1985 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (Hunt's Boarding House - drawn by Susan M. Shook - 12th grade)

A familiar landmark in Scottsville for may years was this home which stood on the corner of North Court and west Cherry Streets where the Farmers National bank is now located.  Built in the early 1900's, it was purchased from Rupert Huntsman and wife, Lena, by Mr. and Mrs. G.V. Hunt in 1921.  Prior to this time, Mr. and Mrs. Hunt had been living on and cultivating a farm just off the Franklin road where Lovelace Nursery is now located.  "Aunt Nellie" and "Uncle Vernon" as they are known affectionately, established a boarding house in his home.  According to all reports, Mrs. Hunt was a wonderful cook and their home was called Hunt's Boarding House.  In the days of the oil boom, many of the workers in the oil fields are here and many of the businessmen and women looked forward every day to the good country cooking and the homey atmosphere which Hunt's Boarding House offered them.  Tourists and visitors heeded the sign in the front yard of the house which advertised "good home cooking".  They began serving meals for $.50.  In time the price was raised to $.75 and before they discontinued serving, it had to be raised to $1.00.  They also rented rooms and, after they discontinued serving meals in the early 1940's, they continued this practice.  Mr. Rupert huntsman, whose wife had to go out west for health reasons, continued to live with the Hunts as did his son, Joseph, who is now living in California.  Mr. and Mrs. Hunt, having no children of their own, treated him as their son.  On Nov. 1, 1958, Mr. and Mrs. Hunt sold their house and lot to the Farmer's national Bank with the condition stipulated that they were to have lifetime use of it.  Mr. and Mrs. Hunt continued to live there as long as they were able.  In 1965 the boarding house had been replaced by the structure which now houses the Farmer's National Bank.
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FEBRUARY - (Yates' Log Home - drawn by Angela Gibbs - 12th grade)

Members of the Yates family believe the house was built before 1850 by a Houchens family but this cannot be documented.  Because of the Allen County Court House fire in 1902, the date, 1893 is the earliest record available.  A.C. Oliver and wife, A. F. Oliver, sold the farm to Charles J. Houchens and wife, Cora Jane, on August 2, 1893 for $1000.00.  Mr. Houchens sold the property to C.B. Whitney and wife, Sarah, on Aug. 4, 1905 for $1500.00 and on March 2, 1928, Mr. Whitney conveyed it to O.T. Yates  and Bertha E. Yates for $3000.00  There is no reference to buildings or improvements in the deeds of transfer.  The house was used as the principle farm residence form 1928 until 1946 and used as a tenant house from time to time until about 1965.  The log section of the house was 18 feet wide and 27 feet long and constructed of yellow poplar logs, except for two chestnut logs in one end.  It had a log partition which divided the log pen into two rooms;one is 8.5 feet by 17 feet and the large one is 17 feet square.  Their fireplace was in the end of the large room and there was a narrow, steep stairway into the upstairs area.  The log section contained seven tiers of logs which make a one and a half story structure.  The house had an ell off the back that served as kitchen-dining room.  It was of "double boxed" construction which was a common method used in the 1800's and early 1900's in the area.  The log house was moved to its present location, the intersection of Ky. 252 and Ky. 1533 near the Barren River Dam in the Port Oliver community by O.T. Yates, Jr. in 1972, and has been used as an antique-gift shop since that time.
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MARCH - (The Tom and Curtis Pardue Home - drawn by Thomas Livesay - 12th grade)

The home of Tom and Amanda Dossey Pardue was located on the banks of Puncheon Creek in a settlement called Godfrey, about eight miles from Holland, Kentucky on Hwy 1333.  The farm was purchased by Mr. Pardue from the Ben Downing heirs.  The two log rooms were remodeled into a spacious two-story house with a room added to each side and a front porch in the center.  The old logs were overlaid with weather boarding as most of the early Allen County homes are.   This is where their 5 children grew into adulthood.  They were: Martin Pardue, Will F. Pardue (who served as county Judge of Allen County for 8 years), Beverly Pardue (who was the father of Ray, Otis and Ernest Pardue), Johnnie Pardue and Dolly Pardue Bray.   Their father, Tom Pardue, was a respected farmer and storekeeper in the Godfrey community.  Mr. and Mrs. Pardue lived in this house until Mrs. Pardue's death in September of 1932.  Mr. Pardue then made his home with his son, Beverly, until his death only two months later, November, 1932.  In 1933, Curtis Pardue, grandson of Tom and Amanda Pardue, and his wife, Lillie, purchased the farm.  He and his wife lived in this home until 1954 at which time they tore down the old house to make room for a new brick home which stands on this site today.
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APRIL - (Petroleum High School - drawn by Lee Holland - 9th grade)

The first year for Petroleum High School began in August,1935. It grew out of a need to further the education of the students living in the western and southern parts of Allen County.  During the depression years, many could not afford the tuition charged by Scottsville High School nor could they furnish their own transportation.  Under the leadership of Dr. A.O. Miller, who lived in the community, and I.N. Marsh, Roy P. Hinton, W.B. Ogles (the latter two being merchants) and others, secured a parcel of land with an old dwelling and barn on it form the Anthony heirs.  The property adjoined the railroad property there.   School began in the partially renovated dwelling while paper work on the new building was being finalized.  Jasper Cooper, a building contractor was hired to supervise the WPA labor.  In 1936 the new building consisting of 6 rooms was ready for occupancy.  Permanent basketball goals were erected and the court black-topped.   In 19442, the petroleum High School along with Mt. Zion High School, joined the already merged schools 91941) of Meador and Mt. Victory to complete the consolidation of Allen County High School.  The building which formerly housed the school is now being used as a shirt factory.
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MAY -  (First United Methodist Church - drawn by Chris Burris - 12th grade)

The First United Methodist Church of Scottsville is the result of the conference uniting the Methodist Church, South and Methodist Episcopal Church in 1939, forming the Methodist Church, then the uniting of the Methodist Church and the United Brethren in 1968, becoming the First United Methodist Church.  In the Spring of 1905 the Methodist Episcopal church circuit organized the First Methodist Church of Scottsville.  A building was erected on South Third Street where the congregation worshipped for several years.  The church and lot were later sold and the proceeds applied to the grounds where a new church was built on the corner of Second and Maple.   This site is now occupied by the Church of Christ.  In the year 1880 a plot of ground was purchased on East Main Street from J.P. Perry.  A small frame building was erected in that same year and the Methodist Church, South became a visible part of Scottsville.  In 1920, under the leadership of Rev. H.H. Jones, a new imposing edifice was constructed beside the white frame church.   The following year workmen dismantled the aging structure and rebuilt the old Methodist church, South on the Bowling Green Road where it is still used by a congregation known as New Bethel Methodist Church.  in 11960 an educational annex was added to the building on East Main Street, creating the church of the present.
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JUNE - (W. T. Willoughby Home - drawn by Kenny Hunt - 12th grade)

W. T. (Tommy) and Elena Tabor Willoughby purchased their farm from Jim Neal in July 1890.  They moved into the house located four miles north of Scottsville on the Halifax Road on Christmas Eve.   The original house contained two large rooms with a breezeway connecting a log cellar-house to the main house.  The breezeway was often used for summer dining.   As the family grew, so did the house.  Rooms and porches were added so that there were eight rooms plus a pantry, front hall, screened porches on two sides and a column porch across the front.  The four upstairs bedrooms were called the "boys upstairs" and the "girls upstairs" with separate stairways for each.  The Willoughbys reared twelve children to adulthood, namely: Ona, Lattice, Lola, Estes, Clara, Mautie, Everett, Winnie, Jewell, Novice, Margaret Edna and Lewell.   Following in their father's footsteps, the girls all prepared for teaching.   After the parents' death so much family spirit remained that three of the children continued living at the homeplace until their death.  The farm still remains in the family, being presently owned by Mautie and Ernest Reynolds.
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JULY - (Walker's Chapel Methodist Church - drawn by Teresa Harris - 11th grade)

The William Walker family moved to an area known as the "Big Woods" in 1848 and in 1850 a log church was built bearing the name Walker's Chapel. William Walker deeded 150 acres of his land to Anderson Graves for making boards for the roof. Rough benches with no backs were hewed out of logs. The floor was made of logs split and laid side by side. As this was in the days of slavery, the slaves helped hew the logs and bring them to the building site. William Walker died March 29,1879. Their graves are inside the rock wall at Walker's Chapel Church. In 1904 the congregation built a new church, a tall weather-board church building, which served the people for 46 years. The present brick church was built in 1949 on this site, with the addition of Sunday School rooms in 1966.
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AUGUST -  (The Dodson -Smith Home - drawn by Julia Powell - 11th grade)

Records reveal that three families from South Carolina came into this area in the early 1800's; the Hams who settled on Drakes Creek, the Dodsons who built in the Trammel Creek area and the Smith family on Bays Fork Creek. Charles Dodson, son of Dr. Dillingham Dodson (the first Allen County graduate from Harvard University) and grandson of Charles Dodson, a Revolutionary War soldier, married Osthinia Ham, daughter of William and Jenetta Williams Ham, and built this house of logs in October of 1829. It consisted of two stories with a chimney located on each end and was located near Butlersville on Trammel Creek. The porch was added about 1850 by the son of Charles Dodson, Tillman, who was only seven years old when his father died. Tillman Dodson married Helen Harmon and they became the parents of a daughter, Melissa Dodson who married Thomas W. Smith. They had 3 sons, Ewing, Marshall and Ernest, all of whom were born in this house. Ewing Smith married Helen Gillmore; Marshall Smith married Lillian William; and Ernest Smith married Nellie Johnson. Ewing and Helen Smith had one child, James Williams, who now lives in Lexington, Ky. He has one daughter, Diane, who lives in Gulfport, Miss. Marshall and Ernest Smith had no children. In later years the house was enlarged and remodeled; the logs were covered with weatherboarding. Nellie Smith, widow of Ernest Smith, sold the farm to Jerry Ayers in August, 1971. It had remained in the Dodson-Smith, sold the farm to Jerry Ayers in Aug. 1971. It had remained in the Dodson-Smith families for a period of 142 years. It is now owned by Clovis T. Moore.
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SEPTEMBER - (Mt. Victory High School - drawn by Stephen Duke - 12th grade)

Mt. Victory School, located at Trammel in West Allen County, was founded in 1919. Through the persistent efforts of Dr. A.J. Dixon, W.W. Bryant, E.L. Richards and others, the Beech Grove and White Oak Schools were combined and became Mt. Victory. W.W. Bryant donated the land for the school building and grounds. The school's first teachers were Mary Ellen Richards, Julia Gilliam Wheat and Jimmy "Dock" Holland. Although established as a graded school, Mt. Victory became a junior high school in 1922. Professor Albert Henry Hill was the first high school teacher. In 1935, it became a four year high school and graduated its first class in 1936. In 1941 Mt. Victory High School, along with others, was consolidated into what became known as Allen County High School located on West Cherry Street in Scottsville. Mt. Victory grade school remained at Trammel until the 1950's, when it, too, became a victim of consolidation. The building was soon vandalized. It was later sold, dismantled and built into a home in that community. The home burned a short time later. Although the building may not have been the most costly or beautiful, the alumni of Mt. Victory share an unequalled enthusiasm for their Alma Mater and hold a reunion every year.
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OCTOBER - (The Osborne Homeplace - drawn by Wayne Calvert - 12th  grade)

Ruben Bolivar Osborne II owned a 300 acre farm in Warren County, Ky. near Rocky Springs Church where his father had settled at the time Daniel Boone came into Kentucky. This farm was all upland and he longed to own a farm with good bottom land. He found just such a tract of 300 acres in Allen Co., Ky. After locating this farm he made a proposition to his four sons, William, Ewing, Ruben III and Andrew Douglas, who were still at home. He told them that if they would come with him to Allen Co. and stay with him until the farm was paid for, he would purchase the farm and would see that each one had a home. I 1891 he sold his farm in Warren Co. and purchased the 300 acres on Barren River in Allen County from Lovel Morehead. In 1895 William and Ewing bought another farm known as the Leath farm. This land adjoined the original farm. In 1898 Ruben Bolivar Osborne II and his sons had the farm paid for, so they then bought out the other heirs, George, Newman, Elizabeth, Ann, Meriam, and sis. Osborne who had remained in Warren County. He then divided the 300 acres into three equal parts and gave each of the three married sons, William, Ewing, and Ruben III, the land which he had promised. Douglas, who was not married and still at home, had no land. At that time they purchased a farm just across Barren River in Warren County, built Douglas a house and deeded the farm to him. Early records show that the home on the 300 acre tract was built by the Jewell family in the 1860's and at that time this part of Allen Co. was known as the "Jewell Bend." This is the house the Ruben Bolivar Osborne II family moved into when they came to Allen County. When the farm was divided, William Dunn Osborne was given the 100 acre tract with the homestead on it. He later moved into the house. The home, located in the Meador community off Hwy 101 on the Osborne Bend Road, has been remodeled four times and today is a modern country home, but throughout the years has retained the original design. Stephen Eual Holder, who is a great-great-grandson of Ruben Bolivar Osborne II, now owns the farm and lives in the house.
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NOVEMBER - (The Judge Pardue-Hannah Ryan Home - drawn by Christopher Calvert- 12th  grade)

Hannah Ryan's home located at 207 North Court street dates back before the Civil War as shown in the following excerpt from the pen sketch of Miss Sallie Edmonds as she described Scottsville as it was before the Civil War: "North of Scottsville you find a real historic place. Here lived on e Mr. Griggs. In the year of 1833 we had a meteoric shower which aroused the entire population. Thinking the Judgement Day was being ushered in and knowing that they had failed to prepare for it, they sought Mr. Griggs to pray for them. The home was later purchased by T. L. Atwood. In Nov., 1881, O.S. Bryant purchased the home, enlarged and so completely changes the home that it has little resemblance to its former self." County Judge W.F. Pardue purchased the home on Aug. 25, 1926. In August, 1949 Mrs. Annie Crow Ayers and Edith Crow (sisters of T.W. Crow, Sr.) bought the house from Judge Pardue. It is now the home of Hannah Crow Ryan, grandniece of the sisters.
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DECEMBER - (Mt. Zion Baptist Church - drawn by Carrie Wright - 11th grade)

Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church is located about one mile form Holland, Ky. on Hwy 99. H.s. Evans from Indian Creek Church, H.W. Jent from Spring Creek, and J.P. Durham from Hopewell Church constituted Mt. Zion Church at the home of Asa Jent on December 8, 1888, with 18 members. J.P. Durham was the first pastor. The Church met in a small, white frame building until the present building was constructed in 1946, most of the work being done by the members using timber donated by members of the Church. The Church has experienced many great revivals, one being in 1938, when the pastor F. W. Lambert baptized forty converts. Mr. Zion has been a Light House in the community for nearly a century.