1987 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (The Troutt-Fowler Home - drawn by Stephenie Britt - 11th grade)

This home is the present day Goad Funeral Home located at 215 West main Street.  Although many court records were destroyed by the 1902 fire, among the surviving records is a deed from John W.   Love & Co., conveying this property to Sophia E. Spillman in February, 1894.   In May, 1906, Sophia Spillman and husband, A.G. Spillman of Lexington, Ky., transferred this property to Charles Trout.  There is no record available as to the date, but the Trouts did extensive enlargement and remodeling of the home while they occupied it.  They made it very modern for its time, with a central water system, bathroom and carbide lights which were later changed to electric.  However, the pride of Mr. Trout was the woodwork in the house which was all mill turned, quarter sawed oak and installed with brass screws.  It is still in evidence in the Goad Funeral Home.   After the death of Mr. Trout, Mrs. Trout conveyed the property to Wirt C. and Dorothy Fowler in Sept. 1956.  During the 17 years the Fowlers occupied the house, they completely renovated it, modernizing the kitchen, adding bathrooms upstairs and other changes.  The Fowlers and their three children, Bill, Janet, and Nancy and their many friends have fond memories of this lovely old home.  In Oct. of 1973, the Fowlers conveyed this property to Ira and Sue Meador and once again, the house was extensively renovated to fit the owners' needs.  Sue Meador operated her beauty shop at this location for the years they lived here.  They conveyed this property to Roger and Dianne Goad in Jan., 1982.  Although the present owners completely changed the outside appearance of the structure by the additions to accommodate their business, they have retained much of the decor and originality of the stately old home.
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FEBRUARY - (Rough and Ready Schoolhouse - drawn by Christine Cone - 12th grade)

A record found in Perrin's History of Kentucky supports the belief that this school had its beginning in the early 1800's.  It was probably about 1820 when a group of men interested in providing their children with an education, worked together to build a log schoolhouse.  The story has been passed down through the descendants of these men that, when the building was completed, one of them remarked, "Well, men, it's rough, but it's ready, so let's name it Rough and Ready."  This school with the unusual name was located about four miles northwest of the Bowling Green Road.  It was built on land believed to have been a part of a 200 acre land grant received from the state of Kentucky b George Wilson on March, 3, 1800.  During the more than 100 years of the school's existence, there were three buildings.  Around 1867 the log structure was replaced by the building shown in the picture.  Robert B. Williams taught the first school in this building and some forty years later, his niece, Ruth Williams (McReynolds) taught the last one.  Other teachers who taught in the second structure were B.W. Bradburn, N.B. Towe, Betty Patton and Samp McReynolds.  In 1909 school opened in a new white weatherboarded building which served for nearly forty more years.  There were a few years around 1930 when the enrollment in the warm months would reach 75 or more.   Then a part-time teacher would be hired to help until the cold winter months came and the enrollment dropped.  By 1946 enrollment had dropped to 17 students so the following year Rough and Ready was consolidated with Halfway.  In November, 1947, the building and grounds were sold to G.W. Pruitt who sold to Sam Mann in May, 1948.  He converted the school building into a dwelling house and in 1953 sold it to Lola Jones, who conveyed it to W.E. and Blanche cooper in 1965, however, before they could move in, the house burned and they built a house in the same location where they live at the present time.   
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MARCH - (The Charlie Towe Home - drawn by Daniel Fisher - 9th grade)

This house is located in West Allen County on Middle Fork Creek in the Mount Aerial Community.  The original house was constructed about 1860 and consisted of 5 rooms, 4 fireplaces, a meal room used for storing meal and flour; a porch with a bedroom leading off it where the boys slept.   A cellar was under the kitchen.  It is not known who built the house.   Jonathan Davis sold it to John Elijah Calvert in the early 1900s.  The Calverts' added the second story about 1910.  Charlie and Lucille Towe bought the house and farm in 1935.  The property is still owned by Mrs. Towe.  There is a cemetery behind the house which has tombstones dating back to the year 1800.  These tombstones bear the names of the McElroy family.
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APRIL - (Scottsville Negro Missionary Baptist Church - drawn by David Graves - 12th grade)

the Negro Missionary Baptist Church in Scottsville had its beginning in the middle 1800's when a wealthy landowner, Thompson Manion, freed his slaves and gave them a plot of land for the construction of a house of worship.  Manion was the builder of the original house which was later remodeled and enlarged by Mr. and Mrs. Cal Turner, Sr., and the land which he gave for the site of the church was located in what came to be called "Baptist Hollow."  The first church building was a boxed building with a foundation of logs.  It is reasonable to assume that the church was the reason for the location to be called "Baptist Hollow."  Rev. Jimmie Lewis was the first pastor of the church with Berry Manion, Ausborn Starks, Elzie Dodd and Steve William serving as the first deacons.  The church continued in that location until about 1914 when the present building of North Fourth Street was built - a white weatherboard building with concrete foundation.  Other early pastors of the church included: Y.W. Starks, W.W. Wheeler, J.B. Bratton, W.B. Wood and W.C. Allen.  In 1949 the church celebrated its 98th year of progress.  A souvenir booklet of that event gives the name of Rev. G.H. Murrell as pastor at that time.  Other leaders were Hallie Fishback Smith, Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Smith, Filmore Hughes and Henry Hughes, Drucilla Stovall, Arvalla Stovall, Garnett Heater, Marvin Ponds, John Soules, Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Thomas, Mr. Lois Ponds, Mrs. Livia Pipkins, Mrs. Lorene Glenn, Miss Mattie Carpenter.  More recent pastors and workers include: Rev. J.E. Butts, Rev. C.P. Bridges, Rev. W.K. Richardson, L.C. Starks, Dora Isabelle and Mrs. Nintha Ponds.  Services are conducted every Sunday morning under the direction of the present pastor, Rev. A.L. Burnett.
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MAY -  (The Henry Lones Home - drawn by Sandy Brown - 11th grade)

Henry Lones came to Allen County, Ky. in 1862 from Knox County, Tennessee.  Soon after his arrival in Allen County, he married Jimmie Johnson.  In 1864, he purchased what was at that time a four room log house situated on eighty acres of land located in southeastern Allen county in the Red Hill Community.  The second floor was added to the house in 1910.   Their 6 children were born in this home, four surviving to adulthood: John, Joe, Oliver and Willie.  The home that Henry Lones established remained in the Lones family for over 12 years.  Willie Lones, a son of Henry, reveived title to the house in 1946 and it remained in his family until September, 1985 when it was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. James Hughes.
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JUNE - (Paris Produce Company - drawn by Lonnie Douglas - 10th grade)

This business began as Paris and West Produce, a partnership formed by Mr. Oscar Paris and Mr. Jody West.   Its first home was a metal building on East Main Street.  Later, Mr. Paris obtained a lease form Mr. Paul Welch on a lot located on East Maple Street and erected a building which is still standing.  It became a family owned business when Mr. West, who wished to return to Claire, Ky., sold his interest to Mr. Paris.  Mr. Paris was first joined by his son, Halqua and after Elzie, another son, graduated from high school, he joined the small business venture.  Wayne, being the youngest son became associated with the business in its later years.  Three trucks went to all the stores and many farms in the county buying chickens and eggs.  The live chickens were kept in a room equipped with roosting poles in the produce house until a box car load could be accumulated for shipment to New York or Chicago.  They were fed three times a day while awaiting shipment and were also fed while enroute to their destination.  Late, Mr. Kay Pruitt owned trucks which transported the poultry.  Eventually the poultry and egg business became commercialized which put an end to the demand for "farm grown" chickens and eggs.  Paris Produce continued in their other services which consisted of buying wool, ginseng, mayapple root, goat hair, hides, walnuts - in fact, almost anything the farmer had to sell.  They sold feed, seed, insecticides, fertilizers, sprayers and farm implements.  They purchased a walnut huller and bought walnuts from the farmer, hulled them and hauled them to a market in Nashville.  In 1966, they hulled and hauled over 600,000 pounds of walnuts to Nashville.  Elzie left the business in 1966 because of poor health.  Sometime latter, Mr. Paris retired, leaving Halqua and Wayne to manage the business.  Upon their retirement in 1971, the business ceased and the building which had housed it was sold to Larry and Pearl Graves who own the G. & W. Furniture Company and use the building for a thrift store.
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JULY - (The Fletcher Napier Home - drawn by Celicia Madison - 10th grade)

Present appearance notwithstanding, the original part of this home, the front room, is well over one hundred years old and is built of logs.  The house located in the Mount Union Community was owned by Fletcher Napier and was built by his broth-in-law, Millard Hanes.  Fletcher Francis Napier was the father of eight children: Emma (N.) Law, Learner Napier, Ova (N.) Arterburn and Velva (N.) Blankenship.  Learner Napier who was born and reared in this home helped set out the maple trees which are still standing.  Learner died in 1975 at the age of 86 and his wife, Lillian and daughter, Laverne still live in the home.   Learner's son, Weldon lives near and helps take care of the farm.  The farm consists of 212 acres and is located on both sides of the Kentucky-Tennessee border.   Since the barns are located in Tennessee, the Napiers had a family joke concerning having to go the state of Tennessee in order to gather the eggs.
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AUGUST -  (Scottsville High School - drawn by Kristy Graves - 12th grade)

Construction of the Scottsville High School building began in 1925 and was completed in March, 1926 in time to graduate a class of 71 students.  Located on the corner of North Third and Poplar Streets, the brick building with white masonry trim was built at a cost of $45,000 including the land.  At that time it contained 10 class rooms, two offices, and a study hall which doubled as an auditorium and a banquet hall.  A complete home economics department was maintained as well as a biology and science laboratory. Agriculture and commercial courses were included in its schedule; music and physical education were later additions.  Those who were serving on the Board of Education in the year 1925 were K.B. Garrison, T.W. Crow, Sr., Lee Williams, Dr. Lattie Graves, Dr. H.M. Meredith, Frank Goad, Sr., and Prof. N. D. Bryant, Superintendent of the Scottsville Schools.  Prof. Bryant is credited wit spearheading the drive for a new high school building.  In 1960 a new brick gym replaced the old wooden one at the rear of the building and in1970 a circular shaped annex was built on to the south sing.  It included a large library and additional classrooms.  In 1973 the city and county school boards worked out a merger of the two school systems and in the fall of 1974 the city high school students were transferred to the county high school building completed in 1970 and located on the Bowling Green Road.  The building which was the Scottsville High School for almost 50 years is now used as a United States Reserve Center.
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SEPTEMBER - (Tom Pardue's Store - drawn by Tiffany Goad - 11th grade)

This store was located in a settlement called Godfrey about 8 miles from Holland, Ky. Johnnie Pardue, father of Curtis, Neal and Stella Pardue Spears, owned it until his death in1921.  During his ownership, the post office for Godfrey was located within the store and Johnnie Pardue was the postmaster.  After his death in 1921, Tom Pardue became the owner and operated the store until the early 1930's.  The store was quite large for country general stores of its time and carried dry goods, farm and home supplies as wellas groceries which the farms could not supply.  Farm families brought their chickens and eggs to the store and sold or traded them for merchandise.  The store also seved as a meeting place for residents of the Godfrey communty - a place where they could gather, particularly when weather prevented field work, and exchange news.  No doubt, many checker games were played out within its wall.  Tom Pardue died in 1932 and the building was bought by a resident of Portland, Tennessee who moved it to that area.   Tom Pardue was married to Amanda Dossey.  They were the parents of 5 children: Martin, Will F. Beverly (father of Ray, Ottis and Ernest) J. Willard and Dolly Pardue Bray.
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OCTOBER - (The Claude K. Watts Home - drawn by Tammi Harper- 12th  grade)

this house and farm is located six miles from Scottsville in the Settle community on highway 234 and junction # 1533; Little Difficult Creek and Barren River flow by the 267 acre farm.  The house was built in 1879 for Matt L. Motley (brick bearing his initials can be found in the house) and his bride-to-be. She expressed the thought that if the house should be erected by the farm's "big spring" there would be no wedding; therefore, Mr. Motley chose a site facing road # 1533.  In later years, she related to her husband that she wished she had asked that their home be built facing highway 234.  During this time period,m a building not joining the house was built for slaves quarters and a "style block" was placed on the front lawn to aid visitors in mounting and dismounting from their horses.  The building and style block remain on the property.  William Worth Watts and wife, Fannie Morgan Watts purchased the homestead August 1, 1907 from J. W. Morehead and wife, Nannie P.  Fannie M. Watts died June 6, 1917 followed by William W. Watts Feb. 20, 1938.  On March 21, 1938 the home place was purchased by a son Claude Kelley Watt, Sr., and wife Nealie Weaver Watts.  They had 5 children: Claude Kelly, Jr., Robert E., James N., Clarence E. (deceased) and Ann Watts Brown.   Claude Sr. died Dec. 13, 1967, followed by his wife, Nealie, Feb. 10, 1979,
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NOVEMBER - (Holland Missionary Baptist Church - drawn by Celeste Lawson - 12th  grade)

About 1923 a need was felt for a Baptist church in the Holland community.  Henry Clay Hughes, merchant, farmer and devout Christian was impressed to build a church and talked to several other Christian leaders about this endeavor.  With much enthusiasm, the organization and construction of a church building were begun.  On Oct 27, 1923, a meeting was held at the Holland School to organize a Missionary Baptist Church.  Each at the meeting had letters of dismission from the respective churches.  Rev. L.W. Stewart was elected pastor and Bro. R. W. Wood was elected clerk.  A building committee consisting of rev. W.T. Steenbergen, Bro. H.C. Hughes, and Bro. r.W. Wood was appointed.  Services were conducted at the school for several months until the church building was completed enough for services to be held there.  On Aug. 24, 1924, the church was dedicated and the following month was received into the Allen Association.  The land on which the building was erected was purchased form and given by Bro. H.C. Hughes and Mrs. M.M. Downing.  Years later, the plot where the cemetery is located was given by Mr. Ruth Downing, a granddaughter of Bro. Hughes.
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DECEMBER - (The Hurt-Kranz Home - drawn by Lorna Sackett - 11th grade)

The back section of this house is a large log cabin which was already built when Mr. and Mrs. Jim Smith purchased this farm in 1882.  The Smiths raised their nine children here and added the two front rooms and hall around 1900.  Their local descendants are Mrs. Jackie Oliver, Mrs. Ovaleta Herrington, Mrs. Martha Stovall and Mr. Frankie Smith.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen Jones bought the farm in 1943 and enclosed a large side porch making a dining room, kitchen and utility room.  The farm is presently owned by Mr. and Mrs. James Hurt.   Their daughter, Judy Kranz and her two sons reside in the house which is located 6 miles out on highway 231, then on e mile on the Dry Ridge Road.