1976 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

76-01.jpg (37506 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

JANUARY -  (John Whitney, Sr. home - drawn by John Conner, 10th grade)

In 1794, this Revolutionary War Veteran traveled overland from South Carolina with his wife and 5 children and settled along the lands adjoining Barren River.  This is the home he built, originally of logs, later covered with weather boarding.  The home of Mr. and Mrs. Carlston Pardue is now located on this site in the Walnut Creek area.  Married to a lovely French girl, Anne Merritt (Marie), he was the first Whitney to settle in the state of Kentucky.  His land was a grant signed by the first governor of Kentucky, Isaac Shelby.  John Sr., and one of his sons are buried in the yard of this home which stood until sometime in the 1930's.
76-02.jpg (13806 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

FEBRUARY - (Scottsville Courthouse - 1879 - drawn by Vickie Scruggs, 12th grade)

Erected of brick made on the site, the courthouse was financed by the sale of original town lots.  It was surrounded by a lawn enclosed by an iron fence and served briefly during the Civil War as a fortress and storage for guns and ammunition.  In 1902, after the fire which destroyed the clerk's office (shown at left), the courthouse was razed and a new courthouse erected on the site in 1903.  In 1819, the view is from N. Court St.  Aside from being the center of judicial matters, the building served as temporary place of worship for many churches until they were able to erect their own buildings.  The eagle which was atop the 1819 courthouse was placed atop the 1903 courthouse.
76-03.jpg (37916 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

MARCH - (The Garrison House - drawn by Melody Duke, 12th grade)

This noted landmark came into the Garrison family in 1836.  Eli D. Garrison, noted furniture maker and wood-worker was its remodeler, combining the then existing three structures into one.  Miss Lula Garrison, granddaughter of Eli conducted a private school for many years in the rear portion of the house.  The home remained in the same family for 130 years.  It was sold in 1966 and on the site today is the Mammoth Cave P.C.A. building.  The front part of the original home was divided by a "dog trot" and a stack chimney.  The kitchen was a separate structure to the rear.  The interior wood used in the home was yellow poplar but never had any stain applied.  Stained only by time, it came to resemble walnut.
76-04.jpg (20585 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

APRIL -  (The Spike Mill - drawn by Judy Russell, 11th grade)

Established in the late 1800's by Love, Boyd Lumber Co., the spoke mill soon came under the ownership of James W. Allen, a Canadian.  It manufactured spokes for buggy and wagon wheels and was one of our leading industries.  In 1916 the business was purchased by W. W. Thompson and after her father's death, Ethel Thompson Barlitt continued its operation until the 1940's.  It was located on South Third Street on the site now occupied by the Bryant Lumbar Mill.  Young boys were hired to stack the spokes in the manner shown.  Standing inside the stack, they would catch spokes thrown to them, climbing within the stack as it rose higher.  Water from the public spring was carried to the mill by youngsters using the "yoke" method.
76-05.jpg (32337 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

MAY -  (The Winnie and Fannie Brown Home - drawn by Shane Lyle, 10th grade)

Impossible to establish a date as the deed was destroyed in the 1902 file of the clerk's office, however, photographic evidence shows that the home existed in its remodeled state before 1865.  Our first telephone switchboard was located here, also, a bakery in the back part.  In 1962 the home was sold and razing began.  the property is now the location of the City-County building which was dedicated during the Allen Co. Sesquicentennial in 1965.  The home originally consisted of two rooms and kitchen which became the rear part of the home when the upper and lower front stories were added.  Bread baked in the old kitchen was sold to the stores for 3 cents per loaf which retailed it 5 cents.  Also, in the front corner of the yard facing Main and Cemetery Streets, there was a one room log schoolhouse in which Scott Brown, father of Winnie and Fannie, conducted a private school.
76-06.jpg (30044 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

JUNE - (Carpenter Dent Drug Co. - drawn by Kathy Stafford, 12th grade)

In 1875, two brothers "Tibbis" and T. J. Carpenter established a drugstore business which was in a frame structure where the National Store is now.  In 1881 they built this brick building for their business and the firm is still operating in the same location.  This is the pioneer store in the C.D.S. chain.   In the early days, townspeople called at the first home of the firm for their mail which arrived twice a week.  Fairly early in the firm's history, Emory G. Dent, a pharmacist and son-in-law of "Tibbis" Carpenter joined the firm, thus forming the Carpenter Dent Drug Co.
76-07.jpg (35152 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

JULY - (East Main Street - early 1900's - drawn by Julia Brogli, 8th grade)

This early 1900 scene of East Main Street shows the Welch building which was erected in 1897 and housed the Ed F. Welch Clothing Store, now occupied by Gibson's.  The next store was I.F. Knight's Variety Store.  Below that was Turner & William's Dry Goods.   The livery stable was at one time operated by J. R. Garrison and C. B. Briley.   the last building that can be seen is the old jail built about 1886.  The location of the Welch building was the former location of the first store in Scottsville, the Lockhart Kennedy Store.  The jail featured a quaint portico or veranda at the front entrance.  A board sidewalk connected this corner with the Carpenter Dent corner to keep the dust of the street off the shoes and clothing of the local citizens.
76-08.jpg (30112 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

AUGUST -  (The R. B. Justice House - drawn by Jeff Siddens, 10th grade)

The way it looked when built by Thompson Manion is 1865.  It came into the Justice family in 1910 and during their ownership the rear portion was re-built and the upper front porches were added.  In 1952 the home was purchased by Cal turner, Sr., who extensively remodeled it but retained the 13" thick walls of the front portion of the original home.  It was constructed of brown brick made in the backyard and trimmed with white stone.  Thompson Manion, its builder was a wealthy slave owner and had extensive land holdings along Bays Fork Creek.  The Manion cemetery is located near the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Dugas, Bowling Green Road, indicating that he owned this entire tract extending to and including Baptist Hollow.
76-09.jpg (36344 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

SEPTEMBER - (Scottsville High School 1905 - drawn by Karen Tabor, 8th grade)

Erected in 1905 of red pressed brick with white stone trim, the school offered elementary and high school courses in addition to a preparation course for teachers.  many county students boarded in the city while attending this school.  It was later remodeled into an elementary school and served until 1955 when it was town down for construction of what is now known as the Scottsville Elementary School.  It was largely due to the efforts of Prof. John D., Spears assisted by Prof. W. W. Whalen that the school was built.  Constructed at a cost of $10,000 on land donated by J. E. Dalton, it was a building of which the whole county was proud and was referred to as "our magnificent college".
76-10.jpg (29262 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

OCTOBER - (The Meredith Infirmary - drawn by Tom Yates, 12th grade)

Built about 1901, the Meredith Infirmary was our first permanent hospital.  It was established by Dr. W. E. Meredith and Dr. H. M. Meredith and served until 1914 when it was destroyed by fire.  It was an architectural beauty in red brick with white trim but its purpose was healing the sick and injured.  It was located at the corner of Fourth and Maple Streets where the Dr. John Meredith family now lives.  Drs. W. E. and H. M. Meredith had living quarters on the first floor and the x-ray and operation rooms were also located downstairs with the patients' rooms on the second floor.  The building was destroyed by fire when struck by lightning in a night storm.  It was never rebuilt because of the intervention of World War I when Dr. Hubert joined the Army.  Dr. Will Meredith died prior to the war.
76-11.jpg (35363 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

NOVEMBER - (Henry Clay Hughes Home - drawn by Ann White, 11th grade)

Built about 1900 by Henry Clay Hughes, prominent merchant and farmer of Holland, Ky.  It was originally built as a combination hotel and residence and contained eighteen rooms, four of which were later removed and used to build a house across the road from it.   This home is now owned by Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ed Hudson, Holland, Kentucky.  Mr. Hughes conceived the idea of building a hotel to accommodate "drummers" who called on him as owner of the Holland store.  The combination hotel and residence became a popular place for young people of the community to meet and have parties and song "fests".
76-12.jpg (29654 bytes)

(click on picture to see an enlarged view)

DECEMBER - (Scottsville Methodist Church, South - drawn by Joe Steward, 12th grade)

In 1880 the plot of land upon which was built the Methodist Church, South, was purchased from J. P. Perry.  The church stood slightly east of the sanctuary of the present Main Street Methodist Church.  In 1920 the present church was built and the following year, the old building was dismantled, moved and rebuilt a few miles out on the Bowling Green Road where it serves the New Bethel Methodist congregation.  Bro. Enoch Crow was one of the chief organizers of the Methodist Church, South, and served as the first pastor of the church.  Other early pastors were Bro. M. L. Russell, a Bro. Read and a Bro. Wooldridge.