1986 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (The Lyric Theater - drawn by Tiffany Goad - 10th grade)

The Lyric Theater was located on the south side of East Main Street in the Welch building between the Standard Store on the corner and L.O. Meador's jewelry store.  It was owned by Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Caldwell and managed by their son, Charles.  After being extensively damaged by fire in or about 1943, the Lyric was remodeled into one of the most beautiful in this area.  The exterior was of black and ivory glass tiles with chrome trim.  The marquee was very impressive especially in the evening, with its vari-colored neon lights.  It had a seating capacity of 600 and movie-goers of this area were privileged to view the best of the moved in luxurious surroundings.  It was the first, and for many years, the only air conditioned buildings in town.  The theater feathered three different movies a week plus cartoons and various short subjects.  Admission was 10 cents for children under twelve and 20 cents for adults.  Popcorn was sold for 5 and 10 cents.  The Caldwells operated the theater until the early 1950's when the advent of home television began to lower attendance.  They sold the business to Andy Anderson who operated a chain of theaters.  L.E. Crewell purchased the business from him and was the owner at the time it was hit by another disastrous fire.  On November 19, 1957, at two o'clock in the afternoon, a gas furnace exploded causing flames to quickly engulf the building.   The theater was completely destroyed but fire walls and the efforts of the local volunteer fire department aided by a crew from the Bowling Green fire department, saved the buildings on either side.  Although the building was eventually rebuilt, another theater was not considered a profitable venture so Scottsville was without one for several years.
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FEBRUARY - (The John Railey Home - drawn by Carrie Wright - 12th grade)

This is the house where John William Railey and his wife Locca (Lockey) Tabitha Agee Railey lived on Bay's Fork Creek near the Warren-Allen County line.  They were married on December 30, 1825 and is 1828 bought property from Isaac Railey, believed to have been john's father.  It is not known which one built the house.  It is known that Isaac Railey paid taxes in Allen County in 1816.   Since he left the county in 1828, it is quite possible that John bought the house from him and added to it.   It is evident that the house was built at different intervals from the appearance of the windows and the difference in building materials.   The Raileys and Agees came to Allen County from Bedford County, Virginia. A reference to John Railey says, "he was to supervise the building of a road from Drake's Creek on Warren  County to Halifax in Allen County making a ford on Bay's Fork Creek on his property."  This ford was known as the Railey ford until recently when some people began calling it the Sledge ford.  There is now a bridge just above the ford.  Another reference to John Railey found in Louise Horton's, "In The Hills of the Pennyroyal," page 61 said, "The same General Assembly approved an act to charter the Bowling Green and Scottsville Turnpike Road Company with John Railey (and others) as directors."  These men were to construct a turnpike road from Bowling Green to a bridge over Drake's Creek at Thomas' old ferry, thence, the most direct and practicable route to or near Railey's Ford of Bay's Fork Creek in Allen County, thence to Scottsville.  At the present time, (1985) there is a large pecan tree near Bay's Fork Creek on the farm of Marion Willoughby.  It is thought that this tree, which still bears a few pecans, was brought from Virginia and set out by the Raileys when they came to Kentucky.  There was also a pecan tree growing near the old homesite, now the home of Jessie E. Willoughby, however the tree was struck by lightning about a year ago and had to be cut.  John and Locca Railey are buried, with several of their children in the Agee family cemetery in Allen County.  many of their descendants still live in Allen and Warren County.
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MARCH - (New Middle Fork Missionary Baptist Church - drawn by Scotty Clark - 12th grade)

Early minute books are missing so much information is lost, however, there is a gape brought forward to each minute book which states that the church was organized in the year 1866 on December 29th.  Bro. W.D. Miller was the first pastor and W.L. McElroy was the first clerk.  Only two deacons' names have been preserved.  There were: William Dodson and W.L. Ham.  The land on which the log church was built was donated by a Dodson family but the record does not tell which Dodson family.  Some of the early members were: W.H. Dodson, Sarah Dodson, Sam Dodson, W.L. Ham, Mary Ham, Lewis Dodson, Charles S. Dodson and Jane Dodson.  Mordeciah ham was known to have been one of the early pastors of the church.  Later ministers serving as pastors were Joe Meador and his son, Earl Meador, Leonard Garmon, Durward Garmon, and their father, Carline Spears, and Claude McCleary.  Gerald Britt is presently serving as pastor of the church.  The congregation still uses the original building which has been remodeled and added to from time to time. New pews were purchased in 1973.  The building has been weatherboarded and now is covered with aluminum siding.
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APRIL - (Mt. Aerial Funeral Home - drawn by Lee Holland - 10th grade)

This house was built by Bud House in 1899 to be used as a combined residence and funeral home. A short distance away a small house was built in which caskets were made.  The small house is not standing now but the one pictured above is still standing on the farm of John Pitchford in the Mt. Aerial community of Allen County.  by 1902, the funeral home had ceased to operate and the building was sol to Mich Jackson and used as a schoolhouse.  As such, it served the youth of the community until 1908 when the Shiloh school was built.  After it ceased to be used as a school, Wallace Deberry purchased the house for a dwelling - thus this house has served the community in many ways.
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MAY -  (Allen County High School, 1941-1970 - drawn by Mike Lyle - 12th grade)

The first meeting on record of the Allen County Board of Education for the purpose of building Allen County High School was held on March 9, 1940.  The purpose of this meeting was to purchase the property on which Allen county high was to be built. The board approved the purchase of 11.42 acres from dr. L.W. Johnson for the amount of $5,000.00.  Land for the school was located on West Cherry Street in Scottsville.  On May 11, 1940 a meeting was held for the purpose of approving the bonds for the construction of the school.  The bond issue was $50,000 at 3.5%.   The first school year was 1941-42.  This year only Mt. Victory and Meador High School students came to Allen County High.  The following school year, 1942-43 Mt. Zion and Petroleum students came.  The first year enrollment was 129 students and 32 graduated.  The first building was destroyed by fire on May 10, 1943.  the building was rebuilt exactly as it was originally - all joined in to help as this was war time and both labor and materials were scarce.  Eventually, as the population of the county grew, this building became too crowded and it became more and more evident that other arrangements would have to be made.  In 190, a new high school building was completed.  The former Allen County High School became the Middle School for grades 7 and 8.
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JUNE - (The Guy Celsor Home - drawn by Tammie Cooper - 11th grade)

This house was built in 1905 by Guy and Lucy Barton Celsor, just 2 miles off Hwy 1333 near the Red Hill Community about 15 miles from Scottsville.  It is located on the Jimmie and Sarah Barton farm, where their daughter, Lucy, was born in 1881.  Lucy Barton and Guy Celsor married in 1903 and built this house on the same farm where Lucy was reared.  The farm contains about 540 acres.  The two story home originally had a double porch but was remodeled to the present structure around 1927-28. Lucy and Guy Celsor had two children who were born and reared in this home.  Sarah Celsor Pardue and Jimmie Barton Celsor.  Like so many homes built at that time, the house contains two separate stairways, one for the girls and one for the boys.  The home is still in the Celsor family, being presently owned by the son, Jimmy Barton Celsor.
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JULY - (The Allen County Livestock Auction Commission Company - drawn by Sara Morgan - 10th grade)

Thee Allen County Livestock Auction Commission Company was built during the great depression of 1930 on the farm of col. C.M. Carter located on the Gallatin Road.  It was built by Col. Carter, whose sons started their careers at this stockyard.  Weekly livestock auctions were held each Thursday; horses and mules were sold on Fridays.  Col. Carter traveled to Ft. Worth, Texas and St. Louis, Missouri to buy Hereford cattle, horses and mules to sell here.  the fee for selling pigs and goats was 5 cents per head; cattle were sold at $.25 per head and a fee of $1.00 each was charged for selling horses and mules.  Each day the sales ranged from 300 to 600 head sold.  To the left of the stockyard was a small lunchstand (not shown) which was at first operated by Mr. and Mrs. Willie Button.   Later, it was operated by the Carter children, Helen, Jake and Jonell.  This stockyard closed in 1942 during World War II when with the shortage of manpower, help was impossible to get.  The residence of the J.C. Carter family is located on the Carter farm in White Plains today.
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AUGUST -  (Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church - drawn by Pattie Vernon - 10th grade)

Following a revival at Old Buck Creek church in 1815, through the efforts of a Mrs. Mary Martin and a Mrs. (Sarah) McReynolds, the Mt. Pleasant Methodist Society was organized.  These ladies opened their homes for preaching services and prayer meetings were held in various homes until at an early date, Mrs. Martin donated a plot of land and a log church was built.  It also served as a school.  Some years later Malcom B. Crowe gave more land to be used by the Society.  Due to conflict between the States in the 1860's the Society was divided into two organizations but continued to use the same building for worship.   Some of their meetings were held jointly but each organization had its minister and alternated the Sunday Worship services.  About 1880 the organizations jointly erected a frame building (shown here) to replace the log one.  This frame building was remodeled from time to time and both organizations continues to worship in it until 1939 when they united.  In 1955 Mr. Joe Crowe donated a parcel of land which aided in the locating of the present brick building which was dedicated on may 31, 1959.  One of the most attractive churches in the county, it stands 4 miles south-west of Scottsville.
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SEPTEMBER - (The Moore-Motley Home - drawn by Georgana Browning - 12th grade)

This house stands on a 146 acre tract located in Erwin's Bend of the Barren River.  Although it is now in a badly deteriorated condition, it has been "home" to many families.  The house may have originally consisted of the left front room which is of logs, with a kitchen behind it separated by a breezeway or dog trot.  The earliest owner we could find on record was James Willis Moore of Bowling Green.  In 1901, his widow, Elizabeth, and his other heirs sold this property to John W. Starks.  Other owners have been George Mitchell and wife, Sallie, Robert H. Mitchell, W.T. Gardner and wife, W.B. Tabor and wife, Sallie and Fletcher Johnson.  In 1927 the land sold by the Master Commissioner of the Allen County Court, G.W. Weaver, and The Federal land Bank of Louisville was the purchaser.  Virgil Motley and wife purchased the land from the Federal land Bank and moved their family into the home about 1930.  They lived there until about 1943 when Mr. and Mrs. Motley moved to Indiana and sold the land to Henry Rush and J.H. Collins who were primarily interested in the timber.  On November 2, 1944 the land was sold to W.W. and L.H. Arterburn.  L.H. Arterburn is the present owner.
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OCTOBER - (Durham Springs Store - drawn by Melissa Toungett - 10th  grade)

This store, thought to have built by Frank Graham in 1895, is located on Hwy 98 near Durham Springs.  Mr. Graham had no children but reared his nephew, Wilson Graham who was orphaned when quite young.   In 1899 Wilson Graham married Birdie Jackson and the young couple moved into the living quarters in the rear of the store.  They ran the business for several years.   In 1902, Frank Graham deeded them the store and a tract of land on the eastern side of Walnut Creek consisting of about 50 acres.  The last person to run the store was Hubert Jones in 1926.  Wilson Graham later became a rural mail carrier and the family moved to Scottsville, renting their home to others.  The store building was also rented to a succession of families in need of shelter.  In 1967 it was used as a neighborhood church.  The house built by Wilson Graham was destroyed by fire started by lightning about thirty years ago.  In 1968 Charles and Irene Motley of Louisville, bought the Graham land including the old store.  They built their home on the site of the Graham home.  The old store has been repaired and is now used for storage.   Among Mrs. Motley's prized possessions is the bell used on the front door of the store to announce the arrival and departure of customers.
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NOVEMBER - (The Cushenberry Homeplace - drawn by Cynthia Pearson - 12th  grade)

The Cushenberry homeplace was constructed in 1879, replacing a log home that was destroyed by fire.  This home is located 2 miles from Scottsville on the Old Glasgow Road originally known as the Jackson highway.  The home was built with 6 rooms, two hallways and a pantry. The original roof was of red oak boards later replaced with metal roofing.  Lucinda Read Cushenberry, the widow of John P. Cushenberry, resided in the home until her death on February 9, 11922.  The family of the late john William Cushenberry(Grandson) now reside on portions of the original farmland.  The home place itself remained in the Cushenbery family until 1985 when purchased by Cal Turner, Sr.
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DECEMBER - (Gilead School - drawn by Kris Medley - 12th grade)

The old log school was first located on what is now Spencer Road in the Cedar Cross community of Allen County.   It is believed that the first log school was built in the mid 1850's on land originally included in the James Jones Foster land grant (later known as the Satterfield farm).  In 1890 the school was moved and rebuilt of poplar logs on land given by J.W. and Francis Foster. This site is located just behind where the Cedar Cross Missionary Baptist Church is now located.  In 1914 or 1915, the second log school was torn down and the logs sold to Mr. John Jameson.   He saved the logs and stored the lumber and when the church building was constructed, Mr. Jameson donated this lumber for window and door facings which are still in use.  Records show that at one time, approximately 150 students attended Gilead School and an additional room was added and a second teacher hired. Some of the early teachers were: Drew Slate, Archie Grubbs and Ernest Stovall.  Evelyn c. Willoughby was teacher when the school was consolidated with the Allen County Elementary School in Scottsville.  The building was sold to Leon Stafford who moved it to Spencer Road and converted it into a dwelling.  It now stands less than a mile from its original site.  The land was sold to Mr. Latman Duncan who later gave it to his grandson William Rex Hunt.