1993 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (Roy P. Hinton Home - drawn by J. R. Russelburg - 12th grade)

This house was built about 1913 by Bedford young for the Rev. J.W.W. Kelley.  It was T-shaped with a wrap around porch on two sides downstairs, a small porch off one room upstairs, and a one floor portion at the back of the house which provided for a kitchen and a screened in back porch.  Each room had at least two exposures which helped cool it in the summer.   The Kelley's had lived in Illinois for several years before they returned to Kentucky.  It seems that it may have been modeled from the Illinois farm houses since there were so many T-shaped homes there.  Rev. J.W.W. Kelly was a Free Methodist missionary and pastor.  He was a native Allen Countian, a grandson of William Walker, who founded Walker's Chapel United Methodist church.  Brother Kelley and his wife, called "Sister Kelley", started Free Methodist churches throughout Kentucky and Tennessee.  If they lived there at all, it was for just a short time.  Don Sarver's parents, Connie and Corinna Sarver lived there early in their married life, and the Hinton's lived there from 1918 until 1945.  Roy P. Hinton and his parents bought Petroleum Mercantile and Drug Company, (then called Hinton Mercantile and Drug Company) in July 1918.  He, his father and sister moved into the house.  In December 1918, Mr. Hinton married Tula Mayhew and it became their home and remained such until they sold the store in 1945 and moved to Scottsville, where he was pharmacist at Atwood Drug Store until his death in 1954.  Their daughters, Ruth Hinton Minyard and Juanita Mayhew Hinton Downing were born here.  The house burned in the 1980s.  It was located on U.S. Highway 31E until Petroleum was bypassed in the construction of the "new concrete highway" in 1931.  It was about six miles from Scottsville.   (Courtesy of Juanita Hinton Downing)
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FEBRUARY - (Store at Gainesville - drawn by Shaun Steenbergen - 11th grade)

This country store is located at Gainesville, Kentucky on Big Difficult creek in Northeast Allen County.   The store sits at the junction of the old Gainesville read, Jefferson Schoolhouse road, the Gainesvile road and the Gainesville-Port Oliver road.  The building is of double boxed construction with a metal roof.  The main store is 30X50 feet with 30X30 living quarters in the back.  There is a side room on the left of the building that is 50X12 feet long.  There was a chicken house on the right of the building where chickens and eggs were sold.  This store was a general merchandise store which sold groceries, clothing, hardware and everything the farm family needed to survive.  The store was built in 1902 by Karl Stark.  Mr. and Mrs. Stark lived in the back of the building until the mid 1920s.  Mr. Stark was a descendant of Jeremiah Stark who came to this area in the late 1700's with a land grant of a thousand acres or more.  At different times in the history of the building, there was a soda fountain, barber shop, and post office.  It was also used as the voting precinct for several years.   Logan Stark, a brother of Mrs. Stark, was the barber who operated the barbershop.   Mr. Frank Morehead ran the store for Mr. Stark until about 1942, when it was sold to Fowler Whitlow.  After World War II, when Jimmie D. Steenbergen got out of the Navy, he and Estell Harmon bought the store from Mr. Whitlow.  Jimmie D. and his wife Evelyn Harmon Steenbergen lived at the store for 2 years until they sold their part of the business to Estell Harmon.  In 1948 Mr. Harmon and his wife, Elizabeth Brunson Harmon, moved into the store and ran it until they retired in 1964.  Mr. Harmon added seed corn, fertilizer and tires to the inventory.  Three people helped very much in this added business, William  Henry Motley, Ernest Holland and Earl Cline.   (Courtesy of Evelyn Law)
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MARCH - (T.W. Crow and Son Funeral Home - drawn by Staci Carver - 12th grade)

In 1940 Thomas Warner Crow Sr. and Thomas Warner Crow, Jr. purchased this property at the corner of North Court and Cherry streets and started construction on their new funeral home.  The design was copied from a photo in a trade journal and interpreted by master carpenter Roy Hood with the assistance of many local journeymen.  The main floor was finished in 1941 and Mr. Crow Sr. and his wife Ida Morgan Crow moved into the apartment on the north end of the building.  Mr. Crow jr., his wife Alice Johnson Crow, and their infant daughter Jo Hannah moved in to the apartment at the other end. The funeral home was in the center of the building between the two apartments.  Two more children, Gwendolyn Read and Thomas Warner III, were born to Thomas W. and Alice during the forties.  There has been little change to the original part of the structure since additions have been built at the rear of the lot.  The wood columns have been replaced by wrought iron and the neon sigh has been removed.  The funeral home is still owned, operated, and occupied by members of the Crow family.
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APRIL - (Harris Homestead - drawn by Joe Murray - 12th grade)

Davie Harris, born 1762, died 1842, was from Culpepper County, Virginia.  In 1802, as compensation of service as an American Revolutionary War Soldier of three years service within the state of Virginia, he received a land grant in "The Green River Plat" of the state of Kentucky.  David moved to the new lands and in 1815 was one of the Justices of the Peace who met to form the County of Allen.  David's son, Amos Harris bought an additional 800 acres in 1836 for 50 cents an acre.  He was born in 1791 and died in 1867.  The original two story log house was built in the early 1800s.  It consisted of two large rooms, one upstairs and one downstairs with a large fireplace and chimney of native limestone rock.  Other rooms and hall formed a "T" to the back of the log rooms and included a hand water pump within the side porch.  In the 1930's the back portion was torn down and in the 1950's more rooms were added to the southern side of the log rooms.  In 1972 the home was destroyed by fire.  At that time it was the home of Etna Harris Overholt, David's great great granddaughter.   She was born in 1895 and died in 1988. The barn built prior to 1880 remains today in good condition and is constructed of wooden pegs and square nails with chestnut wood boxing.  these lands on the banks of Buck and Wolf Creeks, just one mile south of Highway 100 West in the Chapel Hill community have been the beginnings of Old Buck Creek Methodist, Harris School, and the New Buck Creek Methodist church.  In 1992 the homeplace of over 8 generations of Harris' was honored as the 2nd oldest historic farm in Allen County by the Ky. Bicentennial Commission. (Courtesy of Harris D. Overholt)
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MAY - ("Norro" Wilson Home - drawn by Sandi Bonds - 10th grade)

This nine room house is located above the public Spring and is believed to be one of the oldest homes still standing in Scottsville.  The rear part of the house is a two story, six room log structure with two fireplaces.  The front addition has two rooms downstairs, one room upstairs, and two more fireplaces.  The present owner of the house, Norris D. "Norro" Wilson, was born in the log portion of the house and lived there with his parents (George and Mary Meador Wilson), his aunt Attrice Meador McReynolds and her husband Garland G. McReynolds and Garland's aunt sis Freeman.  Mrs. Freeman's husband was T.J. "Tom" Freeman who served at least two terms as jailer and was killed in a fight while seeking election as sheriff.  Reportedly his opponent tweaked Mr. Freeman's long handlebar mustache and the fight ensued.  The names of former residents of this house are Dr. W.R. Shepeard, John Sam Carpenter, Hill, Howards, Garings, and A.J. Ritchey.  Mr. Ritchey was sheriff here during the Civil War.
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JUNE - (Ward's Chapel A.M.E. Church - drawn by Steve Mandrell - 10th grade)

The church was first located on South first Street.  It was built in the 1800's by an unknown trustee of the church.  It was destroyed for some unknown reason and was rebuilt in 1908 by Bill Binom and Nelson and Jim Soules.  It was later moved up the street to the present location.  On May 19, 1925 the first homecoming was held with Rev. Buchanon conducting the service.  During the time of rebuilding of the church, members walked to New Roe twice a month for church services.  The church is still located on South Court Street with services being conducted every Sunday.  Some of the former Pastors are: Rev. Sis. Gertrude Crumes, Rev. Reuben Harvey, Rev. C.L. Williams, Rev. Stokes, Rev. N.H. Rutherford, Rev. Robinson, Rev. M.H. Johnson, Rev. Russell, Rev. L. McFadden, Rev. F.L. mayes, Rev. Green, Rev. Watkins, Rev. Hilary Milton, Rev. Oscar Welch, Rev. O.Q. Roberts, Rev. C. Derrick Brice, Rev. Samuel Veal, Rev. Doris Patton, Rev. Ernest Lathan, Rev. Elliott Joyner, Rev. Frederick Hill, Rev. Paulette Woodard.  Rev. Donzella Lee is the current pastor.  (Courtesy of Denise Bunton)
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JULY - (House on West Main Street - drawn by Brian Varner - 12th grade)

This house located on West Main St. is reported to be the birthplace of Gary Huntsman Alexander who was born on Nov. 15, 1906.  She was the daughter of Herschel H. Huntsman and Cora Brown Huntsman.   Courthouse records show that the house was owned by Dr. J.E. Pace, Lonnie and Ruth Atwood, and F.E. and Kathleen Bradley.  It has been a rental property as long as people in the neighborhood can remember.  Mae Belle Rippy Doss bought the house in 1981 form the F.E. Bradley Estate.  Mrs. Doss rents the house as two apartments.   (Courtesy of Sarah Alexander Garmon)
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AUGUST - (Johnny Mayhew Home - drawn by Chris Williams - 11th grade)

The Johnny Mayhew family first lived in another house toward the back of this 100 to 120 acre farm.  In 1904 they built this house around a two room log house with a dog trot.  They added the upstairs and a three room one story addition on the back.  It has a double veranda with gingerbread trim throughout.  Johnny Mayhew died in 1913, and his wife, Nettie Mayhew died in 1935.  They were descendants of Alexander Mayhew, who lived in the Stony point area just west of the location of this house.  They were the parents of 3 children.  William Ezra Mayhew, who was a teacher and then a pharmacist who graduated from Valparaiso Indiana University School of Pharmacy in 1913 and lived in martin, Tenn. from that time until his death in 1960. Pearl Mayhew lived most of her life in this house until her death in 1944.  Tula Mayhew Hinton was a teacher in the Allen County schools form 1906 until 1918 when she married Roy P. Hinton and moved to Petroleum.   This house is about 10miles form Scottsville.  It is located about one and one half miles off highway 100 W. on the Walker's Chapel road.  The house is still standing, but is in a very dilapidated state.  Max and Nadine Johnson who live in the next house north of this house are the current owners.  (Courtesy of Juanita Hinton Downing)
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SEPTEMBER - (Pardue Homeplace - drawn by Kevin Thorne - 10th grade)

The land for this home located at 219 Pardue Road was acquired in 1925 when Samuel Roscoe Pardue gave it to his son, Oliver Garland Pardue.  The farm was covered in timber and the family began clearing a spot for the house.  All wood used to build the house came from the timber on the farm.  Mr. Marvin Napier built the house.  The Pardue family. O.G. Pardue and his wife, Laura Elizabeth Pulliam Pardue, their daughter, Evelyn Elizabeth, and their son, Samuel Robert, moved into the house in October, 1926.  Another son, O.G. Pardue Jr. was born to the family in November 1926 in the house.  Mr. and Mrs. Pardue lived in the house until their deaths in January 1964 and November 1965 respectively.  The house in it's sixty-six year existence has always remained in the Pardue family.  It is now owned by Samuel Robert Pardue.  (Courtesy of Elizabeth Fisher)
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OCTOBER - (Roy K. Meador Grocery - drawn by Sharon Hooper - 12th  grade)

This grocery store and dwelling is located on Macedonia Church road about 10 miles south of Scottsville on highway 1147.  Roy K. Meador, the son of Rev. Joseph and Susan spears Meador, built this building in 1949.  It is the fourth store on this same road that Mr. Meador built.  This building was constructed with lumber salvaged from a tenant house on the Dr. A.O. Miller homeplace.  Mr. Meador began selling groceries from a side room of his house in the early thirties, and peddled groceries and supplies with a wagon and mule team in the Oak Grove community, on Shotting Hill, and up and down Macedonia Ridge.   He and his wife, Maggie Evelyn Brown, were the parents of 7 children:  Linn, Delbert, Lector, Dewey, Texie, Eara, and Reba.  he was married a second time to Etta Pullium Marsh and they lived in the store until his retirement in 1958. The grocery is now operated by his son Lector Meador.  (Courtesy of Dewey Meador)
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NOVEMBER - (Mack Spencer Home - drawn by Danyell Johnson - 12th  grade)

This was the tenant house of Amanda Buchanon Goodrum.  Mach and Una Goodrum Spencer lived in this two room house during the period from 1912 through 1922.  Two of their sons, Milton and Garnett were born here.  It was located about three miles north of Scottsville on the Old State road east just off the Halifax Road.  (Courtesy of Mrs. Garnett (Naomi) Spencer)
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DECEMBER - (The Devasher Home - drawn by Eli Gilliam - 12th grade)

this house is located off the Walnut Hill road in the Holland community.  It is on land that John C. Calvert homesteaded after returning from the War of 1812, having been wounded in the Battle of New Orleans.  This house was built by William Tolivar (Tol) Devasher around 1868.   He was a well known Baptist minister and a Civil War veteran having fought for the Union.  He was a son of William T. Devasher and Elizabeth Calvert Devasher.  He married Minerva Glover in 1857.  She was the daughter of Richard B. Glover and Jane Calvert glover.  These women were the daughters of John Calvert and were named in his will to receive portions of his sizeable acreage.  This house is constructed of hand hewn and hand notched logs, some of them being quite long.  The mortar was first of mud. Th dog trot separated the kitchen from the other art of the house but has since been enclosed.  It is well constructed and well preserved.  The fourth generation is now living in the house.  Micaja Duke, a son of Tol and Bee Brown Devasher were the parents of Henry, Fred and Ethel.  Henry married Julia Jackson in 1939.  Fred lives in Indiana and Ethel still lives in the house.  Henry added to the acreage and improved the house.  After Henry's death in 1986 the unmarried sons continue to live in the house with their Aunt Ethel.  At one time there was a Devasher mill on Barren River at Jew's Harp Bend.  Another early ancestor, Dr. Joseph Devasher was a Revolutionary War soldier.  He arrived in the Colonies as a Hessian soldier, soon defected and fought for the Colonies.  (Courtesy of Ethel Devasher)