1992 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (The Graves Home - drawn by Andy Henson - 12th grade)

This home was purchases in 1917 from H.L. Hendrick by Dr. P.G. Graves and wife, Mina Towe Graves for their family Eura, Eutra and Margaret.  This 10 room house was built around the turn of the century by Mr. Hendrick.  Originally large white wooden columns graced the front porch but shortly before Dr. Graves' death in 1925, the columns were replaced with large brick pillars and the brick railing as shown in the picture.  The outer walls are two bricks thick, and the 10 foot ceiling rooms have lathe and plastered walls.  The woodwork throughout the house is golden oak; there is picture molding in the formal rooms, and shaped molding crowns the eight-inch baseboards in every room.  The dining room has an ornate plate rail, built-in china cupboard, and a butler's window to the pantry adjacent to the kitchen.  Hardwood floors are laid in the herringbone pattern.   Massive sliding doors divide the living room from the dining room, as well as the large entrance hall from what was originally built for a library.  It was among the first houses in Scottsville to have running water, designed with a cistern feeding a large holding tank in the basement, then pumped by a generator powered pump to both floors of the house.  Four generations of the family have lived in this house, with Mrs. Euletta Strait Graves, widow of Eutra Graves, being the last of the family to reside here.   Mrs. Margaret Graves Johnson, who resided in Florida, is the only surviving child of Dr. and Mrs. Graves.  The house remains in the family at this time.  It is located at 301 North Fourth Street.
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FEBRUARY - (New Bethel United Methodist Church - drawn by Tara Walden - 11th grade)

New Bethel United Methodist Church is located on highway 231 North approximately four miles from Scottsville, Kentucky.  The present church was moved to this location in 1921.  The building which was originally built in Scottsville in 1880 was purchased from the Scottsville Methodist Church, dismantled and reconstructed on the present site as it was originally.   In 1966, the church was remodeled, changing the front entrance.  In 1975, it was further improved with the addition of classrooms and restrooms.  In August 1986, a Fellowship Hall was added.  Records dated March 4, 1867 are in the possession of the present congregation titled, "Class and Church Book for New Bethel Society Scottsville Circuit Louisville Conference."   This church was located on the Old State road south of Highway 231 North just before one crosses Langston's Branch.   There is a cemetery on the hill above where the church stood.  It is believed there was another church or building where the first congregation worshiped.  Bessie Wagoner Duckett remembers her mother Alpha Wagoner talk about her mother, Louisa Jane Wagoner, saying there was another church farther down the Langston Branch.  On the Tobias (Tanty) Pruitt farm, Lena Pruitt Guy showed George Wagoner where an old school house stood.  The spring is still there and part of a foundation.  In those days they often conducted worship services and school in the same building.  There is proof that M.E. Church South (New Bethel) did exist in 1856 in that the will of a Pleasant M. Martin dated May 7, 1856 refers to the "Land marked out on which New Bethel church stands be reserved or use and benefit of M.E. Church South." (Courtesy of Bessie Wagoner Duckett)
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MARCH - (The White Home - drawn by David Grellier - 11th grade)

This house and 175 acre farm is located about 18 miles form Scottsville in southeast Allen County on Long Hollow road.  It was built in the late 1800s by W.G. and Camie F. White.  They were the parents of the late Vesper White who was Circuit Court Clerk of Allen County.  Vesper White and his wife Willie D. White were the parents of 6 children; Helen W. Turner, Tressie W. Dobbs, Ural W. Spears, Wendell (deceased), Clovis and Richard.  Helen, Tressie and Ural were born and spent their early childhood days here along with two older brothers, Wendell and Clovis.  The house is a two-story, seven-room house built on a foundation of large logs with weatherboard siding and a tin roof.  It was sold by the White family in the early 1930s.  The present owners are Mr. and Mrs. Ron Mullen.   (Courtesy of Helen White Turner)
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APRIL - (Charlie P. Guy Home - drawn by Craig Towe - 12th grade)

This home is located 5 miles north of Scottsville on Highway 231 North.  It was built on land which was a land grant given to the "Bald Family" of Virginia.  Because of a large spring on the land, it was considered for the site of the town of Scottsville.  The land unclaimed by the family, was divided and sold in tracts in the late 1800s.  John R. Mitchell and wife purchased a tract of which 100 acres was later sold to Charlie P. Guy and his wife Jennie Holland Guy on August 22, 1892.  Mr. and Mrs. Guy set up housekeeping in a two-room house.  Four children were born to this union, Floy Guy Ayers, Charlie Ester, Hallie Marie Guy Pharris and Hollis Preston Guy.  After the death of Mrs. Guy in 1907, Mr. Guy enlarged and remodeled as they had planned.  The youngest child, Hollis, was not yet four when she died, but Mr. Guy and the children worked hard to keep things going and the children in school.  Hollis later became the first Executive Director of the National Business Education Association. (1946-1968).   He and his wife, Katherine, who worked with him, founded F.B.L.A. (Future Business leaders of America).  After Mr. Guy's death in 1930, his son, Charlie Ester Guy and his wife Lottie Gillmore Guy bought the home farm which now contained 186 acres.   They lived there together almost 65 years.  they had 4 sons, Charlie Ester, Jr., William Loran, Larken Uriel, (died in infancy) and Sammie Dean.  The farm is now owned by sons, C.E. Jr., and Loran.  The house belongs to Loran and his wife Imogene.   Their daughter, Holly and her husband, Timothy Harvey, reside in the house.   (Courtesy of Loran Guy)
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MAY -  (John Parrish Home - drawn by Scott Payne - 10th grade)

John Parrish and his wife, Betty Calvert Parrish built this house about 1870.  It had eleven rooms with a fireplace in most of the rooms.  The house was "L" shaped with full-length porches on the inside of the "L".  The boys' rooms were downstairs and the girls' rooms were upstairs.  The Parrishs' had a large family which they supported by farming.  There were 12 children, five boys and seven girls.  The children were: Edward, Ark Allen, Marvin, Curtis, Larry (Bud), Nola, Purvis, Johnnie, Ada, Lovie, Hattie and Ottie.  Three of the girls died at an early age.  The house burned about 1930.  It was located about 3 miles from Holland on the Walnut Hill Road.  Part of the land is now owned by Neal Todd.  (Courtesy of Imogene Guy, great-granddaughter of John Parrish)
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JUNE - (Rev. William L. Harris Home - drawn by Sharon Hooper - 11th grade)

Just this side of Mt. Union General Baptist Church on the Bowling Green Road stands the comfortable country home of Rev. and Mrs. Edward Carver.  Situated on 22 acres of well kept grounds, this home was purchased by the Carvers from the estate of Emily Smith Harris, third wife of Rev. William L. Harris.  She had lived in this house since her marriage to Bro. Harris in 1888.  Bro. Harris' family was among the earliest settlers in this area.  His father, John, was born in Allen County in 1818.  His mother was Elizabeth Bruff Harris.  A Civil War veteran, Bro. Harris at nineteen years of age fought for the Union with the 52nd Kentucky Mounted Infantry Volunteers.  He bought the first parcel of this tract in September, 1874, from his wife's parents, Reuben and Mary Ayers Willoughby, and began to build a home for his wife, Martha Ann Elizabeth, and their children.  He was a master wood craftsman, embellishing the house and small structures around it with Victorian style trimmings.  The small outbuildings around the house are still of much interest.  One of them, finished inside, housed a hand printing press from which Bro. Harris produced "Plain and Ornamental Printing" under the heading of Christian Messenger and Job print, Halfway, Ky.  The press was still in the building when the Carvers bought the property.  This 10X14 building they attached to the house, put on a new roof, and now use as a utility room.  (Courtesy of Mrs. Arles (Joyce Weaver)
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JULY - (Mt. Union School - drawn by Daniel Ford - 12th grade)

In 1835, Jacob Teel, Bathsheba, his wife and Elizabeth Napier established the first building for the purpose of a school for the children and a place to worship.  The building was known as the Mt. Union Meeting House.  Mr. Teel was killed by a falling tree while constructing the building.  In 1886 one acre of land was sold by William Cooper for one dollar to the trustees, John H. Dalton, Thomas Johnson and William B. Cook for the common school district number 39.  Mr. Cooper granted the right of way to the school in exchange for the use of the spring by his family.  The school was located on the waters of Long Creek near the Kentucky-Tennessee state line.  the teachers in the late 1890s were J. T. Pitchford, E.J. Keen and Andy Howell.  The third building was built about 1900 on the Napier Road.  The teachers were: Bishop Napier, Warner Dalton, Bascom Napier, Herbert Douglas, Osley Napier, Linus Napier, Pauline Jones, Eva Napier, Ira Simmons, Raymond Brawner, Jessie Lee Woodward, Mildred Woodward, N.S. Shaw, Lewis Woodward, Ella Chandler, Mary Madison, Berna Bewley, Merle Foster, Vesper Jones, Virginia Garmon, Halque Overton, Hortence Overton, Laverne Napier, and Billie Riddle. (Courtesy of Susan Hanes)
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AUGUST -  (Able Nathaniel Loyd Home - drawn by Shaun Steenbergen - 10th grade)

Able Nathaniel Loyd was born July 28, 1867 and died April 19, 1950.  He married Lydia Jane England who was born Feb. 22, 1873 and died June 25, 1923.  They moved to Scottsville from Gamaliel, Kentucky.   They lived around Scottsville for a few years before they bought this home from Frank Harper around 1920.  He worked in the oil fields and cut stave timber in addition to farming.  He belonged to the Masonic Lodge.  They were the parents of nine children: A. Hershal (Huck), Vernie Loyd Gray, Virgil Pascal, Joe E., Jimmy Cecil, Pearl Loyd Frost, Daisy Loyd Frost, Josie Loyd Frost, and Odus Loyd.   This home is located about three and one half miles from Scottsville on the Old Gallatin Road.  It is fondly referred to as "The Old Pappy House" by members of the family.  It once had an "L" shape, when it had another room on the back.  There was once a long porch across the front.  They have both been since torn away.  This home still belongs to the Loyd family and some of the family still reside there.  (Courtesy of Nellie R. Loyd Jent)
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SEPTEMBER - (Roy P. Smith Home - drawn by Danyell Johnson - 11th grade)

This house was built around the turn of the century by Richard Henry Smith and his wife, Amanda Buchanan Smith. The couple had 7 children: Thomas, Robert, Sampson, Bessie, Manuel, Roy and Lola.  The land upon which the house was built was acquired by Richard Henry Smith form B.R. Freeman in 1897.  This land was added to additional tracts of land Richard Henry Smith acquired from land belonging to his parents, Lacey M. and Elizabeth Williams Smith.   Upon the death of Richard henry smith in 1927, the land was bought by 2 of his sons, Sampson and Roy.  Roy bought the tract of land upon which this house had been built.  He and his wife, Amanda Daisy Devine Smith reared 3 children: Roy Murlyn Smith, Wanda Faye Smith Read, and David C. Smith.  Other descendants of Richard Henry Smith who have been associated with the house and still living are: Betty Oliver House, Patty Oliver Lawrence, and Veldon Oliver, children of Brad and Lola Smith Oliver; and Hebron Smith, son of Manuel and Catherine Lawrence Smith; and Corrine Smith Jones, daughter of Robert and Mattie Railey Smith.  the land remained in the Smith family until the death of Roy B. Smith on July 1, 1982.  The house is now owned by the Jerry Wood family.  It is located about 5 miles from Scottsville on Highway 231 North. (Courtesy of David C. Smith)
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OCTOBER - (Orene and Gladys Wood Home - drawn by Jason Marr - 12th  grade)

Avery Chism married Callie Hagen on Sep. 10, 1881.  They lived in a log house on this site until this home was completed about 1897.  It consists of 8 rooms and 2 halls.  They were the parents of 7 children:  Earnest, Clay, Sam, Jay, Glee, Gladys and Tim.  Four of the children and on grandson were born here.  It has always been owned by the Chism family.  Their daughter Gladys and her husband Orene Wood still maintain the farm.   It is located about 12 miles from Scottsville on Highway 98.  (Courtesy of Marie Hatler)
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NOVEMBER - (Strausburg - Bewley Home - drawn by Chris McClard - 11th  grade)

In 1882, John Frederick and Melvina Thomas Strausburg built a one and a half story log house.  This log house was built on approximately 142 acres located four miles east of Scottsville on the Maysville Road.  The L-shaped structure contained six rooms with hall, full front porch, side and back porches.  The Strausburgs reared eight children in this log house.   They were: Sarah Colson, Kitty Ann Reynolds, Mary Atwood, Ollie Moore, William H., Walter, Judge Robert H. and twins, Shepard and Bettie Strausburg.  Bettie died in infancy.  John Frederick died in 1913.  He left the farm to his son, Shep, and his wife, Etta Whitlow Strausburg.  They worked the family farm, reared three daughters, Frances Morgan, Eunice Bewley and Anna Oliver, as well as caring for Melvina until her death in 1932.  In 1`951, Shep and Etta's daughter, Eunice and her husband, Ralston Whitney Bewley purchased the homeplace.  They reared one daughter, Patsy Diane Bewley Taylor, thus making four generations having lived in this house.  In 1959, the house was first remodeled.  Four rooms and basement were added to the back of the structure.  In 1980 a master bedroom and bath were added to the East side on the structure with the entire house being bricked.  At present, Eunice and Ralston still live and maintain the working farm.  They have expanded the farm to encompass approximately three hundred thirty-three acres.  (Courtesy of Eunice (Strausburg) Bewley)
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DECEMBER - (Carlos Cook Home - drawn by David Carver - 12th grade)

This house was built by William Harvey Faulkner in1866, shortly after his marriage to Angelina Fraim.  They had a slave who lived with them.  When the house was sold it was bought by their son, Aldredge J. Faulkner.  The downstairs consisted of 6 rooms with 3 fireplaces, a pantry and a back porch, plus a bathroom that was added on.  Upstairs, there are four rooms with two stairways which was referred to as one side for the girls and one side for for the boys.  One of the stairways has been closed off and a door cut leading to the other rooms.  Over the years the different owners of the property were Leason Bishop, Joe and Lucy Jones, Rudolph Manion, Roy and Lennie Eaton and Carlos and Ethel Cook.   James and Linda Hughes bought the property from Carlos and Ethel Cook and gave them a lifetime home there.  However, after the death of Mr. Cook in 1990, Mrs. Cook decided to go to a nursing home.  The house is still owned by the Hughes.  At the present time Nathan and Melissa Jones reside there.  It is located on highway 98 about 12 miles from Scottsville.  (Courtesy of Mrs. James Hughes)