and became a member of Co. H. 30th Ill. Volunteers. He remained in the service until the close of the war." -- Obituary: The Western Star, 24 May 1929.

Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918.

Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans
Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919
--The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


Humphries
Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918.
J. A. Jarnagin
Obituary: The Protection Post, 18 July 1918: "At the early age of eight years he moved with his parents from Tennessee to Ohio county, Ky. where he lived until he grew to manhood. At the outbreak of the Civil war or in 1861 he enlisted as a private in the armies of the Union and served his country well and loyally for 3 years and eight months or until the close of the great conflict when he was honorably discharged with a war record of which he could be proud."

Mentioned as a Civil War veteran in Oliver Snare's obituary, The Wilmore News, April 25, 1918.


John Jordan Sr.
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


William H. Kimple W. H. Kimple
"Mr. Kimple was born in Philadelphia, Pa., and lived in that state until he was 12 years of age, when he came west, making his home for a few years with relatives in Wayne-co., Iowa. He was not long in adapting himself to the pioneer conditions in the West and soon caught the spirit of perseverance, industry and fearlessness which characterized the early day settlers in the new country. Shortly before he was 18 years of age he heard the call for volunteers in defense of the Union, and it was not long before he was duly enlisted as a member of Co. M. Third Iowa Cavalry. His three years record as a Union soldier was one of distinguished bravery and of devotion to the flag and all that it stands for. His company was in Missouri most of the time and took part in a number of important engagement. So well did Billie Kimple, the young soldier, perform his duties that he was made an orderly to Gen. Noble and was entrusted on a number of occasions with very important duties. After the close of the war he was among the first to join the Grand Army of the Republic, and as a member of that order he was always loyal, his patriotism never waning as a citizen of a united country." -- Obituary: William H. KIMPLE, The Western Star, April 11, 1924.


Moses Alexander Kluttz

"Mr. Kluttz served in the Confederate army through the civil war." -- Obituary: Moses Alexander Kluttz, The Wilmore News, May 31, 1917. He is buried in Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Kansas.


Stephen Knecht

Gravestone of Stephen & Diana Knecht, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck. At left: Gravestone of Stephen & Diana Knecht, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas. Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck.


STEPHEN KNECHT
MAR. 3, 1830 - JULY 18, 1915
----------
DIANA, HIS WIFE
MAY 12, 1838 - DEC. 28, 1909

Obituary for Stephen Knecht, The Western Star, June 25, 1915. Note: his obituary gives his death date as June 18, 1915 whereas his gravestone says July 18, 1915.

Stephen Knecht's Civil War history -- Residence: Williams Township PA; Enlisted on 10/7/1862 as a Private. On 07 Oct 1862 he mustered into "F" Co. PA 153rd Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 24 July 1863 at Harrisburg, PA. He was listed as Wounded 01 July 1863 Gettysburg, PA. (Sources: History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-1865 and History of the 153rd Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers Infantry.)

"Stephen Knecht at one time assisted to catch old John Morgan when he has extended his raid into Ohio. A force of three or four hundred volunteered and putting themselves under command of army officers, gave chase to the old fellow on Sunday. He was overtaken seated in a corner of the fence, and though it was the intention of the company to forever put an end to his raiding, the officers rushed him off and saved his life. Mr. Knecht is 49 years of age and was born in Pennsylvania. He has resided in various parts of that state and Ohio. He came to Algansee 14 years ago, nearly all of which time he has lived on the farm where we found him taking solid comfort under his own vine and fig tree. He worked several years in the coal banks of Pennsylvania and Ohio." -- Tramping Through Algansee, news article, 25 April 1879, Coldwater, Michigan. (History of Stephen Knecht courtesy of David Bickford)


Adam S. Livingston
"When about 13 years old he removed with his parents to McLean county, Illinois, settling near Bloomington, where he grew to manhood. He answered the call of his country to the colors and enlisted on August 7, 1862, in Company E. 94th Illinois regiment of infantry and served with distinction under General Grant till November 1864, when he was discharged at Fort Morgan, Alabama, on account of disability." -- Obituary: A.S. Livington: The Protection Post, 28 Feb 1924.

Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918.

Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans
Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919
--The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


W. G. Lindsey
Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918.

Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans
Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919
--The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


J.L. Mahaffey

Listed in Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919 --The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


G.W. Manard or Maynard

Gravestone of G.W. Manard (or Maynard), Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck. MANARD*, G.W. : Died November 21, 1891

CIVIL WAR : CO. F. 10th Ill. INF

"G. W. Maynard, who lives in Shimer township, about 21 miles southeast of this city, died very suddenly last Saturday morning. Mr. Maynard had worked all week hauling and shoveling wheat from a threshing machine in his neighborhood. On Friday he complained of pains in his head but worked all day. On Saturday morning he arose but was taken violently sick, and a courier was sent to this city for a physician, but before the physician could get ready and get very far from town, another courier arrived stating that he was dead. He leaves a wife and eight children to mourn his loss. The remains were interred in the city cemetery east of town on Monday. The bursting of a blood vessel in the head is supposed to have been the cause of his death." - "Obituary, The Western Star, 21 November 1921.

Lot 15, Block 28E, Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.


Robert D. McBride
"Mr. McBride is an old and highly respected citizen, and one of the noble veterans of the civil war" - From his obituary in The Western Star, March 18, 1893. He is buried in the Avilla cemetery.

McCUNE, William E.: March 1846* - May 16, 1910 Transcription: "O Death Where is My Sling...O Grave Where is Thy Victory.. 1st Cor 15:56"

Note: William married Miss Mary Jane Kirk. He was a Justice of the Peace and a farmer. Their children include: Albert, Ella A., John D., Pearl S.(married Dora L. Rupe), Hollie Earl, and Margaret H.

Extra Note:*Census has 1847

CIVIL WAR Co M 3 Iowa Cavalry

OHCC; 1900 Census: Coldwater City(McCune)Coldwater Twp.(Kirk); Marriage Index M-Z(McCune/Rupe)

OHCC Star Deaths (Aug 1923)

Buried: Lot 7, Block 14E, Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.


Andy Cameron McDonold
"Andy Cameron McDonold was born in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on February 8, 1847. His age at the time of death was 75 years, 1 month and 9 days. When he was three years of age he moved with his parents to Williamson-co., Texas, where they lived for some time. When Andy was but 15 years of age he took his father's place as a soldier in the Civil War. He served for 3 1/2 years as an artillery man, being stationed for most of the time at Galvaston, Texas. Soon after the close of the war he went to Stephens-co., Texas, where he engaged in the cattle business. From Texas he went to New Mexico, where he spent eleven years, coming from there to Comanche-co. in the year 1895." -- Obituary: Andy Cameron McDonold, The Western Star, March 24, 1922.

He is buried in Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Kansas.


William H. McLaughlin
"A soldier in the Civil War, he won a worthy record for bravery and for his devotion to the cause of the Union." -- Obituary: The Western Star, November 25, 1904.
J. W. McWilliams
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


W. A. McWilliams
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


James Meeker
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


William Mitchell
Listed in Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919 --The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


John Moore Born June 2, 1840 in Ohio. Died October 26, 1894 at home near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas. According to his obituary in The Western Star, November 10, 1894: "In 1861, he enlisted in the army as a volunteer in Co. A. Reg. 53rd. Ohio and served three years." He married Belle Miller in 1866 & moved his family to Comanche County in 1885. They had six children. He was buried in the Riverside Cemetery, which might be the Avilla cemetery as his obituary states that in 1885 "he preempted a claim a half mile south of Protection, which has since been the home of the family.", which is in the area of the Avilla cemetery, which is beside a river.

Christopher Carson Pepperd, Civil War Veteran. Christopher Carson "Cap" PEPPERD
Born in Lusk, Ireland, Confederate Civil War Veteran, Cowboy, Bronc Buster, Trail Driver, a prominent figure in Dodge City, Kansas, who was once arrested by Wyatt Earp, and an early (1874) Comanche County rancher. He founded the the city of Wilmore, Kansas, which he named after his ranch foreman, Tommy Wilmore, a Union veteran of the Civil War. He lost his fortune in the 1887-1888 Coal Mining Fever in the county and moved to Texas, where he died in 1921.



Milton Phebus
DEATH OF MILTON PHEBUS -- Milton Phebus, aged 86 years, died on June 24 at his home in Inglewood, Calif., after an illness of several weeks. He was a resident of this county for a few years prior to moving to the Pacific coast. He had lived in Inglewood for about 14 years. Mr. Phebus was a Civil War veteran. Not long after the close of the war he settled in Linn-co., Kans., and lived there for a number of years. He was a splendid citizen, and his passing is mourned by all who knew him. Mr. Phebus is survived by his wife and by two sons, Wm. Phebus of Inglewood, Calif., and Eyman Phebus of Dodge City, Kans. All were present during the sickness and at the time of Mr. Phebus' death. Eyman returned to his home in Dodge City the latter part of last week." -- The Western Star, July 5, 1929.


Jefferson Phillips
Born May 17, 1838, in Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana. Died Febrary 8, 1904 near Protection, Kansas at the home of Z.J. Bratcher. He moved to Comanche County, Ks, in 1885. From his obituary in The Western Star, February 12, 1904: "At the outbreak of the Civil war young Phillips offered his services to his country, becoming a member of the 71st. Indiana infantry and afterwards serving in a company of cavalrymen. He was in some of the important battles of the war, his term of service lasting over 3 years. During the war he was badly crippled in the right leg, the result of an accident while helping to manage a team of mules." He had no relatives in Comanche County, Kansas, and his body was shipped for burial in Spencer, Indiana, where a brother and two sisters lived.
John Rader
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


J.D. Ray

Gravestone of J.D. Ray, Civil War veteran, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck. RAY, Jno 'J.D.': 1838- April 4, 1888

Obituary: J.D. Ray

Enlisted December 20, 1864. Age 26. Mustered February 1, 1865. Became Corporal February 1, 1865.

CIVIL WAR Corp'l: JNO Ray, CO. H : 5TH Tenn. Mtd. INF.

Service information from Tennessee GenWeb.

Lot 1, Block 28E, Crown Hill Cemetery, Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.



David F. Roberts
18 September 1839 - 17 April 1918. Served three years in the 26th Indiana Volunteers. Died at his daughter's home in Wilmore, Kansas. "The body was taken to Pleasanton, Kansas, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Baugh, where the funeral was held in the M. E. church at 3:00 p.m. Friday, April 19th, conducted by C. W. Wood assisted by the Masonic Lodges. Interment was made in the Battlefield cemetery." Obituary: David F. Roberts, The Wilmore News, April 25, 1918.
Thos. Schlosser
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


Jesse Shimer
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


J. W. Shroyer
Charter member of the Joseph H. McWilliams Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Nescatunga, Kansas, March 1887.


William H. Sickler
"When the Civil War broke out Mr. Sickler, who was then but 16 years of age, enlisted in Co. E. of the Eighth Iowa Cavalry. He saw some active service, mostly in the state of Kansas. His record as a soldier is one of bravery and of constant devotion to the Union. At the time of his death, deceased was 61 years, 3 months and 2 days old. In the fall of 1884 Mr. Sickler moved with his family to Comanche county, settling in Kiowa creek a few miles above Protection." -- " Obituary, The Western Star, 09 November 1906.
Stephen S. Smith
"Deceased was born in Ashland county, Ohio, on February 19, 1842. His age, therefore, at the time of death was 71 years and 9 days. During the Civil War, Mr. Smith was a valiant Union soldier, serving as a member of Co. A., Sherman's brigade calvary. At Hayesville, Ohio, on September 13, 1865, he was united in marriage with Miss Matilda L. Bower. In 1867, Mr. and Mrs. Smith moved from Ohio to Carthage,, Mo. In 1885 they settled in Valley tp., this county, but on the way they lived for a while in Cowley county, Kansas. In this county, Mr. Smith became a successful farmer and stock raiser. In 1903 he sold his land interests in this county and purchased a ranch near Hooker, Texas county, Okla.., and there he moved and continued to live." -- Obituary, The Western Star, 07 March 1913.
Oliver Hazard Perry Snare
16 May 1847 - 09 October 1915. From his obituary in The Western Star: "As a Union soldier, Mr. Snare made an honorable record during the Civil War. He was a member of Co. K., Twenty first Ohio Infantry. He was mustered into the service in 1863. He was at the battle of Chickamaugua, Lookout Mountain and a number of other engagements along the line of Sherman's march to the sea. A portion of the time he did scout duty under Gen. Sherman. His devotion to his country and his loyalty to the flag were unquestioned. Six comrades of the Civil War acted as pall bearers at his funeral. They were: As a Union soldier, Mr. Snare made an honorable record during the Civil War. He was a member of Co. K., Twenty first Ohio Infantry. He was mustered into the service in 1863. He was at the battle of Chickamaugua, Lookout Mountain and a number of other engagements along the line of Sherman's march to the sea. A portion of the time he did scout duty under Gen. Sherman. His devotion to his country and his loyalty to the flag were unquestioned. Six comrades of the Civil War acted as pall bearers at his funeral. They were: Owen Connaughton, W. H. Kimple, J. A. Jarnagin, D. F. Edmonds, Elias Willard and W. E. Fisher."He is buried in the Wilmore Cemetery.
J.W. Stanfield
Enlisted 1864, served 3 1/2 years, member of the Seventeenth Iowa Infantry and later of Co. K, Fifteenth Iowa Infantry; attained rank of 2nd Lt.
B: 13 Nov 1833 in Illinois.
D: 18 Aug 1907 in Protection, KS.
M: 1863 to Elizabeth Brenamon.
Buried: Protection Cemetery
Obituary: The Western Star, August 23, 1907.



Sam Stitt
Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918, and in Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919 --The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


John F. Stuckey

Gravestone of J.F. Stukey, Civil War Veteran, Crown Hill Cemetery near Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas.  Photograph by Bobbi (Hackney) Huck. J.F. STUKEY

Died December 25, 1889
Co. H, 15th OHIO Inf.
Grand Army of the Republic,
Lot 3, Block 21E,
Crown Hill Cemetery,
Coldwater, Comanche County, Kansas

Photo by Bobbi Huck.

John F. Stukey's obituary in The Western Star, December 28, 1899, states: "He was buried Wednesday by the G. A. R. of which order he was an honored member." He died in "this city" (Coldwater) on Christmas morning. His obituary doesn't give his birth date or age. He left a widow and several children. He is listed on the List of Pioneer Settlers Buried In Crown Hill Cemetery, published in The Western Star 16 June 1933.


John Taylor of Protection, Kansas John Taylor
"His army record begins with enlisting in Company B of the One Hundred Seventh Illinois Infantry. His captain, was James Turner, and the regiment was commanded for a time by Col. Thomas Snell and later by Col. Kelley. During the first winter the regiment did guard duty on the railroads in Kentucky against the Morgan band of raiders. After that the regiment went into the heart of the Confederacy, joining some of Gen. Schofield's troops under Gen. Sherman. But before that time Mr. Taylor was sent back to the rear for recuperation in a hospital and never rejoined his command. At Cincinnati he was detailed to help guard rebel prisoners and deliver them to Camp Chase, Columbus. After two months of invalidism in a hospital at Camp Madison, Ind., he was given his honorable discharge December 26, 1863. On leaving the army he returned home unfit for further military duty and it was over a year before he was sufficiently recovered to be of any practical use on the farm." -- Mr. & Mrs. John Taylor of Protection, The Western Star, March 11, 1921.

"John Taylor, son of Thomas and Litha Taylor, was born at Waynesville, Ill., October 10, 1838. In August, 1863, he enlisted in Company B. 107th Illinois Infantry, and served under General Schofield in the Civil War. He campaigned in Tennessee and Kentucky against "Bush Whackers" and helped chase Morgan's famous raiders out of Ohio. He was honorably discharged in 1864 because of disability." - Obituary: John Taylor, The Protection Post, 4 Oct 1928.

He is buried in the Protection Cemetery.

Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans
Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919
--The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


Edward Porter Tinker
"At the outbreak of the Civil War, Mr. Tinker returned to Iowa in order to volunteer, and became a member of Company C, 5th Iowa Cavalry. While not taking part directly in any heavy engagements, he saw much active service during his four year enlistment, receiving a wound in the right shoulder and carried the bullet to the day of his death." -- Obituary, The Western Star, January 9, 1920. (The printed obituary gave his name as "Edward Porter Tinkler"; his great-great grandson, Jacob Tinker, provided the correct spelling of his name.)


G. C. Toland
Listed as a Civil War veteran in "Protection's Roll of Honor", The Protection Post, 30 May 1918.

Civil War & Spanish-American War Veterans
Living In or Near Protection, Comanche County, Kansas, in 1919
--The Protection Post, June 5, 1919.


Captain Basil Meeks Veatch
From his obituary, The Western Star, January 25, 1901: Basil M. Veatch was a son of Nathan and Elizabeth (Evans) Veatch, of Harrison co., Indiana, and was born in that county on April 12, 1823. His father was a native of Tennessee and was a brave soldier of the war of 1812. His grandfather, also named Nathan Veatch, of Welsh descent, and reared in Maryland, was a soldier for the colonies in the Revolutionary war. Capt. B. M. Veatch was a brave soldier for the Union during the Civil war from 1861 to 1865. "Thus, in three great wars of the country," says a biographer of the Veatch family, "grandfather, father and son have been engaged under the same flag in behalf of their country."


F.M. Watson
J. A. Jarnagin, Mansel Barnes and F. M. Watson were, so far as we have learned, the Comanche co., old soldiers in attendance at the Southwest Veteran's Association held in Dodge City last week, Mr. Jarnagin was chosen vice president for this county. -- The Western Star, September 10, 1909.


Elias Willard, Civil War Veteran. Elias Willard
"He was 20 years of age when the Civil War broke out, and his patriotic impulses soon led him to volunteer his services for the defense of the Union cause. His entry into the army was on October 12, 1861, for a two years enlistment. On December 15, 1863, he re-enlisted for the remainder of the war as a "Veteran Volunteer," and was a member of Co. A., 68th Ohio Infantry. In all, he served his country for nearly four years and participated in many of the principal battles and campaigns of the Civil War. His company took an active part in the battles of Fort Donelson, Corinth, Shiloh, Iuka and Champion Hill, also in the siege of Vicksburg and with Sherman on his famous "march to the sea." At Vicksburg he took part in running the gauntlet on the Mississippi river above that city for a distance of 14 miles, thus aiding materially in the Union victory which attended the fall of that strongly fortified Confederate city. His regimental flag, now in Washington, D. C., shows that Mr. Willard took part in 34 important battles and in 36 minor battles of the war. His record as a soldier indicates that he was always brave and even daring, and that his loyalty to Stars and Stripes was constant and genuine. Several times he was cited for bravery and for distinguished service in action. One of the medals he received was granted by the state of Ohio. He was wounded three times. In the battle of Champion Hill he received quite a severe wound in one of his jaws, but he never had to go to a hospital. Mr. Willard was mustered out of the service on July 10, 1865, and immediately returned to his home in Ohio to again take up the pursuits of peace." -- Obituary, The Western Star, April 22, 1921.


Thomas Jackson Wilmore, Civil War Veteran. Thomas Jackson "Tommy" Wilmore, U.S. Navy
17 September 1843 - 7 July 1917. "Wilmore, Comanche County, Kansas, was named in honor of Civil War veteran Thomas Jackson "Tommy" Wilmore, who was born Sept. 17th, l840, "Toronto Canada West", Canada. When he was l4 or l5 years old he left home, supposedly because he didn't get along with his father. He did keep in touch with a brother. (We so far haven't been able to get any information from Canadian relatives). He went to New York and enlisted there in the Union Navy on April 23rd, 1863. At the time his occupation was "clerk" and his post office address was "New York". He was discharged from the US Naval Service September 22, l865 from the U.S.S. Niagara as landsman, in New York, with ordinary discharge. And, also from his Civil War service pension application: "Thomas Wilmore enlisted April 23, l863 and was discharged from the US Naval Service April 22, l864, from the USS Niagara as landsman, with ordinary discharge, at expiration enlistment, in Boston, Massachusetts". He personally filled out his pension request form on October 15th, 1915, and it was witnessed by both of his sons, Arthur and Ray Wright Wilmore." -- excerpt from Wilmore Family History by Gene & Sue Wilmore. He moved in November 1911 to Del Norte, Colorado, died there and is buried in the Del Norte Cemetery.


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