1988 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (The Gary F. Stone Home - drawn by Stephanie Britt - 12th grade)

This house is believed to have been built in 1858 by Alfred and Ewing Pruitt.  It consisted of four rooms.   Sometime around 1890 two rooms were constructed a short distance from the house.   These two rooms served as an office and living quarters for Dr. R. E. Oliver.   He practiced there until his death in 1903 of typhoid fever.  In 1909, R.W. and Nannie Pruitt bought the house and sold it to Perry and Effie Gardner Barnes in 1910.   Mr. and Mrs. Barnes, and Mrs. Barnes' parents, Acklus and Lou Gardner, lived in the four rooms.  The two rooms offset from the house were used at this time as a boarding house for traveling salesmen, mail carriers, and ministers.  There was a well house in the front yard that was used for travelers to water their horses.  Mrs. Barnes and Mrs. Gardner always had a welcome kitchen for boarders and travelers.  They sold the house in 1931 to Garland and Elsie Parris, and Oliver and Sylvia Smith.  Sometime in the early 1930's the two rooms and the four rooms were joined.  On Dec. 29, 1933, Dr. John Meredith, still in medical school, delivered his first baby, Hubert Glen Paris, in this house.  After the death of her mother in 1934, Cornelis McReynolds Jackson and family came here to live with her aunts and uncles.  The Paris and Smith families sold the home to Frank Stone in 1972.  Gary and Leta Ann Stone remodeled the house, but the original structure remains the same.  It is located with the Halfway community.
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FEBRUARY - (The Boucher Schoolhouse - drawn by Beth Lyle - 11th grade)

Boucher School had its beginning in the period 1847-1850.  the pioneer families of the somewhat isolated area seven miles northwest of Scottsville felt the need of a local source to educate their children.  Isaac Boucher was given a land grant by the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and from this tract he donated a parcel of land and the logs for the building.  The neighborhood worked together to construct this first school in the area.  The one-room school was used for about 20 years.  However, it was in an area that at times was subject to isolation by flooding of a branch nearby.  About 1866 Matison Boucher gave another parcel of land for a new school.  He also gave the lumber, and again the neighbors worked together in the construction.  This same building was used until the school was closed. Boucher School consolidated with other schools in 1937.   For some ninety years, several generations of children received their basic education in the one-room school.  Treasured memories remain among Allen Countians and others who attended Boucher School  Among the teachers who contributed their best efforts for the children were: Arlie P. Macon, Vera Mitchell Whorton, Lorene Tabor Sledge, Pearl Meredith Sikes, and Nellie Dean Downing.
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MARCH - (The Langston-Isaac Newton Williams Home - drawn by Sara Morgan - 12th grade)

This home was located on Langston Branch, a tributary of Trammel Creek, about four miles northwest of Scottsville on Highway 231, on a 300 acre land grant acquired by Langston Williams.  It was the home of Langston and Ruth (McElroy Williams, both of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, who were married on Dec. 27, 1801.  The left portion of the house is believed to have been the original house, probably built in 1801.  It consisted of two large rooms--one downstairs and one upstairs, with a cellar for storing provisions.  Two more rooms and a wide hall were added.  The front part of the house was constructed of logs with floors of wide poplar planks.  There were separate stairways to each of the two upstairs rooms.  The floor level of the original house was one step up from the hall.  Each of the rooms had a large fireplace.  The older ones were made of rock, and the newer ones were made of brick.  The back part of the house, which was one story and of frame construction, may have been built by Isaac N. Williams after he became owner at his mother's death in 1870.   It was probably at the time of this construction that all of the exterior was covered with weatherboarding.  At least 12 of the 13 children born to Langston and Ruth Williams in this home lived to adulthood.  They were: Rebecca (Ragland), Fanny (Williams), Sara (Thompson), George Washington, Benjamin Hubbard, Thomas Tolbert, John M., Richard Horatio, Nancy Vines (Wright), Elizabeth M., Isaac Newton, James Franklin, and Irene Jane (Hinton).   Lansgton died in 1840, and Ruth died in 1870.  Isaac Newton Williams became the owner.  In 1871, at age 48, Newt Williams married Elizabeth Griffin.  Their only child, a son, died at birth.  Newt Williams died in 1903, and Elizabeth died in 1914.  This ended more than 100 years of Williams' ownership of the home.   Elizabeth was the last of more than twenty family members to be buried in the graveyard located only a short distance from the house.  The house burned in 1960.   Maxie R. and Ann Brown are the present owners of the farm.  Lillian Williams Smith is believed to be the oldest of the more than thirty descendants living in Allen County.
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APRIL - (The Dinwiddie Home - drawn by Lorna Sackett - 12th grade)

This home was built by George Wolfe, a well-known Allen County carpenter, for Willie and Lucinda Dinwiddie in 1910.  It is located 5 miles west of Scottsville on Hwy 100.  It remained in the Dinwiddie family for 3 generations.  Willie and Lucinda's son, Robert, and his wife, Alda, had 2 children, Ray and Corinne.  Ray and his wife, Dema, and their 4 children, Morris, Martha, Carol, and Jimmie, lived in the house until their new home was built.   this eight-room frame house, with upper and lower halls and wrap-around porches, offered spacious living.  The upper porches had banisters which were duplicated in the center halls of the home.  A section of this hall is now in the entrance hall of Corinne D. Strausburg's home in Franklin, Tennessee.  In 1965, when Ray and Dema built a new house, many of the posts and banisters were used from the original structure.   The old rock support and log foundation remain at the original site, with the walks and concrete porches still intact.
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MAY -  (The Fitzpatrick-Vesper Jones Home - drawn by Aleta Foster - 12th grade)

For many, many years, to anyone inquiring directions to most any point in the Southern part of Allen County, the usual reply would be to "Go to Ike Fitch's Store", and proceed from there.   Ike Fitzpatrick was that colorful character who was proprietor of the store two miles fourth of Scottsville at the intersection of Highways 100 and 1421, better known as the Holland Road and Mt. Union Road.  In the mid to late 1800's, Joe Fitzpatrick and his wife, Phoebie Cole Fitzpatrick, built the two story house on the hill overlooking the store site, and it was in this house in 1883 that "Mr. Ike" was born.  Thus the property known as the "Old Fitzpatrick Place".  Joe Fitzapatrick was a logger by trade.  This may explain the fact, that during remodeling in 1964, there was found to be much choice yellow poplar lumber used in the structure.  One special discovery was yellow poplar sills hewn from a single log more than 40 feet long.   Thought there have been changes and additions to the house, the basic structure of the front portion is original, including the tin roof.  Since the deaths of Joe and Phoebie, the property has been home to several families, namely: the Charlie Sexton's, the A.T. Woodward's, The Rev. Everett Jones', and since 1956, Vesper and Clara Helen Jones and their children, Martin and Melanie.
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JUNE - (Halfway Post Office - drawn by Sandra Cornwell - 12th grade)

The Halfway Post Office, established June 20, 1877, is one of the oldest in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  It is located on U.S. Highway 231 North.  Levi J. Spann was the first postmaster; Carvin Sherrell is the postmaster today.  Sherrell was appointed in July, 1973 and is the 14th postmaster.  The original building was destroyed by fire around 1921.   Business was moved to the front rooms of a house adjacent to the b\present building which was completed around 1922 and is in use today.  the Halfway Post Office is located in the left front portion of Halfway Trading Post owned by Mrs. Martha Shadix.   It has been said that "Halfway" got its name from a mail route starting at a point in Tennessee.  Halfway was the midway point between there and Bowling Green, Kentucky.  mail carriers rested their horses and stayed the night in a boarding house nearby.  Halfway Post Office celebrated its 110th year of community service in June, 1987.
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JULY - (The Ray Williams Home - drawn by Darren Shipley - 10th grade)

The dwelling was built in the early 1880's by W.J. Motley.   The house replaced their previous residence of a two-story log house located behind the new home.  members of the Motley family are buried in a cemetery located on the property.  The original structure boasted three handmade brick chimneys, two of which remain intact.  William and Mary Williams moved there in 1890 with their children, Clay, Bryant, and Susie.  The home was later purchased by the eldest son, Clay, and his wife, Queen Tabor Williams, and their children, Benjamin, Ozelle, Hollis, Bernadine, Ray, and Nancy.  Ray G. Williams and wife, Aline, are the current owners of the home located 10 miles from Scottsville on the Halifax-Settle Road.
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AUGUST -  (The Ida Guy-Gail Brownfield Home - drawn by Mendi Kent - 12th grade)

This home is located at 217 North Bedelia Street.  It was built in 1910 by W.E. Buy and his wife, Margaret Guy, and remained in the Guy family until the death of Ida Guy in 1985, granddaughter of W.E. Guy.  the home consists of four rooms upstairs and four rooms downstairs, along with center halls.  Porches on both the upper and lower levels add to the character of this home.  In 1985 Erval and Gail Brownfield bought the "Ida Guy" home and began the vast process of remodeling.  During this time, tragedy struck the Brownfield family when Erval died of injuries suffered in an automobile accident.   After her husband's death, Mrs. Brownfield decided to complete the renovation of the house as a "tribute to him."  The restoration was completed in August of 1987.
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SEPTEMBER - (The Elisha Warden Home - drawn by Lonnie Douglas - 11th grade)

Elisha Warden was born in Fauquier County, Virginia in1761.  In 1798 he married Fanny Dearing who was born in 1781.  Elisha served in the Revolutionary War.  One of his duties was to guard Mt. Vernon.  For this service, he received a land grant in Kentucky.  Elisha, his wife, and seven of their ten children came to Kentucky in 1813 or 1814.  They were: James, 1801; William, 1803, Elizabeth, 1808; Cynthia Ann, 1810; and Mary, 1813; Asa, 1814; Jeremiah, 1819; and Frances Ann, 1821 were born in Kentucky.  His land was located on North Bays Fork Creek about 3 1/2 miles from Scottsville, off the Halifax Road.   The first home consisted of two rooms constructed of logs.  It is still standing.  The second home was built some years later, but prior to the Civil War.   It sat on a hill just above the Old State Road.  A three foot retaining wall was built along the road.  The house consisted of four rooms below and one above,   and two halls.  The exterior of the house was weatherboarded, and there were tall windows throughout the house.  members of the Warden family lived there until 1890.  The family cemetery was between the first log house and later one.   Elisha and Fanny are buried there, along with at least three of their children.   The farm is presently owned by Bobby and Yvonne Reynolds.  Sylvia Hood Dowell, a great-great-great grandchild of Elisha Wardeen, resides in Allen County.
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OCTOBER - (The Shockley House - drawn by Larry Hunt - 10th  grade)

Located 12 miles east of Scottsville on the Dunnsford Road, this house still bears the initials of its original owner, Dr. Barton Warren Stone, and the date "1865" on each of its two chimneys.   Built in that year, a dog-trot through the center of the house has since been enclosed, but two 18-foot square rooms remain in their original form.  One of them, which served as Dr. Stone's office, has a four-foot wide door, made to accommodate handicapped patients.  Several descendants of Dr. Stone's wife, Martha, have lived here through the years.
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NOVEMBER - (The Elbridge Napier Home- drawn by James Whitlow - 10th  grade)

Elbridge Napier, born 1859, and Enolia Brown, born 1865, were married in 1882.  They were the parents of eleven children, of which ten lived to be grown: Marvin, Bascom, Minnie, Ouseley, Pauline, Olga W., Iverson, John E. (died in 1903), Maggie, Odean, and Eurine.  They built this home in 1887-88 in the Mt. Union community in southern Allen County.  When the first tree was cut, Elbridge Napier knelt down by the big stump and prayed to dedicate this home to God.  They lived in this house until their deaths in 1937.  Their son, Olga, married in the same year and lived in this house until his death in 1971.  He and his wife, Bessie Howell Napier, raised three children.  Their youngest child, Paul, now owns the home.  Paul and his wife, Marietta Woodward Napier, remodeled the house, but the basic structure remains the same.  They, too, prayed by the stump and dedicated the house to God, which makes the place very sacred to the family.
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DECEMBER - (Concord Methodist Church - drawn by Tiffany Goad - 12th grade)

Concord church was built in a valley on unclaimed land south of Scottsville.  Later, this small valley was included in a boundary of land claimed by Wilson Foster, who deeded the church boundary to the church trustees in 1806.  It is not known when Concord Church was built.   The original church was a one-room building of logs.  The church had a fireplace and mantle at one end and had only a few windows.  Charter members of the church were: A.e. Hooten and wife, Nancy Dalton Hooten; henry Mayhew; Moses Mayhew; Mahalio Wolf; John Mayhew; George Mayhew; Jane Mayhew; and Frances Mayhew.  Some of the pastors of the 1800's were: Daniel Dalton; W.C. Slate; Dec Gilliam; and Preston Lee King.  The church building stayed virtually the same until 1968 when three Sunday School rooms were added.  The road was blacktopped, and a bridge was built over the nearby creek.  On June 23, 1969, a flood washed the church off its foundation.    The building was restored and remodeled.  church members decided to relocate concord when another flood occurred several years later.  Construction began in 1981.  Outdoor services were conducted while the church was being built.  The first service to be held in the new log church was in December, 1981.  The church was dedicated April 29, 1984.