1990 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (Newman's DX Service Station - drawn by James Whitlow - 12th grade)

"Five Gallons of Gasoline for $1.00 - Plus a chance on a Chevrolet sports car to be given away on Christmas Eve"   That was the advertisement for Scottsville's first "Modern Service Station" opened in 1931.  At that time the term "modern" meant gasoline and oil sales; rest rooms, a grease-rack and automobile mechanical service.   Located on West Main Street next to the late Winnie and Fanny Brown home, a temporary platform was constructed for the drawing, which attracted a large number of people from the entire county.  The lucky winner of the car was 13 year old Ralph Lyles, who jumped to the platform, claimed his prize and drove away.  The station was built by Mr. C.F. Wright of Nashville, Tenn. and the Walker heirs, who then owned the site, including their brick home built in the 1870's, and was leased to the Mid-Continent Petroleum Corp.  The first operators of the station were the late Oakley and Oscar Patton.  They were succeeded by the late Maurice K. Holland.  In 1942 Holland was drafted into the U.S. Armed Forces.  Ed Newman, who was distributor of Mid-Continent products, assumed the ownership and operation of the business and renamed it Newman's D-X Service Station.  Mr. Newman continued the promise of "full service" for 40 years until his retirement in 1982.  At that time the station property was sold to the firm of Harrison and Goin, who remodeled the building into law offices.  (Courtesy of Ed Newman)
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FEBRUARY - (The Griffin Homeplace - drawn by Jane Newman - 12th grade)

The Samuel Griffin home was located in the Gainesville community of Allen County.  The house shown, actually burned in the early 1900s.  A new home was built approximately one mile from the original location on the road now known as the old Gainesville road.  A small log cabin constructed for Samuel's mentally ill brother still stands near the location of the original home.  Samuel Griffin, son of John and Nancy (Spillman) Griffin of Culpepper County, Virginia, was born July 3, 1835.  He died January 30, 1906 and was buried in a family graveyard on the Griffin farm.  He first married Mary Ann Atwood, daughter of Jett and Nancy (Hickman) Atwood.  She died in 1865 and was buried in the Atwood graveyard on the Jett Atwood farm.  Their three children were William Franklin, Louisa Marion and Charles Edward.  On Aug. 17, 1886 Louisa Marion (Lou) married John Langston Williams.  Members of 4 generations of their descendants, including a daughter Mrs. Marshall (Lillian) Smith, presently reside in Allen County.  In 1942 John Griffin's widow sold the Griffin home and land to J.W. Marr and moved to Scottsville.   The present owner is Mrs. Ralph (Lassie) Thomas.  (Courtesy of Mrs. Nadine Spencer)
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MARCH - (The Huntsman Home - drawn by Rhonda Graves - 11th grade)

The home of Cora Brown Huntsman and Herschel H. Huntsman located on 412 N. 4th Street, was built about 1908.   It has 5 large rooms, wide center hall and two fireplaces downstairs.  In the center hall there is a large winding oak stairway which leads to a center hall upstairs.   There is a small enclosed stairway in the dining room that leads to a bedroom on the second floor.  On the second floor there are three large bedrooms, a center hallway and one large walk in closet.  At one time there was  a screened in porch on the back where the cistern and pump were located.  The premises then and for several years consisted of the main house with a white picket fence, a wash house, smoke house, storage building and out house.  There was also a barn where Mr. Huntsman kept his horse and buggy.  He was one of the first rural mail carrier, delivering mail in a horse and buggy.  He also served on the City Council.  Mr. Huntsman died in1948 and Mrs. Huntsman in 1963.  Mrs. Huntsman and Gary were well known for their floral gardens and the large man made fish pond.  The Huntsman's collected rocks.   These rocks were used to outline their fish pond and gardens.  (Courtesy of Mrs. Clovis Garmon)
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APRIL - (The K Brown Home - drawn by Jerri Lynn Farley - 11th grade)

Hugh K. Brown was born January 16, 1830.  In August 1884 he purchased 245 acres of land from Shelby Follis for $2,000.00.  The house was originally a log home.  Some time later extensive remodeling was done and weatherboarding added.  In later years the fence in front of the house was torn down.  There were 4 slave houses on the farm.  When Hugh died March 8, 1896 the farm was divided and two of his sons, K (Thomas Kelsey) Brown and Vivian Brown each bought a part from their sister and other brothers.  They were Annie Brown (Miller), Burton Brown, Ward Brown, Lee Brown and Malon Brown.  K Brown bought the house pictured.  K Brown and his wife, Theora had two daughters, Mildred and Alma who died at the age of seven.  K Brown was born in 1873 and died in 1950.  After his death, his widow Theora and daughter Mildred and her husband Jesse Lee Woodard continued to live there until 1957, when the three moved into a new home built by the Woodward's.   They sold the house to Cortez Gumm.  They lived there for a period of time and then it was used as rental property until it burned in 1965.  That year the farm was sold to Thurman and Catherine Gosnell, who are the present owners.  It is located four and 1/2 miles out the old Gallatin road on the K Brown Road. (Courtesy of Vivian Secrest)
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MAY -  (The James Warren Frost Home and Business - drawn by LeAnne Keen - 12th grade)

This was the home and general merchandise store located on a well traveled pioneer road between the Gallatin and Franklin Roads.  It was known as Rodemer.  People came from miles around to secure many needed products here.  Mr. Frost was born here in 1859 and beginning at an early age began the operation of the store.  He continued in this business until shortly before his death in 1931.  At that time there was a U.S. Post Office at Rodemer.  Mr. Frost was appointed postmaster by President Benjamin Harrison in 1891.   In those days there was an extension of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad from Gallatin, Tenn. to Scottsville.  At a second stop before reaching Scottsville there was a tunnel.  Here Mr. Frost picked up his merchandise.  He loaded it on a horse drawn wagon and took it a mile or two back to the store.  There is no road there now, no railroad, and even the tunnel has been filled in due to the construction of the new 31E Highway. (Courtesy of Mrs. Noble Allen)
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JUNE - (The Read Home - drawn by David Workman - 11th grade)

This house was built in 1919 by William A. "Brack" and Beulah Morgan Read on land purchased from Dr. H.M. Meredith and T.J. Settle.  It was the home of Mr. and Mrs. Read, and their only child, Allen r. "Casey" Read until their deaths.  The four bedroom house was home also to Beulah's mother (Fannie Read Morgan) and brother (Vernon B. Morgan) and to Brack's brother (James W. Read).  At Casey's death the house was willed to the Scottsville Baptist Church and was sold to the First United Methodist Church whose property it adjoins.  It is located on 407 E. Maple Street. (Courtesy of Hannah Ryan)
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JULY - (The Whitlow Homeplace - drawn by Serena Mandrell - 12th grade)

This residence, historically called "the old Whitlow homeplace", is located on the Maysville road approximately 5 miles form Scottsville.  It is the home of a third generation Whitlow descendant, Robert and his wife Jeanette.  The 300 acre homestead was bought by Robert Whitlow's grandparents, Jesse Newton and Ann Cliburn Whitlow, from Jim Read, great-grandfather of the late Harry Payne Read.  It was on this farm in 1890, that Jesse Newton and Ann built the original part of the home pictured above and reared their ten children of which there were farmers, housewives, teachers, a doctor, a minister, county superintendent, and a merchant.  When the farm was purchased by Robert H. and Jeanette Whitlow, the back rooms of the house, which were L. Shape, were torn away and new rooms added.  The front rooms were reconstructed keeping the fireplace and many features of the original part.  (Courtesy of Linda Cline and Patty Hogue)
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AUGUST -  (The Osborne Home - drawn by Mutsumi Funato - 11th grade)

This house, known as the late A.E. Osborne residence was built by him and the carpenter, Bob Jones of Scottsville, Ky.  All the lumber used in building the house was oak and ash.  The lumber was cut, sawed, planed and seasoned on this farm except the doors and weather-boarding.   A.E. Osborne designed the house himself.  The house was begun in 1917 after the crops were laid by and finished in 1918.  A.E. Osborne and his family moved into the house December 13, 1918.  A bathroom and powder room were added later.  a. E. Osborne died Dec. 27, 1963.  In 1965 his daughter, Myrtie, and her husband, Bennett Erwin purchased the house and farm.  In 1988 she had vinyl siding put on the house.  In 1989 she sold the farm to Stephen Holder, the great, great, grandson of R.B. Osbourne Sr., who bought the farm in 1891 when he moved from Warren To Allen County.   The house was sold to Scott Gilbert and Beth Hester who reside there.  It is located 12 miles out 101 North on River Bend Road. (Courtesy of Mrs. Myrtie Erwin)
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SEPTEMBER - (The John Buchanon Home - drawn by Daniel Fisher - 11th grade)

This eight room home was constructed on a 193 acre land grant given to Citation rights by from the U.S. Government in 1810. They had one daughter, Amanda, who married James C. Williams.  They had one daughter,  Minnie, who married John Buchanon.  The first home was a log cabin.   It was remodeled in 1893 and again in 1919.  The house burned in 1965.   Roger Buchanon now owns the land.  It is located on 101 North in the Gainesville Community.  (Courtesy of  Roger Buchanon)
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OCTOBER - (The T. J. Settle, Jr. Homer - drawn by Mark R. Taylor - 12th  grade)

The home of T.J. Settle, Jr., was a beautiful residence standing at the corner of East Maple and South Third Streets, formerly called College and market Streets.  The owners of this splendid residence owned and operated the T.J. Settle Woolen Mills located near the public springs.   During World War I the mill manufactured wool blankets for the Army.  Miss Corrinna Settle was the last of the family to live there.  The house was in a state of disrepair for many years.  After her death in 1971, at the age of 90, the house and lot was purchased by the First United Methodist Church.  The condition of the house was such that it was not considered worth remodeling and so was torn down.  The lot was paved and today serves the church as a parking lot. (Courtesy of Marie Gerald)
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NOVEMBER - (The Joe Crowe Home - drawn by Stephanie Gregory - 12th  grade)

In the early 1800s, Joseph Crow purchased a 20 acre farm in Southern Allen County which was divided in half by the Jackson Highway, now known as the Old Gallatin Road.  The house on the land at that time was a one story log home.  When Joseph and a joining land owner by the last name of Dobbs got into a lawsuit over a boundary line dispute, Joseph won the case.  As the two were leaving the courthouse, Mr. Dobbs shot and killed Joseph.  His only son, Malcolm Breckinridge (M.B. or Bud) Crow then inherited this land.  M.B. being the only boy, his sisters gave him their interest in the land.  Malcolm, born in 1849, died in 1923.  Before his death, Malcolm had let it be known that he wanted the part of the farm with the home to go to his son Joseph Washington (J.W. or Joe) Crowe.    (Joe was the person that added the "e" onto the name, however, most of the family did not add the "e").  Joe had lived in the house with his father for several years before his father's death.  Joe was the father of 16 children, 10 of which lived long enough to be raised in this house.  This part of the farm and house is now owned by Joe Crowe's youngest son ray Crowe and his wife, Virginia.   Malcolm's daughter, Lizzie Crowe Williams was to get the part of the farm across the road.  This part was later bought by Joe's oldest child Ethel Crow Foster and her husband Curtis Foster, where they operated Foster's Home Cooked Meals for several years.   The house was built in 1912 by Bill Cooper and his son.  It is located four and 1/2 miles out on the Old Gallatin Road.  (Courtesy of Vivian Secrest)
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DECEMBER - (The Mayhew Homeplace - drawn by Tina Kelsey - 11th grade)

In 1804 Alexander Mayhew received a land grant for 1250 acres.  In his will dated 1844, he states that this land and home goes to Little Jim Mayhew.  The home then may have been the one and one half story log structure with a large rock fireplace that was torn away in some of the remodeling.  the main part of the house, (most of the first floor) was built before 1856.  Hand planed wide poplar planks were used on the floors, walls and ceilings throughout the house.  They are nailed with the old square head nails. The rooms all had large rock fireplaces.  Over the years most of the fireplaces have been enclosed.   One of the fireplaces in what is Miss Mayhew's den is still open with a large wide mantle over it.  In 1915 or 1916 extensive remodeling was done.  A second story was added with wide porches all around the house both downstairs and upstairs.  White columns were added on the front porches.  A screened in porch was added for dining in the summer months.  In the 1950's the large porches were torn down and a smaller concrete porch was installed on the front.  The home and land was passed on to Cornelius Mayhew from his father John Washington Mayhew. Cornelius and his wife Laura Hinton Mayhew moved here in 1896.  Their children Oscar, Estwelle, Cassie, Vilma, Eva Mae and Cornelius Edwin were born here.  Eva Mayhew still resides here.  It is located nine miles out on Highway 100 West, and is owned by Edwin Mayhew.  (Courtesy of Eva Mayhew)