1995 MONTHLY PICTURE

 

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JANUARY -  (Robert Williams Home - drawn by Steven Mandrell - 12th grade)

The Williams homeplace, located about 2 miles out the Franklin Road, was acquired by a land grant in the early 1800's.  The original house was a log structure.  George Washington Williams, Sr. (born in 1808) and his wife Matilda (Lyles) Williams and their children, Hartwell J., Thomas, Langston E., Wesley, George Washington Jr., Sarah (Lygett), Ruth (Spann), Nancy (Frances), Mary (Travelstead), and Matilda (Shaw) were the first occupants.  George Sr. and Matilda were the first to be buried in the family cemetery.  At one time there were 15 headstones in the enclosed cemetery.  George Washington Jr., (born 1851) married Josephine Crow.  Their children were: Lucy Kate (Mayhew), Harry Oscar, Amanda (Gaines), and Blanche (Creasy).  Wash and Josie, as they were known, remodeled the homeplace in 1902 to look as it does in the picture.  Harry Oscar (b. 1873), married Millie Alice Terrell.  In 1918, they moved here with their children, Homer, Arthur, Ira, Nell (McReynolds) and Robert Edwin.  Mr. Williams, a successful farmer, opened the Limestone Dairy, so named because of the large amounts of limestone rock on the farm.  The dairy, a family venture, was operated by Mr. Williams, his sons and grandsons.  In 1928 delivery service was added.  Robert, Wilburn, Harry, Jr. and Jack took turns distributing the milk, butter, orange juice, and chocolate milk in a 1928 Chevrolet truck.  The dairy was operated until 1942.   In 1942, the owners were Willie McReynolds and wife Nell (Williams) McReynolds and their children, Joe and Phyllis (Losey).  In 1948, Robert Edwin, (b. 1912) and his wife Dorothy (Harrell) Williams moved to the homeplace.  Robert, the 4th generation to live here, remodeled the house, tearing down two bid rooms at the back of the house, removing a central hall, adding a basement  which was dug by Robert and Darrall Frost using a pick and shovel.   Plumbing and electricity were added at this time along with a big coal furnace for heat.  In 1965, the front porch was removed, and perma stone was added to the outside.  The kitchen was remodeled and plastered ceilings were added to the two front rooms.  After Dorothy's death in 1993, Robert continues to live here.   Their children are: Bobbye Regena (Willoughby), J. Edwin, and a foster son, Harvey Taylor.  (Courtesy of Bobbye Regena (Williams ) Willoughby and Jean (Mrs. Joe) McReynolds)
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FEBRUARY - (Masonic Temple - drawn by Kelly Smith - 12th grade)

This Masonic Temple was located on the right in the first block off the square on East Main Street.  It was completed in 1929.  It was valued at $7,500.00.  It was equipped with every convenience, including a kitchen with facilities for serving banquets.  The Temple was also used as a meeting place by Scottsville Chapter No. 171, R.A.M., Chapter No. 60 Order of the Eastern Star and Assembly No. 5, Order for Rainbow for Girls.  Miss Sallie Edmonds wrote a historical account of early Scottsivlle in 1928.  Her history was sealed in a jar and placed in the cornerstone on the second floor of the New Masonic Temple and was to remain there for 100 years.  On January 11, 1984, fire completely destroyed the two story building.  After a diligent search the history was found along with other items.  After the fire they purchased land on Highway 31-E-By-Pass and erected a new Masonic Temple at a total cost of approximately $123,00.00.  The exact location of the first Masonic Hall is unknown, but some recall that at one time it was located on the Northwest side of the Public Square and later moved to the Northeast side.  In 1901 fire destroyed the building and all records of the lodge.  Graham Lodge No. 208 was granted their charter in August, 1850.  Post office history states that in the late 20's the Post Office moved from what is now J. and W. Home Center to a new location on the ground floor of the Masonic Temple.  It remained there until 1959.  At the time of the fire, Annie 'Tiques and Fancies owned by Sherri Dunn occupied the former post office.  Also occupying that spot at one time was Patterson's which sold ladies clothing and shoes.  Livesay Jewelry Store was also destroyed by the fire.  some of the other occupants of this spot were: L.O. Meador Jewelry and Appliances, and The Grand Cafe.  (History of the Lodge, Courtesy of Jerry Marsh)
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MARCH - (Sallie Calvert Home - drawn by Ryan Maynard- 11th grade)

This beautiful  home located on West Main Street in Scottsville was built in 1919 by B.J. and Sarah Oliver on land purchased from Ed and Dora Welch.  The house consists of 11 rooms and a full basement.  The Olivers added such detail as beautiful oak woodwork throughout the house and pocket doors separating the dining and living rooms.  Windows flank three sides of the upstairs living area.  The columns supporting the forty foot front porch and the side porch are said to be solid brick.  Previous owners of this house include R. C. and Fannie Huntsman (1926 - 1967), Curtis and Ethel foster (1967 - 1971), and Glen and Virginia Chandler 91971 - 1974).  In the fall of 1974, the house was purchased by Sallie Ray Calvert and Wilile, Jane Ray.  The sisters moved into the house along with their sister-in-law, Glades Cliburn Ray.  In 1977, they were joined by Sallie's youngest grandson, Todd Calvert.  Miss Sallie (Mammy), now 96 years old, feels that the most important part of the house is the side porch.  There she has sat and rocked many hours over the past 20 years.  (Courtesy of Kathy Calvert Szekendi)
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APRIL - (Old Telephone Building - drawn by Eric Gaines - 11th grade)

The Allen County Telephone Company was organized in 1904 with a capital stock of $7,500.00.  W.F. Pardue was the General Manager.  The directors were E.J. Hooten, Rupert Huntsman, A.F. Brown, Warren McReynolds, J.W. Huntsman and Dr. Willoughby.  It began with 65 subscribers and by 1907 it had reached 200 in the city and about 1,000 in the county.  The rates were $.75 for residence and $1.25 for business and offices.  To quote from an article in the January 30, 1913 of the Citizen, "The Allen County Home Telephone Company since the fire which destroyed their old plant, erected a splendid brick building on their own lot on East Main Street and have it as modernly equipped as any telephone office in this section of the state."  There was a hitching post in front of the building and a stable in the back with 3 stalls to hitch and feed the horses.  The Allen County Library Board purchased the property from the phone company and opened in February, 1961.   Through the efforts of Anne Goad and Ruby Claire Jackson, and encouragement from the DAR which had been meeting there, a museum was soon opened on the second floor.   Mrs. Jackson remained with the Library Board for 30 years serving as Bookmobile Librarian for 12 years and Children's Librarian for 18 years.  On Feb. 22, 1977, fire almost completely destroyed the interior.  On April 30, 1977, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Woods bought the property at auction.  They completely renovated the interior of the building.  Radio Station WLCK broadcast from  this building for 5 years.   The Looking Glass Clubhouse, a facility of Lifeskills Inc. moved into the building in Feb. 1988 and remained there until July, 1993.  On July 30, 1993, the law offices of Cole, Moore and McCracken, Frank R. Goad of counsel opened and remain there at this time.  (Courtesy of: Mrs. Ruby Claire Jackson and Mrs. Marvin Woods)
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MAY -  (Johnson Lumber Company - drawn by Crystal Carter - 12th grade)

The Livingston Lumber Co. was purchased in the fall of 1929 by Earnest G., Y.O., and W.O. Johnson.  Mr. Ernest Johnson was named manager and he and his family moved to Scottsville from Hartsville, TN in October of 1929.  The Johnson Brothers Lumber Co. proved to be a successful business and has grown steadily through the years.  In the early 1950's Ernest (1888-1960) and his son-in-law, Norman Simmons purchased the interest of the other brothers and the name was changed to Johnson Lumber Co. The business has been in continuous operation for 65 years and at the present time is under the management of Norman and his son, Ernest Lee Simmons.  the original building has been remodeled twice, the last time in the late 1950's.  (Courtesy of Christine (Johnson) Simmons)
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JUNE - (Britt Home - drawn by Rob Graves - 12th grade)

This two story, three room log house was owned and may have been built by William James Crow (1828 - 1892) and his wife Sarah E. Hinton Crow(1827 - 1914).  Their son Wesley Walker Crow (1855 - 1892) and his wife Sarah E. Hinton Crow (1829 - 1914).  Their son Wesley Walker Crow (1855 - 1906) and his wife Lucinda Follis Crow ( 1858 - 1896) lived there and it was the birthplace of their children, Annie (1878 - 1962), Thomas Warner, Sr. (1880 - 1972), Edith (1882 - 1969), and Pernie (1885 - 1887).  Their two youngest children, Aubrey Follis, Sr. (1889 - 1961) and Mary 1893 - 1967), were born after a move to Texas.  On January 26, 1897, William James and Sarah E. Crow sold the house and land to Lou E. Martin and her husband P. Dunn Martin.  On October 25, 1905 William Isaac Britt (1865 - 1948) from Barren County bought the house and 115 acres of land from the Martins.   "Dink" was first married to Ella Houchens (1860-1899) and the had 5 children: Drew, Pattie, Travis, Elbert, and Jonas.  His second wife, Nora Alice Wood, bore him nine children; Ruby, Fannie, Bessie, Glen Sr., Floyd, Carl, Pauline, Jesse, and Depp.  Mr. Jonas Britt, who will celebrate his 100th birthday this year, recalls that Glen, Floyd, Carl and Pauline were born in this house and that Drew had his appendix out by lamp light in the kitchen.  This house has remained in the Britt family and many of the children have made it their home over the years.  It is presently the home of Lucy Anderson Britt and is owned jointly with their son, Glenn Britt, Jr.  Additions have been made to the house, however the living room contains the original logs and fireplace.  (Courtesy of Jonas Britt and Mrs. Katherine (Crow) Walbert)
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JULY - (Cedar Cross Church - drawn by Sarah Hagan - 11th grade)

Cedar Cross Missionary Baptist Church was organized on Saturday, December 1, 1923 at the Old Gilead schoolhouse.   the services continued to be held in the school on the 1st Saturday and Sunday of each month until the church was built.  the first service held in the church was the 1st Saturday in June, 1926.  The land for the church was donated by Jerry and Fannie Foster, and was named by Jerry Foster.  it was so-names because it was located at a cross road lined with cedar trees.  Ike Brady gave the trees from which the framing was to be cut.  J.Y. (Yetman) Centers donated the pillar rocks.  Elax Carver sawed the framing and hired Babe Carver and his sons to haul the logs.  Different ones in the community cut the logs, then hired T. and Dock Spencer to put up the framing.   Deck Spencer made the first church seats.  Sunday School rooms and the front entrance were added in the fifties and restrooms later.  The church now has full time services with Elder David Swindle as Pastor.  It also supports 3 missions.  At the present time a building is under construction in Emporia, Kansas.  (Courtesy of Sarah (Mrs. Eual) Holder)
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AUGUST -  (Frank & Martha Shook Home - drawn by Brad Simmons - 11th grade)

It is believed that this house was built in the late 1800's by the James Devasher family.  The earliest recorded deed was in 1920 to Sallie (Mrs. F.G., Sr.)  Mitchell by her children.   Members of the Mitchell family occupied the house until 1943.  In 1943, Dr. Glen Lambert and his wife, Louella, bought the house and did extensive remodeling, adding rooms, and updating the kitchen.  The upstairs rooms had no electricity until that time.  Dr. Charles and Delores Alexander bought the house in 1963.  The present owners, Frank and Martha Shook, bought the house in1975.  The original two-story frame house consisted of 6 rooms - three up and three down - with a large hall on each floor and two staircases.  The large rooms have tall windows with detailed moldings and high ceilings.  The kitchen fireplace is stone and the beams in that room are structural; there is another fireplace in the living room.  A side stone porch, which was originally the front porch, faces a former county road.  The spring on the northeast side of the house was used by neighboring families.  The ice storm of 1994 took its toll on the century-old trees that surrounded the house, some were severely damaged, others destroyed.  (Courtesy of Frank and Martha Shook)
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SEPTEMBER - (Hobdy, Dye & Read Building- drawn by Vera Fisher - 12th grade)

W.A. Read, called, "Brack" and Arthur Hobdy, Sr....nicknamed "A" began their partnership in a building on Old East Main which now is the property of Dollar General Corp. (See Historical Calendar, 1979).  The structure pictured here was built in1915 by Mr. "A" Hobdy and he retained ownership until his death in1936, at which time it became the property of his wife, Era.  After her death in 1958, as a part of settling her estate, it was sold to Mr. F.E. Bradley.  The firm acquired the Ford Franchise in 1914 and became a Standard Oil dealer in 1916.  Sometime during the 1920's they became the Maytag dealer.  Mr. Roy Dye came to Scottsville in the early 1900's during our great, but short-lived oil boom.  He became a partner in the early 1920's.   In 1959, the Ford Automobile franchise was terminated.  In Sept. of 1959, they became the Ford Farm Tractor and Implement dealer and remained at this location until Sept., 1981 when they moved to their new facilities on the Bowling Green Road.   Ownership has changed at different times, but the name is still the same.  In 1979, Robert Penrod bought the property from the F.E. Bradley estate.  He has completely renovated all 3 floors of the interior.  It is occupied by the Family Junction.  They have Delicatessen and have live entertainment on Friday and Saturday nights.  The owners are jack Bussell and Madelyn Bennett.
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OCTOBER - (Robertson Brown Homeplace - drawn by Kevin Carver - 12th  grade)

This poignant scene was taken at the Robertson Brown Homestead.  This large home and farm was located about 3 miles east of Holland near Barren River.  Mrs. Brown is standing beside her husband's grave.  The two daughters are standing nearby.  The beauty of the workmanship shown in the shelter tells one of the affection and loss Mrs. Brown must have felt.   Robertson Brown was born Jan. 11, 1822, son of Henry and Alcy Austin Brown.   Henry came to Kentucky from North Carolina with his father, Wiley Brown, around 1802.  Wiley's father, William, was a Revolutionary War soldier.  Robertson married Angeline Francis, June 17, 1846.  She was born Sept. 7, 1822, the daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Boyles Francis.  Frederick's father was Malachi, a Revolutionary War Soldier.  From the date of the marriage of Robertson and Angeline, it is reasonable to think the house was built well before the Civil War, perhaps, before 1850.  Their daughter, Henrietta, married Henry Clay Hughes.  Robertson Brown died Nov. 23, 1878: Angeline died Aug. 1, 1899.  They were the only two buried at this site on the old homeplace.  (Courtesy of Mrs. Mildred Hudson and Mrs. Annice Conner)
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NOVEMBER - (Nichols Home - drawn by Stacie Taylor - 12th  grade)

Luther and Amanda Tabor Nichols bought this house on North Court St. in 1918 from Oscar Guy.  It was not finished until after they bought it.  It was built by Rad King and framed with local hardwoods.  There are twelve rooms including the screened in back porch that had been converted into a den.  The original fireplace and mantle in the formal living room.   the house was the home of the Nichols' until they passed away -- Luther on January 8, 1928, and "Granny" on Oct. 9, 1956.  Their son mason passed away on Oct 9, 1925.  His wife, Vertie Conner Nichols, and four children (Opal, Harry, mason, and Glenn) moved in with the elder Nichols.  When "Granny" died, the four grandchildren purchased their aunt's (Luna Judson Nichols Dalton) half interest in the house for their mother who lived there until her death on June 6, 1970.  The home was then sold to Marshall and Lillian Smith.  Thomas B. and Lois Vest Taylor bought the house in 1973, and lived there until 1994 with their four children (Nancy Taylor Stewart, Jeannie Taylor Williams, Dr. Thomas B. Taylor, Jr. and John Edward Taylor).  The Taylors sold the house in 1994 to Mr. & Mrs. Danny Bridgeman. (Courtesy of Mrs. Opal (Nichols) Fields)
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DECEMBER - (Ed Newman Birthplace - drawn by Kevin Thorne - 12th grade)

This stately house is located on Keen road near the Midway Community Center.  It was formerly known as the Lee Place.  It dates back to the late 1800's.  It was purchased about 1900 by "Uncle" George Newman.  He was the father of Ed Newman, who was born there on Jan. 28, 1907.  "Uncle" George rode on horseback to Mt. Aerial, (about 5 miles) to get Dr. Alexander to come to deliver the baby.  Mr. Newman now resided at 214 West Cherry Street, and enjoys getting out and meeting with his friends.  This house has 10 rooms with four fireplaces including a parlor, setting room, dining room, kitchen and pantry.  There were two long covered porches on the back complete with gingerbread trim.  One of the cisterns was on the one that formed an "L" on the right side.  Two separate stairways led to the bedrooms on the second floor.   At one time the upstairs veranda was enclosed with balusters and railing.   There was a large cellar where they stored their canned fruit, vegetables, barrels of apples wrapped in paper, potatoes, turnips, onions and winter squash.  The water source was 2 cisterns on each side of the house.  They were hewn out of solid limestone rock.  Reeder Alderson married Zettie Mae Henson.  Their children are :Eldon B. and Jean Perry Barber.  After Mrs. Reeders death, he married Agnes Akers and their children are: Edward Lee, Jerry and Linda Faye.  Jerry Alderson owns the property now and the family still talks about coming back and restoring it.