1989 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (The Jim Dixon Home - drawn by Beth Lyle - 12th grade)

One of the prettiest homes in the area was the Jim Dixon home on Long Creek about two miles from Holland.  Mr. Dixon built the house in the late eighteen hundreds.  It consisted of twelve large rooms with high ceilings, and five porches.  The upstairs was connected to the downstairs with three stairways.  There was no other entrance to any of the rooms except by these stairways.  The home burned several years ago.  (Contributed by Mrs. Naomia Spencer and Mrs. Ovaleta Gibbs)
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FEBRUARY - (The Shiloh Methodist Church - drawn by Nathan Hendrix- 11th grade)

Shiloh Methodist Church located on Highway 263 in the Mt. Aerial community was established in the early 1800's.   this sketch is from a post card, belonging to Mrs. Dottie Lambert of the second building constructed in 11897 on land from the Joe and Ret Wright farm.  The Shiloh School stood directly behind the church.  During thunderstorms the teacher would take the students up to the church.  during revival meetings the children attended the daytime services.  The school closed in 1954. In 1948 the third church building was constructed on the same site.  In 1974 Sunday School rooms were added.  The pulpit from the second church is still used in the present church.  Also, a log from the original building was used in this building and is said to be as sound as it was originally.  Reddie Herrington Mayhew, the oldest living member of the church, will be 100 years old in February.  The present pastor is Bobby Hendricks. (Courtesy of Clara Brady, Angie Hinton, Harold Rippy)
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MARCH - (The Warren Weaver Home - drawn by Wendy Fleming - 11th grade)

This house was built about 1908 by M.C. House and was purchased in November, 1909  by George Warren and wife, may Stephens Weaver.  It consisted of four large rooms downstairs, wide hallways, four chimneys.  Two stairways led to the upper floor which was divided into three large bedrooms and a sewing room.  There was also a large porch on the back of the house.  The premises then consisted of the main house and outbuildings which included a smoke house and a large barn.  Mr. Weaver later added a brick washhouse in which there was a fireplace, a play area for children and a deep well.  Before 1920, he installed a pressurized water system into the house which allowed the addition of one of the first bathrooms in the city.  The Weavers were the parents of six children, all of whom were born in this house.  Mildred (Mrs. Ed) Newman, Dr. Edgar Stephens Weaver, Gertrude (Mrs. A.e.) Burnette, Margorie (Mrs. Owen T.) Yates and Miriam (Mrs. W.F.) Cornwell. One daughter, Nathalie, died at the age of six in 1920.  Mr. Weaver served as Circuit Court Clerk of Allen County for 18 years.  He was also the master Commissioner and Mayor of Scottsville.  In November, 1963 Mrs. Weaver sold the house to Lauretta (Dot) Cook.  In April, 1985 Mrs. Cook sold the house to Morris and Patty Jones who are the current occupants.  It is located at 402 North fourth Street. (Courtesy of Mrs. Owen T. Yates)
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APRIL - (The Ed Satterfield & Son Funeral Home - drawn by Hope Gibbs - 12th grade)

This residence located on Highway 231 at Allen Springs stands next to the former Satterfield home and served as the Satterfield Funeral Home.  Although Ed was a farmer, operated a lumber mill and leased land to oil producers, early in life he listed the "undertaking" business as his primary occupation.  In 1896 he had his first burial, an infant whom he buried in a handmade coffin and a wooden vault for which he received $6.00.  Prices remained in the $5.00 to $10.00 range until about 1900.  After Ed received training in the art of embalming.  $10.00 was added to the cost.  An additional $3.00 was charged after rubber wheels were installed on the hearse.  In 1900 Ed purchased property at Allen Springs which had once been a resort with cottages, outbuildings and mineral springs nearby.  He remodeled and enlarged the cottage nearest the highway for his funeral business.  In 1904 he married Julia Smith, daughter of Dr. H.C. & Nancy (Cooksey) Smith, and the job of record keeping was delegated to her.  Her clear, accurate records are evidence that she was an asset to the business.  Later their three children participated in the business by building and decorating the caskets.  In 1905 Ed was importing some caskets form Nashville.  They were copper, oak and rosewood, but the homemade caskets were still requested and charity services were provided.  Ed joined briefly with the Enoch Funeral Home in Bowling Green, 1915-19117 and with T.W. Crow in Scottsville, 1926-1927 but his own business was rapidly growing and demanding his attention.  In 1928, their son, Lewie, who received training in the Louisville School of Embalming, joined his father as a partner and the business was known as the Ed Satterfield and Son Funeral Home.  The building which began as a resort cottage was enlarged from time to time to accommodate the business and it was the Satterfield Funeral Home for over 43 years.  After 1945 it was sold and converted to residential property and is presently owned by Debbie and Ricky Bragg.  (Courtesy of Julie Michael)
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MAY -  (The Ed Satterfield Home - drawn by Rhonda Keen - 12th grade)

About 1907 after their first child, Lewie, was born, Ed and Julia Satterfield, who operated a funeral home at Allen Springs, Ky., saw the need for a larger home.  this eleven room home was constructed in 1908 on a site adjacent to the funeral home.  It was constructed largely of oak which was cut and milled on the Satterfield lands.  It retains its original metal roof, stained glass windows, Doric columns and ornate trim.  The front and side porches add to its charm.  Home of the first telephone and electricity in this rural area, it was the feature of AT&T national advertisement in the spring of 1988.  The Satterfields were the parents of three children, all of whom grew up in this home.  Lewie, married Dorothy Justice and joined his father as a partner in the funeral home.  Earline, married C. A. Gilliam, for many years the present of the Farmers National Bank in Scottsville, and Marquerite married A.H. Barber, Civil Engineer in Jackson, Mississippi.  The property was purchased by Herbert F. Smith, brother of Julia Satterfield, in 1945 from the heirs of Ed Satterfield.  After their deaths, the home was owned by their daughter, Lucille and husband, Pearl Lightfoot and are the present owners. (Courtesy of Julie Michael)
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JUNE - (The Hickory Hill Methodist Church - drawn by Tracy Walker - 12th grade)

Hickory Hill Methodist Church was established in the year 1899.   Church services were held in the Hickory Hill School building which was located on the site of the present home of Mr. and Mrs. W.R. (Bill) Kingrey.  Some of the early members of the church were Albert Harris, Ben Guy, Sherd Dennis, Frank Smith, Harry Wiliams and Columbus Costello.  At this time Hickory Hill was affiliated with the Scottsville Circuit and Rev. Artie M. Dixon was the first pastor.  About 1913 Polly Dennis donated a portion of land where the present building now stands.  It is located about 4 miles out on Hwy 100 West.   Additional land was acquired for a cemetery from a man well known in the community as "Pop" Myers.  He was the first to be buried in the cemetery.  The auditorium of the present building was completed and dedicated in 1923.  In 1938 Hickory Hill became part of the Chapel Hill Charge.  In 1951 Mr. Bryant Carter donated the lumber for the construction of 3 Sunday School rooms.  Hickory Hill and Walkers Chapel merged in 1955, becoming a charge on their own.  Together they built a parsonage in the White Plains community.  To complete the present structure in 1971 two Sunday School rooms, two bathrooms, a partial basement and central heat and air were added.  In 1977 the parking area was paved, in 1978 aluminum siding was installed to replace the weatherboarding.  In 1979 the old church steeple was replaced with a new one, and 1987 the old windows in the auditorium were replaced with stained glass.   For most of the years Hickory Hill has existed there has been an active Sunday School.  An account of the church history would not be complete without mentioning a dear old gentleman affectionately known as "Uncle Ben."  Mr. Ben Hendrickson for many years served as superintendent of the Sunday School.  the present pastor is Rev. Paul Harrop.  (Courtesy of Katha Meador)
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JULY - (The Rev. William Burton Miller Home - drawn by Cary Calvert - 12th grade)

The first home of Brother Miller and his wife Elsie Ann Hichman Miller was a log home.  In August, 1895, Brother Miller was away form home conducting a meeting when he received the news that his home had burned.  He bowed his head a moment then raised it and said, "The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away."  His many friends and neighbors came to his aid and helped build another house up the hill and across the road from the first one.   Mr. Anthony Welch placed a $20.00 gold piece in his hand.  Mr. Jim Moore, who ran a saw mill in Warren County, gave him the framing for a new house.  Friends worked and gave furniture.  The upstairs bedrooms were reached by two separate stairways.  One from inside and one from the outside.  Brother Miller and his wife lived there until their deaths in 1904 and 1906.  Their son Paul and daughter Erna continues to live there until Erna's marriage in11928.  In 1909 Fannie, the oldest daughter, her husband Willie Williams and daughter Mable moved there.  In 1913 Mable married Roy P. Hood.  Their daughter Frances was born there.  They moved in 1918.  In 1940, Fannie sold the home after her husband and brother died.  The home was purchased in 1949 by Lorvell and Martha Stovall.  The Stovall's remodeled the house removing one of the outside doors pictures on the front of the house.   After the death of Mr. Stovall the home sold to Kenneth and Sandra Whitney in 1985.   (Courtesy of Sylia Hood Dowell, great granddaughter of Brother Miller)
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AUGUST -  (The Durham's Spring Missionary Baptist Church - drawn by Dustan S. Hogue - 12th grade)

Durham's Spring Missionary Baptist Church is located on Highway 98.  A group of Christians were meeting occasionally in the Durham's Spring schoolhouse.  These Christians decided to organize a church in the Durham's Spring Community with the help of Mt. Gilead, Hopewell and Bethlehem Churches.  In September 1886 a log house was constructed to house the congregation and Durham's Spring United Baptist Church of Christ was organized.  This log church was weather boarded in the early 1900's.  After a stirring sermon from the Pastor a.I. Wilson the congregation decided to build a modern brick building near the site of the first church in 1943.  Since that time other remodeling has taken place, including the steeple which was erected in 1985 and the stained glass windows which were added in 1988. 
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SEPTEMBER - (The James F.-John L. Williams Home - drawn by Tommy White - 12th grade)

This house was located some 4 miles northwest of Scottsville about one mile west of Highway 231 on a portion of a 300 acre land grant acquired by Langston Williams in 1799.  It was built for James Franklin Williams, youngest son of Langston and Ruth McElroy Williams, about the time of his marriage to Jane M. Blackburn in1845.  The front of this house, a two story log structure consisting of two large rooms and a large chimney was part of the original house.  Lillian Williams Smith, granddaughter of James F. remembers hearing that this part of the house was separated from kitchen by a dog trot.  A large rock chimney which served the old kitchen was used later in the kitchen of a five room addition built sometime after 1866.  another interesting feature of the house was the way the outside wall of the addition was lined up with the outside of the rock chimney.  This formed a stairwell for the stairway leading up to the upstairs log room.  Under this stairway was a closet with an outside door.  This was used for storage, the most unusual of which was a human skeleton.  The "Skeleton in the Williams' Family Closet" was used by Robert Blackburn Williams in his studies to become a doctor.   The addition was covered with weatherboarding and it may have been at this time that the log portion was covered with wide poplar panels.  Two generations of the Williams children were born and reared there and during its 120 years, the house sheltered five Williams generations.  The last descendants of James Franklin Williams to live there were Nadine Spencer, daughter of Aaron and Ruth Williams McReynolds, her husband, Milton, and daughter, Ruth and Marion.  From 1945 until 1969 Marshall Smith and wife, Lillian Williams Smith were the owners.  They sold it to Herschel Haynes of Gainesville, Florida.  The house had been in the family for 120 years and part of the land for about 170 years.  Although the house is no longer standing, it exists in various forms.  some of the lumber from the logs is now a part of the home of Cecil Clavert.  The lumber from the frame portion has been stored for future use by Chris Keen.  The log portion was sold to Johnny Matney from the Greensburg area of Ky. and may have been shipped to New York.
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OCTOBER - (The Trace Creek School - drawn by Nicole Brown - 12th  grade)

Trace Creek School had its beginnings in the late 1800s.  It is located some ten miles from Scottsville on Highway 98 near Brown's Ford Boat Dock in the eastern part of Allen County.  For many years several generations of children received their basic education in the one room school.  It was used until it was consolidated with the other schools in1957.   It has also been used through the years as a place of worship in the community.   Each year former students, teachers, and all who care to come, meet at the school for a reunion on Sunday  before Labor Day.  Four former teachers are still living: Nell (Profitt) Finley, Harry N. (Jack) Fraim, Leon Whitlow, and Louise (Bishop) Pardue.  The building is now in the process of being restored as a community center.   (Courtesy of Jewell Spencer).
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NOVEMBER - (The Leroy & Martha Howard Home - drawn by James Wm. Whitlow - 11th  grade)

This house is owned by Leroy and Martha Howard, where they and members of their famjily have lived for several years.  They ar the parents of Michael, John David, Stephen, Kirk and William.   According to Irene Celsor Hagan, the house was built around 1845 by Jefferson Celsor, son of Harden and Eliabeth Berry Celsor.  He married Areena Barlow.   They were the parents of Jimmie, Jefferson, Dr. Gilbert and Ada (Alexander).   Originally it consisted of two log buildings with a wide breezeway between and a third log building nearby.  Jefferson (Jeffie) Celsor, who was born there, was the next owner.   He married Nannie Taylor.  They were the parents of Irene (Dr. Leslie) Hagan, Mae (Williams), Chloe (Freeman) and Joe Celsor.  During the years the Jeffie Celsor's lived in the home, they enclosed the breezeway, fashioning it into a large hallway.  They added a dining room, a large front porch, remodeled the kitchen and covered the house with weatherboarding.  The house is ceiled with yellow poplar, and poplar ceiling beams are exposed in the family room.   Also in this room is a three cornered walnup press, thought to be one of the earliest ones in this seciton.   Mr. and Mrs. Howard apreciate this old home with its many good feathures.   They have added a patio, redecorated the inside and furnished it with many beautiful antiques.  Jefferson and Areena Celsor, Jefferson and nannie Celsor, and other members of the family are buried in the Celsor cemetery near the house.  It is located on Highway 100 East near the Monroe County line.  (Courtesy of Leroy and Martha Howard)
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DECEMBER - (The Dr. Harris Home & Hospital - drawn by Gary Houchens - 12th grade)

This bungalow style frame house, located in the Gainesville Community, was built in 1915, for a Dr. Harris, first name unknown, and served as living quarters, dentist office, and hospital until 1923, when Dr. Harris moved to Florida.  The first floor comprised his residence and dental office.  The four rooms of the second floor housed the hospital.  He installed a Delco battery lighting system.  The interior trim and mantels were all made with pattornon oak.  The bungalow style of architecture became an American favorite around the turn of the century and was built up until the 1940's.  In the early 1900's the bungalow was considered the "Archievable Americah Dream House."  The Harris home is mildly Victorian-Colonial in appearance and was built by Bob Jones of Scottsville, Kentucky. (Courtesy of Stephen C. Foster)