1997 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (Forest Springs - drawn by Julie Garmon - 10th grade)

"Among the green hills of Allen County, on the Highland Rim, surrounded by all the environments conducive to health and pleasure...cool and fresh from nature's laboratory, the tide of healing flows, endowed with life-giving powers that impart health and vigor to all who will come, and drink, and ... live.  The waters of Forest Springs can not be surpassed anywhere", so states an April 1914 advertisement as E.E. Cox and wife prepare to open the famous resort for another season.  The resort was located about eight miles southeast of Scottsville in the Mt. Union community near the Tennessee line.  in the ten-acre park area twenty-odd springs of different colors and mineral contents were located, four of them under a 30-foot shelter.  Sometime before 1889 a basin was found dug in the solid rock below the earth's surface, indicating the area had been a health resort for several centuries.  In the  mid-eighteen hundreds Allen County was home to tan old settler and hunter by the name of Hooten.  He hunted elk and deer as they came to eat the salt collected around the mineral springs.  Col. W.F. Evans, a prominent Scottsville lawyer, was in wretched health suffering from kidney trouble and dyspepsia.  The virtues of the waters were known to the old hunter, and he made known their qualities to the ailing Evans, who was induced to try them in 1849, experiencing great relief and benefit from drinking them after only a few days.  in the spring of 1850, Col. Evans purchased the lands on which the springs were located, built a double log cabin and spent the summer there with his family.  By summer's end he was physically sound and the cure became widely known.  Col. Evans was persuaded to erect several buildings at the  Springs to rent to invalids, always with beneficial results.  (click here for the continued story )
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FEBRUARY - (Marlin's Grocery - drawn by Amy Pardue - 10th grade)

Marlin's Grocery is located about 16 miles from Scottsville in the New Roe Community.  Vernon Leslie marlin, age 84 and his wife Bertie Mae Marlin, age 78 are natives of the Sengtown, Tn. and the Rapids, Ky area.  They purchased the store from Virgil Martin in 1965.  They still operate the store in much the same fashion of a typical country store.  There is a stove near the center of the store surrounded by chairs.  This is where all the neighbors gather to visit with the Marlins, discuss world affairs, and the community news.  According to some accounts, other proprietors of the community store over the years were: Criggin and Herl, B. Riggs, Munk and Roy Graves, who also ran the Grist mill and Blacksmith shop, Virgil martin, and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Slayton who still live in the New Roe Community.  A short distance from Mr. Marlin's grocery you can still see the old building that housed the Blacksmith shop and Grist Mlil.  The Marlins are the parents of five children.  Dalton, the oldest, lives in the New Roe community and often helps his parents out in the store.  Dorothy Ray lives in Simpson County, and Glinda Oliver lives in Red Boiling Springs, Tn.  Their last two children were still at home when the Marlins moved to New Roe.  David lives in Simpson County, and Helen Taylor lives about one mile form the store.  There is much history in this community.  A newspaper article taken from the scrapbook belonging to the late  "Miss Etta" Newman stated "that is the early 1800s three families, the Anthonys, Harrells and the Chaneys decided to leave old Virginia and seek new homes farther west. They settled here, and after a while, it was named New Roe after a town in old Virginia named "Roe".
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MARCH - (Davasher Mill - drawn by Emily Sullivan - 12th grade)

This water powered grist mill was located on Jews Harp Hill which was on Barren River at the end of Walnut Hill Road just off Highway 100 in the Holland community.  This grist mill was only used to grind corn.  The corn could be ground for money or a percentage of the cornmeal.  The mill was in operation for approximately 50 years.  It was the only water grist mill anywhere in the area.  People came from all around to get corn ground into cornmeal.  Some of the locations from which these people came were Red Hill, Beulah Town, Fountain Run, Maynard, and Capitol Hill.  There weren't many roads so these people would cut through woods and cross streams on horseback with their corn to get the most valuable necessity of life, cornmeal for their cornbread.  The original purchase of the land was made in 1876 by William Toliver Davasher from David Dyson.  William T. Davasher was a well known Baptist Minister and a Civil War veteran having fought for the Union.  He was the son of William L. Davasher and Elizabeth Calvert Davasher.  William Toliver Davasher married Minerva Glover in 1857.  She was the daughter of Richard B. Glover and Jane Calvert Glover.  Minerva died at the age of 42 and then William T. Davasher married Jane Calvert Mitchell, first cousin to Minerva.  Elizabeth Calvert and Jane Calvert were daughters of John Calvert and were named in his will to receive portions of his sizable acreage.  William T. and Mary Jane later moved to Tennessee.  Duke Davasher, Homer and Lizzie Davasher Tracy then bought the mill from the remaining heirs.  Duke and Lizzie were children of William Toliver.  They ran the mill until it went out of business.  In later years, a thirettn year old girl fell in to the hopper and was killed.  The hopper is the part of the mill that feeds the corn in to the mill.  The mill never could regain its original business and was closed a few years after the accident.  The mill is no longer standing.  Ethel Davasher, daughter of Duke Davasher still lives close to this area.  Duke's son, the late Henry Davasher, has children in this area.  They arre Freddie, James, Glen, Luther (deceased), Junior, Randy and daughters Carolyn Carter and Judy Richards.  The grandchildren of Homer and Lizzie Tracy are Evelyn MIller, Nadine Tabor, and Wimpy Hudson.  Evelyn, Wimpy and the Davashers still own land in this area.
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APRIL - (Gerald Printing Service - drawn by Jeff Cook - 11th grade)

The large brich building at 7th and East main Streets now occupied by Gerald Printing Service was built in 1926 by Miller Hardware Co.  One of their employees was L. P. Browning.  Miller Hardware operated the business in 1940, selling out to Frank and Leslie Graves.  The Graves Brothers only stayed in business until April 1942, selling the stock and building to Surplus Sales of Nashville.  Washington Overall rented the building to be used as a cutting room for their sewing operation, making overalls and jeans.  Washington Overall constructed a building on Burnley Road, moving their business there shortly before their plants closed due to overseas competition.  The cutting room building on East main was purchased by Larry E. Gerald in 1977 and remodeled to house his rapidly growing commercial job printing operation.  Subsequent additions to the business included the old Christian Church next door and construction of a warehousing area to the rear of the buildings.  After almost 50 years in the printing business, Larry Gerald has sold his entire printing plant to Joe and Sharon Davis of Indianapolis, effective November 1st.  They will be making their home in Scottsville and continuing the operation of the well known printing plant.  Customers come from all over the country to do business with Gerald Printing Service and the work this company is best known for is producing prints from original works of art.
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MAY -  (Hobdy's Florist - drawn by Chad Taylor - 12th grade)

This building is located at 210 East main Street.  It was built about 1890 by J.R. Garrison.  It is now known as Hobdy's Florist, and is owned and operated by Sue Read.  Sue purchased the business from Nym Hobdy in 1972, but kept the name.  In 1963, Nym Hobdy bought the business from sisters Lottie Hurt and Era Atwood, who opened the business in 1857 under the name of Lottie's Florist.  In 1988 Sue purchased the property from T.W. Crow Jr. who inherited it from Allan "Casey" Read.  In 1930 Thomas W. Crow, Sr., and Haskel Guy bought the property from Molly Shive and Mertie Porter.  Theyoperated a funeral home here from 1936 to 1941 under the name of Crow and Guy Funeral Home.  Mollie Shive and Mertie Porter boughty the property from A. Hobdy in 1926.  A. Hobdy and W. A. Read bought it in 1916 from B. S. and Bessie Huntsman.  When Hobdy and Read purchased the house, it was known as the old Drane Homestead. B. S. and Bessie Huntsman bought it form Maggie and G.C. Dalton purchased the home from R.S. Welch  In 1910 R.S. Welch bought the house from Buford Bradburn, and Bradburn bought from J.R. Garrison in 1890.  A part of the house was converted into apartments, and some of the occupants were Peggy and Webb Elmore, Red and Cordie Agee, Mr. and Mrs. Buel Spears, Viola Shields, and Herschel Elmore.  Dr. Callis lived here and operated his medical practice in the early 50s.
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JUNE - (Grist Mill - drawn by Brenda Davis - 10th grade)

This Grist mill was located on Pinch Gut Creek near Highland General Baptist Church in South Eastern Allen County near the Kentucky-Tennessee State Line.  The mill was built on or before 1880.  the first known operator was Jack Law.  About 1920 it was operated by Asa Emmit.  The farmers would bring their sacks of grain to the mill where the operator would grind it for a portion of the grain.
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JULY - (Medical Clinic - drawn by Daniel Hagan - 11th grade)

The medical office of Dr. John M. Hall was built in 1961 by Dr. Owen L. Davis.  Dr. Davis started his medical practice in Scottsville in 1951.  Ten years from that date is when the Davis-Hall Clinic was built at 218 North Court Street.  Dr. Hall started his practice with Dr. Davis in August 1961.  Dr. Hall practiced medicine with Dr. Davis form August of 1961 until June 1962.  Then he left to serve with the United Stated Medical Corp. at Ft. Benning, Georgia.  In 1964 Dr. Hall returned to Scottsville to practice medicine with Dr. Davis for the next 15 years until Dr. Davis retired.  In 1977 Dr. Bob Drury worked at te clinic for 6 months.  He left to return to Missouri.  In August, 1985, Dr. Kevin Keown came to work with Dr. Hall.  He stayed for two years then moved to South Georgia.  Dr. Hall is a graduate of Centre College in Danville, Ky., the University of Louisville Medical School and he interned at the Medical Center in Columbus, Georgia.  He and his wife Dell, who is the first female Mayor of Scottsville, reared their 5 children here, and are the proud grandparents of 15.  Dr. Hall is still practicing family medicine at the Hall Clinic at 218 North Court Street in Scottsville.
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AUGUST -  (Davasher School - drawn by Beth Henson - 12th grade)

In 1887 John Devasher gave the land to the Allen County Board of Education for a school to be built, thus forming a new school district for the people in the northeastern part of Allen County.  This building was made of logs.  In 1926 the same man made a deed to the Board for land located at the junction of Steenbergen and Devasher Roads.  The building pictured above was built at that location.  Boys and girls continued to attend school in the building until 1957 when the one-room schools were consolidated into larger elementary centers. The abandoned school building was moved to an empty field on Devasher Road, where it became the property of Elloid Barton.  When the Allen County Retired Teachers became interested in restoring a one-room school to it former appearance so that it might be an historic addition to Allen County's heritage, Virginia Barton and her daughter, Ann Barton, generously donated the building.  On November 11, 1994, the building was moved to its present location at the north end of Bazzell Middle School where the present Board of Education had granted use of the land.  The outside of the building has been completely repaired with a new roof, windows and doors. After repairs were made to the weather-boarding it glistened with a new coat of white paint.  The next step is the restoration of the interior.  People are contributing money and furnishings in honor of past family members.  Money from sales of the book, School Days in Allen County, is being used for this project.
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SEPTEMBER - (Harper Ford Sales- drawn by B. J. Starks - 11th grade)

This building was erected in 1946 for jack Read and G.E. Newman on property purchased from R.C., Fannie, and Miss Grace Huntsman.  There was a Kaiser-Frazer and a Firestone Dealership here for a short time.  Maxie Ogles and Elmer Neal Conner were the managers.  Willie Mungle operated a garage and electrical shop here.  In 1948 J.W. Simmons got the Pontiac franchise. He moved from across the street into this building bringing the GMC and Allis Chalmers Farm and Equipment business to Earl Stamps and moved the GMC and Allis Chalmers Tractor and Farm equipment back across the street.  Earl Stamps got the Ford franchise after it was terminated with Hobdy, Dye and Read in 1959.  It changed ownership several times in the next few years.  February, 1965 "Bob" Harper acquired the Ford franchise.  The Harper's son, Bill, joined them in 1974.  There has been no structural changes to the building since it was built.  The interior was renovated in 1983 after the Harpers purchased the property from Mr. G.E. Newman.  When the Simmon's opened here in 1948, Fuqua Bus Lines was already operating a route from here to Bowling Green and back once a day.  Then Greyhound started a route to Louisville at 7:15 A.M. and back to Scottsville arriving at 6:30 P.M. Continental Trailways had a route going through here North and South three times a day.  October 31, 1981 Greyhound left from here for its last run to Louisville, KY and on August 25, 1983, Trailways made its last trip.
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OCTOBER - (Thaxton Home - drawn by Jeremy Rolett - 11th  grade)

The John Thaxton house is located on the north side of Highway 98 about  miles from Scottsville near Durham Springs Church.  The house is till standing, but a small shop near the house is gone.  This farm is now owned by Truman Mays.  Family records go back to Z.B. Thaxton, born in '"Virginia in 1766 and listed in the census as a minister, Paul Thaxton, born in Virginia in 1796 listed in the census as a wagon maker.  John W. Thaxton was born in 1846 and listed in the census as maker of shoes, boots, and brooms.  He married Mollie Ray, sister of Dr. W.B. Ray.  They are buried in the Thaxton cemetery along with an infant.  A land deed in 1897 gave the Thaxton land to F.C. Thaxton on condition that an iron fence be erected around the Thaxton and Gross graves.  The fence was later removed.  John Thaxton deeded the cemetery across the road from Durham Springs Church for a public burying ground, with three members of Durham Springs Church to serve as administrators.  Mr. Leon Whitlow says he can barely remember going with his father Dr. E.A. Whitlow to take their shoes to Mr. Thaxton for repair and new half soles, and his mother also bought brooms there.
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NOVEMBER - (Store at Holland - drawn by Justin Parrish - 11th  grade)

The store was built at Holland in the late 1890's by James Siddens and his son Dee Siddens.  It was located on the corner where Kentucky Highways 100 and 99 now converge.  It is interesting to note the fine workmanship of the weatherboarding and the solid shutters on the lower windows.  Dee Siddens and his wife, Hattie Young Siddens lived in the house where the Broughtons later lived.  The upper floor of the store was a millinery shop run by Charles White, nephew of Dee Siddens.  In back of the store in a separate building the Siddens sold wagons, buggies and surreys.  The store was sold to Caleb Barton, and in 1923 Woodard Broughton bought it.  In October, 1924, two weeks after the stillborn birth of the Broughton's second child, a son, the store burned.  Joe Harlan Seay built a house on the site.  Mildred Hudson now lives in the house.
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DECEMBER - (Howell House - drawn by Jo Ann Thrasher - 12th grade)

The Howell house stands overlooking the Long Creek Valley near the Kentucky-Tennessee state line.  The house was built by the Howell family before the Civil War.  It has two log rooms, 20 by 20 feet, with a half attic over each room connected by a dog trot that was later enclosed.  A three room lean-to was added on the back, with porches on the front and back.  The log attic rooms have cut-out gun slots on each side that was used during the Civil War for protection.  James Howell (1797-1880), and Elizabeth (Perdue) Howell are buried on the farm in a family cemetery.  Brad Howell, son of James and Elizabeth Howell, served in the Kentucky Infantry Co. C. in the Civil War. He was in the battle of Shiloh, Perryville, and Murfreesboro, besides a number of small battles and skirmishes.  Brad married Jane Lyles, march 10, 1858.  They raised their family on the farm and sold it to the Douglas family in the 1880s.  The Hanes family purchased the farm in 1950.