1994 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (Standard Oil Bulk Plant - drawn by Steven Mandrell - 11th grade)

The old Standard Oil Bulk Plant was built around 1918 to supply the demands caused by the oil boom in Allen Co. and the growing automobile industry.  Kerosene was delivered to the country stores before the demand for automotive fuel.  The first agent was Jim Jackson, the uncle of Nina Chism Ogles.  Mr. Jackson served as agent until his death in 1930 when T.F. (Bud) Pitchford, who had worked for Mr. Jackson for several years, was named the new agent.   Mr. Pitchford served as agent until his death in 1965, a total of 42 years service to the company.  J.C. (Cliff) Pitchford, brother of "Bud" and long time bookkeeper for the plant, was named agent in 1965 and served until 1975, a total of 43 years service to the company.  Some early employees were Euclid Wade, J.R. (Roy) Barger, Marvin Pike, Raymond Pennington, Marion Williams, Karl Williams and Hoy Cline.   The business grew into one of the largest suppliers of bulk oil in the county and is now operated by Benedict & Benedict located on Hwy 101.  this building was torn down and replaced with a new structure in 1941.  The new building was later purchased by Browder Tatum for his building supply company.  Tatum's closed in 1993 and the property was bought by Harold King. (Courtesy of Harold "Wop" Pitchford)
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FEBRUARY - (Tabor-Hancock Home - drawn by Bobbie Sue Pardue - 11th grade)

Charles H. Tabor bought two lots on the corner of West Main and Dixon streets in 1907.  According to the deed, he paid $400.00, a big black sound horse valued at $175.00, and rubber tire buggy valued at $50.00.  Sometime after 1907, he built this house for his new bride, Allen Weaver Tabor.  They were the parents of two daughters: Margaret Helen, who died at the age of 18 months, and Elva Lorene, (Mrs. Johncy Sledge).  This eight room house has had many owners and several changes over the years, but the original balcony off the second floor is still there.  It was the home of the late Judge Goebel and Mrs. Ruth Jones Goad for many years.  Mrs. Goad taught piano and organ in the home from 1946 until 1970.  It is currently the home of their daughter, Mrs. Seva Goad Hancock.   (Courtesy of Jolene Sledge Cooper)
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MARCH - (Yessie Oliver Store - drawn by Ryan Maynard - 10th grade)

The Yessie Oliver Store was located on Highway 234 at what is now known as the L.C. Tabor farm.  Mr. Yessie Oliver opened the store and post office in the 1920's.  Horace Rector operated the store from the early 1930's until its closing in the mid 1930's.  In 1936, Lewie and Josephine Conner, along with partners Hammie and Nellie Conner, reopened the store.   The store, then called Conner and Conner Groceries, was operated by Lewie and Josephine.  Lewie's first customer, Aubery Tabor, purchased a can of Clabber Girl Baking Powder.  Lewie and Josephine later bought Hammie's half ownership of the store and operated it until 1938, at which time they sold the store to Mr. Virgil Tracy.   In 1939, Lewie and Josephine Conner purchased the store again and operated it until 1941.  They then sold the store to Hobart Taylor, who operated the store with his family until he sold it to Herman and Ruby Hardcastle in 1944.  Jack and Marie Hargis purchased the store in 1948.  They then sold it to Cardell and Katherine Tabor.   Mr. and Mrs. Tabor closed the store in the early 50's.  L.C. and Mildred Tabor then bought the building and surrounding farmland.  The building has since been torn down.  (Courtesy of Launa Conner Tabor)
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APRIL - (Oliver Homestead - drawn by Jason Blankenship - 10th grade)

Willie Gray and Sarah Tom Motley Oliver lived in a small log house on this 20 acre farm for the first few years of their married life.  In 1842, they built this home for a family of 5 children, Cecil, Ora Oliver Weaver, Icy Oliver Corbitt, Ana Oliver, and Malon who was born on e month after the family moved into the new home.  The farm had many large yellow poplar trees.   The best and largest were cut and used to build this two-story, six room house.   It has two stairways leading to separate areas on the second floor.  One for the boys and one for the girls.  Willie Gray and Sarah Tom lived here until the death of Willie Gray in 1925.  After his death, a son, Malon and his wife, Quilla, lived with Sarah Tom until her death in 1938.  After her death, the farm was divided among the 4 surviving children.  At this time, the oldest son, Cecil, Moved into the home and lived there until his death in 1958.  It has remained in the Oliver family for 4 generations.  Presently it is the property of Oretha Conner and Wilmer Dean Oliver who are grandchildren of Cecil Oliver and great grandchildren of the original owners.   The original metal roof has weathered many storms, but shows dents from the big 1935 hail storm.  Otherwise, the house is sound and solid and is still in good livable condition.  It is located on Big Springs road approximately one mile west of Settle store.  (Courtesy of Mrs. Oretha Conner)
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MAY -  (Allen County Farmers Service - drawn by Sandi Bonds - 11th grade)

Allen County Farmers Service, under a franchise with Southern States Cooperative Inc. of Richmond, Virginia, had its official opening on March 14, 1949.  The owners and operators were R. Raymond Simmons and his wife the late McDonia W. Simmons.  It was first located on East main Street in the "Wilson Block" which was across the street from what is now the entrance to Harper Ford Sales car lot.  They leased the building from Washington Mfg. Company.  The business grew very rapidly and a lot was purchased in that same year from the late Yessie Oliver on the corner of 4th and East main Street.  A   building was started immediately and was completed one year later. They relocated in march of 1950.  In Jan. of 1959, the business was incorporated and additional shareholders were added.  The business continued to grow and demanded more room and larger facilities.  Property became available and was purchased at 512 Smiths Grove Road.  New buildings were constructed and improvements were made.  This East main location was closed and the move was made in August, 1984 to the present location.   With the changing of demands in the fertilizer and farm supply business, a new fertilizer blending and bagging plant was built on the Maysville road one mile form downtown Scottsville.  With Charles Wagoner, manager and shareholder, Terry Trammel, assistant manager, and 17 additional employees, Allen County Farmers Service, Inc., still offers friendly service, plus hardware, feed, seed, fertilizer, lime spreading, chemical spraying, grain storage and a complete line of farm, home and garden supplies.  Allen Co. Farmers Service has a total of over 44 years of continued service to the people of this area.  All the buildings in this sketch were torn down to make way for the new post office.  (Courtesy of R. Raymond Simmons)
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JUNE - (Allen County War Memorial Hospital - drawn by Paul Strain - 11th grade)

The first steps in building a hospital were taken by Allen County Fiscal Court on Dec. 3, 1946.  the hospital was built as a memorial  to the county's servicemen who died during World Wars I and II.   The building was completed March 4, 1952.  The front wing was used for administration purposes, the rear and right wings were for patient rooms, and the left wing was for obstetrical and surgical use.  In the beginning there were 31 beds in nine private and 11 double rooms; also there were 12 bassinetts.  The medical staff, headed by Dr. A.O. Miller, President, included Dr. John W. Meredith, Dr. Owen L. Davis, Dr. J.J. Halcomb, and Dr. Earl P. Oliver.  On July 14, 1952, some four hundred people attended the dedication service.  The program included the introduction of the employees and a tour of the new facility.  On July 15, the hospital officially opened for business and that day two patients were transferred from the Graves Infirmary (now Dr. Carter's office). Room rates on that day were $11 and $12 for private rooms and $8 and $9 for semi-private rooms.  (Courtesy of Faye Parrish)
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JULY - (Big Springs School - drawn by Travis Rogers - 11th grade)

The original Big Spring school was a log building located near a big spring.  It was about one half mile from the present location on what is now the Brad Motley farm.  In the late 1800's as the population grew, there became a need for a new and larger school.  the schools at that time were governed by a board of trustees.  In 1889, E.C. Motley and wife, Elizabeth, gave a plot of land for a new school.  The new school was erected on this site.  After the school closed in 1954, the land reverted back to the original farm from which it was given.  The present owners are Oretha Oliver Conner and Wilmer Dean Oliver who are great great grandchildren of E.C. and Elizabeth Motley.  Currently, reunions are held at the school each year.  It is located on Big spring road (once known as String Town Road) about one mile from Settle Store.  (Courtesy of Oretha Oliver Conner)
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AUGUST - (Col. Robert Ficklin Pulliam, Jr. Home - drawn by Kevin Thorne - 11th grade)

This was the home of Col. Robert Ficklin Puliam, Jr. (b. 4-8-1850, d. 9-16-1923) and Alice Claypool Pulliam, (b. 7-29-1860, d. 2-6-1953).  It was located on Hwy. 98, East of Scottsville, about one mile behind the home of Toy Douglas.  It was built in 1920 after the previous house was destroyed by fire.  There was a large log house nearby that the family lived in while the new house was being built.  The log house had been there since Col. Pulliam's grandfather, Joseph Ficklin settled here about 1797.  He was one of the first settlers in the county.  This house had 6 rooms.   The front door of solid beveled glass led into a long hall with the dining room at the end.  It had built in china cabinets.  A solid swinging door led into the kitchen.  On the left of the hall there were three bedrooms and on the right was the living room.   Both front rooms had fireplaces with beautiful mahogany mantels with long mirrors, and marble hearths.  The Pulliam's had 6 children.  Mildred, the oldest, died when she was 19 months old; Oma Eichenberger, Luara Pardue, Evelyn Krouse, Grace Skaggs and Ralph.  Many descendents still live in this area.  This land remained in the Pulliam family until the 1950's.  The Ficklin, Pulliam cemetery was located in sight of the house.  It has been destroyed, but according to records, Joseph and Easter Ficklin, Robert Ficklin Pulliam, Sr. and wife Eveline Ellis Pulliam, Mildred Pulliam and other members of the Ficklin, Pulliam family were buried there. (Courtesy of Sue Skaggs Williams)
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SEPTEMBER - (Allen County News - drawn by Kelly Smith - 10th grade)

The Allen County News was founded in Sept., 1935 by the late Herbert and Ora Ward at the encouragement of several local businessmen.  Mr. Ward was principal, coach of all sports, and a history and civics teacher at Scottsville High School.  Mrs. Ward was primarily responsible for the newspaper publication for several years.  The Wards and their daughter, Jean, as well as the late Guy Cook, printer and pressman, worked on the newspaper throughout the 1930s and 1940s.  Mr. Ward had a job printing business in 1934 upstairs over what was then the Hobdy, Dye and Read building.  In 1935, the operation moved to South Court Street beside what was then York and  Massey.  This building at 116 E. Maple Street was erected in 1949.  Larry Gerald was hired in 1947 after he was discharged form the U.S. Navy.  W.J. Cannon and his wife, Jean Ward Cannon joined the operation in 1949 after he graduated from Western Ky. University and the University of Louisville School of Law.  Mr. Gerald leased the newspaper and job printing business in 1959 and published the News until 1970, when the Cannon's purchases the paper from her parents after the retirement of Lt. Col. Cannon from the USAF. During their tenure as publishers, the News was presented dozens of state and national awards for excellence in editorials, individual columns, photography and feature stories.  The Cannon's sold the News in 1978 to Scottsville Publishing Corp.  Their employees, Michael and Janice Patton eventually bought it.  Due to financial reasons, it closed in 1991.  (Courtesy of Jean Ward Cannon)
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OCTOBER - (Dr. Charles Holliday Alexander Home - drawn by Vera Fisher - 11th  grade)

The home of Dr. Charles Holliday Alexander, a prominent Scottsville physician, was built before the Civil War.   It was located on North Court Street at the site where N.S. Guy later built his brick residence.  In 1849, Dr. Alexander (b. about 1827, d. 1889) married Eliza Ann Drane, whose father Anthony Drane operated a tavern-hotel located on the public square.   Dr. Alexander was a son of Amzi C. (1795 - 1863) and Elizabeth Watkins (Holliday) Alexander (1800 - 1889), who lived at the place which later became the County House farm.   Dr. Alexander was a grandson of Rev. Charles Holliady 91771 - 1850), a Methodist minister in Allen County during 1818 - 1821.  The Alexander home was the birthplace of Dr. Alexander's son, Rev. Gross Alexander (1852 - 1915), who became professor of theology at Vanderbilt University, author of several books, and editor of "The Methodist Review."  (Courtesy of Ray H. Garrison and Katherine Alexander Shapiro)
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NOVEMBER - (Bailey Store - drawn by Laurie Whitlow - 12th  grade)

The Bailey Store is located on the halifax-Bailey Road on the Lewie Conner farm which is 9 miles north of Scottsville.   The land and original store were owned by Virgie and major Spencer, but the store was built and operated by Lank Cooksey.  From the opening to the 1920's, it was operated by several people including Joseph Cooksey, Burl Claypool, and Virgle Pruitt.   In the early 1920's while Albert Spencer was the operator, the store was destroyed by fire.  Lewie and Jack Conner cut and hauled the logs which were used to rebuild the store.  The logs were taken to a saw mill in the neighborhood that was run by Lonnie Bonds (father of Rev. L.V. Bonds).  Lewie and Jack used a team of mules named Dick, Tom, David, and Elick to haul the logs.  In 1933, after the store was rebuilt, Oscar Foster was the first operator.  Henry Meredith was the next person to operate the store and later Albert and Sally Weaver were the operators.  In 1945, Lewie and Josephine Conner and their children: Launa, Leatrice, and Oscar Lee bought the house and store from Albert and Sally Weaver.  They operated the store for the next ten years.   Lewie would go to Bowling Green about twice a week to buy groceries, R.C. Cola, and Coca Cola for the store.  Some of the products they sold in the 1940's were: Pink Salmon 15 cents a can or 2 for 25 cents, colas and candy bars 5 cents each or 6 for 25 cents, Maxwell house Coffee 16 cents, cigarettes 11 cents, and cheese and crackers 5 cents.  In 1955, Lewie and Josephine sold the stocking the store to Bernice Willoughby who ran it until it closed in 1961.  Lewie and Josephine Conner still live at Bailey and the store is now used for storage. (Courtesy of Launa Conner Tabor)
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DECEMBER - (Tom Hinton Home - drawn by Angie Perruquet - 12th grade)

The home of James Thomas "Tom" Hinton (1842 - 1891) and Sarah Wygal Hinton (1851 - 1927) was located in southern Allen County at the intersection of Oak Forest Church Road and Fleet Road in Adolphus.  The original log structure extended behind on the right side as pictured.   A porch on that side had two entrances, one opened into the kitchen (the log part) and one into a large wide hallway, used as a bedroom, which connected the log portion with the front rooms.  The two front rooms were divided by a hallway and each had a fireplace.  This hallway exited onto another porch on the opposite side of the house and connected another room that was used for the making of breads and pastries and was referred to as the pantry.  Another log room that was separate form the house was used as the smoke house.  Tom and Sarah Hinton had seven children.  Bettie (1873 - 1943) married Lon Mayhew; Jerry 91874 - 1955) married Mary Florence Foster; Genevie (1879 - 1974) married Charlie Calvert; Julia (1885 - 1963) married Freelie Harris; Lula 91876 - 1924), Alva (1877 - 1959), and Flitcher (1881 - 1961) never married and remained at the homeplace which was sold after their deaths.  Tom Hinton was a grandson of Jeremiah and Elizabeth Key Hinton, the first of the Hinton family to settle in this area, and is buried at the Hinton Cemetery.  Sarah Hinton and all the children and spouses are buried at Mount Pleasant Methodist Church Cemetery.  The house was dismantled in 1993 for reconstruction some time in the future.  Bobby Ausbrooks now owns the land surrounding this homeplace.  (Courtesy of Harris Overholt)